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Parade for 100-year-old WWII veteran goes on despite New Jersey coronavirus shutdown
Neighbors gathered in front of World War II veteran Frank Uveges' New Jersey house to celebrate his 100th birthday with a parade after the veteran’s birthday was canceled due to the coronavirus shutdown.
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foxnews.com
New Orleans Saints move draft war room to team-owned brewery
The New Orleans Saints are planning to hold their draft war room at the Dixie Brewery in New Orleans, which is also owned by team owner Gayle Benson, since the NFL forced its teams to shut down its facilities amid the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Nurses gather to pray on rooftops during coronavirus pandemic
As hospital staffs across the country battle the coronavirus outbreak, many are turning to their faith to carry them through long, difficult days.
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foxnews.com
Jennifer Lopez, Alex Rodriguez go to gym despite Florida stay-home order
There's even a sign on the door that indicates the facility was closed.
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nypost.com
95 percent of European coronavirus fatalities are people older than 60, WHO says
Nearly all of the people in Europe who have died from the coronavirus were more than 60 years old, the World Health Organization announced Thursday. 
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foxnews.com
Cuomo critics highlight years of taxpayer waste, amid deepening coronavirus crisis in New York
While coronavirus ravages New York City -- with officials desperately clamoring for life-saving supplies and federal assistance -- attention has also turned to years of fiscal mismanagement and cost-cutting, despite being one of the highest-taxed states in the country.
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foxnews.com
Savannah Guthrie questions Dr. Fauci’s health over hoarse voice during ‘Today’ interview
America’s top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, was queried about his own health on Thursday as he croaked his way through an interview about the coronavirus crisis. “Are you OK? Your voice does not sound great,” Savannah Guthrie asked the hoarse sounding doctor who serves on the White House coronavirus task force as he...
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nypost.com
Garth Brooks, Trisha Yearwood delight fans with coronavirus concert at home studio: 'The comfort I needed'
Garth Brooks and Trisha Yearwood brought joy to fans with an at-home concert on Wednesday.
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foxnews.com
Grand Canyon National Park closes after first resident tests positive for coronavirus
The announcement on Wednesday follows Grand Canyon South Rim's first identified new coronavirus case on Monday in a Delaware North employee.       
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usatoday.com
Is Zoom Safe and Is Your Privacy at Risk? Video Calling App Explained After Hacking Vulnerabilities Exposed
The California-based video-calling company enjoyed an influx of new users as the coronavirus outbreak pushed countries into lockdown, but its security and privacy policies have come under fire.
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newsweek.com
MLB considering neutral sites for restarted season, Yankees pitcher says
The MLB players’ union has been discussing a handful of potential neutral stadiums that could host baseball games to restart the 2020 season, New York Yankees pitcher Zack Britton said Wednesday.
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foxnews.com
Over 6 million people file for unemployment as coronavirus crisis deepens
The Labor Department has announced that it received over 6 million jobless claims in one week, significantly higher than the previous week's record-setting 3.3 million. CBS News Business Analyst Jill Schlesinger joins "CBS This Morning" to weigh in on what the latest report means for the U.S. economy and what out-of-work Americans can do to help themselves and their families.
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cbsnews.com
Poorer NYC Neighborhoods Are Hit Hardest by Coronavirus
One doctor says crowded housing could be playing a role
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time.com
Coronavirus Mountain Division: Ski, snowboard companies help flatten curve
From the Rockies in Colorado to Vermont’s Green Mountains, America’s skiers and snowboarders can count some of their peers among the growing list of do-it-yourself COVID-19 heroes nationwide. And they’re hoping other makers, and health care workers, can help in their efforts to flatten the curve.
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foxnews.com
Stopping coronavirus spread: Can I make my own hand sanitizer at home?
If you are thinking of making your own hand sanitizer at home, be very careful since there are many recipes available online that can put you in harm’s way. 
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus ‘rapid escalation and global spread’ has WHO chief ‘deeply concerned,’ he says
The aggressive spread of the novel coronavirus has officials with the World Health Organization (WHO) on edge. 
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foxnews.com
Man Breaks Into Zoo Restaurant and Helps Himself to Beers and Wine During Coronavirus Lockdown
Police said the 44-year-old man was charged with burglary after officers responded to Dudley Zoo in the U.K. after an alarm was activated.
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newsweek.com
Gravity Payments employees offer to take pay cut amid pandemic
Employees of Gravity Payments, a credit card processing company, have offered to cut their salary to help the company in an unprecedented move at a time when the coronavirus pandemic has businesses shutting their doors. Dan Price, the company's CEO, made headlines in 2015 as the "best boss in America." He cut his own salary and paid all of his workers a minimum yearly salary of $70,000. Jonathan Vigliotti speaks to some employees about why they are choosing to make the charitable move.
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cbsnews.com
9 Out Of 10 Children Are Out Of School Worldwide. What Now?
Recovery will take years, and other lessons from "education in emergencies" around the world.
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npr.org
Organizing for Sanders in New York when the city’s on lockdown and you can’t leave your apartment
As the coronavirus pandemic continues, the senator’s organizers have found themselves stuck at home.
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washingtonpost.com
Mississippi Now Has the Highest Rate of Coronavirus Hospitalizations in the United States
About 31 percent of Mississippians who tested positive for coronavirus have been hospitalized.
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newsweek.com
Jamie-Lynn Sigler leaves 'quarantine bubble' during coronavirus pandemic to obtain MS medicine
Jamie-Lynn Sigler informed fans that she was forced to risk leaving her “quarantine bubble” during the coronavirus pandemic in order to get her medication for multiple sclerosis.
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foxnews.com
Stocks set for muted open as jobless claims surge 6.6 million
U.S. stock futures pared gains Thursday after the number of Americans who filed claims for unemployment benefits surged to 6.6 million last week in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.       
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usatoday.com
Coronavirus measure in Japan of 2 masks per home taken as April Fool's joke, mocked as 'Abenomask'
The newest measure to contain the growing number of coronavirus cases in Japan quickly backfired on Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, whose plan was slammed Wednesday on social media as many believed it was an April Fool's Joke. 
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foxnews.com
Latest Kobe Bryant book release announced by his wife
Vanessa Bryant has announced a new book created by her late husband.
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edition.cnn.com
U.S. Jobless Claims Double in One Week As 6.6 Million File for Benefits
Jobless claims hit record levels for the second time in as many weeks as the coronavirus pandemic continued to rattle the economy.
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newsweek.com
Rodrigo Duterte says he’ll ‘bury’ coronavirus lockdown protesters in Philippines
Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has warned troublemakers who violate coronavirus lockdown rules and abuse medical workers that they would be shot dead.
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nypost.com
A middle school teacher’s creative way of framing the pandemic for children
I'm focusing on what will help them process what is happening and maybe even help them come out on the other side of this a little stronger.
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washingtonpost.com
Temporary changes in college sports may be needed due to coronavirus, athletic directors survey indicates
A survey of major-college athletic directors says some have interest in short-term changes to pay of highly compensated employees and academic rules.        
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usatoday.com
Jets mailbag: Why trade for Redskins’ Trent Williams is unlikely
You ask, we answer. The Post is fielding questions from readers about New York’s biggest pro sports teams and getting our beat writers to answer them in a series of regularly published mailbags. In today’s installment: the Rangers. Do you think the Jets will still try to pry Trent Williams from the Redskins (for less than...
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nypost.com
A letter to readers
Dear Reader, I woke up New Year's Day convinced that 2020 would be the most consequential year in recent memory.
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latimes.com
Domestic abuse cases could escalate during coronavirus crisis: experts
Domestic violence victims stuck at home amid the coronavirus pandemic and facing economic burdens that the crisis brings with it could experience increased abuse, experts warn. “Something that might have been emotional or financial might turn into physical [abuse],” Crystal Justice, chief development and marketing officer for the National Domestic Violence Hotline, told Axios in...
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nypost.com
Why coronavirus scammers can send fake emails from real domains
Vox Organizations like the WHO could prevent domain spoofing, but many don’t On March 18, an email went out from the World Health Organization soliciting donations for its Covid-19 Solidarity Response Fund, to support WHO’s work tracking and treating the novel coronavirus. The sender address was “donate@who.int,” and who.int is the real domain name of the organization. But the email is a scam. It was not sent from the WHO, but from an impersonator looking to profit off our tendency toward generosity during a global crisis. Fortunately, the attacker revealed themselves by asking for donations in bitcoin. Sophos Labs A scam email spoofing the WHO’s domain. This is just one of many fake emails that have spoofed the WHO’s domain name during the coronavirus pandemic. Some are addressed from Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the director-general of the WHO, and carry attachments that can install malware on the victim’s device. Others announce a coronavirus cure that you can read all about in the attachment. They each appear to be sent from a who.int email address. If it seems like it shouldn’t be this easy to impersonate a leading global health institution, you’re right. As we outline in the video at the top of this post, there is a way for organizations and companies to prevent spoofing of their domain, but the WHO hasn’t done it. “One of the things that a lot of NGOs and nonprofits don’t necessarily understand is that email is a very open protocol by design,” said Ryan Kalember, who leads cybersecurity strategy at Proofpoint. That “open protocol” means that the email transmission system itself doesn’t verify the identity of senders. Instead, senders and receivers have had to organize voluntary authentication methods: Domain owners can adopt an ID system, and email providers can check for for those IDs. But participation has not been universal on both sides. “There are just so many organizations that don’t authenticate their mail. So if you are interested in tricking someone, that becomes an incredibly useful vector to do so,” said Kalember. There are three main pieces of jargon to learn when it comes to email authentication systems. There’s SPF (Sender Policy Framework), through which a domain owner can specify that legitimate emails always come from a certain set of IP addresses. There’s DKIM (Domain Keys Identified Mail), which relies on a unique signature to verify senders. And then there’s DMARC, which builds on SPF and DKIM by specifying how the receiving email service should treat messages that fail those tests (do nothing, send to spam, or reject the message altogether). It also provides a feedback system so that domain-owners can learn about messages passing or failing checks from their domain. Setting a strong DMARC policy is the surest way to prevent domain spoofing, and all major email providers like Gmail, Outlook, and Yahoo, will check incoming emails against a DMARC record. A spoofed WHO email in a Yahoo Inbox. The WHO has enabled SPF but there is no DMARC record for who.int as of April 1, 2020. “The SPF record is a good thing to have, but without a corresponding DMARC policy, it won’t unfortunately result in spoofed messages being blocked,” Kalember said. Sure enough, we ran some experiments with help from Dylan Tweney at Valimail, an email cybersecurity company, and easily placed a spoofed who.int email into our Yahoo inbox. Outlook and Gmail caught it in their spam filters, the last line of defense. We also tried spoofing voxmedia.com and cdc.gov, and neither reached an inbox. Both have strong DMARC policies in place. A test email from a fake WHO address in our Yahoo inbox. A study conducted in 2018 by researchers at Virginia Tech similarly found that their experimental phishing email “penetrated email providers that perform full authentications when spoofing sender domains that do not have a strict reject DMARC policy.” Unfortunately, it’s extremely common for domains to lack a strict reject DMARC policy. WHO is joined by whitehouse.gov, defense.gov, redcross.org, unicef.org, and the health agencies of Washington, California, Italy, South Korea, and Spain, among many others. According to a recent report by Valimail, more and more domains are setting DMARC records, but less than 15 percent of those with a DMARC record actually have a “reject” policy to prevent spoofed emails from being delivered. “The current situation is that not everybody is doing it. So essentially the problem is that you cannot punish other people for not doing it. You cannot just block their emails automatically because you will not receive legitimate emails from them,” said Gang Wang, professor of computer science at University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign. Wang and his colleagues interviewed email administrators in 2018 to investigate the low adoption rates of the authentication systems and found that “email administrators believe the current protocol adoption lacks the crucial mass due to the protocol defects, weak incentives, and practical deployment challenges.” The authentication systems can be difficult to configure for organizations that allow many third-party vendors to send emails, or that use forwarding and email lists. If DMARC is not set up carefully, legitimate emails might not get through, which may weigh heavily in the cost-benefit calculation for organizations. According to one of Wang’s survey respondents: “Strict enforcement requires identifying all the legitimate sources of email using a return address domain. Large, decentralized organizations (e.g. many large universities), will often have organizational units which acquire third-party services involving email, like email marketing tools, without telling central IT. Figuring all this out and putting policies and procedures in place to prevent it is more work than many admins have time for.” The benefit of protecting unknown victims from potential fake emails marked with your domain name may be less obvious than the costs, in everyday contexts. But right now, as cyber criminals deploy coronavirus lures en masse and we’re all desperate for information from authorities, the benefits seem much more clear. The WHO did not respond to our request for comment. You can find this video and all of Vox’s videos on YouTube. And join the Open Sourced Reporting Network to help us report on the real consequences of data, privacy, algorithms, and AI. Open Sourced is made possible by the Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists.
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vox.com
Column: You can thank the coronavirus for a plunge in robocalls
With call centers in India, the Philippines and elsewhere shut down for the coronavirus, many robocall companies have simply stopped making calls.
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latimes.com
'NCIS' vet Pauley Perrette prefers CBS's 'Broke' sitcom to 'that military show about murder'
Pauley Perrette calls new comedy 'Broke,' 'my favorite show I've done,' appreciates CBS and 'NCIS' friends but declines to reflect on 2018 departure.        
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usatoday.com
Review: Canceled, creepy and still funny, Woody Allen shrugs
"Apropos of Nothing" is a mixed bag of rich memories, harsh defenses and tone-deaf reveries.
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latimes.com
Nia Dennis became UCLA's latest internet sensation with Beyoncé-inspired floor routine
UCLA junior Nia Dennis became an internet sensation with a floor routine inspired by Beyoncé. It earned her recognition from celebrities and a verified Twitter account.
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latimes.com
Restaurants offering delivery and takeout Passover meals
These L.A. restaurants are offing takeout and delivery Passover meals including brisket and matzo ball soup
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latimes.com
Gene Weingarten: Confessions of a purse snatcher
An accidental theft leads to an only-in-Washington encounter.
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washingtonpost.com
‘US wants to shift the blame’: China denies hiding coronavirus cases
The Chinese Communist Party disputed the American intelligence community’s conclusion that Beijing hid the extent of the coronavirus outbreak, saying its response was “open and transparent” and accusing the US of fumbling its handling of the pandemic, according to a report. “Some US officials just want to shift the blame,” Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying...
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nypost.com
Biden says he thinks the Democratic convention will 'have to move into August'
Joe Biden said he believes the Democratic National Convention scheduled to take place in July will be pushed back a month later because of the coronavirus pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
The Technology 202: State unemployment websites are crashing amid record number of claims
The websites are ill-equipped to handle the drastic economic downturn from coronavirus.
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washingtonpost.com
Doug Collins rips Schiff's call for coronavirus response commission: He was distracted by impeachment
Now is not the time for Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., to push for an independent commission to investigate the federal government's response to the coronavirus pandemic, Georgia Republican Congressman Doug Collins asserted Thursday. 
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foxnews.com
Zoom CEO responds after calls hacked with slurs and porn
The popular app said its number of users has ballooned to hundreds of millions with people isolated at home under coronavirus precautions.
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cbsnews.com
Heartbreaking case: Healthy 30-year-old dies suddenly
Ben Luderer, a 30-year-old New Jersey teacher and coach, passed away only days after contracting coronavirus. Brandy Luderer, his wife, shares the heartbreaking details with CNN's Alisyn Camerota.
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edition.cnn.com
Out of Work: Jobless Claims Jump By 6.6 Million
More than 6.6 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week. The record 6,648,000 claims comes after 3.3 million sought benefits two weeks ago. Claims have skyrocketed after large segments of the U.S. economy shut down in response to government
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breitbart.com
Record 6.6 million Americans file for unemployment amid coronavirus crisis
A record-smashing 6,648,000 people filed for unemployment in the week ending March 28 amid the novel coronavirus pandemic.
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abcnews.go.com
Tucker Carlson: The propaganda war with China over coronavirus has long-term consequences. We’re losing badly
The Chinese government the messaging war in the coronavirus pandemic as a battle in the struggle for control of the world.
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foxnews.com