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Barr calls Jan. 6 subpoenas "significant," says nominating Trump would be "really bad" for GOP

Former Attorney General Bill Barr says recent federal grand jury subpoenas in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot suggest that prosecutors are "taking a hard look" at high-ranking Trump allies and the former president himself. He also said he thinks it would be "really bad for the party" if Trump were the 2024 Republican nominee. Barr spoke with CBS News' Catherine Herridge in an exclusive interview Friday.
Read full article on: cbsnews.com
Steep water cuts are coming for the Southwest as Colorado River shrinks and Lake Mead's level plummets
New mandatory water cuts are coming for the Colorado River. But they aren't enough to solve the West's water crisis.
5 m
edition.cnn.com
Real-Life Willy Wonka Auctions Antique Candy Store Memorabilia
Edward & Vintage, the antique candy store, has featured in a number of TV shows.
8 m
newsweek.com
Why calling monkeypox an STD is about more than just a label
A hallmark of the ongoing monkeypox outbreak is that most cases have been linked to sexual activity, and this has prompted some debate around whether to describe the illness as a sexually transmitted disease.
edition.cnn.com
Missouri house explosion kills one, injures 9: CBS News Flash August 16, 2022
One person was killed and nine others injured when a house blew up in the small town of Wyatt in extreme southeast Missouri. American Airlines is trimming its November schedule by 31-thousand flights, or 16-percent. The carrier says it's to reduce disruptions. And on his birthday, the late rapper Nipsey Hussle got a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He was fatally shot in 2019.
cbsnews.com
We've Abandoned Afghanistan's Religious Minorities | Opinion
A year ago this week, the United States began its complete withdrawal from Afghanistan.
newsweek.com
Banning sleepovers: Has helicopter parenting gone too far?
Rite of passage or too risky? Gen X and Millennial parents are divided over whether to allow their kids to spend the night at a friend's house.
nypost.com
How Amber Heard Can Win Her Appeal Against Depp, According to Lawyers
Legal experts weigh in on Heard's appeal, following the shake-up of her legal team.
newsweek.com
Trump and Allies Inciting Base Against FBI, Kinzinger Warns
The Illinois representative said Republicans should take their time to figure out what the FBI raid was about before "jumping on the Donald Trump bandwagon."
newsweek.com
Eric Trump Says People Tried to Buy Him Dinner to 'Apologize' For FBI Raid
Eric Trump said he has never seen the American people more mad than right now, following the FBI raid on Donald Trump's home.
newsweek.com
Watch Two Male Flamingo Dads Raise Abandoned Chick
Flamingo fathers Hudson and Blaze are popular for their parenting skills at the British zoo.
newsweek.com
5 things to know for August 16: Primaries, Gas prices, Air travel, Recalls, Ukraine
Here's what else you need to know to Get Up to Speed and On with Your Day.
edition.cnn.com
Toddler Hospitalized After Restaurant Mistook Alcohol for Lemonade
The restaurant told outlets that the chef mistook a bottle of sake for lemonade when performing for customers and squirting it in their mouths.
newsweek.com
Multiple shooting victims at Memphis hospital but circumstances unclear
Their conditions weren't known. It was unclear where the gunfire happened, but some may have occurred at a nearby gas station.
cbsnews.com
Five Things to Look Out for in Today's Primaries
Liz Cheney could be heading for defeat in Tuesday's Republican primary in Wyoming where she's facing a Trump-endorsed opponent.
newsweek.com
Vic Mensa on Why America Needs Black Cannabis Ownership Now
Photo Illustration by Thomas Levinson/The Daily Beast/GettyLouis Armstrong’s soaring trumpet bounced from the walls like star beams reflecting from the moon, his melodies breaking into a million pocket-sized pieces. His reefer smoke curved backstage like the bosom of his white women, inspiring love and fear alike. That fear holds the key to one of America’s most notorious locked doors—a door that, to this day, keeps many men and women of African descent confined in soul-crushing cages in the modern-day iteration of this nation’s original sin.The reefer madness propaganda used to disseminate fear of cannabis and criminalize its use was largely based on the plant’s association with jazz musicians and their magically non-traditional lifestyle, one that drew envy, applause, and everything in between from the hearts of their illustrious white audiences. Once the fearmongering campaign had been successfully implemented, and weed became intrinsically linked in the minds of America’s masses with crazed Black men and their quintessential psychological fantasy of the latter’s rape of white women, it has taken nearly a century—and undoubtedly thousands, if not millions, of ruined lives—for this nation to begin to end its draconian prohibition on God’s fruit of this Earth.Even in this moment of transformation, the momentum of the legal cannabis industry is not free of the vile hypocrisy that prevented its development for a hundred years, as the members of that community once represented by Satchmo and his contemporaries have been largely, if not entirely, excluded from participation in this billion-dollar business. Nationally, cannabis companies with Black ownership are less than 4%; in my home of Chicago they have been, up to this point, zero percent.Read more at The Daily Beast.
thedailybeast.com
The biggest quarterback competitions for the college football season
The college football is less than two weeks away. There's still an open quarterback competition at several top teams. A look at the biggest ones.       
usatoday.com
UK workers suffer biggest hit to their wages since records began
UK workers have suffered the biggest drop in their spending power in more than 20 years as prices keep soaring.
edition.cnn.com
How can we help humans thrive trillions of years from now? This philosopher has a plan
William MacAskill's book, What We Owe the Future, urges today's humans to protect future humans — an idea he calls longtermism. Here are a few of his hardly modest proposals.
npr.org
As NHL makes gains in front-office diversity, can hockey keep up?
The NHL has five women in assistant GM roles – and the first Black general manager in league history with Mike Grier leading the San Jose Sharks.       
usatoday.com
Week of widespread violence shows power of cartel's "vast empire"
Mexico has made more attempts to capture drug lords, something the president previously said he wasn't interested in.
cbsnews.com
Diversity in NHL front offices
There are five female assistant general managers in the NHL and the San Jose Sharks hired Mike Grier as the first Black general manager.      
usatoday.com
John Wayne Trends in Wake of Sacheen Littlefeather Oscars Apology
Littlefeather claimed Wayne had to be held back by six security guards while trying to accost her on stage at the 1973 Oscars.
newsweek.com
NBC's Jac Collinsworth, Jason Garrett pairing lacks credibility with side of nepotism | Opinion
NBC Sports is getting blowback over the decision to have Jac Collinsworth and Jason Garrett call Notre Dame football games this fall.       
usatoday.com
Rare Two-Headed Mutant Baby Tortoise Stuns Vets
The African spurred tortoise is expected to live a long and healthy life.
newsweek.com
Memphis hospital locks down, treats shooting victims
A hospital was on lockdown early Tuesday while treating multiple victims of a shooting involving two crime scenes in Memphis, Tennessee, local media reported. (Aug. 16)      
usatoday.com
Here Comes the Sun: Actor James Hong and Eskimo Ice Cream
Actor James Hong sits down with Ben Mankiewicz to talk about his nearly seven-decade career, and how he has had to face racism on set. Then, Jonathan Vigliotti travels to Alaska to learn how to make akutaq, also known as Eskimo ice cream. “Here Comes the Sun” is a closer look at some of the people, places and things we bring you every week on “CBS Sunday Morning.”
cbsnews.com
China's Strategic Incoherence on Taiwan Shows Ominous Mindset | Opinion
Because China is doing something that makes no strategic sense, there must be something terribly wrong inside the Chinese political system at the moment.
newsweek.com
Woke Corporations are Supporting Groups that Promote Cop-Killing | Opinion
The loved ones of police officers are acutely aware of the risk of loss.
newsweek.com
Second Russian military facility in Crimea hit by explosion in a week
edition.cnn.com
A blast at an ammunition depot in the annexed peninsula is the second in a week. Ukraine has not said publicly whether it has struck the region
• CNN goes to secret field hospital near front line. See what it's like
edition.cnn.com
Train services suspended in most of Crimea after explosion at ammo depot
edition.cnn.com
'We are war moms': Moms for Liberty dominates school board politics across US
Conservative Moms for Liberty is growing fast, but some doubt the group's grassroots nature and sustainability as it touts plans to reshape education.       
usatoday.com
'Wordle' #423 Clues, Hints and Answer for Tuesday, August 16 Word Puzzle
Here is everything you need to know about the latest "Wordle," including tips, tricks and if you're truly stumped, the answer.
newsweek.com
Putin Says U.S. Using Ukrainians as 'Cannon Fodder', Trying to Prolong War
The Russian leader also told a Moscow security conference that Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan this month was a "carefully planned provocation."
newsweek.com
Opinion: Congress has let down most diabetics like my late son. Here's what needs to be done
Janelle Lutgen lost her diabetic son, Jesse, after he began rationing his insulin because he couldn't afford the life-saving medication. Lutgen wants Congress to introduce a bill to lower prescription prices across the board, which will help both the insured and uninsured, like her late son.
edition.cnn.com
A Functional Congress? Yes.
Congress is known for being dysfunctional. Why hasn’t it been over the past two years?
nytimes.com
'Better Call Saul' Ending Explained: What Happened to Saul and Kim?
"Better Call Saul" brought an end not only to Saul Goodman's story, but also the "Breaking Bad" franchise, revealing what became of the lawyer.
newsweek.com
A Terrorist Lingers in Plain Sight. Why Is She Still Free? | Opinion
The Jordanian woman who planted the bomb at the pizzeria, who scouted central Jerusalem and selected the target site because of the many children inside, who later called the carnage "my operation," was shockingly set free. That woman's name is Ahlam Ahmad Tamimi. As a college student of 21 working evening hours as a TV newsreader, she became the first female accepted into the ranks of its killers by Hamas.
newsweek.com
Human remains found near Civil War fort in Nashville
The fort, built by runaway slaves and freed Black people for the Union, has become a flashpoint in recent years.
cbsnews.com
She was a pioneering newspaper publisher in a room full of men. In history, she wasn't alone
What's it like to be the only woman in the room? Filmmaker Immy Humes began collecting photographs of female professionals, politicians, and public figures -- like this image of former Washington Post publisher Katharine Graham -- to tell their stories.
edition.cnn.com
Woman 'So Angry' That Her Step-Son Overstayed His Welcome Praised Online
Co-parental conflict and stepparenting issues are among the unique stressors faced by step families, according to the Family Process journal.
newsweek.com
The Secret Powers of an Australian Prime Minister, Now Revealed
Scott Morrison was busy during the pandemic. In addition to being prime minister, he covertly put himself in charge of five ministries. Critics say he damaged democracy.
nytimes.com
Basketball star Liz Cambage announces she is stepping away from the WNBA 'to focus on healing and personal growth'
Four-time WNBA All-Star Liz Cambage has announced that she is "stepping away from the league for the time being," three weeks after she agreed to a "contract divorce" with her team, the Los Angeles Sparks.
edition.cnn.com
Disgusted Ariana Grande Fans Say She Was 'Sexualized' as Nickelodeon Teen
Following the release of Jennette McCurdy's tell-all memoir, fans are looking back clips of Grande playing the character Cat Valentine.
1 h
newsweek.com
Teenager Gored by Huge Bison in South Dakota State Park
A British teenager who was hiking in Custer State Park was gored by a bison, leaving her partially paralyzed from the knee down.
1 h
newsweek.com
Woman struck by lightning near White House talks her road to recovery with 'GMA'
In an exclusive interview with "Good Morning America," Amber Escudero-Kontostathis discusses being the sole survivor of a lightning strike near the White House on Aug. 4.
1 h
abcnews.go.com
Why Lake Mead Water Levels Are Rising Again
The Las Vegas Valley has seen one of the wettest monsoon seasons in decades.
1 h
newsweek.com