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Mayo Clinic CEO says group working to predict potential coronavirus hotspots
Dr. Gianrico Farrugia admitted that there is "no direct end in sight" for fight against COVID-19
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cbsnews.com
Maryland man defies coronavirus emergency order, hosts bonfire with 60 people, police say
A Maryland man with a violent criminal past defied the state’s coronavirus emergency order and hosted a bonfire with about 60 people on Friday, investigators said.
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foxnews.com
Pictures of coronavirus' impact across the US
CNN's John King and the Washington Post's Holly Bailey discuss her travels across the nation documenting how the virus has changed American life.
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edition.cnn.com
University Grad Students Step Up To Fill U.S. Coronavirus Testing Void
Universities around the country are revamping research labs to help process the backlog of coronavirus tests, thanks to help from student volunteers.
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npr.org
The 2020 Census: America is down for the count
The once-in-a-decade enumeration of everyone in America has been launched – and pandemic or not, the work of the Census Bureau will go on. Chip Reid talks with Census Director Steve Dillingham, and with other public officials and social activists, about the importance of participating in the census, which – in a time of pandemic – can be fulfilled by phone, email and online. To fill out your census information online, go to 2020census.gov.
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cbsnews.com
Are golf courses considered essential businesses?
As more states place restrictions on citizens' activities during the coronavirus crisis, some golf courses have been able to remain open.        
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usatoday.com
California got 170 broken ventilators from feds; Silicon Valley is fixing them, Newsom says
Amid the coronavirus outbreak, Gov. Gavin Newsom said the U.S. government sent L.A. County broken ventilators, so a Silicon Valley company is fixing them.
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latimes.com
After initial hysteria, Andre Fili mastering shelter-in-place: 'We're just hanging out at home'
Like most Americans these days, Andre Fili has been forced to make some serious changes to his daily routine thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic        Related StoriesQuarantine exercise: Georges St-Pierre, Henry Cejudo, Holly Holm, others share home workout tipsUFC free fight: Relive Tony Ferguson's debut in the 'The Ultimate Fighter 13 Finale'Frustrated Francis Ngannou vents on day of postponed UFC Columbus headliner 
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usatoday.com
Joe Buck gives play by play of Justin Thomas' hair styling
Joe Buck might be a little bored without live sports, so he has a little fun with PGA Tour star Justin Thomas.        
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usatoday.com
Inslee: no 'energy' to respond to every Trump slight
New York Mayor Bill De Blasio gives updates on how the city is continuing to handle the growing coronavirus pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
Whitmer: Many hospitals are already at capacity
Governor Gretchen Whitmer gives an update on Michigan hospitals reaching capacity as the amount of coronavirus cases continues to increase.
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edition.cnn.com
Tornado rips through Jonesboro, Arkansas damaging homes, cars and local airport
The tornado injured at least six people as it rolled through Jonesboro, Arkansas on March 28.        
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usatoday.com
U.S. Counties Without Coronavirus Are Mostly Rural and Poor
More than a third of U.S. counties have yet to report a single positive test result
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time.com
Blood of recovered coronavirus patients could be used to help 'critically ill patients,' study suggests
With countries and companies racing to find a cure for the novel coronavirus, a recently published study suggests the blood of recovered patients can aid in the treatment of severe cases.
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foxnews.com
North Dakota: Images of the Peace Garden State
North Dakota is home to about 760,000 people—the fourth-smallest population of any state in the U.S. It is primarily farmland, with about 90 percent of the land used for agriculture. North Dakota is also home to a recent oil boom, based on new drilling technologies like fracking, which has changed both the landscape and the population. Here are a few glimpses into the terrain of North Dakota, and some of the animals and people calling it home.This photo story is part of Fifty, a collection of images from each of the United States.
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theatlantic.com
Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards calls on feds to send ventilators as coronavirus cases grow
Governor John Bel Edwards told "Face the Nation" that the current supply of ventilators is "inadequate to the task."
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cbsnews.com
2020 Time Capsule #9: ‘That Woman in Michigan’
Just before the 2016 election, and then again after its results became clear, I did a series of Atlantic items on a challenge I thought the press was not prepared for.The challenge was dealing with a major political figure—Donald Trump—who fit no previous pattern of how presidents or other major figures conceived of “truth” versus “lies.”All politicians, like all people, will lie about matters large and small. But most politicians, like most people, usually lie for a reason. They want to avoid blame, or embarrassment. They want someone to like or treat them better. They want to paint themselves in a better light. They’ve talked themselves into “believing” a more comfortable version of perhaps-painful truths.We all know examples from daily life. In the life of public figures, it means things like: Richard Nixon lying about Watergate (in hopes of not getting caught). Bill Clinton lying about his affairs (ditto). Lyndon Johnson concealing what he knew about the worsening situation in Vietnam (so as not to complicate his re-election chances). FDR concealing his physical limitations (so as not to have them complicate his political and policy goals).So in dealing with the political universe as of the summer of 2015—the time when Donald Trump entered the presidential race—the press could start by asking: What’s the reason a certain statement might be a lie? What would a president — a mayor, a senator— have to gain by shading the truth? The related assumption was that people wouldn’t go to the trouble of crafting a lie without a reason to do so. Lies are harder to remember than the truth; they involve more work in getting people to back up your story; they involve the risk that you’ll be caught.What made Donald Trump different was not how much more frequently he lies — though he does so at a prodigious rate. (As Daniel Dale and the Washington Post’s fact-check team, among others, has tirelessly chronicled.)Rather the difference was that Trump so plainly recognized no difference between true and false—between what the “facts” showed and what he wanted them to be, between what he wanted people to think and what they could see for themselves. Some public figures are unusually “willing” to lie; Trump seemed not even to be aware he was doing so. The philosopher Harry Frankfurt’s famous book “On Bullshit” bears on this phenomenon—people who just talk, in a slurry of “true” and “false,” with no concern or even awareness of the difference between the two.Oil painting of Trump at Mar-a-Lago, as I saw it when attending a foreign-policy conference there a dozen years ago. (James Fallows)In Trump’s case it became clear long ago that he lacked the mental filter that alerts most people to the boundary between true and false. He would probably sail through any lie-detector test. He does not care if his claim can be instantly disproved (eg, his “landslide” victory, actually one of the narrowest in history). He does not care if his lies contradict one another, as when he attributes the same “someone told me” story to different sources each day, or rolls out his ludicrous “Sir” anecdotes. He does not care if a lie does him any good—who believes, or cares, whether his uncle was “a great super genius” as a professor at MIT. He does not care that the Adonis-like heroic portrait that has hung for years at Mar-a-Lago would be a source of mirth for most viewers.“The news media are not built for someone like this,” I wrote two months before Trump was sworn in: [We have] as president-elect a man whose nature as a liar is outside what our institutions are designed to deal with. Donald Trump either cannot tell the difference between truth and lies, or he knows the difference but does not care…. Our journalistic and political assumption is that each side to a debate will “try” to tell the truth—and will count it as a setback if they’re caught making things up. Until now the idea has been that if you can show a contrast between words and actions, claim and reality, it may not bring the politician down, but it will hurt. For instance: Bill Clinton survived “I did not have sexual relations with that woman,” but he was damaged then, and lastingly, when the truth came out. Knowledge of the risks of being caught has encouraged most politicians to minimize provable lies. None of this works with Donald Trump. He doesn’t care, and at least so far the institutional GOP hasn’t either. In that item, “A Reflexive Liar in Command,” and then a follow-up, “Dealing with Trump’s Lies,” I set out press guidelines for the time ahead. The first one was: 1) Call out lies as lies, not “controversies.” In covering Trump’s latest illegal-voting outburst [that “millions of people” had snuck into the polling places and voted, presumably for Democrats], The Washington Post and The LA Times took the lead in clearly labeling the claim as false, rather than “controversial” or “unsubstantiated.”... By contrast.. the NYT takes a more “objective” tone—there’s “no evidence” for Trump’s claim, much as there was “no evidence” for his assertion that Ted Cruz’s dad played a part in the JFK assassination. What’s the difference? The NYT said that the claim had “no evidence.” The Post said it was false. The Times’s is more conventional—but it is also “normalizing” in suggesting that Trump actually cared whether there was evidence for what he said. I think the Post’s is closer to calling things what they are. It’s nearly three-and-a-half years later. Everything we saw about Trump on the campaign trail we have seen from him in the White House, including the limitless fantasy-lying.I submit that these three-and-a-half years later, much of the press has still not re-built itself, to cope with a time or a person like this. Or with a political party like the subservient Trump-era GOP.To choose only a small subset of examples, from only the past three days’ worth of history, here are some illustrations. These are words and deeds that, each on its own, would likely have been major black-mark news events in other eras. Now they are just part of the daily onrush.1) Us, and them. Two days ago, on March 27, Donald Trump signed in the Oval Office the most expensive spending bill in American history. Getting it enacted required sustained, major efforts from Nancy Pelosi, the Democratic Speaker of the House, and from Chuck Schumer, the Senate Majority leader, who got every one of his fellow Democrats to vote for the bill.After Lyndon Johnson relied on Republican support to get his Civil Rights and Medicare legislation through the Congress, he made sure that the Republican leaders from the House and Senate were with him for the signing ceremonies, to receive some of the first pens he used. (When Barack Obama signed the Affordable Care Act in the Oval Office, he had only Democratic legislators around him—but that was because of near-unanimous Republican opposition to the bill.)Structurally Trump’s situation this week was like LBJ’s: he was signing a bill the other party had helped enact. But when Trump signed the bill yesterday, not a single Democratic legislator was present. Pelosi said she had not been invited.Every other president has tried, at some point, to expand his support beyond those who originally voted for him (which is why all others have at some point had popularity ratings of 60 percent or 70 percent). Every other one has at some point tried to express the interests of the entire public, not just “the base.” Trump has never done either—and that failure is so baked-in that it barely registers now.Obama used crucial months trying to get GOP support for his medical plan; he failed; and a running press critique thereafter was that he should have been doing more to “reach out” to the other side. (Recall the whole “Have a drink with Mitch McConnell” motif.) I haven’t seen any columns fretting about Trump’s failure to “reach out” to Pelosi or Schumer.2) “If they don’t treat you right, I don’t call.” In this past Friday’s version of his marathon TV sessions—the supposed “health” briefings that have become daily hour-long substitutes for Trump’s campaign rallies—Trump said that most of the governors now requesting federal aid were friendly to him. But not all, and the ones who weren’t “appreciative” had better watch their step.Trump was asked what he meant about being “appreciative.” His answer (as you can see starting at time 24:00 of this C-Span video): “Q. You say the governors are not appreciate of what the federal government has done. What more— “A: [breaking in}: I think the governor of Washington [Jay Inslee] is a failed presidential candidate. He leveled out at zero in the polls. He’s constantly tripping and—I guess ‘complaining’ would be a nice way of saying it… In Michigan, all she does is—she has no idea what’s going on. All she does is saying [whining voice] ‘Oh, it’s the federal government’s fault…’ “I want them to be appreciative. We’ve done a great job… “Mike Pence, I don’t think he sleeps any more. He calls all the governors. I tell him—I’m a different kind of guy—I tell him, Don’t call the governor of Washington. You’re wasting your time with him. “Don’t call the woman in Michigan…. “You know what I say, If they don’t treat you right, I don’t call.” What would have made news about this passage in any other era?First, the naked quid-pro-quo: What Trump is saying about the states of Washington and Michigan is more or less what led the House to impeach him last year, regarding Ukraine. That is: threatened use of federal power and favors, to reward politics friends and punish political enemies—and in this case for unconcealed, openly stated political reasons. Second, the crassness and cruelty. “A failed presidential candidate.” “She has no idea what’s doing on.” Third, the misogyny: Repeatedly avoiding the name of Gretchen Whitmer, elected last year as governor of Michigan, and calling her “the woman in Michigan.” Check the CSpan video if you’re in doubt about the dismissive tone, and recall his references to “Crooked Hillary” and “Crazy Nancy Pelosi.” There was some brief press followup on all these points, but mainly it was normalized as Trump being Trump.3) Lies, lies, lies. I’ll leave to the other chroniclers a complete list of the several dozen lies in Trump’s live-broadcast appearances in the past few days. On Thursday, he went on at length about the bounty of tariff payments that the U.S. was receiving “from China”—which revealed either a black-is-white misunderstanding of how tariffs work, or a Harry Frankfurt-style indifference to the bullshit of what he was saying. (None of the White House reporters challenged him about his tariff claim.)Here is just one consequential lie to stand for the rest: Trump repeatedly claims, and has done so every day this past week, that no one possibly could have seen this pandemic coming, and that everything was great until just a few weeks ago.Of the countless reasons to know this is false, consider this Politico story on the detailed, 69-page playbook the National Security Council had prepared for coping with just this kind of emergency. The exact timing, origin, and biology of this new disease of course came as surprises. But the consequences and choices are ones any competent government would have foreseen.Just a month before the 9/11 attacks, in which more than 3,000 people were killed, George W. Bush received a memo famously titled, “Bin Laden Determined to Strike in U.S.” Many years later, press analyses still pointed this out. For years after the attack on a U.S. consulate in Benghazi, in which four Americans died, Congressional Republicans held several dozen hearings, to determine whether the Obama administration should have been more prepared.In the past few days’ papers, I see no followup on this NSC report. Press standards for covering Trump have already factored in, and thus implicitly forgiven, the corruption and incompetence.4) Repeating the mistakes of 2015. Starting in the summer of 2015, cable channels began running live Trump rallies, because they were so “interesting.” People watched. Ratings went up. And by election day, Trump had received billions of dollars’ worth of free air time. One calculation of the value was $5 billion; another, $2 billion. In either case, a lot.Without this coverage—this decision by TV outlets, to improve their ratings by giving limitless free, live airtime to Trump—he could never have become president.Trump himself clearly views the “briefings” about the “virus” — really, rallies about his greatness—as this year’s substitute for the live rallies he can no longer hold. But the cable and broadcast outlets, as if 2015 and 2016 had never occurred, are covering his daily briefings as they did the rallies of days gone by. For more on why this is a mistake, please see this suggestion from Jay Rosen of PressThink, about how the media could shift to “emergency setting” , and this from the Washington Post’s Erik Wemple on the problem of nonstop live coverage of Trump telling lies.The media were not built for someone like this. That someone has not changed. The media must change.Reader mail FYI potential PS I have no doubt that appeals to Trump’s conscience will fall on deaf ears. But is the same thing true of his fellow Republicans? I don’t know, it may be. But there’s only one way to find out for sure. Obviously we can’t all go marching in the street while we’re doing social distancing. But if we’re all going to be stuck at home isolated and alone – which is exactly what they want – then we need to begin bombarding our Republican Senators and Congresspeople with telephone calls and emails. We must demand that they stop this madman now before thousands of more people die and this disease spreads to the point where it is uncontrollable. If they fail to act -- if they permit Donald Trump to continue one more day on this path -- then the blood is on their hands too. We need to do everything we can to arouse some sense of shame in them, make it impossible for them not to act. Rob Portman is my Republican Senator and I am determined that he is going to hear from me now and every day until he leaves office. I just sent him the following message: How long are Republicans going to wait? "And again, when you have 15 people, and the 15 within a couple of days is going to be down to close to zero, that’s a pretty good job we’ve done."-- Donald Trump, Press Conference, February 27, 2020 https://twitter.com/ryanstruyk/status/1243608448098603014 Will it work? I have no idea. History certainly isn’t encouraging. But I can’t sit in front of my TV any longer watching this insanity. If this is the only path left to me then it’s the path I’ll take. I encourage everyone who gives a damn to do the same.
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theatlantic.com
Fauci responds to Trump's jab at MI, WA govs
The nation's top infectious disease doctor, Anthony Fauci, addresses President Trump lashing out at some Democratic governors
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edition.cnn.com
Gottlieb says coronavirus restrictions should continue
Gottlieb seemed to split from President Trump, who wants to reopen the U.S. economy, as early as April 12, and said it's "too early" to lift restrictions.
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cbsnews.com
Fauci: 'I doubt' US can lift guidelines now
In an interview with Jake Tapper, the nation's top infectious disease doctor, Anthony Fauci, disucces the possibility fo the US relaxing social distancing guidelines
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edition.cnn.com
Joe Biden’s message on coronavirus: It’s time to tell the unvarnished truth
Courtesy of Biden Campaign “We should be telling the American people the truth. They’re strong. They’ll get through it.” Joe Biden’s appearance on Meet the Press with Chuck Todd on NBC Sunday morning was — to anyone who’s followed Sunday morning political interview shows for years — borderline surreal. Due to coronavirus concerns, both the host and his marquee guest were broadcasting from home studios, delivering production values that fell way short of what we’ve come to expect from network television. Satellite transmission lags clearly marred the dialogue at key moments, and while Biden avoided any gaffes, he repeatedly stumbled over words or shifted directions mid-sentence — reminders that for all he’s rode the Obama legacy to front-runner status, he’s not even close to his former boss’ equal as a public communicator. But the former vice president had a clear double-barreled message to deliver to President Donald Trump and the American people. First, the president should listen to qualified scientific and economic experts about Covid-19, and second, the president should accurately convey what they are telling him to the American people. No more happy talk, no more wishful thinking: Just a serious effort to prepare the public for what’s likely to be a prolonged experience and to mobilize the resources of the federal government to alleviate that trauma with wider use of the Defense Production Act (DPA) and additional fiscal stimulus beyond what Congress has already enacted. “We should be telling the American people the truth” The interview’s key moment came when Todd said scientists believe it may take until June before the United States is in a position to start relaxing social distancing measures. “You’re certainly hearing scientists say that and an occasional governor will say that, Dr. Fauci might say that,” Todd observed, “But you don’t hear a consistent message nationally. How would you convey that to the American people, basically telling them, another 60 days of home confinement? That’s a lot to ask of the American public.” Biden did not exactly muster a level of eloquence to match Winston Churchill’s famous “blood, toil, sweat, and tears” speech, but he did have a clear and compelling answer: Tell the truth and trust the people rather than raising unrealistic expectations that inevitably won’t be met, and that could provoke a crisis of confidence in the government and its officials: Look, the American public is really strong and tough. The first thing we should do is listen to the scientists. Secondly, we should tell them the truth. The unvarnished truth. The American people have never shied away from being able to deal with the truth. The worst thing you can do is raise false expectations and watch them get dashed. Then they begin to lose confidence in the leadership. So we should just tell the truth as best we know it. As best the scientists know it. We should let them speak. Biden then repeated his call for the president to set free market dogma aside and invoke the Defense Production Act to broadly scale-up production of personal protective equipment and other health care supplies before returning to this theme of honesty. “We should be telling the American people the truth,” he said. “They’re strong. They’ll get through it.” This is a strong contrast to Trump’s approach, which owes less to the historic legacy of statesmanship than to sales and marketing tactics or the self-help tips of The Power of Positive Thinking. Trump prefers not only to put a positive spin on his administration’s handling of things, but on the overall situation — touting the possibly of returning to normal by Easter and relentlessly promoting the scientifically unproven idea that hydoxychloroquine is a remarkably effective treatment for Covid-19. There is obviously a lot of uncertainty about the coronavirus situation, and it’s certainly possible that the country — and the world — will benefit from upside surprises or technological breakthroughs. But Biden’s two-fold argument is that it’s a mistake to count on such things because they leave the country both materially and psychologically unprepared for the extent of the difficulties we may be facing. Biden’s prescription: More mobilization and more stimulus Todd a couple of times tried to entice Biden into delivering a quote-worthy slam on Trump, or to elicit praise for the president in the interest of national unity. Biden didn’t bite in either direction. For instance, the former vice president declined Todd’s invitation to say Trump has “blood on his hands” but also refused to say that he would eschew criticizing the president. “I argued several weeks ago, we should be using the Defense Production Act,” Biden said. “It was there, I have been arguing for it for some time. If I see something that’s not happening, I think it’s my obligation to step up and say this is what we should be doing.” Beyond the idea of using DPA to increase output of medical supplies, Biden spoke repeatedly about the need for additional stimulus beyond what Congress and the White House have already delivered. He didn’t get into details on the show, but his campaign has called for responding to the coronavirus pandemic with student loan forgiveness, a boost to Social Security benefits, fiscal transfers to state and local governments, more comprehensive action on paid sick leave, and taking a look at delivering additional checks transfers to households beyond the $1,200 per person that Congress has already enacted. Rather than promising people that the country will swiftly get back to normal, in other words, Biden wants the government to roll up its sleeves and prepare to do more. Biden’s found his voice on Covid-19 Biden’s final advice to President Trump was to spend more time focused on the administrative details of government. “You should focus on making sure we’re in a situation where we’re able to see to it that unemployment benefits can get to people,” Biden said. “What is the IRS doing to get the $1,200 checks to people? That’s where the focus should be and it should be laser-focused.” The reference here is to administrative problems in the unemployment insurance system, which is not really built to handle the current volume of claims as well as to the reality that the government currently anticipates it may take months to get the $1,200 into the hands of people who don’t already have direct deposit setups with the IRS. This kind of administrative minutia has never been Trump’s strong suit (see the testing fiasco) and it seems very unlikely that he’ll take this advice. But for those who’ve been waiting for Biden to become a more forceful and visible public presence on the coronavirus crisis he seems to have found his message — listen to experts, tell the truth about what they say, and put in the difficult, granular work to address the crisis.
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vox.com
Ricketts: Better outcome if states manage response
In an interview with Jake Tapper, Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts addresses the coronavirus in his state and how the country should respond
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edition.cnn.com
Inslee: Need to base decisions on 'science & reality'
Washington Governor Jay Inslee tells Jake Tapper that decisions in the coronavirus crisis need to be based on science
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edition.cnn.com
Over a Dozen Tornadoes Are Reported Across Central U.S. Amid Severe Weather Outbreak, Causing Damage and Injuries in Arkansas
Six people were injured by a large tornado which struck the city of Jonesboro in Arkansas.
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newsweek.com
Whitmer: No energy to respond to Trump attacks
In an interview with Jake Tapper, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer responds to President Trump's recent attacks against her amid the coronavirus crisis
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edition.cnn.com
NBC's Chuck Todd to Joe Biden: 'Do You Think There Is Blood on the President's Hands?'
Sunday on NBC's "Meet The Press," anchor Chuck Todd asked former Vice President Joe Biden if President Donald Trump had "blood" on his hands, given the Trump administration's response to the coronavirus pandemic.
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breitbart.com
Tapper presses de Blasio on coronavirus in NYC
Jake Tapper presses New York Mayor Bill De Blasio on his handling of the coronavirus response in the epicenter of the US outbreak
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edition.cnn.com
Mnuchin says many Americans will see money from coronavirus bill "within 3 weeks"
The Treasury secretary says taxpayers who have set up direct deposit will have the money automatically sent to their accounts, while those who do not have direct deposit can upload their information to get money immediately.
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cbsnews.com
Fauci predicts 100,000-200,000 US deaths
Dr. Anthony Fauci breaks down the latest in the US government response to Coronavirus, and predicts up to 200,000 deaths.
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edition.cnn.com
Peter Navarro: Intent on preventing 'bottlenecks' of needed medical supplies, ventilators
White House Trade Advisor Peter Navarro, who President Trump appointed as Defense Production Act coordinator on Friday, said on “Fox & Friends Weekend” that his focus in his new role is on “the expansion of our industrial base and to make sure that we have an allocation of resources in our supply chain so there's no bottlenecks or delays.”
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foxnews.com
Tapper to GOP gov.: Does your state think this is a hoax?
CNN's Jake Tapper speaks with Gov. Pete Ricketts (R-NE) about Nebraska's battle with the coronavirus outbreak as well as President Trump's response to the pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
Travel advisory issued for New York region, as Trump backs off quarantine; US death toll passes 2,000
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edition.cnn.com
Mitch Albom: Hey, President Donald Trump, her name is Gretchen Whitmer
She has a name. It is not "the woman." It is Gretchen Whitmer. And she's doing her job to protect Michiganders from the deadly coronavirus pandemic.        
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usatoday.com
Canadian PM Justin Trudeau's wife, Sophie, recovers from coronavirus, says 'feeling so much better'
The wife of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Saturday she has recovered from coronavirus.
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foxnews.com
At least 8 strains of the coronavirus are spreading across the globe
Scientists have identified at least eight strains of coronavirus as the bug wreaks havoc spreading across the globe. More than 2,000 genetic sequences of the virus have been submitted from labs to the open database NextStain, which shows it mutating on maps in realtime, according to the site. Researchers said the data, which includes samples...
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nypost.com
Antonio Brown and Floyd Mayweather deserve each other
It makes a kind of sick sense that disgraced NFL star Antonio Brown would turn to Floyd Mayweather for a pep talk. Of course Mayweather believes if you have outstanding ability in your sport, you should continue to get paid millions of dollars to perform — despite a history of alleged violence, particularly against women....
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nypost.com
Cuomo needs 30,000 ventilators for coronavirus-stricken New Yorkers: Fauci
Dr. Anthony Fauci said “bottom line” Gov. Andrew Cuomo has to have the ventilators he needs to treat people stricken with the coronavirus in New York as it struggles with the largest number of cases in the nation. “One way or another, he needs the ventilators that he needs and hopefully we will get him...
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nypost.com
Coronavirus cases in California soar past 5,000 as hospitals fill up
Coronavirus cases in California have topped 5,000 as ICU hospital beds fill with patients, and officials tried to enforce social distancing measures.
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latimes.com
Gottlieb says coronavirus restrictions should remain in place ahead of "difficult April"
Dr. Scott Gottlieb, the former FDA commissioner, says the U.S. "might have millions" of coronavirus cases over the next few months.
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cbsnews.com
Busch to give '3 months' of beer to people that adopt or foster a dog during coronavirus pandemic
Dogs may be man’s best friend but beer is also his good buddy.
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus pandemic causes Beethoven's 'Ode to Joy' rendition to go viral
With the coronavirus pandemic ravaging the globe, nearly all live events have understandably been postponed or canceled, as countries attempt to "flatten the curve" and slow the spread of COVID-19. But thanks to technology, the Rotterdam Philarmonic Orchestra has gone viral and bucked the trend.
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foxnews.com
8 killed as plane reportedly carrying medical supplies crashes in the Philippines
A Tokyo-bound plane crashed while taking off from Ninoy Aquino International Airport in the Philippines capital city of Manila on Sunday, killing all eight on board, airport personnel told CNN.
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edition.cnn.com
Former NFL player Myron Rolle on front lines of coronavirus battle
Former Florida State defensive back and Rhodes Scholar Myron Rolle is now on the front lines fighting coronavirus as a doctor in Boston.        
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usatoday.com
Longtime Athletics minor league coach, manager Webster Garrison hospitalized with coronavirus
Webster Garrison, a longtime coach/manager in the Oakland Athletics' minor league system is hospitalized after testing positive for the coronavirus.       
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usatoday.com
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usatoday.com
2020 Detroit Auto Show canceled due to coronavirus crisis
Location will be sued as a temporary hospital.
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foxnews.com
Dr. Fauci Says Coronavirus Deaths in U.S. Could Top 100,000
About 125,000 cases of COVID-19 in the U.S. had been recorded as of Sunday morning, with over 2,100 dead
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time.com
The pioneering doctor behind hand-washing
In the mid-19th century, after studying the mortality rates at hospital wards, Hungarian doctor Ignaz Semmelweis determined that proper hand hygiene could make all the difference between life and death – and his ideas were rejected. Lee Cowan reports.
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cbsnews.com