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CAUGHT ON CAMERA: Infected people fall down on streets due to virus?

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Acting ICE chief rips sanctuary policies in NY and San Francisco: 'A clear public safety threat'
While there is pushback against Immigration and Customs Enforcement for requesting information on illegal immigrant suspects, Acting ICE Director Matt Albence said on Friday that the greatest misconception is that they are forcing local and state law enforcement to share information.
foxnews.com
U.S., Taliban agree to sign historic peace accord at month's end
Signing would follow weeklong reduction in violence in Afghanistan and could pave way for withdrawal of thousands of U.S. troops
cbsnews.com
Branson says new Virgin cruise line will overcome coronavirus fears
British entrepreneur Richard Branson heralded his first cruise ship "Scarlet Lady" on Friday as targeting a younger generation of holidaymakers with a range of attractions that he believes will outweigh any fears around coronavirus.
reuters.com
California’s Housing Crisis: How Can It Be Solved?
Friday: A conversation about how housing became the great problem of our time. Also: How a Central Valley town pushed back against an ICE facility.
nytimes.com
'Killing Eve' confirms new head writer for season 4
"Killing Eve" has tapped Laura Neal as head writer for Season 4 of the BBC series.
edition.cnn.com
See Gwen Stefani's reaction when Blake Shelton appeared on stage
Country singer Blake Shelton surprised his girlfriend Gwen Stefani and her audience at a concert in Las Vegas.
edition.cnn.com
American women seek $66 million in damages from U.S. Soccer
The U.S. women's national team players are seeking damages as part of their gender discrimination lawsuit.
cbsnews.com
Six coronavirus cases discovered in north Italy, hundreds to be tested
Six people have tested positive in Italy for coronavirus, the northern Lombardy region said on Friday, in the first known cases of local transmission of the potentially deadly illness in the country.
reuters.com
The week in pictures, Feb. 15 - Feb. 21
Here's a selection of the most amazing images captured around the world in the past seven days. Enjoy!
foxnews.com
Midshipman dies at Naval Academy in Annapolis
Foul play is not suspected, academy officials said.
washingtonpost.com
Fox News personalities come to Neil Cavuto's defense after Trump's jabs
A couple of Fox News personalities jumped to Neil Cavuto's defense after Donald Trump attacked the journalist for his coverage.      
usatoday.com
The American farmer is on the mend
The worst may be over for farmers in the United States.
edition.cnn.com
Why the President is attacking a Roger Stone juror, months after trial
Roger Stone was sentenced Thursday to 40 months in prison for lying to Congress and threatening a witness regarding his efforts for President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign, but the legal battle isn't over.
edition.cnn.com
Vladimir Putin Wants to Stay in Power Until He Dies, Leading Pro-Democracy Campaigner Says
Putin is planning to amend the constitution to allow him to skirt presidential term limits and remain in power.
newsweek.com
Tom Steyer: The critics are right, President Trump won Democrats' Nevada debate
Following the Democratic presidential debate in Las Vegas, Tom Steyer on Friday admitted that the Democrats did not perform well, paving a victory for President Trump. 
foxnews.com
Alien planet is on its way towards the 'edge of destruction'
Experts have been closely watching an exoplanet that is so close to its star, it may well be on the "edge of destruction."
foxnews.com
Winter Weather and Flash Flooding To Hit Phoenix, Arizona, Las Vegas and California
A Flash Flood Watch means that flooding of washes, creeks and other drainage areas is possible within the watch area.
newsweek.com
Donald Trump Jr. Says Mike Bloomberg Has 'spent Half a Billion Dollars to Look like a Jerk' after Debate Disaster
The president's son took aim at the former mayor of New York City's performance during the Democratic debate in Las Vegas.
newsweek.com
Fatal shooting in Southeast Washington
D.C. has had 22 homicides so far this year.
washingtonpost.com
BTS releases new album 'Map of the Soul: 7'
It's finally here.
edition.cnn.com
Republican U.S. lawmaker Collins says he's focused on Senate run, not intelligence post
U.S. Representative Doug Collins on Friday said he still plans to run for the U.S. Senate, despite President Donald Trump's remarks that he was a leading candidate to head the nation's intelligence agencies.
reuters.com
Naomi Campbell: 'There's always work to be done'
At almost 50 years old, the fashion icon and one of the original 90's supermodels is still gracing magazine covers, walking runways and speaking her mind.
edition.cnn.com
Naomi Campbell: 'There's always work to be done'
Before getting into what Naomi Campbell has to say, it is impossible to ignore what Naomi Campbell projects: A kind of surreal, cyborg beauty. She is what I imagine a 3D printout of what a perfect otherworldly woman would look like.
edition.cnn.com
Death of prominent Hollywood therapist raises questions about domestic violence
New details about the death of a prominent Hollywood therapist, and former fiancée of comedian Drew Carey, has raised questions about domestic violence and stalking. Amie Harwick, 38, was killed Saturday at her Hollywood Hills home. Her former boyfriend has been charged with murder. Erin Moriarty reports for “48 Hours.”
cbsnews.com
BERNIE SANDERS SAYS OBAMA WILL BE 'ENORMOUSLY IMPORTANT' TO CAMPAIGN IF THE VERMONT SENATOR WINS NOMINATION
Sanders told CNN that he believed the former president would play a "vigorous" role in the 2020 campaign.
newsweek.com
Starting Five: No. 1 Baylor hosting No. 3 Kansas in Big 12 tops college basketball weekend
The college basketball weekend is led by a huge Big 12 showdown between Baylor and Kansas, plus a Pac-12 clash between Arizona and Oregon.       
usatoday.com
Miles C. Bates' Wave House finds new life in Palm Desert
In Palm Desert, Miles C. Bates' stylish Wave House has a bright future in store after a dramatic restoration.
latimes.com
This Baja island adventure was too easy. Then things got a little too real
A camping-and-snorkeling expedition to Isla Espiritu Santo showed the island's rugged beauty and nature's unpredictability.
latimes.com
What Are the Chances Sanders Has Another Heart Attack Before November?
The chances of another heart attack are low. Rehospitalization is a different story.
slate.com
Hundreds infected in Chinese prisons as coronavirus cases jump beyond epicentre
The new coronavirus has infected hundreds of people in Chinese prisons, authorities said on Friday, contributing to a jump in reported cases beyond the epidemic's epicentre in Hubei province, including 100 more in South Korea.
reuters.com
Naomi Campbell on diversity in fashion
Supermodel Naomi Campbell explains why there is still a lot of work to be done to address representation in the fashion industry. And why the issue she's focusing on next is pay disparity.
edition.cnn.com
She’s Pete Buttigieg’s top fundraiser. He’s the founder of Nest. And they’re Silicon Valley’s new power couple.
Matt Rogers (center) and Swati Mylavarapu (right) are Silicon Valley’s new power couple. | Courtesy of Incite.org Swati Mylavarapu and Matt Rogers plan to spend $2 million to beat Trump and others. Swati Mylavarapu still remembers the $20 check she sent to Pete Buttigieg by snail-mail in 2010. Now, a decade later, Mylavarapu is the national finance chair of Buttigieg’s presidential bid — and she’s spending 100,000 times as much on Democratic causes in 2020. Mylavarapu and husband Matt Rogers, who founded Nest and sold it to Google for $3 billion, are planning to spend at least $2 million on politics this year, a sum that will catapult them into the ranks of the top Democratic donors in the country. Each in their late 30s, Mylavarapu and Rogers epitomize a new class of rising power brokers in Silicon Valley in the age of Trump: politicized, extremely well-connected, and eager to spend their money now rather than later. They are rising to prominence as the prior generation of baby boomers — who grew just as rich in the tech boom of their time but hewed apolitical and more philanthropically conservative — are slowly passing the reins. “I would love to see the billionaires of Silicon Valley spend at least as much on giving back as they do on their yachts” But their emergence coincides with the beginning of an era of far greater skepticism toward tech. As part of this techlash, the public and politicians have begun reckoning with the power of big tech companies, where both Mylavarapu and Rogers worked and made much of their wealth. Many have grown increasingly skeptical of the industry, of its leaders’ influence, and yes, of its money. Meanwhile, the art of raising big dollars for political candidates is noxious to parts of both the left and the right. And billionaires like Mike Bloomberg are on the back foot, forced to defend their fortunes, their charity, and their mere existence more than ever before. So as Mylavarapu and Rogers expand their reach, they also must wrestle with questions of whether they should have so much influence in the first place. Sitting in the airy, sun-soaked living room of their home in San Francisco’s Russian Hill neighborhood — where photo books of Barack Obama lie side by side with reads on Indian history, and around the corner from a wall-length mural painted by a family friend that mixes Hebrew lettering and ornate paintings of tigers — the couple explained their uneasy embrace of big-money politics. “It’s absolutely something that weighs on me. We talk about it a lot,” says Rogers. “[Republicans are] using all the weapons possible to raise money and all the means necessary to get there. And if progressives are going to quibble around raising $2,800 here and there and doing a fundraiser at someone’s house, we’re going to lose again.” Mylavarapu is more direct and offers the philanthropist’s standard defense during this peculiar moment: Is it better for tech’s elite to not donate their money at all? “Don’t you feel like when people have benefited so tremendously by the opportunities that society has made available to them, don’t they have the responsibility to be doing more?” she asks. “Why wouldn’t we expect more of them to do more of that?” The problem is that as of late, tech wealth is funding not just inoffensive programs like hospitals and perpetual charitable foundations, it is also paying to build catastrophic political apps like the one used in Iowa and vague, $10 billion efforts to try and combat climate change. And while Mylavarapu and Rogers are not the richest entrepreneurs or the most prominent figures in town, they must navigate these same tensions as they part with their fortune. Mylavarapu flatly dismisses the notion that she is becoming a “power broker.” And indeed, she is one of many tech figures — from LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman to venture capitalist Chris Sacca — who is responding to the election of Donald Trump by turning her wealth into political influence. “It’s about the work. I didn’t start the Arena because I want to broker who ends up in Congress,” Mylavarapu says of the group, which trains first-time candidates, that she started after 2016. “I did it because we need to flip a whole bunch more seats.” The $2 million Mylavarapu and Rogers plan to spend — more than twice than they’ve ever spent before in a given year — includes $500,000 to the Arena and $100,000 to Vote Vets, a super PAC that backs veteran candidates and which has been providing significant advertising support for Buttigieg this cycle. They plan to spend all of their money by July, hoping to inspire Silicon Valley donors to give their money now, when the millions can go further than they can in the fall since groups can budget more effectively. Rogers, the more cutting (and less restrained) of the two, makes plain his frustration with these peers in Silicon Valley, who he sees as hoarding their incredible wealth. The billions of dollars sitting in donor-advised funds at the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, for instance, is “atrocious.” “I would love to see the billionaires of Silicon Valley spend at least as much on giving back as they do on their yachts,” says Rogers. “It’s ridiculous.” Mylavarapu is the more diplomatic one. “It just seems like there’s a coming-of-age that we’re going through out here,” she says. “If Silicon Valley had hundreds of people like me and Matt, that would be money that was so well put to work. And that’s my hope out here.” It used to be Rogers who was the higher-profile one in the couple, who first met at their Florida middle school. Rogers co-founded the home security company Nest with Tony Fadell, which they sold to Google in 2014. But the political work of Mylavarapu has elevated her to first-name status in the world of Silicon Valley politics as the wizard behind a dynamo candidate who has tapped tech’s riches with unexpected success. Mylavarapu met Buttigieg in 2002 when the future presidential candidate, holding a clipboard, led a group of Mylavarapu and friends that knocked on doors in East Cambridge for the Democratic candidate for governor. The two activists, separated by a year at Harvard, grew much closer as fellow Rhodes Scholars at Oxford. “We were two nerds in a sea of nerds that believed that more nerds should be very civically active,” Mylavarapu recalls. They kept in touch as they built their careers in South Bend and Silicon Valley, with Mylavarapu offering advice on whether Buttigieg should move home from Chicago and sending him that $20 check in the mail when Buttigieg made his first run for office in 2010. In the spring of 2018, Mylavarapu and Rogers visited Buttigieg’s Indiana home, and over breakfast in his living room, Buttigieg broached the idea of running for president. Rogers encouraged him to do it; Mylavarapu was more skeptical. By that November, Buttigieg was on the phone telling them he was, indeed, doing it — and the Silicon Valley power couple offered to host one of his first fundraisers. That February, they struggled to convince 25 donors to show up in their living room. Now, this couple has proven to be the tip of the spear of Buttigieg’s Silicon Valley offensive, responsible more than anyone else for the high-dollar relationships that other candidates say put Buttigieg in the pocket of Big Tech but have nevertheless powered his improbable campaign. When Buttigieg visited Silicon Valley last week for two fundraisers, Mylavarapu and Rogers blasted out invitations to hundreds of their former colleagues, classmates, and new political friends, along with dozens of more personal notes to contacts who they knew might be curious about Buttigieg. High-dollar fundraising demands this personal touch. And so that Monday, a few days before Buttigieg’s events with hundreds of Silicon Valley contributors, Mylavarapu and Susie Tompkins Buell, an older-guard mentor to Mylavarapu in political fundraising, hosted a more intimate event for about 15 big donors who were committed to other candidates, according to people familiar with the event. Mylavarapu made her pitch on behalf of her college friend. These private get-togethers — the meeting was called a “Cultivation Event” — can conjure the image of the secret, smoke-filled rooms that Buttigieg’s rivals, who have strained to keep their distance from tech donors, have tried to cast as corrupt. But when asked about her new influence and that of other tech donors, Mylavarapu thinks of her 19-month-old daughter asleep upstairs and then turns unapologetic. “I don’t want the first president that she remembers to be Donald Trump — and it’s as simple as that,” she says. “Are we here to win this or not?”
vox.com
Robbery looks unlikely as motive in rapper Pop Smoke's death, police say
The home-invasion death of up-and-coming New York rapper Pop Smoke does not appear to be part of a robbery, police said Thursday.        
usatoday.com
Police arrest mother whose children are still missing
Lori Vallow, an Idaho woman who re-married and fled with her husband once police began investigating the disappearances of her two children, was arrested in Hawaii on a Madison County arrest warrant and is being held on $5 million bail.
edition.cnn.com
Spring training features several veterans in new places hoping to be in the majors on Opening Day
A look at veteran players trying to make The Show.
foxnews.com
Richard Branson launches his luxury, adults-only cruise ship
Richard Branson is sailing into new waters with the launch of his first cruise liner, making a bold pitch to younger travelers at an undeniably awkward time for the industry.
edition.cnn.com
Richard Branson launches his luxury, adults-only cruise ship
edition.cnn.com
Rep. Doug Collins said DNI chief job is 'not one that I would accept'
Republican Rep. Doug Collins of Georgia said he's not interested in being the director of national intelligence, after President Donald Trump floated his name for the position, because he's focused on running for US Senate.
edition.cnn.com
Sources: Russia is looking to help Trump win in 2020
The intelligence community's top election security official delivered a briefing to lawmakers last week, warning them that the intelligence community believes Russia is already taking steps to interfere in the 2020 election with the goal of helping President Donald Trump win, three sources familiar with the matter tell CNN.
edition.cnn.com
‘Wheel of Fortune’ contestants guess rarely used letter to solve a puzzle, leaving fans confused
Two contestants on “Wheel of Fortune” missed out on a big trip when they decided to guess one of the most infrequently used letters to solve a puzzle. 
foxnews.com
What questions do voters have for the Democratic presidential candidates?
CBS News will co-host the Democratic debate in Charleston, South Carolina, on February 25, with Gayle King and Norah O’ Donnell as two of the moderators. We’re asking voters across the country what questions they want the candidates to answer.
cbsnews.com
GM upgrades myChevrolet app to help electric car drivers find available charging stations
General Motors is upgrading its myChevrolet app to integrate features designed to make it easier for electric car owners to find charging stations.      
usatoday.com
What to expect from BTS' new album 'Map of the Soul: 7'
CNN's Bianca Nobilo speaks with K-pop columnist Jeff Benjamin about what to expect from the new BTS album and how the band is handling its skyrocketing global fame.
edition.cnn.com
Brother of ex-NFL star Brian Urlacher charged in offshore gambling ring
An Illinois village mayor who is the brother of former Chicago Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher has been charged along with several other people with operating an offshore gambling business. Mettawa Mayor Casey Urlacher, 40, and nine others, including a police officer, were charged with conspiracy and running an illegal gambling business that raked in millions...
nypost.com
Mike Bloomberg's Campaign Outspent Every Other Top Democratic 2020 Candidate by at Least 8 Times in January
The billionaire former New York City mayor has pumped $463.8 million into his self-funded campaign so far.
newsweek.com
Coronavirus: 11 of 13 Diamond Princess evacuees taken to Nebraska test positive
The University of Nebraska Medical Center said Thursday that 11 of the 13 Diamond Princess evacuees taken there have tested positive for coronavirus.       
usatoday.com
Give Iris her body back, Britain
The Brexit-era case for returning the Elgin Marbles to Greece.
washingtonpost.com
Amie Harwick was texting with friend just before police say she was killed
Days before she was killed she told friends she feared Gareth Pursehouse, now charged with her murder.
cbsnews.com