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'Baywatch' star David Chokachi sheds longtime Miracle Mile home
Following 13 years of ownership, David Chokachi of 'Baywatch' fame has sold his Spanish-style home in the Miracle Mile area for $1.515 million.
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latimes.com
Kentucky orders quarantine-breakers to wear ankle monitors
Authorities have ordered Louisville residents who have been exposed to the potentially deadly virus but won't self-quarantine to wear a tracking device to ensure they don't leave the house, CNN affiliate WDRB reports.
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nypost.com
Feds ramp up probe of $2.1B Google-Fitbit deal amid privacy worries
The Department of Justice has stepped up its investigation of Google’s proposed $2.1 billion acquisition of Fitbit, a deal that critics say could pose increased threats to customer privacy, two sources close to the situation told The Post. In a move that typically signals increased scrutiny for a merger, regulators are now conducting a so-called...
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nypost.com
Preakness Stakes postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak
The Preakness Stakes, the second leg in horse racing's Triple Crown, has been postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak.
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latimes.com
Cats can infect each other with coronavirus, study finds
Hold on to your cats! The rapidly-spreading coronavirus can be transmitted between your feline pets, according to a new Chinese study. Researchers at Harbin Veterinary Research Institute found that cats are not only susceptible to contracting COVID-19 but can pass it on to their furry friends as well. But other animals — such as dogs,...
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nypost.com
U.S. Postal Service could shut down by June, lawmakers warn
As funding runs low, U.S. Postal Service says it may not be able to keep operations going.
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cbsnews.com
‘Tootsie Slide’ into these surprising Drake facts
The world knows Drake as a music superstar, dropping dance jams from quarantine in Toronto, Canada. Even the biggest Drizzy fans, however, might not know these seven facts about the “Tootsie Slide” singer.   Subscribe to our YouTube!
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nypost.com
Key GOP senator warns that U.S. needs millions of coronavirus tests by August
“The big test for the administration right now is: Can you scale up the production of hundreds of millions of tests," he says.
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politico.com
Storytime with Dana: 'Squeak, Rumble, Whomp Whomp Whomp!'
Today’s book is a treat: "Squeak, Rumble, Whomp Whomp Whomp!" And who better to read all of the onomatopoeia in this book than my husband Peter?
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foxnews.com
New York, Connecticut want details on Zoom’s privacy practices
At least two US state attorneys have sought information from Zoom Video Communications following multiple reports that questioned the privacy and security of the videoconferencing app. Zoom’s popularity has surged as employees at businesses, schools and millions of other organizations across the world work from home due to lockdowns imposed to slow the spread of...
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nypost.com
Trump Elevates Unqualified Judge As a Reward for Defending Kavanaugh
McConnell ditched coronavirus relief negotiations to celebrate Justin Walker's swearing-in. Now Walker is getting promoted.
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slate.com
Anick Jesdanun, longtime AP technology writer, dies at 51
Anick Jesdanun, deputy technology editor for The Associated Press, has died in New York City of coronavirus complications
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washingtonpost.com
This isolation system is how the Air Force will transfer coronavirus patients
The Air Force is training medical professionals to operate an isolation system used to safely transport patients with infectious diseases aboard military aircraft.
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abcnews.go.com
TSA confirms first employee death from coronavirus
A federal TSA employee passed away Thursday from COVID-19, a statement from TSA to Fox News confirmed.
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foxnews.com
Wisconsin governor calls on legislature to change primary election
Governor Tony Evers wants the Wisconsin legislature to come back for a special session to vote on changes to Tuesday's primary, amid concerns about the coronavirus.
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cbsnews.com
Teresa Giudice and Joe Gorga's father, Giacinto Gorga, has died
Gorga often appeared on series, offering sage advice, biting commentary or active in the kitchen.        
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usatoday.com
Illinois AG warns against coronavirus scams
Scammers are looking to take advantage of the coronavirus chaos to make a quick buck.
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foxnews.com
Cardi B donates to NYC medical professionals amid coronavirus pandemic
She wanted to provide sustenance for medical staffers and ambulance crews who are too busy to have a proper meal during their hectic shifts.
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nypost.com
Attempts for Middle East ceasefires amid the coronavirus crisis have not stopped the fighting
Calls for coronavirus ceasefires have not halted Middle East battles
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latimes.com
How 'Pinkalicious & Peterrific' can be a social studies class during coronavirus school closures
During coronavirus school closures PBS offers distance learning on TV and online for students.
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latimes.com
Chaos erupts on plane when Moscow-to-NYC flight is suddenly canceled
Fliers desperate to escape Russia erupted in a near-riot Friday when officials canceled Aeroflot’s last Moscow-to-New York flight — even though the plane had already begun taxiing on the runway. “People are starting to panic and go crazy,” one passenger, Montana-born ballet star Julian Mackay, 22, said in a cell-phone video he recorded from his...
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nypost.com
Nikki Haley accuses WHO of taking 'China's word' on coronavirus transmission
Former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley took aim at the World Health Organization on Friday, saying the health body owes an explanation for why “they took China’s word” on the claim that coronavirus could not be spread from person to person -- a claim now known to be entirely false.
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foxnews.com
At collapsed New Orleans Hard Rock Hotel, OSHA cites 'willful' and 'serious' safety violations
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration found numerous safety violations at the 18-story Hard Rock Hotel in New Orleans that collapsed.       
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usatoday.com
It’s a Tough Time for Men With No Friends
And it turns out a lot of men fit that description.
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slate.com
What we know about the fourth coronavirus relief bill
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (right) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer speak at a press conference marking the one-year anniversary of the House passing HR 1, the For the People Act, March 10, 2020. | Win McNamee/Getty Images Congress’s next coronavirus bill might look a lot like the last one. Despite an initial Democratic push for a bold infrastructure bill to infuse the economy with cash and jobs,the next coronavirus bill Congress may take up later this month could look very similar to the last one it passed. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is already calling it “CARES 2.” A fourth package could include more direct payments, extended unemployment insurance, health insurance for laid-off workers who lose theirs, and hazard pay for front-line health care workers and other essential employees like grocery store workers, truck drivers, and postal workers. With an unprecedented 10 million people applying for unemployment benefits due to the coronavirus economic crisis, Democratic leaders on Capitol Hill are acknowledging the relief provisions in the $2 trillion bipartisan CARES Act simply may not be enough for the stark economic hardship many Americans now face. Both Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and Pelosi told Vox onseparate press calls that Congress needs to take additional action to alleviate the financial hardship of workers and small businesses. “I believe that we will need a Covid 4 [package] and I hope we’ll do it relatively soon,” Schumer told Vox on Friday. “And I think this is one of the big questions. Do we need more money? We probably will.” “I think now we need a fourth bipartisan bill, and I think the bill could be very much like the bill we just passed,” Pelosi told CNBC’s Jim Cramer Friday. “I’d like to go right back and say let’s look at that bill and update it for some other things we need, and again put money in the pockets of the American people.” Pelosi spent much of this week pushing the idea of a recovery infrastructure package to help get Americans back to work and give struggling state and local governments a boost. But on Friday, she shifted hermessage, saying infrastructure might be moved to a later bill. “While I’m very much in favor of doing some of the things to meet the needs — clean water, more broadband, and the rest of that — that may have to be for a bill beyond this,” Pelosi said on CNBC. “Right now, I think we have a good model; it was bipartisan, it was signed by the president, but it’s not enough.” And they may have more luck working with Republicans on such a package than an infrastructure package; Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has also said a fourth bill may be necessary, but he wants to focus on making sure aid from the third package reaches Americans. It’s a tacit acknowledgment from Democratic leadership that the spiraling economic effects of the US coronavirus outbreak are much worse than anyone could have imagined — and may not end anytime soon. “We’re still in the midst of the crisis; that is the difficulty in this,” a congressional aide told Vox. “Imagine it’s a hurricane — it’s not just moving along, it’s sitting on top of you.” What the next coronavirus package could contain The bipartisan CARES Act cost a historic $2 trillion, but it may be just the beginning of the federal response. Congress isn’t scheduled toreturn to Capitol Hill until April 20 at the earliest, but discussions about the next bill are underway. Though we’re nowhere near a bill draft yet, here are some of the ideas being talked about: Extending expanded unemployment insurance: Anyone who is on unemployment or signing up for unemployment benefits will get an extra $600 per week on top of their current state benefit until the end of July. But Schumer and Pelosi admitted that may need to be extended, depending on the state of the US economy this summer. “Certainly, I would be willing, if the numbers continue to be bad, to expand the program,” Schumer told Vox. “We do not want to leave people behind,” Pelosi agreed. “Should we again do the $600? I certainly think so,” she told Vox. “So that the people have the purchasing power to help them meet their needs but also spend it, inject demand into the economy, help the stimulus as well as relief.” Hazard pay for health care and essential workers: The US Department of Labor defines hazard pay as “additional pay for performing hazardous duty or work involving physical hardship.” Schumer said he wants to see hazard pay for health care workers dealing with an influx of Covid-19 patients as well as other essential workers who cannot work from home, like grocery store and food delivery workers, truck drivers, postal service workers, and others. Expanded OSHA regulations for health care and other essential workers: House Democrats want to include something in a bill requiring the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to put in regulations to protect health care workers and essential personnel from infectious diseases. “There is no legal requirement for health care facilities — not just hospitals, but nursing homes, mental health institutions, ambulatory care facilities, and others — to take necessary steps to protect front-line health care workers,” said House Committee on Education and Labor Chair Bobby Scott (D-VA) on a press call. “We introduced legislation requiring OSHA to adopt an emergency temporary standard and pushed to include it in the last Covid-19 bill, but it was blocked by the Senate and the administration.” More direct payments to Americans: Many Americans will see direct payments in the coming weeks and months from the CARES Act. Most adults making less than an adjusted gross income of $75,000 annually will receive a $1,200 one-time payment. Payments will go out to individuals whose income is as much as $99,000, but those bringing in more than $75,000 won’t receive the full amount. Pelosi on Friday said she could see more direct payments for Americans in a fourth bill. Expanded health care access: As millions of Americans get laid off, many are also losing the health insurance they get through their employer. Democratic leaders are calling on the Trump administration to reopen the enrollment period for health care exchanges, so laid-off people can get coverage. The Trump administration has so far declined to do so. “We haven’t gotten to the question of the uninsured,” Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) said on a press call. “I share [Schumer’s] view this is going to be essential.” An infrastructure bill is still being talked about — but it probably won’t happen right away Earlier this week, Pelosi and House committee chairs laid out the first pieces of a potential infrastructure bill — the “recovery” component of coronavirus relief. Democrats wanted to include expanding rural broadband and 5G capacity, building community health centers, and fixing up American water infrastructure. Democrats believe they can work with President Trump on an infrastructure bill; the president tweeted his support for the idea, calling on Congress to get to work on a bipartisan infrastructure bill as its “phase four” coronavirus stimulus and recovery. “It should be VERY BIG & BOLD, Two Trillion Dollars, and be focused solely on jobs and rebuilding the once great infrastructure of our Country!” Trump tweeted. But Senate Republicans may need more convincing. McConnell made it clear he didn’t want to start considering a recovery bill until Congress ensured resources from the CARES Act were actually getting to workers and businesses. “Well, look, the current law has not been in effect for even a week yet,” McConnell told Fox Radio. “The Treasury Department’s got a massive, complicated problem here in getting all of this money out rapidly. And the speaker is already talking about phase four. Well, we may need a phase four, but we’re not even fully into phase three yet.” While Democrats will likely continue to draft an infrastructure package in the background, it’s a more distant priority than continuing to get emergency money out as fast as possible. And it makes sense; this week ended with the realization that far more workers are being impacted by the coronavirus economic crisis than originally thought. As Vox’s Matt Yglesias wrote, the government’s unpredictable response to coronavirus makes it really difficult to know how long the public health crisis and aftershocks on the economy will last: Policymakers currently seem to be assuming that the economy is kind of like a light switch that they’ll be able to turn back on when the virus is under control. But that’s not really an idea the world has a lot of practical experience with, and it’s far from obvious that it will work in practice. All we really know is that the country is currently experiencing an unprecedented economic downturn and nobody can say when it will end. Staving off a prolonged spell of mass unemployment is going to require wartime-style mobilization efforts involving both enormous levels of government spending and a fully cooperative central bank. We’re in uncharted economic territory, and Congress’s next steps are crucial.
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vox.com
Trump Administration Used Venezuela Anti-Drug Operation to Distract from Coronavirus Crisis at Home, Officials Say
A senior administration official told Newsweek that the drug trade "can contribute to the spread of the virus," but a senior Pentagon official said the recent mission "has nothing to do with the virus."
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newsweek.com
Steven Spielberg feeds doctors, nurses on 'frontlines' battling coronavirus pandemic: report
Steven Spielberg is extending a helping hand to the healthcare professionals who are relentlessly combatting the mounting coronavirus cases around Los Angeles.
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foxnews.com
Gen. Milley on Navy removal of aircraft carrier captain over COVID-19 letter
Staff Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said on “Outnumbred Overtime” on Friday that he supports acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly’s decision to relieve the commanding officer of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt.
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus Diaries: We Had to Quarantine Our 12-Year-Old
I hate that I can’t hug my sick kid.
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slate.com
Wall Street falls as coronavirus shreds U.S. payrolls
Wall Street's main indexes fell on Friday as the coronavirus abruptly ended a record U.S. job growth streak of 113 months and amped up fears of a deep economic slow down.
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reuters.com
A $350 Billion Loan Program Is Supposed to Save Small Businesses. But Banks Are Balking.
Thomas Wells is sympathetic to the hundreds of small businesses that have been knocking on the doors of his bank’s 59 branches this week. They all want to know how to apply for a loan through Washington’s massive new program that aims to stop Main Street from collapsing during the coronavirus pandemic. But on Friday,…
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time.com
Jordan imposes coronavirus lockdown as cases spread in Middle East
The country of Jordan is imposing a strict 24-hour curfew as the number of coronavirus cases in the country top 290. There are growing fears the virus will spread across some of the nation's poorest communities and Syrian refugee camps. CBS News producer Amjad Tadors joins CBSN from Amman, Jordan with the latest developments.
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cbsnews.com
Stock market takes dive as horrendous jobs report sinks in
US stocks tumbled Friday after a brutal monthly jobs report gave Wall Street more proof of how hard the coronavirus pandemic has hit the economy. The Dow Jones industrial average dropped as many as 550.35 points, or 2.5 percent, after the feds’ March jobs report that said the US economy lost 701,000 jobs last month,...
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nypost.com
Google data shows New Yorkers doing less social distancing than people in Italy, Spain
The release follows Trump administration coronavirus coordinator Deborah Birx saying Thursday that she could tell by the US increase in new infections that people were not universally abiding by requests that they stay home.
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nypost.com
Supreme Court postpones April oral arguments over coronavirus concerns
The arguments the court postponed were scheduled for April 20- April 22 and April 27-April 29
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foxnews.com
The Drake of Country Music Is Back With a More Thoughtful Take on That Old Town Road
On Sam Hunt’s long-awaited Southside, the Nashville heartthrob grows up.
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slate.com
Jennifer Aniston, Jimmy Kimmel give $10K gift card to nurse with COVID-19
"We are very, very grateful to what you and all these health care workers are doing."
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nypost.com
Russian ventilators sent to U.S. made by firm under U.S. sanctions: Russia newspaper
Ventilators delivered by Russia to the United States for coronavirus patients were manufactured by a Russian company that is under U.S. sanctions, Russia's RBC business daily reported on Friday.
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reuters.com
Bikers swarm streets outside funeral home for procession despite crowd ban
Hundreds of mourners on motorbikes flouted the ban on large crowds and swarmed the streets outside of a funeral home in Queens Friday — while two NYPD cops even directed traffic, The Post has learned. The streets were filled with the high-speed funeral procession at about 10:30 a.m. at the Leahy McDonald Funeral home at...
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nypost.com
'Take This Serious': Bus Driver Dies Of COVID-19 After Calling Out Coughing Rider
"I feel violated," Jason Hargrove said, in a widely shared video complaining of selfish behavior during the coronavirus pandemic. Nearly two weeks later, the Detroit driver is dead of the disease.
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npr.org
MD Gov. confirms Kennedy family members missing
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan says that rescuers are searching for two missing boaters - the daughter and grandson of former Maryland Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend - after their canoe was found in Chesapeake Bay. (April 3)       
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usatoday.com
Pyramid house in Malibu sells to former Warner Bros. exec
Malibu's offbeat pyramid house has sold to a former Warner Bros. executive for $2.02 million.
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latimes.com
Woman in ICE custody speaks out about coronavirus fears
A woman detained at an ICE detention center in Jena, Louisiana tells CBS News she's afraid for her life because of the lack of coronavirus protective measures.
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cbsnews.com
Congress gave $25 million to help the Kennedy Center weather the coronavirus. Now some politicians want it back.
Criticism continues over the arts center’s decision to furlough hundreds of employees after receiving the federal funds.
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washingtonpost.com
Bruce Willis and Cybill Shepherd Knew How to String You Along
Moonlighting was a master class in unresolved sexual tension.
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slate.com
Supporting the front line: Americans raise thousands to feed health care workers
Just some of the many ways people in the New York-area are supporting health care workers who might be overwhelmed.
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foxnews.com
Working from home during coronavirus: How to avoid burnout
What may have once been exciting and interesting work in an office setting may now seem dull and monotonous without face-to-face interaction, which can signal impending burnout.
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foxnews.com
Photojournalists are risking their lives to capture the pandemic
In a video shot from her hospital bed where she is recovering from Covid-19, Austin American-Statesman photojournalist Lola Gomez described the predicament that photographers like herself face as they cover the pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com