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RFK Bridge assault suspect was released without bail just 3 weeks ago
Josue Viorato, the Queens man accused of trying to flee police in a stolen car on the RFK Bridge, was busted weeks earlier in another car he'd allegedly swiped — but was released without bail.
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nypost.com
These are the world's most expensive cities in 2021
Inflation across major global cities is rising at its fastest rate for five years. Here are 2021's most expensive places to live.
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edition.cnn.com
Idaho Will Ban Most Abortions, Charge Those Who Perform Them if Roe V. Wade Overturned
The law would ban abortions except in cases of rape, incest or danger to a mother's life and could go into effect within a month if Roe v. Wade is overturned.
newsweek.com
Kemba Walker benching shows Tom Thibodeau is hellbent on winning a title
After trying and failing in Chicago and Minnesota, Tom Thibodeau is hellbent on winning a championship before he’s done.
nypost.com
Save on the best Cyber Monday golf deals from Stitch Golf, Bushnell and more
If you're a golf lover and are searching for the best deals on clubs, hats and more, here's you chance to score a hole in one!
nypost.com
Scientist who helped discover Omicron variant warns of its potential
The Omicron variant has more than 50 mutations, enhancing the virus' ability to infect the body.
cbsnews.com
Tamra Judge slams ‘liar’ Shannon Beador, tells her to ‘STFU’
"STFU you victim-liar! Not engaging is 'no comment,'" Judge angrily tweeted Monday in response to comments made by her former "RHOC" co-star and ex-BFF. 
nypost.com
Teens caught on camera doing handstands on railway crossing
Two girls have been caught on camera doing handstands on a railway level crossing.
nypost.com
SCOTUS Won't Hear Vaccine Mandate Case from Workers at Massachusetts' Largest Hospital System
Mass General Brigham, the state's largest hospital system and employer, set a vaccine mandate for all its workers, sparking outrage.
newsweek.com
Wall Street steadies, stocks rise after omicron news
The stock market steadied itself Monday following a dip last week due to a new coronavirus variant. As investors await more clues about how much damage the new strain may do, financial expert Laura Moreno Lucas remains hopeful in the market. (Nov. 29)      
usatoday.com
BTS brings boy-band precision, and bedlam, to SoFi Stadium
For the second of four shows in Inglewood, K-pop megastars BTS were joined by Megan Thee Stallion, but the best parts of the concert were the most intimate.
latimes.com
Alleged Epstein victims will testify at Maxwell trial
CNN Correspondent Brynn Gingras gives details on what is expected to come from alleged victims of Jeffrey Epstein as they testify during the Ghislaine Maxwell trial.
edition.cnn.com
Ghislaine Maxwell Merely 'Scapegoat' for 'Man Who Behaved Badly,' Defense Says in Opening
"She's not Jeffrey Epstein. She's not like Jeffrey Epstein" or any of the powerful men, moguls and media giants who abuse women, attorney Bobbi Sternheim said.
newsweek.com
Chris Cuomo Must Go
Andrew Cuomo’s resignation as governor of New York might have been a godsend for CNN. The network faced a nearly intractable conflict of interest: The governor was a major national figure, but his brother, Chris, was also one of CNN’s prime-time stars. Instead, the fallout from Andrew Cuomo’s departure has made Chris Cuomo’s position untenable. He should resign; if he doesn’t, CNN should sack him.On Monday, New York Attorney General Letitia James, whose investigation into sexual-harassment complaints against the Democratic governor precipitated his August resignation, released new documents that show how Chris mixed his roles as brother and broadcaster. The documents show that he was engaged in passing information to a top aide to the governor, Melissa DeRosa, as his brother’s team scrambled to respond to accusations. “I have a lead on the wedding girl,” he texted DeRosa, referring to a woman who complained that Andrew had made an unwanted advance at a wedding.“When asked, I would reach out to sources, other journalists, to see if they had heard of anybody else coming out,” Chris explained in an interview with the attorney general’s office. He said he had only been seeking info about whether other complaints against his brother were forthcoming, not trying to dig up dirt on accusers. “I would never do oppo research on anybody alleging anything like this. I'm not in the oppo research business.”[David A. Graham: America’s Andrew Cuomo problem]This is not the first revelation about Chris Cuomo’s flawed handling of the scandal. Long before the allegations against Andrew, CNN had tried to find a finely sliced solution: Chris wouldn’t cover his brother’s travails on air, and he could confer with his brother on a personal basis, but he shouldn’t deal with the governor’s staff. The Washington Post reported in May, however that Chris had participated in meetings with staff members. He apologized on air, and CNN issued a statement saying, “It was inappropriate to engage in conversations that included members of the Governor’s staff, which Chris acknowledges,” but that he had not been disciplined.The new revelations demonstrate more serious errors of judgment. When Chris Cuomo simply offered advice to staff members, he failed to observe the rules CNN had set for his private behavior. But by gathering information from “sources” and passing it to his brother’s staff, Cuomo committed the more egregious step of directly mixing the journalistic work of calling sources and gathering information with his personal, familial commitments. He was wise not to go further into the realm of “oppo research,” but he still went far beyond the bounds of propriety.Perhaps few can blame Chris Cuomo for being “family first, job second,” as he said in May. “Being a journalist and a brother to a politician is unique, and a unique challenge, and I have a unique responsibility to balance those roles.” Whether that balance was ever truly achievable is debatable, but the conflict between the roles eventually became irreconcilable. He could have chosen to step down from his job to back his brother, or he could have chosen to distance himself from the scandal and commit to journalism. Instead, he tried to have it both ways. In using his journalistic skills and access to aid his brother, Cuomo broke trust with his employers and, more important, his audience.CNN bears some of the blame. For years, the network banned Chris Cuomo from interviewing his brother, a commonsense precaution. But in the spring of 2020, as the coronavirus ravaged the country, Andrew Cuomo presented himself as a competent counterpart to Donald Trump’s pandemic bungling. CNN, knowing ratings gold when it saw it, decided to put the brothers on air together, apparently concluding that the rules mattered less in the midst of a crisis.[David A. Graham: CNN is picking ratings over ethics]The exchanges between them were entertaining—lots of brotherly jibes about who was the favorite child and who hadn’t called Mom recently—and sometimes poignant, as when Chris fell sick with COVID-19 and interviewed Andrew from basement isolation. Journalistically, however, the shtick was appalling, as I wrote in May 2020. Rather than ask tough questions of his brother, Chris grilled him on whether he’d run for president. Again, no reasonable person would expect Chris to hold his own brother’s feet to the fire. The mistake was allowing them on air together in the first place. The puffy news coverage helped make Andrew Cuomo a liberal hero (briefly) and also helped obscure the serious shortcomings of New York’s pandemic response, including deaths in nursing homes that the governor tried to cover up. As it turned out, the rules mattered even more in a crisis, when watchdog journalism could be literally a matter of life and death.Just like the coronavirus, karma is highly transmissible. The adoring coverage of Andrew Cuomo fueled a backlash against his long-standing bullying. A legislator who’d challenged him over COVID-19 said the governor had threatened to “destroy” him. Soon after, a former aide publicly aired allegations of sexual harassment, which were quickly followed by many more. The process took a few months, but Andrew Cuomo’s fate was sealed. (Chris Cuomo has faced his own allegations of sexual harassment. A former colleague at ABC wrote in a New York Times column in September that he had groped her in 2005. Cuomo acknowledged and apologized at the time of the incident and again when the column was published.)When he was advising his brother earlier this year, Chris Cuomo encouraged Andrew to dismiss calls for his resignation as “cancel culture,” and perhaps he will take the same view against calls for his own resignation. But the defense doesn’t stick here. Hosting a prime-time television show is a privilege, not a right. Chris Cuomo doesn’t need to be drummed out of journalism, but he does need to face repercussions. By keeping Cuomo on the air and in his job, CNN would send the message that journalistic ethics are only for the little people and viewers are on their own. Cuomo should take a little time off and reflect on his chosen profession—and if and when he comes back, perhaps he should choose a new beat.
theatlantic.com
Broadway director Jerry Zaks on the new ‘Mrs. Doubtfire’ and ‘Music Man’ shows
Jerry Zaks has more awards than Kamala has apologies. Pre-pandemic, he manipulated Bette Midler through “Hello, Dolly!”
nypost.com
I paid $39K debt by transforming rusty ambulances into stunning mini homes
Samantha has since now bought eight ex ambulances to turn mini homes and they can sell from between $19k-$24k each.
nypost.com
What could Glenn Youngkin as governor actually do to alter admissions at TJ?
Very little, at least in the immediate future, say legal and educational experts.
washingtonpost.com
Review: Benedict Cumberbatch stuns as a cruel cowboy in Jane Campion's 'Power of the Dog'
Benedict Cumberbatch has plenty to chew on as a toxic cowboy in 'The Power of the Dog,' Jane Campion's masterful and nuanced exploration of male ego.       
usatoday.com
Hundreds of seal pups killed by storm at nature preserve
A devastating blow has killed off hundreds of seal babies at a Scottish nature reserve. 
nypost.com
Consumers Spending Less This Holiday Season, But Retailers Are Still Raking in Billions
Black Friday deals aren't the same this year. Shoppers are expected to pay 5 percent to 17 percent more for items like clothes, TV and appliances.
newsweek.com
What’s Fact and What’s Fiction in House of Gucci
Lady Gaga’s new movie tells the story behind Patrizia Reggiani’s murder of Maurizio Gucci. Is it accurate?
slate.com
Tiger Woods says his days of being a full-time golfer are over: 'Never full time, ever again'
In an exclusive interview with Golf Digest, Tiger Woods spoke publicly about his golfing future for the first time since his car crash earlier this year.
edition.cnn.com
CNN says it will have 'conversations,' seek 'additional clarity' amid Chris Cuomo revelations from NY AG probe
CNN was forced to issue a statement amid the damning revelations of its star anchor Chris Cuomo and his unprecedented involvement in his brother's inner circle as the now-ousted New York governor was engulfed in scandal.
foxnews.com
USC fans chant 'F--- the Mormons' during game against BYU, school apologizes
The same day USC football hired Lincoln Riley to be its next head coach, the school released a statement apologizing for fans who broke out a "F--- the Mormons" chant during the Trojans’ game against BYU on Saturday night.
foxnews.com
New charge for Waukesha Christmas parade massacre suspect Darrell Brooks
Prosecutors formally charged Darrell Brooks with a sixth count of first-degree intentional homicide on Monday after Jackson Sparks, 8, died from brain injuries.
nypost.com
New Drug That Helps Identify Ovarian Cancer Is Approved by FDA
Cytalux could help surgeons identify ovarian tumors during surgery, potentially improving outcomes for those with the female reproductive system cancer.
newsweek.com
AP Top Stories November 29 P
Here's the latest for Monday November 29th: Biden urges vaccine action amid virus variant concerns; South Africa sees milder variant cases in young adults; Stocks look for rebound despite virus jitters; Maxwell sex trafficking trial gets underway.      
usatoday.com
Lee Elder, the first Black golfer to play in the Masters, dies at 87
Elder, who fought through numerous obstacles to become the first Black golfer to play in the Masters, died at the age of 87, the PGA Tour announced Monday.
cbsnews.com
Oklahoma picks up pieces after Lincoln Riley leaves for USC
Oklahoma athletic director Joe Castiglione, school president Joseph Harroz Jr. and interim head football coach Bob Stoops combined to speak for nearly an hour on Monday about plans to steady the program a day after Lincoln Riley left to take over as coach at USC.
foxnews.com
The stories behind the homes from your favorite holiday movies
Everyone wants to be home for the holidays. Not surprisingly, many Christmas movies are based around families getting together for the holidays. This has resulted in many of the most popular holiday movies being based in iconic houses. Whether it’s Macaulay Culkin being left behind while his family goes on vacation or Arnold Schwarzenegger trying to get...
nypost.com
Here's What We Know About Chris Cuomo's Efforts to Help His Brother Amid Ethics Concerns
The former governor's allies assisted him with strategizing his case and how to save his political career, according to released testimony.
newsweek.com
New COVID omicron variant concerns media -- because it could hurt Biden: 'The Five'
Left-wing media figures like NBC News anchor Charles Todd appear very concerned about the new “Omicron” coronavirus variant discovered in Botswana late last week – but not chiefly because it may or may not be extensively hazardous, the panel on “The Five” discussed Monday.
foxnews.com
Here's who is joining Lincoln Riley's coaching staff at USC
As Lincoln Riley assembles his USC coaching staff, he's starting by pulling from his former staff at Oklahoma.
latimes.com
Esper says Americans deserve 'unvarnished' look at 'tumultuous' Trump administration as he sues Pentagon over book redactions
Former Secretary of Defense Mark Esper said Monday that the American people deserve an "unvarnished" look at former President Donald Trump's "tumultuous" presidency after he filed a lawsuit against the Pentagon for not clearing his book manuscript for publication.
edition.cnn.com
Md. lawyer sentenced to 12 years for stealing from client
Jonathan Robbins, 59, took $1.8 million from an elderly client, according to prosecutors.
washingtonpost.com
Pistons’ Isaiah Stewart booed by Lakers fans after LeBron James brawl
The first meeting between Isaiah Stewart and LeBron James since their incident didn’t include another altercation, but featured plenty of boos.
nypost.com
How long can Mitch McConnell ignore Donald Trump?
Mitch McConnell would like everyone in the Republican Party to forget all about Donald Trump -- and the last four years.
edition.cnn.com
Andrew Giuliani and wife Živilė Rezgytė welcome a baby girl
Andrew Giuliani and his Lithuanian-born wife Živilė Rezgytė welcomed a baby girl making Rudy Giuliani a first-time grandpa.
nypost.com
Parents upset over mask mandates attack school board chair's child online
Chris and Kelsey Waits describe the the ugliness that followed Kelsey's unsuccessful race to be re-elected as chair of her school board in Hastings, Minnesota.
edition.cnn.com
Manchin slows Schumer push to get $2T spending bill passed by Christmas
Sen. Joe Manchin declined to say whether he would back Chuck Schumer's vow to force the nearly $2 trillion social spending bill through the chamber by Christmas.
nypost.com
Red states are now paying people not to get vaccinated
washingtonpost.com
Mayor-elect Eric Adams has narrowed down picks to lead DOE, NYPD
Mayor-elect Eric Adams has selected three top candidates to be the city’s next Department of Education chancellor and police commissioner and will announce his final decisions shortly after returning from a trip to Ghana next week. “We’re really excited, we have a good problem. The skills and candidates are amazing. We’re right on time. I’m...
nypost.com
Elizabeth Holmes Says Former Boyfriend Abused Her
Ms. Holmes, the founder of the failed blood testing start-up Theranos, blamed Ramesh Balwani, the former No. 2 at the company.
nytimes.com
Iran nuclear talks restart as participants draw their lines in the sand
Iran nuclear talks resumed Monday in Vienna, Austria, as the US warned Tehran against further uranium enrichment, Israel forcefully lobbied against sanctions relief for Iran and Iran announced its "willingness and seriousness" to reach a deal -- but only if the US lifts sanctions.
edition.cnn.com
Journalist Danny Fenster Says Detroit Has Shown Him a Lot of Love Since He Returned Home
The journalist who was jailed in Myanmar for almost six months, was welcomed home as a candle lighter for a Detroit Hanukkah event.
newsweek.com
Why the US government is always shutting down
How the US can shut down but other countries can’t. Toward the end of every year, the countdown until the United States government goes into a shutdown begins. Congress and the president usually avoid it in the final hour, but sometimes they don’t manage to agree on a spending bill and the government actually shuts down. The US is really the only country that does this. The longest shutdown in history, in 2019, lasted 35 days. Federal workers — and many contractors — didn’t get a paycheck for 35 days. Some of those employees were furloughed, meaning they didn’t have to go to work, but more than half of them still had to go into the office unpaid. So ... why? It goes back to the Constitution and how the federal government funds its agencies. We talk to a law professor and workers who have been through a shutdown to explain. You can find this video and all of Vox’s videos on YouTube.
vox.com
Pentagon to Analyze Positioning of Troops in Middle East, Asia-Pacific: Official
The study finished by the Pentagon and discussed by officials Monday revealed minor changes planned to be made regarding U.S. troop placements around the globe.
newsweek.com
Inmate Whose Execution Was Halted Because of Vein Issue Dies 4 Years Later From Cancer
Doyle Lee Hamm was convicted in 1987 for the killing of hotel clerk Patrick Cunningham.
newsweek.com