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Coronavirus cases set off rowdy demonstration at Washington prison
More than 100 inmates at a Washington state prison staged a rowdy demonstration this week after six men there tested positive for the coronavirus, officials said. The minimum-custody prisoners, at the Monroe Correctional Complex in Snohomish County, gathered in the rear yard of the facility around 6 p.m. Wednesday, the state Department of Corrections said...
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nypost.com
Mort Drucker, legendary Mad magazine artist, dies At 91
Th renowned caricature artist was having trouble breathing on Friday, but it's unclear if he had coronavirus.
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nypost.com
Quarantine dog video shows man hilariously adopting his dogs’ routine
As quarantine dog memes litter the internet, this Michigan man has decided if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em. See how Joshua Butler spends lockdown with his two pooches, Roxy and Remi, who are boxer-pitbull sisters. All three watch out the window of their East Lansing apartment, looking for squirrels — and generally wasting the...
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nypost.com
Sports world takes an economic hit from Olympics postponement
Olympic organizers aren't the only ones hurting as sports federations cite "crisis" of lost Games revenue.
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latimes.com
The Cost of Surviving the ICU
ICU delirium is real, and the effects are long-lasting.
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slate.com
Yelp laying off or furloughing 2,000 employees
Yelp is in for some new criticism — from axed employees and investors. The popular review website is laying off or furloughing more than 2,000 workers due to economic strain from the coronavirus pandemic, CNBC reported on Thursday. The company has already cut executive pay by 20 to 30 percent, reduced server pay and deprioritized...
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nypost.com
Did Fox News downplay Covid-19?
Journalist Kara Swisher and former Fox News correspondent Carl Cameron discuss how the president's favorite network has reported on the pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
China Discovers 100 Million Tons of Oil on Uyghur Land
Chinese state media on Thursday announced the discovery of a massive oilfield in Tarim Basin, located in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, where millions of the local Muslims have been confined to concentration camps and “re-educated” to become better Communist subjects.
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breitbart.com
The shift to online learning could worsen educational inequality
A mother and daughter study English on March 30, 2020 in Mineola, New York. | John Moore/Getty Images As school goes digital, low-income students are being left behind. Since New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued a stay-at-home order on March 22, Tierra has been at home with her four children, ages six months, two years, five, and six. They live with her grandmother in a crowded apartment in Brownsville, a largely low-income neighborhood in Brooklyn. The two older kids are in kindergarten and first grade, and like the 1.1 million other public-school students in New York City — and millions more around the country — their education has moved entirely online as schools close their doors to help slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. For Tierra’s family, that transition has been challenging. The family doesn’t have a computer, so the kids have been doing their schoolwork on iPhones, which makes it hard for Tierra, who asked that her last name not be used, to check their work. “It’s so small, I’ll probably miss something,” she told Vox. It’s also hard for them to concentrate when they’re at home with the entire family. To help keep the baby quiet, Tierra sometimes puts on cartoons — but then the older kids watch those instead of paying attention to their schoolwork. At home “there’s so many distractions around,” Tierra says. Her family’s experience is a reminder that while the transition to online education is an adjustment for everyone, it’s a lot more difficult for some families than for others. Like Tierra’s children, about 17 percent of students nationwide lack a computer at home, according to a 2019 analysis by the Associated Press. Eighteen percent lack broadband internet access. Low-income families and families of color are especially likely to be without these resources, according to the AP. Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images Na’Asia Hawkins, 18, a senior at Washington Metropolitan High School, in Washington DC, had no laptop and no internet access when her school closed. She has since been able to get both with the help of her school and hopes to graduate this year. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images Parents of students in the Plainview, New York pick up Chromebooks at the district administrative office to allow students to continue their studies at home on March 16. And the so-called “digital divide” is only the beginning. Many low-income students are now in the position of trying to do their schoolwork in small spaces shared with other family members — sometimes in just a single room. While cities have set up food distribution centers to help students in need, many are still missing out on the resources and sense of stability that school can provide. Meanwhile, students in poverty are having to deal with the trauma of living in a pandemic without many of the protections that more affluent families have, like the ability for parents to work from home or take sick leave. “Children are watching family members die,” Natasha Capers, coordinator of New York City’s Coalition for Educational Justice, told Vox. “They’re watching their parents leave their home daily to go outside to work in what is described on television as a dangerous situation.” Experts around the country fear that the coronavirus crisis will end up worsening America’s existing educational inequality, making it harder than ever for low-income students to learn, and putting them at an even greater disadvantage compared to their wealthier peers. “My concern is that they will fall even further behind than they are already,” Raysa Rodriguez, associate executive director for policy and advocacy at the Citizens’ Committee for Children, said of students in temporary housing in New York. “Given what we know about the connection and relationship between education and future economic outcomes, I think that we’re really setting them up to fail in the long run if we don’t do even more to ensure that their educational needs are met.” From lacking computers to physical space, low-income students are at a disadvantage in online learning Schools have closed in all 50 states in response to the coronavirus crisis, with many states extending those closures through the end of the school year. In general, school districts are replacing in-person instruction with some form of distance learning, usually online. What that looks like varies widely from state to state and district to district. In some cases, schools have switched at least part of the day to some form of video conference, Jennifer Darling-Aduana, a soon-to-be assistant professor at Georgia State University who studies equity in digital learning, told Vox. That has the advantage of providing face-to-face time with a teacher and limiting how much parents need to direct lessons, she said, but parents also have to be tech-savvy enough — and have the right equipment — to set up the conference. It’s also less workable with younger students who may have a harder time sitting still during a video call. At the other extreme, Darling-Aduana said, are schools that are “just sending home a bunch of worksheets.” But that’s not particularly interactive, she said, and neither approach represents the “gold standard of digital learning, which is ideally providing students access to resources outside of their community.” Erin Clark for The Boston Globe via Getty Images Malaki Solo, a sixth-grader, works on his homework in Boston on March 31. Malaki, who is a generally confident student, has been feeling unmoored during this online learning experiment. He can’t reach out to teachers if he has a question about his work and is getting little feedback. Reaching that gold standard requires significant advance preparation, Darling-Aduana added, a luxury districts around the country didn’t have in responding to the pandemic. The result is something of a hodgepodge, in which families are sometimes left with basic logistical challenges. Tierra, for example, recalls her kindergartner being told to cut out letters and paste them in boxes for one assignment. But, Tierra wondered, “How am I supposed to cut out some letters and paste them in the box if we’re doing it online?” Meanwhile, online learning requires the ability for students to get online in the first place, which isn’t possible for many families. For starters, there’s the problem of internet access. “If you live in a more affluent community, you take it for granted,” Pedro Noguera, a professor of education at UCLA who studies inequality in schools, told Vox. However, “we have lots of urban and rural areas where internet access is not available.” That availability varies widely from state to state. In Wyoming, for example, just under 3 percent of students lack internet, and about 14 percent lack broadband, according to Education Department statistics gathered in 2017 and analyzed by the AP. But in Washington, DC, 19 percent of students have no internet and 34 percent have no broadband. Meanwhile, internet access isn’t much good if you don’t have a device a child can use for schoolwork. Around the country, many students lack access to a computer at home, from around 8 percent in Utah to 28 percent in DC. And, especially for low-income families, “if you have more than one child, you may have a laptop at home, you may have a tablet, but you probably don’t have one for each child, especially if they’re young,” Capers said. That can leave students of different ages trying to share a device, which is not an ideal solution when some districts are recommending multiple hours of online learning per day. Sarah Reingewirtz/Pasadena Star-News via Getty Images Pedro Munguia, 16, a Reseda Charter High School student, picks up a Chromebook with his mother Graciela on March 25. Then there’s the issue of physical space. While children of more affluent families may each have their own room in which to do homework or watch lectures, that’s not the case for many lower-income students. In New York City, for example, the current epicenter of the pandemic in the US, 1 in 10 public school students lives in a shelter or other temporary housing, Rodriguez said. Shelter housing in New York might mean a single room for a family with multiple school-aged kids, she said. “What does distance learning really look like in that scenario? How effective can that actually be in the long run?” Meanwhile, distance learning requires a lot from parents, who have to make sure that kids have the tools they need, are using them correctly, and then help them stay on task and complete assignments in the absence of face-to-face contact with teachers and other school staff. “Online instruction often, especially initially, requires more, not less support,” than in-person learning, Darling-Aduana said. Not every parent is able to provide that support. Some — often white-collar workers — are able to work remotely during this time and provide at least some supervision for their kids, Darling-Aduana noted. But others have to work outside the home, and although some cities, including New York, have set up centers to provide child care and instruction to children of essential workers, not all parents feel comfortable sending their children there. There are also language barriers to consider. “There are lots of people in our system whose first language is not English,” Capers noted, meaning that parents and kids alike may have difficulty using online resources that are English-only. And there are socioeconomic differences in who feels comfortable reaching out to teachers for additional help, Darling-Aduana said. Add to all that the fact that students in America right now are in an unprecedented crisis — one that is impacting low-income families and families of color the most severely, from high death rates in black communities to high levels of layoffs among low-wage workers. Those impacts touch all aspects of students’ lives, including school. As much as it’s important to focus on academics, “I want to think about our children as people and what they’re going through, their families as people and what they’re going through,” Capers said. Schools are trying to fill the resource gaps, but there are problems other than lacking technology Experts say it’s critical to address the disparities in online learning, because they could magnify disparities that already exist. Students in temporary housing in New York City, for example, “have much poorer outcomes than students who are permanently housed,” Rodriguez said, from attendance to performance on standardized tests. Even before the crisis, “we were significantly concerned about the educational outcomes of these students,” and now, “we are deeply troubled about their educational trajectory and the possibility of a significant amount of learning loss in the next coming weeks,” she noted. Districts around the country are sending devices to students who don’t have them, in an effort to close at least that gap. New York City is sending iPads to students who don’t have computers, but as of Monday, Tierra’s family had yet to receive theirs. The city’s Department of Education says it is distributing the iPads on a rolling basis, starting the week of March 23 with students living in shelters, and continuing this week with high school students in public housing, students with disabilities, and multilingual learners. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images A phone conference is held in a classroom for a student whose parents need English translation at Yung Wing School P.S. 124 in Manhattan, New York. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images A parent of a student receives one of many laptops being lent to students in need for remote learning at Yung Wing School P.S. 124 in Manhattan, New York. Lack of internet access may be a more difficult problem, though districts are working to fix it. In Charleston, South Carolina, for example, 4,000 of the district’s 50,000 students have no internet, according to US News & World Report. The district has responded by strengthening wifi signals at schools so that families can access them from nearby, as well as deploying wifi-enabled buses to neighborhoods with a large percentage of low-income students. In Los Angeles, meanwhile, the district is partnering with Verizon to get students’ internet access, while Atlanta is distributing mobile hotspots in partnership with T-Mobile. Meanwhile, the Citizens’ Committee for Children, a co-convener of New York’s Family Homelessness Coalition, is advocating that homeless students in New York City be allowed to go to regional enrichment centers for education, along with children of essential workers. “Housing instability comes with a significant amount of trauma and schools play an important role in building resilience for children,” Rodriguez said. And given that there is a system set up to serve some students in the city, “students in temporary housing need to be prioritized.” Schools and society as a whole also need to help to make sure students’ basic needs are being met as much as possible, Darling-Aduana said. And, according to Capers, they can’t act like this is business as usual. “We have to rethink what we want to come out of this moment,” she said, and instead of focusing only on academics, start thinking about using distance learning to teach — and express — things like empathy and ethics. “How do we use this moment to really instill some core quality things into our system that have been missing?” Capers asked. “The biggest part of that is humanity.”
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vox.com
McCarthy says Democrats 'playing politics' with coronavirus pandemic, after aid measure blocked
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy accused Democrats of “playing politics” with the coronavirus pandemic, just hours after the Senate failed to pass a measure providing additional funding to small businesses in the midst of the crisis.
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foxnews.com
'Simpsons' writer Tim Long sells Los Feliz Colonial for $4.3 million
In Los Feliz, comedy writer Tim Long sells a 1920s Colonial once owned by Katherine Heigl for $4.3 million. The new owner is Neil Finn of Fleetwood Mac.
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latimes.com
Police find bodies of missing Kennedy child, mother after five-day search
Descendants of Robert F. Kennedy, Maeve Kennedy Townsend McKean and Gideon McKean, disappeared after canoeing on the Chesapeake Bay on April 2.        
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usatoday.com
Join Nicholas Kristof to discuss what’s next in the coronavirus crisis
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nytimes.com
Bar owner gives unemployed staff $3,714 taken from walls amid pandemic
A Georgia owner of a bar known for having cash stapled to the walls took down $3,714 worth of bills to give to her unemployed staff as they weather the financial impact of coronavirus lockdowns, according to a report. Jennifer Knox said customers at The Sand Bar in Tybee Island have long written on dollar...
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nypost.com
Over 7,000 Fly Out of Wuhan on First Day After Lockdown Lifted
According to Chinese state media, over 7,000 people boarded airplanes and flew out of Wuhan, source of the global coronavirus pandemic, on the first day after its two-month lockdown was lifted.
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breitbart.com
Garcetti Fail: Coronavirus Hits Homeless Housed in Los Angeles Rec Center
In another setback for Democratic Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti's effort to move homeless people into neighborhood recreation centers, a homeless individual who was sheltered at a rec center in Granada Hills has reportedly tested positive for the Wuhan coronavirus, igniting fears that the virus could start to spread like wildfire among the city's homeless population.
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breitbart.com
Great championship games: Bret Saberhagen pitches a no-hitter in 1982 City final
Cleveland High's Bret Saberhagen came close to throwing a perfect game in a 13-0 win over Palisades for the 1982 City championship at Dodger Stadium.
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latimes.com
Refurbished iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max are discounted for one day only
Even though the iPhone 11 has been out for eight months, it's still one of the most powerful phones available. And just for one day, Woot! has discounts on unlocked, refurbished models of Phone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max.
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edition.cnn.com
Why Tonight's 'Grey's Anatomy' Episode Will be the Last of Season 16
The 'Grey's Anatomy' Season 16 finale airs on ABC on Thursday.
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newsweek.com
Trump administration plans to open 2.3 million acres of wildlife refuges to hunting and fishing
The Trump administration announced plans on Wednesday to open up 2.3 million acres of land to hunting and fishing on more than 100 national wildlife refuges and fish hatcheries across the country – earning praise from hunting groups but derision from wildlife conservation organizations who called the move “tone deaf” as the country reels from the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
WATCH: Doctor Dressed as Easter Bunny Spreads Joy to Family, Neighbors During Pandemic
A doctor recently brought some much-needed Easter magic to his family and neighbors in Greenville, South Carolina.
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breitbart.com
Charlotte Figi, who inspired CBD movement, dead at 13 after coronavirus-like illness
Charlotte Figi, the epileptic child who became a symbol of the CBD movement, died after a battle with a coronavirus-like illness, her family said.
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nypost.com
Seton Hall lands ‘stud’ transfer Bryce Aiken to ease Myles Powell hurt
The day was Sept. 19, 2015. Myles Powell committed to Seton Hall during an official visit and would later become one of the program’s all-time greats. That same day, his close friend, Bryce Aiken, was on campus, too. Aiken didn’t pull the trigger like Powell, though, and committed to Harvard three weeks later. Four-and-a-half years...
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nypost.com
EU nears deal on coronavirus package as Germany puts its foot down
Prospects for a European Union deal on a package to support its coronavirus-battered economies brightened on Thursday as Germany put its foot down to end opposition from the Netherlands and to reassure Italy that the EU would show it solidarity.
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reuters.com
Farmers will need relief to stay afloat until restaurants and schools reopen, says industry leader
While farmers are facing economic hardship due to the coronavirus shutdown, Western Growers President David Puglia said on Thursday that they are going to need relief while they can't sell their stock.
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foxnews.com
China to reclassify dogs as pets, not livestock, in wake of coronavirus
China has drawn up new guidelines to reclassify dogs as pets, rather than livestock, in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak — a move that the Humane Society called a “game-changer” in animal welfare. The pathogen, which has infected more than 1.5 million people worldwide since it emerged in the Asian nation, is widely believed...
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nypost.com
Son Of '60s Radicals Is The New D.A. In San Francisco Facing The Covid-19 Crisis
Chesa Boudin's radical leftist parents were imprisoned when he was a toddler. Now he's working to de-incarcerate inmates in San Francisco — and worrying about his dad, who remains in prison in NY.
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npr.org
Paris Hilton reflects on her celebrity: ‘I was always ahead of my time’
Paris Hilton is aware she’s one of the most successful celebrities of her generation.
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foxnews.com
NYC Council could be working online due to coronavirus, Johnson says
City Council Speaker Corey Johnson said Thursday that he’s seriously considering having the council members conduct business online because of the coronavirus pandemic in order to get a new budget approved by June 30’s deadline. “We are looking into it,” the speaker told WYNC radio after being asked if Council members could vote remotely under...
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nypost.com
Conversational chaos, prayers and hope: My Passover seder on Zoom in the time of coronavirus
Here's what it was like to do a Passover seder over Zoom during the coronavirus pandemic.       
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usatoday.com
The Hilton Foundation donates $10 million towards coronavirus relief efforts
The Hilton family is giving back in a major way.
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foxnews.com
Fed studying if new facility for small business loans might be opened to non-bank lenders
The Federal Reserve may expand a program to back Small Business Administration loans to include non-bank lenders as a way to help speed distribution of $350 billion in loans considered critical to helping the smallest firms through the coronavirus crisis.
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reuters.com
Mike Pence Bans Coronavirus Task Force from CNN Until Network Broadcasts Full Briefings
The office of Vice President Mike Pence will no longer allow members of the White House coronavirus task force to appear on CNN unless the network broadcasts President Donald Trump's daily press briefings in their entirety.
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breitbart.com
Dolly Parton sings tribute to Kenny Rogers while self-isolating from the coronavirus
Dolly Parton paid tribute to her friend and fellow country artist Kenny Rogers with a sweet acoustic cover during Wednesday night’s “CMT Giants” memorial concert special. 
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foxnews.com
Watch: Melania Trump Demonstrates Importance of Face Masks to Slow Coronavirus Spread
First Lady Melania Trump is stressing the importance of wearing a face mask in public, as well as continued social distancing, to slow the spread of the Chinese coronavirus. 
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breitbart.com
UFC 249 takes another hit as Rose Namajunas pulls out
UFC 249 appears to be happening come hell or high water, but not without continued changes to the card. Former women’s strawweight champion Rose Namajunas is the latest big name to pull out of the April 18 event, with no replacement announced as of yet to fill in for her co-headline bout against Jessica Andrade....
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nypost.com
Apparel company's T-shirt idea accidentally earns over $86G (and counting) for coronavirus relief
One company’s unique interpretation of the popular phrase "Flatten the curve" has unwittingly led to a massive COVID-19 relief fundraiser.
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foxnews.com
OPEC+ works on two-year oil cut deal, implemented gradually: sources
OPEC and its allies, a group known as OPEC+, are discussing plans to cut oil production for at least two years with reductions implemented gradually, two OPEC+ sources said on Thursday.
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reuters.com
Indian Muslims Are Being Scapegoated for the Coronavirus
The #CoronaJihad narrative is a knee-jerk reaction for the Hindu nationalist government.
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slate.com
Meet the former NYT reporter who is challenging the coronavirus narrative
As daily life across America is upended by the coronavirus crisis -- with mass business closures plunging the economy into freefall -- one former New York Times reporter is sounding the alarm about what he believes are flawed models dictating the aggressive strategy.
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foxnews.com
Georgia hospital workers cheer as first coronavirus patient transferred out of ICU
Doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers at a Georgia hospital lined the halls cheering as the first COVID-19 patient was transferred out of the intensive care unit on Wednesday.
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foxnews.com
Democrats are more surprised than anyone
Now what?
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washingtonpost.com
Boris Johnson in Intensive Care: 'Making Positive Steps Forwards, in Good Spirits'
UK PM Boris Johnson is "making positive steps forwards" with his treatment, as he spends his fourth day in intensive care with coronavirus. 
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breitbart.com
The Easter Bunny is most definitely coming to town. I'm sure of it
Easter is all about the unexpected, so be ready to roll back the rock and roll with the punches.
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latimes.com
Saudi Arabia Supertankers Sent To U.S. in Advance of Oil Meeting
So far this month, at least seven supertankers carrying a total of 14 million barrels of oil are currently traveling to the U.S. Gulf Coast.
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newsweek.com
You’ve Heard of 5G. Now Meet Wi-Fi 6.
Finally, an upgrade to home Wi-Fi to support all those devices. If only it had arrived before the pandemic.
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washingtonpost.com
This Pandemic Will Turbo-Charge New Technologies. Companies That Don't Adapt Risk Being Left Behind | Opinion
Data analytics, predictive analytics, machine learning have eased transition into lockdown for the early adapters, and will play a much bigger role in the post-pandemic world.
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newsweek.com
Vogue's Anna Wintour on fund to rescue fashion industry
The initiative aims to give "micro loans" to small businesses and designers Wintour calls "the future generation of American fashion."
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cbsnews.com