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Smart Toilet That Can Detect Disease in Urine and Feces of User Created by Scientists
Device mounted to a toilet incorporates test strips and video cameras and recognizes the user by fingerprint and "distinctive features" on their anus.
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newsweek.com
The Psychological Toll of Health Care Rationing Should Not Be Underestimated | Opinion
The families of forsaken patients will have been wronged, and whatever procedures are put in place, there's no distancing doctors from the horror.
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newsweek.com
Dow jumps over 1,000 points as coronavirus deaths slow in hotspots
Stocks surged Monday amid signs that the coronavirus crisis is easing in some hard-hit places even as US officials warned of a brutal week ahead. The Dow Jones industrial average jumped as many as 1,082.97 points, or a5.1 bout 4.4 percent, in early trading as the number of virus fatalities appeared to slow in Italy,...
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nypost.com
NYC to begin temporarily burying coronavirus victims in local parks
Officials will begin burying the city’s mounting coronavirus dead in local parks — as morgues and hospitals struggle to house the corpses, Councilman Mark Levine said Monday. “Soon we’ll start ‘temporary interment’,” Levine (D-Manhattan) wrote in a series of tweets. “This likely will be done by using a NYC park for burials (yes you read...
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nypost.com
Richard Simmons’ YouTube channel returns to help people during the coronavirus
Richard Simmons is helping us to still sweat to the oldies.
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nypost.com
Police Accuse Man of Licking His Fingers and Deliberately Rubbing Saliva on Supermarket Item Amid Coronavirus Pandemic
Benjamin Best is accused of contaminating or interfering with goods with intent following an incident at a Lidl supermarket in England.
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newsweek.com
Meghan Markle’s facialist Sarah Chapman speaks out about their friendship
"With Meghan, what began as a client relationship quickly turned into a dear friendship and she welcomed me into their lives," the skin guru wrote on Instagram.
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nypost.com
The Open Championship canceled due to coronavirus
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edition.cnn.com
The Open Championship canceled amid coronavirus
The Open Championship has become the latest sporting event to be canceled amid the coronavirus
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edition.cnn.com
Amid coronavirus, 'The Nanny' returns briefly to offer some relief
Fran Drescher will be part of a table reading on Monday with her former cast members from the CBS hit 'The Nanny.'
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latimes.com
States Can’t Fight Coronavirus on Their Own—And the Founding Fathers Knew It
It was a lesson they'd learned from experience
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time.com
Charging Copays and Deductibles During a Pandemic Is Foolish—and Deadly | Opinion
Yes, the United States rations medical care by ability to pay. We can't have that happen as we fight COVID-19.
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newsweek.com
Sarah Ferguson reacts to Queen Elizabeth’s coronavirus speech
"We should take comfort that while we may have more still to endure, better days will return."
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nypost.com
Exclusive: A new app lets you play for 'Who Wants to Be a Millionaire' winnings
Ahead of the return of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire," an accompanying app, "Millionaire Live," will allow you to throw down for cash.       
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usatoday.com
Don’t feel like ‘getting things done’? It’s okay not to be productive during a pandemic.
If you don’t have or want to use “down time” for projects such as organizing your closets or spice drawer, you’re not alone.
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washingtonpost.com
Quibi — the new short-form streaming service for your phone — explained
What is a Quibi? | Quibi The trouble with Quibi is that everything Quibi does, other streaming services are already doing better. The easiest question to answer about Quibi is the one I’m most frequently asked: Just what is Quibi, anyway? Quibi is short for “quick bites” — though you don’t pronounce it “quih-bye” (to rhyme with “rib-eye”) but, instead, “quih-bee,” to rhyme with the name “Libby.” It’s a new streaming service built from the ground up for mobile devices, and some of the names behind it include media mogul Jeffrey Katzenberg (who worked at Disney Animation during its renaissance, then started Dreamworks Animation and was instrumental in making such films as Shrek and Prince of Egypt) and CEO Meg Whitman, who is the former CEO of eBay. There’s a lot of money behind Quibi: As The Verge pointed out just last month, the service had raised nearly $2 billion in seed money before anybody saw a single frame of programming. With that much cash in its coffers and with folks like Katzenberg and Whitman involved, you’d expect Quibi to be new and original, wildly innovative, or at least stuffed full of great programming. Quibi is none of those things. Its central aim is to present short-form programming, so every episode of every one of its shows is under 10 minutes long, and many are quite a bit shorter than that. (I watched a couple in the five-minute range.) Quibi’s embrace of short-form content is supposed to be its killer new idea, the must-see that will compel you to pony up $5 a month to watch with ads and $8 a month to watch without. (Vox Media, the parent company of Vox, is creating programming for Quibi. I haven’t seen Speedrun, its daily show premiering Monday.) But in practice, Quibi largely fails to differentiate itself from many other streaming services. At best, it’s like a YouTube you have to pay for. Quibi’s programming ranges from reality show reboots to bland scripted shows to Nicole Richie making fun of herself Quibi The absurdist mockumentary Nikki Fre$h is the best thing on Quibi, which is not much of a compliment. But it’s a pretty funny show. I spent the better part of a workday watching several of Quibi’s new series. The service sent me screeners of nearly 30 shows, usually providing three or four episodes of each. (Several programs that will run daily, to report or comment on the news, were not available, for obvious reasons.) The offerings ranged from reality competition series to game show reboots to scripted dramas to a very odd mockumentary. They were almost all mediocre. Some were terrible. The most notable titles for many who sign up for Quibi’s 90-day free trial will be two remakes of old MTV shows — the prank show Punk’d (hosted by Chance the Rapper in this incarnation) and the dating show Singled Out (hosted by Keke Palmer and Joel Kim Booster). Neither program is bad, exactly, but neither program does much to explain why it’s been revived for 2020, either; if Quibi wants to ride the nostalgia boom, it’s not immediately clear why the programs it’s resurrecting are going to have the most immediate appeal for 20- and 30-somethings who are already inundated with streaming services aimed directly at them. The other reality programming is ... fine, but it’s clear that no one has put much thought into why it should exist in Quibi’s “quick bite” format. Reality television is often concept heavy — meaning a show can live or die based on the clarity of the concept for a series or episode — and in the sub-10-minute running time of Quibi episodes, generally all there’s time to do is introduce that concept before rushing through a quick conclusion. Many of the Quibi reality shows I screened made me feel like I was starting to get interested right before they abruptly ended. The scripted series fare no better. All of them are structured less like episodic TV shows and more like a movie arbitrarily broken up into chunks. This is probably the right approach — a 10-episode Quibi show composed of 10-minute episodes will run 100 minutes, after all — but few of the programs have really thought through what that might look like. I more or less enjoyed its spin on Most Dangerous Game, with Christoph Waltz as the grinning villain who wants to hunt a man (in this incarnation named Dodge because he has to dodge all those murder attempts), and Flipped, an absurdist comedy I’m not sure I can describe but one that makes great use of Will Forte and Kaitlin Olson. And yet these “pretty okay” shows were stacked up against a program called Survive, which I’d call one of the most irresponsible TV shows I’ve ever seen. About halfway through the show’s first episode, its protagonist (played by Game of Thrones star Sophie Turner) describes at length detailed instructions for both self-harm and suicide, in a way that makes self-harm and suicide seem vaguely alluring. It’s supposed to be dangerous and edgy; instead, it functions as an impromptu how-to manual that seriously crossed the line for me. The one Quibi show I wholeheartedly enjoyed was the Nicole Richie mockumentary Nikki Fre$h. It has something to do with Richie trying to make herself relevant again by dubbing herself “Nikki Fre$h,” and becoming a rapper but also a beekeeper? It makes sense in the moment, but good luck explaining it to anybody. I just know that a major cameo in the third episode, one I dare not spoil, made me laugh uproariously — the only time a Quibi show elicited such a reaction from me. So if Quibi’s shows aren’t worth it, is the service itself? With the caveat that I haven’t actually seen the interface the new service will use — and maybe it will be extraordinary — I’m confident there’s nothing on Quibi that isn’t already being done better elsewhere, and often for much cheaper. Quibi is selling itself as revolutionary. But most of its innovations were pioneered by other services. The various screeners Quibi provided to critics showed us each program in both vertical and horizontal orientations, so we could get an idea of how its shows will look depending on how you hold your phone: Quibi A frame from Quibi’s remake of Singled Out. Every single Quibi show has been considered from the perspective of someone who’d watch in a vertical orientation, as well as from the perspective someone who’d watch in a horizontal orientation. But the narrow framing of vertical orientation often leaves important visual information cropped out anyway, or it creates unintentionally unsettling images, like the contestant looming in the background of the shot above. Particularly in some of Quibi’s more documentary-style programming — where the camera has to dart around to follow what’s happening — the vertical orientation proved difficult to watch. A few programs found a fun way to present information in the vertical orientation, occasionally using a split-screen effect where multiple people onscreen at the same time would appear in different frames stacked on top of each other. Here’s an example of that format in the show Nightgowns, a boring but beautifully filmed series about drag: Quibi A still from Nightgowns. Rather than follow the entire performance of drag queen Sasha Velour — who would be moving all over the stage — the vertical orientation splits it up in a way that gives you the feel of the entire performance while allowing the camera to remain mostly stationary. Unfortunately, it’s the only Quibi show I watched that seemed to have thought about how differently such a performance would play out when watched on a phone. This attempt to accommodate to vertical orientation viewers, I think, will be the difference most people notice when they fire up Quibi. And it might seem incredibly innovative to many of them. I don’t want to sell Quibi short here — the effort made to think about how people holding their phones vertically will experience its programming is welcome, even if it’s yielded far too many shows that just restrict all the action to the center of the frame. But it’s not exactly new. Quibi Nearly every one of Quibi’s programs boasts a big star involved somewhere in production. And that’s the big problem with Quibi: Everything it does that’s interesting is already being done better by somebody else. A lot of the shows feel like lesser, shorter versions of more successful Netflix offerings (for instance, a show about how various pastas get their shapes is okay and all, but it has a pretentious vibe that Netflix’s similar Salt Fat Acid Heat mercifully avoided). And the shows that don’t feel like Netflix knockoffs are exactly the sort of scripted filler that tends to pad out new streaming platforms in need of content. But look beyond Netflix and you’ll find other streaming services delivering even better results on Quibi’s core promises. Quibi is a bunch of short-form content mostly aimed at young people — which makes it a lot like YouTube with more curation, better production values, and occasional celebrities. It’s not immediately clear what Quibi’s Punk’d remake adds to the world that Logan Paul didn’t, other than the chance to see bigger names getting pranked. Similarly, a pop culture rundown show called Memory Hole is no different from hundreds of YouTube videos providing fun looks back at obscure cultural moments, except it’s hosted by Will Arnett instead of an unknown narrator. And YouTube, at least in its base form, is free. It’s also widely beloved by the teens and 20-somethings Quibi seems to be targeting. So Quibi is basically running straight at YouTube with a service that will cost money, for programming that is rarely much better than the best YouTube has to offer but features faces you (and by “you,” I mean an adult who’s not enmeshed in the world of YouTube celebrity) might recognize more. Then there’s Snapchat, which remains enormously popular with teens and early-20-somethings. Snapchat also offers original series — ones that can only be watched vertically, and that have been better designed to play specifically on a phone. They’re TV shows or movies divided into smaller chunks, as Quibi’s shows often seem to be. And they’re free. Snapchat’s shows have deliberately considered what it means to air on a phone screen and how information might best be conveyed. The use of split-screens on a Quibi program is still a tentative thing; on Snapchat, it happens in every single program. And Snapchat’s approach is working, at least according to its internal numbers. Writes Vulture’s Kathryn VanArendonk: According to its numbers, 218 million people use the app daily. With over 38 million viewers, Endless (previously called Endless Summer), created by Michelle Peerali and Andrea Metz, is the most watched of the 95 original shows that have appeared on the platform in the past few years. It’s now in its third season, and most of its audience is between 13 and 24 years old (by Snapchat’s statistics, 90 percent of people in the U.S. in that age range have the app on their phones). The company has studied what works on a phone and what does not, and from those lessons, it has invented mobile storytelling as a new art form. Even if we assume that Snapchat is overreporting its numbers — because it probably is — there’s still a staggering number of people, mostly young adults and teens, watching its programming. Those are the same people Quibi is targeting, and if they’re already watching Snapchat, it’s hard to imagine them being sucked in by Quibi. (I don’t precisely like Snapchat’s shows, but they are relentlessly designed to do what they do perfectly. I can respect that.) So if Quibi’s target audience is mostly occupied on other apps, and if the service isn’t that innovative, and if its programming is mostly unremarkable, why are we talking about it? Media coverage of Quibi underlines the broken ways we talk about tech and entertainment Quibi Chrissy Teigen as a judge? You know, why not? In the spring of 2019, a new streaming service called Nebula kicked off what’s called a soft launch, going online with a small amount of content with the idea that it would add more and more in the weeks to come. Nebula is another streaming service attempting to do “YouTube but better,” and the concept behind it is literally to pay prominent YouTube creators (with money pooled from the service’s $3-a-month subscriber base) to make what they’d love to if they weren’t reliant on the whims of the YouTube algorithm. (I should note here that one of those creators, Lindsay Ellis, is a friend of mine. She is also the only reason I know Nebula exists, which is going to become important in a moment.) I don’t know that Nebula is presenting itself as something different in the way Quibi is, but it’s definitely trying something new. And yet it received maybe a hundredth of the press coverage that Quibi has. If you Google it, you’ll find a handful of news articles about the service, and then a bunch of confused Reddit threads asking what Nebula even is. Nebula hasn’t ever contacted me to offer screeners or access to the site. It’s unlikely it ever will. My guess is that whatever budget Nebula has, it isn’t being spent on publicists. Quibi — which, again, has nearly $2 billion in capital — has been covered breathlessly from almost the moment it was announced. It aired ads during the Super Bowl. Its shows involve big Hollywood stars. It’s the kind of streaming service those of us who write about entertainment or tech are “supposed” to cover. But why? Why waste so much ink on something that feels so bizarrely underconsidered? To me, Quibi is clearly inferior. It’s “more expensive YouTube” at best and “Snapchat but with worse quality control” at worst. It’s difficult to imagine a huge number of people who are looking to subscribe to yet another streaming service deciding to add Quibi. It’s also difficult to imagine many viewers subscribing to a streaming service specifically targeted at people who might want to watch short videos while on the go, given that said service is launching during a pandemic that is forcing everyone to stay home. (The pandemic isn’t Quibi’s fault, of course; the service’s April 2020 launch date was announced months ago. But now the pandemic is another thing standing in Quibi’s way.) My point is that the reason Quibi has been covered so heavily has little to do with its ideas (which are paltry) or its programming (which is bad) or its business model (which is basically the same as every other streaming business model). The reason Quibi has been covered so heavily is that a lot of money has been sunk into it, and the people who started the service have previously made lots of money doing other things. Therefore, it must be important, because a capitalist society assigns value in terms of dollars. I am aware that I am part of the problem. Look how many words I’ve written about Quibi, a service I clearly don’t like. That’s because I know there will be Quibi ads everywhere, and I know that enough people will say, “What’s Quibi?” and click on this article to find the answer. That’s the way the system works. But it’s also a system that is so frequently hijacked by money as to have become functionally meaningless. In a world where news and entertainment moved at a rate slower than hyperspeed, I might have found a way to write about Quibi six months from now, after it had some time to settle in and become a part of some people’s lives. But in this world, the window of attention for Quibi is right now, and so here is this article. And in six months, some other new streaming service will come along. I don’t know if Nebula is any better than Quibi. I do know there’s nothing on Quibi that other services aren’t already doing better. There are so many great niche streaming services out there, but none of them have the massive marketing budgets to get stuck in people’s brains the way Quibi does. Quibi does not de facto have value because it’s spent enough money to convince people it has value. It is a flawed product, starting from a flawed premise, and the idea that it is worth talking about because it has purchased your attention (and mine) is so much of what’s wrong with America in the 21st century. The service is another naked emperor in a land full of them. So why are we looking for cool new fashions when the bare ass is visible from miles away?
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vox.com
PGA Tour plans June tournament in first hint of sports return
The 2020 British Open has officially been canceled as a result of the current COVID-19 pandemic, the R&A announced Monday. The 149th Open Championship, which was scheduled to be played the week of July 12 at Royal St. Georges in Kent, in the south of England, is the first of the four golf major championships...
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nypost.com
Irish Prime Minister to Work As a Doctor During Country’s COVID-19 Crisis
Leo Varadkar, the Irish Prime Minister, has rejoined the country’s medical register and will begin working one shift a week, as the country grapples with a growing COVID-19 outbreak. The Health Service Executive (HSE), the country’s health and social service provider, appealed to all non-working healthcare professionals on March 17 to “be on call for…
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time.com
Tampa Bay Bucs Had Secret Operation to Cover Their Pursuit of Tom Brady
Brady shocked the NFL last month, signing a two-year deal worth $50 million with the Bucs after ending a 20-year spell in New England.
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newsweek.com
'Hearthstone' Ashes of Outland Release Time — When Can You Open Packs?
Here's when you can start opening your new Hearthstone expansion packs and play as the Demon Hunter
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newsweek.com
'Get us off this ship': Coral Princess passengers frustrated with disembarkation process
"Get us off this ship so we can get home and let them deal with these sick people," a frustrated Coral Princess passenger told USA TODAY.        
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usatoday.com
Two Fiji rugby players arrested for allegedly breaking coronavirus quarantine
Two Fiji national rugby team members were arrested for allegedly breaking a 14-day quarantine the country implemented to stop the spread of COVID-19.       
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usatoday.com
White House considering U.S. Treasury coronavirus bond: Kudlow
White House advisers have been discussing the possibility of a coronavirus-related U.S. Treasury bond, President Donald Trump's economic adviser Larry Kudlow told CNBC on Monday.
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reuters.com
Stocks jump as COVID deaths slow; oil falls on OPEC+ delay
World stock markets jumped on Monday, encouraged by a slowdown in coronavirus-related deaths and new cases in some of the world's hot spots, while a delay in talks between Saudi Arabia and Russia to cut supply sent oil prices tumbling again.
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reuters.com
Top CEOs warning Trump of economic shutdown amid coronavirus
The country's leading CEOs are sounding the alarm in private conversations with President Trump that businesses could face economic ruin amid the coronavirus crisis.
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nypost.com
Chicago pizzeria using oven to make face shields for healthcare workers
Pizza ovens aren’t just for pizza anymore. A restaurant in Chicago is using its pizza oven to help out local healthcare workers during the coronavirus outbreak. Aside from just making pizzas, the establishment is using the oven to make much-needed face shields. Dimo’s Pizza teamed up with Avenue Metal to produce prototypes for the shields,...
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nypost.com
Acting Navy secretary blasts ousted aircraft carrier captain as 'stupid' in address to ship's crew
The Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly blasted the now ousted commander of the USS Theodore Roosevelt as "stupid" in an address to the ship's crew Monday morning, in remarks obtained by CNN.
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edition.cnn.com
Athletes jump into action to fight the coronavirus firsthand
Italian rugby player Maxime Mbanda hangs up his cleats to drive an ambulance and England's cricket star Heather Knight puts down her bat to volunteer for Britain's National Health Service.
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edition.cnn.com
The Rationing of Care May Lead to Lawsuits Against Doctors. Here is What We Should Do to Protect Them | Opinion
The last thing we need mid-pandemic is for already overwhelmed, overworked doctors and nurses to worry about being sued.
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newsweek.com
Doctors Are Being Forced to Ration Care. Don't Blame Them. Blame Decades of Poor U.S. Policy | Opinion
America is known for its high spending on health care, yet here we are, facing a devastating shortage of medical resources. It shouldn't be this way.
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newsweek.com
Kiara the beach volleyball dog is real-life Air Bud and internet sensation
Norwegian beach volleyball player Mathias Berntsen's dog, Kiara, took social media by storm this past weekend with a couple of viral videos.      
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usatoday.com
Are Big Ed and Rose Still Together After '90 Day Fiance: Before The 90 Days?'
Ed spoke out and claimed he's "definitely in love."
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newsweek.com
Ruby Princess cruise ship at center of criminal investigation in Australia following coronavirus outbreak
The ship, which is operated by Princess Cruises, is believed to be the epicenter of an outbreak linked to at least 662 cases of COVID-19 and 11 deaths as of Sunday.
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foxnews.com
British Open canceled for the first time since World War II
The tournament will be contested at Royal St. George's, this year's site.
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washingtonpost.com
Jameis Winston ties knot with girlfriend at home after coronavirus pandemic postpones larger ceremony
NFL quarterback Jameis Winston and his girlfriend Breion Allen didn’t let the coronavirus pandemic stop them from tying the knot last month.
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foxnews.com
Sasha Velour delivers empowerment, coronavirus escape with Quibi's drag extravaganza 'NightGowns'
"Maybe drag is more essential than I even realized," said "NightGowns" star and "RuPaul's Drag Race" winner Sasha Velour.        
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usatoday.com
Singer Duffy shares harrowing details of past rape, kidnapping
The "Mercy" singer said she was motivated to speak now to serve as a "momentary distraction or maybe even some comfort that one can come out of darkness."
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nypost.com
Mark Wahlberg pens moving Palm Sunday message to fans: 'We still have faith'
Mark Wahlberg is leaning on his faith during the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
This 'Joe Exotic The Tiger King' Autographed Photo is a Top Selling Entertainment Collectible on Amazon
Buy an autographed poster, signed by Joe Exotic, and say you were there when the Netflix docuseries went mainstream.
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newsweek.com
Navy secretary says White House not involved in Brett Crozier dismissal
Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly said he did not consult with anyone at the White House before he decided to fire the captain of an aircraft carrier for his lack of leadership in the face of a coronavirus outbreak, according to a report. Modly said he “had no discussions with anyone at the White House...
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nypost.com
Larry David bashes Trump's coronavirus response, calls for Bernie Sanders to drop out of 2020 race
In a recent interview, Larry David bashed Donald Trump’s response to the coronavirus and called for 2020 Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders to drop out of the race. 
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foxnews.com
Dan Crenshaw: Now is the time to remember JFK's powerful call to action
Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, said that Americans would do well to remember the iconic words of the nation's 35th president, John F. Kennedy, as they contemplate how to meet the challenge posed by the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Intensive Care Doctor Diagnosed With Coronavirus Says It Felt Like 'Drowning in My Lungs,' Made Video to Say Goodbye to Family
"I was so short of breath and I couldn't breath, and I just wanted to tell my kids that they are the most important thing in the world to me," Dr. Julie John told CNN.
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newsweek.com
Jamie Dimon predicts a 'major recession' is on its way
JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon used his annual shareholder letter to detail just how bad he thinks the US economy can get from the coronavirus pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
Swiss resort offering ‘quarantine apartments’ that includes a $500 coronavirus test
There’s more than one way to quarantine. A hotel and resort in Switzerland is offering luxury apartments for quarantine during the COVID-19 outbreak. Aside from the typical amenities, the apartments include several coronavirus-themed amenities, including an in-room coronavirus test. Not surprisingly, quarantining in luxury is a bit pricey. Le Bijou Hotel and Resort is charging...
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nypost.com
Japanese leader declares state of emergency as COVID-19 spreads
"We need your cooperation to prevent an explosive surge," Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told his nation, as the number of confirmed infections rises sharply.
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cbsnews.com
Supreme Court declines to hear case concerning DC transit agency's restrictions on religious ads
The Supreme Court declined on Monday to hear a dispute concerning a Washington, DC, transit agency's ban on allowing religious ads to be placed on the sides of city buses.
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edition.cnn.com