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Opera singer Andrea Bocelli will perform live on Easter from Italy's empty Duomo Cathedral
Like most churches this Easter, the historic Duomo Cathedral in Milay, Italy, will be closed to the public. But over the empty pews, the voice of famed opera singer Andrea Bocelli will echo through the cathedral Sunday as he performs a special concert that will be streamed live around the world.
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edition.cnn.com
The rise of quarantine pop: How two charming breakup songs became unintentional coronavirus anthems
A number of pop songs, including growing hits by newcomers Benee and Powfu, have taken on added meaning in the face of quarantine.
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latimes.com
Mickey Callaway reaches out to Angels pitchers from the Florida Panhandle
New Angels pitching coach Mickey Callaway wants his charges to act as if they're about to begin spring camp so they'll be ready when baseball resumes.
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latimes.com
Wisconsin primary election: April 7, 2020
An election observer cleans voting booths during a Democratic presidential primary election in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on April 7, 2020. | Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images Wisconsin’s April 7 election is still on despite public health warnings over the coronavirus. Despite Wisconsin being under a shelter-in-place order since March 25 due to the coronavirus pandemic, polls still opened in the state’s primary election on Tuesday, April 7. Wisconsin, which has more than 2,000 confirmed cases of coronavirus as of April 5, is the only state out of 11 originally scheduled to hold Democratic presidential primaries in April that has not postponed or substantially changed the way people can vote in this spring’s primaries. Democratic Gov. Tony Evers repeatedly attempted to delay the state’s elections, citing fears that in-person voting could bolster the spread of the coronavirus. But Wisconsin Republicans and the state’s Supreme Court, which is controlled by conservatives, rebuffed Evers. Republicans also fought off the governor’s efforts to mail ballots to every voter and allow ballots to be counted beyond the original April 7 election date. Joe Biden is up against Bernie Sanders on the Democratic presidential primary ballot. Heading into the primary election, Biden has held a firm lead over Sanders, according to FiveThirtyEight’s average of polls, which had the former vice president at 53 percent support and the Vermont senator at 36 percent. Biden, who’s leading in the national delegate count, looks well-positioned to win the majority of Wisconsin’s 84 pledged delegates. A victory for the former vice president would be a blow to Sanders, who won the state’s primary in 2016. Follow along below for Vox’s coverage of the primaries, including live results, breaking news updates, analysis, and more.
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vox.com
New York suffers single deadliest day of coronavirus fatalities
Despite positive signs that the pandemic may be slowing, New York suffered its highest single day fatality count from the coronavirus on Tuesday. Other states such as New Jersey, Louisiana and Florida are also expected to hit their peaks soon. Mola Lenghi has the latest.
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cbsnews.com
Opinion: Mike Gundy's latest ridiculous comments out of touch with reality of coronavirus
Oklahoma State coach detailed desire to press forward with normal preparations for a college football season. That's ridiculous, Dan Wolken writes.        
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usatoday.com
Most Americans, unlike Trump, want mail-in ballots for November if coronavirus threatens: Reuters/Ipsos poll
Most Americans, including a majority of Republicans, want the government to require mail-in ballots for the Nov. 3 presidential election if the coronavirus outbreak still threatens the public this autumn, a Reuters/Ipsos poll found.
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reuters.com
Climate change has made California's fire seasons worse: Study
Of the 20 largest fires that have occurred since the 1930s, 15 have come in the past 20 years.
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cbsnews.com
How Wisconsin’s election disenfranchised voters
A polling official instructs voters waiting in line outside of a polling place at Riverside University High School on April 7 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. | Scott Olson / Getty Images Wisconsin’s election sends a message about much-needed voting reforms for November. Wisconsin held the first in-person election on Tuesday in the middle of the US coronavirus outbreak. In some precincts, it was an event plagued by hours-long waits and a tremendous shortage of both polling workers and stations, prompting civil- and voting-rights activists to call the legitimacy of the election into questionbefore polls even closed. State Republicans on Monday won a recent and bitter back-and-forth with Wisconsin’s Democratic Gov. Tony Evers on whether to postpone the election and further expand absentee ballot access. The Republican-majority state Supreme Court ruled the election would go ahead on April 7 as planned, and a separate US Supreme Court ruling late Monday night meant no extension for absentee ballots — effectively cutting many voters out of the process. Election results are expected to come in by next Monday. This pileup of last-minute changes meant many voters had to make a choice: risk getting sick while exercising their constitutional right to vote in person, or stay home and safe without voting. Where you live determined how your Election Day experience went. The epicenter of the long lines and lack of polling stations appeared to be in Milwaukee, Wisconsin’s largest city, which is located in a county that’s home to nearly 70 percent of the state’s African American residents. “For black people in Milwaukee, the fear is significant,” said Rashad Robinson, a spokesperson for Color of Change, of the calculus voters were making. “The black community in Milwaukee is facing the brunt of the coronavirus pandemic — accounting for over half of coronavirus cases and 81 percent of related deaths.” The lack of available poll workers on Election Day meant the number of polling places in Milwaukee shrank from 180 to just five for a city of about 592,000, according to Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reporter Molly Beck. In the state capitol of Madison — which has less than half Milwaukee’s population — there were 66 polling places open, Beck pointed out. Madison and other areas also had more locations with drive-through voting. Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP/Getty Images Residents wait in a long line to vote outside the Riverside High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on April 7. “The WI legislature, the state Supreme Court & the U.S. Supreme Court consigned these U.S. citizens to risking their lives to exercise their right to vote today,” tweeted Sherrilyn Ifill, the president of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund. “Today’s election is now legal, but it is democratically & morally illegitimate.” Wisconsin’s decision to hold an election in the midst of a deadly pandemic could have profound consequences on American elections, far more than the state’s results. Especially if voters get sick from in-person voting, it raises the question of how states should be preparing for November’s general election, where turnout will likely be much higher. “The aftermath of what Wisconsin Republicans just made happen might change the politics of continuing with this kind of insanity,” said Ben Wikler, the chair of the Wisconsin Democratic Party. Wisconsin’s on-again, off-again, on-again Election Day, briefly explained Wisconsin is the lone state so far to proceed with a scheduled election since the coronavirus outbreak got serious in the US. Many other governors, Republican and Democrat alike, have postponed their elections to not put voters or poll workers in imminent danger of getting the virus. A few weeks ago, Evers and Republican leadership in the state legislature actually agreed they would continue to hold an in-person election on April 7 and encourage more people to sign up for absentee ballots. But as the weeks progressed and local election officials told state leaders they couldn’t hold an in-person election under social distancing orders, Evers wanted to postpone. Republican leaders did not. “As the weeks wore on, the legislature dug into that position, allowing no accommodations, no flexibility for voters, and the governor slowly moved to the opposite side,” University of Wisconsin-Madison political science professor Barry Burden told Vox. Derek Henkle/AFP/Getty Images Elections Chief Inspector Mary Magdalen Moser runs a polling location in Kenosha, Wisconsin, in full hazmat gear as the Wisconsin primary kicked off on April 7 despite the coronavirus pandemic. Evers tried to move the date to June 9, first by calling a special legislative session this weekend and then through executive order on Monday night. Both times, he was overruled by Wisconsin Republicans in the state legislature and the state Supreme Court. Republican leaders in the state legislature gaveled out of the weekend special session almost immediately after it was convened. Then on Monday night, Republicans appealed Evers’s executive order, saying the governor was “defying numerous state-election statutes and his countless previous statements that he clearly lacks legal authority to cancel tomorrow’s election,” and the Republican majority on the state Supreme Court agreed with them. Evers and Wisconsin Democrats were dealt another blow by the US Supreme Court on Monday. The court’s conservative majority handed down a 5-4 decision that required mail-in ballots in Wisconsin to be postmarked by April 7, overruling a lower federal court ruling that had allowed those ballots to be postmarked by April 13. “I think Democrats are going to wash their memories and not recall Evers and Republicans were on the same page a few weeks ago,” said Burden. The practical effect of this back-and-forth is the election went forward with far fewer polling places and poll workers in some cities. In addition to Milwaukee’s number of polling places being reduced from 180 to five, the nearby city of Waukesha (home to 72,000 people) had just one polling place open. There were numerous reports of long lines as voters tried to social distance, and some people waiting in line for hours to cast their ballot. Notably, one of the most closely watched races taking place Tuesday is also one that Republicans have been eyeing for some time. The statewide race is for a seat on the state Supreme Court, which both Trump-endorsed Republican Daniel Kelly and Democrat Jill Karofsky are currently competing for. Whoever wins will secure a 10-year term in the state’s highest court, which is also poised to review a voting rights case that could lead to the removal of 200,000 people from the states’ voter rolls. Voters who are sick — or afraid of becoming sick — will be unable to vote unless they received mail-in ballots and get them sent by April 7. And numerous people who requested an absentee ballot did not receive one, the New York Times reports. “If you’re in line before the polls close you get to vote. Well, how about you have your request in for your absentee ballot and you don’t get it?” Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), co-author of vote-by-mail legislation, told Vox in an interview Tuesday. “That is just wrong.” Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP/Getty Images Residents wait in a long line to vote outside the Riverside High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on April 7. The Wisconsin election was not equal for all voters; those with access to cars and transportation could drive to the polls and in some instances safely vote from their vehicles. And information about such options wasn’t exactly clear. Places like Milwaukee offered curbside voting, but this effort wasn’t effectively communicated to voters, according to Dakota Hall, the executive director of Leaders Igniting Transformation, an advocacy group aimed at promoting voting rights. The lack of information and the last-minute nature of the election changes had a concrete effect on voters’ decisions to go to the polls. Shavonda, a Wisconsin voter who declined to share her last name, said that she was worried about the risk of physically going to a crowded location given the fact that she has asthma. “It’s too high-risk for me to go out to go to polling places,” she told Vox. What this means for the legitimacy of the election The haphazard implementation of this election means that thousands of voters who were interested in participating will effectively be disenfranchised. As Vox’s Ian Millhiser reported, many voters who had requested absentee ballots had yet to receive them as of Monday evening, meaning that people probably wouldn’t be able to postmark them by the required Tuesday, April 7, deadline. According to the Wisconsin Elections Commission, roughly 408,000 absentee ballots still hadn’t been returned across the state as of Tuesday morning. This dynamic suggests that those who weren’t able to get and mail in their ballots, and those who couldn’t physically participate out of concerns for their health, simply wouldn’t be able to engage in this election at all. Absentee ballots in Wisconsin also require a witness to sign the ballot, a requirement that’s incredibly limiting during the current public health crisis, where people are being advised to stay away from others. Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP/Getty Images A woman votes from her car in a Democratic presidential primary election at a drive-up polling place set up outside the Hamilton High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on April 7. “Voters are forced to make an impossible decision today: They are choosing between their health and losing their right to vote,” Kristin Clarke, the executive director of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, told reporters on a conference call. The handling of Tuesday’s primary is expected to hurt specific subsets of voters disproportionately, including black voters, older voters, and voters with disabilities. “Suppressing, limiting, and outright denying the vote to black citizens is a dark American tradition, but this is sadly one of the most egregious examples we’ve seen so far this century,” said Robinson. ACLU voting rights campaign strategist Molly McGrath notes that the effects of the pandemic have only further exacerbated existing voter suppression efforts in the state. “Let’s be totally clear: Voter suppression was happening in Wisconsin before Covid-19, through onerous voter ID requirements, gerrymandering, and attempted cuts to early voting,” she told Vox. “Due to the pandemic, the disparities of voter suppression have reared their ugly heads right in our faces.” What it means for vote-by-mail efforts in the future Democrats in Congress say Wisconsin’s elections are a perfect demonstration of the need for expanded voting by mail in every state — at the very least in time for the November general election. “Wisconsin is a messy dress rehearsal for what will happen in November if we don’t act,” said McGrath. This effort is being spearheaded in the Senate by Sens. Klobuchar and Ron Wyden (D-OR), and House Democrats are also eager to enact reforms. Klobuchar and Wyden helped secure $400 million in Congress’s recent coronavirus emergency funding package to help states start or expand their vote-by-mail capacity. Each state will get at least $3 million. But the two senators want to take that much further by requiring that states set up contingency plans for voting by mail before the fall election, giving voters more choice and flexibility, and recruiting younger poll workers to protect older folks who volunteer at the polls. That could take each state anywhere from $2 billion to $4 billion to do well, experts estimate. Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP/Getty Images A woman casts her ballot on a voting machine at Hamilton High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on April 7. Wisconsin could be a critical moment for the senators to make their case for voting-by-mail reforms a matter of serious urgency, Klobuchar told Vox. With multiple governors of both parties looking for an alternative, she hopes it will convince Congressional Republicans to make changes. “I think this could be a game changer for reforming some of our election systems,” she said. “It’s not the game changer we wanted.” Despite the backing of officials from both parties on the state level, congressional Republicans — and President Donald Trump — have staunchly opposed the effort. They’ve argued that it could open the door to election fraud and weaken Republicans’ ability to win. “You’d never have a Republican elected in this country again,” Trump said recently of a Democratic effort that pushed voting by mail. “Some have made very clear that they are concerned that increased voting affects their candidacies, which says a lot,” says Vanita Gupta, the president of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights. Klobuchar and Wyden are pushing that more money to expand voting by mail be put into the next coronavirus funding package Congress will consider in the coming weeks. But Burden says Wisconsin shows they need buy-in from state lawmakers of both parties for it to really work. “Republicans generally don’t want the federal government to get involved at all,” Burden said. “There’s a huge set of things that have to happen behind the scenes to make it possible. States are going in that direction, there’s just going to be a lot of variability in how far they go and how successful they are in pulling it off.”
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vox.com
An Interview With the College Senior Behind the Iconic Photo of Wisconsin’s Pandemic Election
"It was completely ridiculous to have hundreds of hundreds of people in a mile-long line wrapping around a couple blocks to go vote."
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slate.com
Grocery Stores Are Avoiding Sales and Discounts During Coronavirus Pandemic
Some food retailers are stopping discounts to avoid crowded stores during the epidemic, but a lack of sales could also put a strain on people's already tight pocketbooks.
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newsweek.com
Consider pulling residents from nursing homes over coronavirus, says L.A. health czar
More than 100 local nursing homes and communal living facilities have seen coronavirus cases. Pulling out residents is advisable, county leader says.
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latimes.com
NYC’s coronavirus toll keeps growing as pandemic claims 3,500
The coronavirus pandemic has now claimed more than 3,500 people in New York City alone as the Big Apple clocked its worst day in the month-long calamity. An additional 806 New Yorkers lost their lives to the deadly disease between Monday evening and Tuesday evening, new statistics from the city’s Health Department show. That brings...
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nypost.com
Coronavirus hitting vulnerable populations in the South
Cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus, has been spreading rapidly across Louisiana where the death toll doubled there in just a week.
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cbsnews.com
Kings hope new initiative will convince people to give blood amid donation shortage
In partnership with Children's Hospital Los Angeles, the Kings hope"Blood and Pucks" initiative will increase blood donations amid the coronavirus outbreak.
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latimes.com
Teens have increased daytime TV consumption by 175 percent during coronavirus pandemic, study says
The coronavirus pandemic has forced people to remain home and many Americans are choosing to spend their extra time indoors in front of the television -- with teenagers having the biggest increase in viewing, according to a new study.
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foxnews.com
Healthy Joe Harris won’t stop shooting during coronavirus quarantine
With the coronavirus pandemic gripping much of society and four Nets having tested positive for COVID-19, Joe Harris reassured fans he is healthy — albeit stuck in quarantine and having to find creative ways to do what he’s best known for: shoot the rock. “Yeah, everybody is good health-wise thankfully,” Harris said Monday in an...
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nypost.com
To protect Trump, White House among first to use rapid coronavirus tests sought by communities
Visitors to meet with President Trump are required to undergo covid-19 tests that can provide results in less than 15 minutes.
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washingtonpost.com
Twitter’s Jack Dorsey pledges $1B to fight coronavirus; 28% of his wealth
Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey on Tuesday pledged $1 billion toward coronavirus relief efforts — representing 28 percent of his wealth. In a series of tweets, Dorsey said that the ten-figure sum would come out of his stake in Square, the payments processor he co-founded, rather than his Twitter shares. “I own a lot more Square,”...
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nypost.com
Trump Is the Star of the Coronavirus Show and He’s Loving Every Minute of It
Who needs rallies?
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slate.com
"CBS Evening News" headlines for Tuesday, April 7, 2020
Here's a look at the top stories making headlines on the "CBS Evening News with Norah O'Donnell."
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cbsnews.com
Scores of ‘probable’ coronavirus deaths not counted in NYC tally
Dozens — if not hundreds — of coronaviurs deaths in New York City will not be included in the Big Apple’s grim tally, because victims died at home without being tested, The Post has learned. Luciano Todman — a 28-year-old with no underlying symptoms — died early on March 29 in his Bronx apartment after...
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nypost.com
Fundraising for Democratic convention continues amid coronavirus
The Democratic Party still plans special perks for the high-dollar donors if the convention takes place in August.
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cbsnews.com
Colton Underwood says he has 'made a full recovery' from coronavirus
Colton Underwood is feeling better after fighting off coronavirus.
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foxnews.com
Regeneron CSO discusses possible timeline for COVID-19 treatment
"By the end of the summer, we could be treating hundreds of thousands, if not millions of people," Yancopoulos said.
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cbsnews.com
Officials ‘underestimated’ issues facing USNS Comfort to fight pandemic, expert says
"The original assumption that they could control access onto the ship of patients who were free of COVID-19 was very unrealistic," said Stephen Morrison of the Center for Strategic and International Studies.
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nypost.com
CNN's Harwood calls Trump 'authoritarian' for questioning media outlet tied to China's government
CNN reporter John Harwood suggested on Tuesday that President Trump showed authoritarian tendencies for questioning the legitimacy of a reporter who peppered him with questions about his cooperation with China. 
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foxnews.com
Adam Sandler, Jimmy Fallon perform self-isolation song 'Don't Touch Grandma'
Adam Sandler and Jimmy Fallon have teamed up to help raise awareness of safety regulations during the coronavirus crisis -- specifically in regard to grandmothers.
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foxnews.com
Passover: Ben Platt, Idina Menzel, Andy Cohen and Billy Porter are streaming a 'Saturday Night Seder'
Henry Winkler, Idina Menzel, Andy Cohen, Josh Groban and Billy Eichner are among those who will taking part in a streaming 'Saturday Night Seder' event.       
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usatoday.com
Trump Says He’ll ‘Put a Hold’ on World Health Organization Funding Before Backtracking
Minutes later the President claimed, “I’m not saying I’m going to do it”
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time.com
Ancient underwater forest may lead to new drug discoveries
Researchers are testing new bacteria discovered in a 60,000-year-old submarine forest in hopes that one day it will lead to new drug treatments.
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edition.cnn.com
Don't want to fly this summer or fall? United waives change fees through end of year
On Tuesday, United became the first major U.S. airline to extend its coronavirus travel waivers through the end of the year. Does your flight qualify?       
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usatoday.com
New Jersey couple die alone from coronavirus within days of each other
A New Jersey husband and wife each died alone in the same hospital within days of each other after one came down with coronavirus, according to a report. Alfredo and Susana Pabatao, who were married for 44 years, both died at Hackensack Meridian Health Palisades Medical Center in North Bergen after falling sick about three...
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nypost.com
NYC park-goers threaten to spit, cough on cops enforcing social distancing
It’s dangerous to be a city parks enforcement officer these days. Several officers told The Post on Tuesday that some park-goers are so angry over being called out about social distancing amid the coronavirus that they threaten to spit or cough on them if they try to enforce the safety rules. “They will say, ‘Screw...
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nypost.com
Eastern tiger salamanders, once nearly gone from Maryland, make a comeback
Scientists helped restore the wetlands habitat of this slimy creature with a smiley face.
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washingtonpost.com
DeWine: Ohio should release 167 inmates early to free up prison space
Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine suggested to the courts on Tuesday that they release up to 160 inmates to free up space in the state's prisons and prevent the spread of coronavirus throughout correctional facilities.
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foxnews.com
Mississippi State AD on Mike Leach tweet: No matter context, noose is 'never appropriate'
Athletic director John Cohen released a statement that said Mississippi State was "disappointed" in a Mike Leach tweet that had a noose in it.       
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usatoday.com
Venezuela's rich flout coronavirus warnings to party during pandemic, report says
They whiled away the week on a sex- and drug-fueled romp: dancing on white-sand beaches and frolicking on a Caribbean island with prostitutes from Europe, some snapping selfies with famous reggaeton artists.
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foxnews.com
Gutfeld on a return to normalcy
If there's one adjective that hasn't been used to describe this coronavirus pandemic, it's "normal."
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foxnews.com
Venice building must be immediately barred from running as hotel, L.A. council urges
The L.A. City Council urged the city attorney to push in court to stop a Venice building from being used as a hotel, arguing that travelers put longtime tenants at risk during the coronavirus pandemic.
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latimes.com
Gov. Newsom On How California Is Preparing For A Spike In Coronavirus Cases
The state is building makeshift hospitals in anticipation of a surge in cases, following weeks of moderate growth, Gov. Gavin Newsom tells All Things Considered.
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npr.org
Wuhan lifts coronavirus lockdown, still struggles to recover from pandemic
Authorities in China, after 11 weeks, are lifting the lockdown in Wuhan, the sprawling city where the coronavirus pandemic began.
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foxnews.com
Bankers plead with Trump: Fix small business rescue plan
Problems with the Small Business Administation system have fed the anxiety of small businesses desperate to survive as the country shuts down.
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politico.com
Trump says US may put a 'very powerful hold' on funding to World Health Organization
President Trump signaled Tuesday he may put a "very powerful hold” on funding to the World Health Organization as he lashed out at the United Nations specialized agency and accused it of “being very China-centric" amid the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Alanis Morissette pays tribute to moms with breastfeeding cover: 'Women are just killing it'
Alanis Morissette graced the cover of Health magazine's May issue breastfeeding her son Winter to showcase the admiration she holds for mothers.       
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usatoday.com
El Camino Real sophomore Justin Levy makes face shields with 3D printer
Wrestler Justin Levy helps coronavirus response effort by building shields at home
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latimes.com
Former 'Real Housewives' star Lauri Peterson’s son, Josh Waring, sues Orange County, deputies: report
Josh Waring, the son of former "Real Housewife" star Lauri Peterson, filed a lawsuit alleging he was almost killed in jail, according to a new report. 
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foxnews.com
How Philip Roth’s nightmare was recreated for ‘The Plot Against America’
Sixteen years before the current pandemic gripped us, writer Philip Roth envisioned a different kind of plague. In “The Plot Against America,” aviator and Nazi sympathizer Charles Lindbergh wins the presidential election against Franklin Roosevelt, unleashing a flood of anti-Semitism that leaves families cowering in their homes. That 2004 novel is the inspiration for HBO’s...
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nypost.com