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New York City Coronavirus Deaths Now Outnumber 9/11 Ground Zero Toll
New York state recorded 731 new coronavirus deaths Tuesday, its biggest one-day jump yet
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time.com
From money trees to hybrid flowers here are our favorite tips for Animal Crossing New Horizons
We're big fans of Animal Crossing New Horizons and our full review is just the tip of the iceberg. As is the nature with any game, the more you play the more you discover. That's no different with New Horizons.
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edition.cnn.com
Pennsylvania's colorful 'Graffiti Highway' is being shut down for good
Pennsylvania's "Graffiti Highway," an abandoned stretch of road that's become an unofficial tourist attraction, is being covered with truckloads of dirt to discourage trespassers.
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edition.cnn.com
See the hilarious way this news station is reminding people what day it is
Fox 8 Cleveland anchor Todd Meany is reminding viewers working from home during the Covid-19 pandemic what day it is.
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edition.cnn.com
Dr. Oz catches Trump's attention as he pushes unproven drug to fight coronavirus
As President Donald Trump flips through the cable news channels, one doctor in particular has caught his eye: Dr. Mehmet Oz, the celebrity cardiac surgeon whose medical advice has been called into serious question in the past.
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edition.cnn.com
Four famous stores that may not survive because of coronavirus
They were once the giants of American retail, strong enough to survive wars, the Great Depression, the Great Recession and the rise of online shopping. But Sears, JCPenney and others may not be able to survive the coronavirus crisis.
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edition.cnn.com
Actress Abbe Lane parts with Palm Desert retreat
In Palm Desert, singer-actress Abbe Lane and her husband, theatrical agent Perry Leff, have sold their golf course retreat for $2.91 million.
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latimes.com
New Coronavirus Unemployment Assistance Guidance May Leave Out Workers It Is Supposed to Help, Experts Say
One expert even called the rules "criminally narrow" and argued that they will "greatly undermine the effectiveness of the system."
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newsweek.com
New York state sets grim record with 731 coronavirus deaths in single day
A New York state-record 731 coronavirus deaths were reported Tuesday, running the total toll to 5,489 — a grim twist following a two-day dip that led officials to believe the disease may have hit its apex. “Behind every one of those numbers is an individual,” said Gov. Andrew Cuomo in his daily Albany press briefing....
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nypost.com
For delivery workers, the paychecks are bigger than ever. So are the risks
During the coronavirus pandemic, companies like Instacart, Uber Eats and DoorDash have seen a surge in demand. For delivery workers, that means more gigs, more money -- and a greater risk of exposure.
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edition.cnn.com
Trump removes independent watchdog for coronavirus funds, upending oversight panel
The move comes amid a broader push against inspectors general from Trump.
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politico.com
Chrissy Teigen showers with her dog and more star snaps
Chrissy Teigen sanitizes with her pup poolside, Luann De Lesseps practices her yoga and more...
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nypost.com
Projected CO2 Emissions Similar to Those Released by Volcanoes During Mass Extinction Event 200 Million Years Ago
Scientists say the environmental changes that took place in the end-Triassic extinction event could be similar to what is predicted for the near future.
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newsweek.com
L.A. author Kathryn Scanlan on whether we're still 'The Dominant Animal'
Kathryn Scanlan, taut new story collection, "The Dominant Animal," probes power relationships in uncertain times. She talks about L.A. and COVID-19.
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latimes.com
'At Home With Olaf': How to Watch the 'Frozen' Inspired Shorts For Your Stir-Crazy Kids
Josh Gad and Disney animator Hyrum Osmond are working together (from home) to bring new 'Frozen' shorts to YouTube.
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newsweek.com
Needed: Not just ventilators, but also the people who run them
As states scramble to secure ventilators during the coronavirus crisis, a potential shortage looms of respiratory therapists — the workers trained to operate them.
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latimes.com
Henry Rollins debuts long-form KCRW show, 'The Cool Quarantine'
The DJ, actor, writer and former frontman for Black Flag has released the first episode of "The Cool Quarantine," a new four-hour show on KCRW.
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latimes.com
NBA 2K Players Tournament Schedule: Quarterfinal Matchups, Where to Watch on TV and Online
Eight players remain in the competition, with Kevin Durant, Donovan Mitchell and DeMarcus Cousins among those already knocked out.
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newsweek.com
Coronavirus scams in India include person who tried to sell the world's largest statue for billions
A spike in criminal activity online has been reported in India amid a three-week lockdown to stop the spread of coronavirus, including someone who tried to sell the world's largest statue.
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foxnews.com
The evidence for using hydroxychloroquine to treat Covid-19 is flimsy
Hydroxychloroquine, an anti-malaria drug, is undergoing tests to see if it can treat the Covid-19 coronavirus. | John Phillips/Getty Images Why experts say we need clinical trials before using the drug to treat the coronavirus. In the rush to treat the hundreds of thousands of people sick with the Covid-19 coronavirus, many — including President Trump — have touted the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine. This has led to shortages of the drug across the country. But researchers know little about its effectiveness against the disease because rigorous scientific studies have not yet been conducted. “The data are really just, at best, suggestive,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told CBS’s Face the Nation on April 5. “There have been cases that show there may be an effect, and there are others to show there’s no effect. So I think, in terms of science, I don’t think we could definitively say it works.” However, as Covid-19 spreads throughout the country, the need for an effective treatment is mounting. And as hospitals struggle with a lack of equipment and personnel, health workers are running out of options for how to help the infected. That’s adding to the pressure to deploy a drug like hydroxychloroquine during the pandemic. Yet without robust clinical trials to verify its potential, the treatment could do more harm than the disease itself. How we could find out if hydroxychloroquine is a good treatment for Covid-19 Clinical trials are the main way researchers figure out whether a drug works — and whether taking it is worth potentially harmful side effects. Doctors in individual cases can repurpose a drug like hydroxychloroquine that’s been cleared to treat other illnesses, prescribing it for off-label use. But even drugs previously approved to treat one illness need clinical trials before they can be used as a widespread standard treatment for another condition. Repurposing drugs cleared for one purpose to use for another also has a tragic history of severe harm to patients. Researchers also don’t know whether hydroxychloroquine is actually good at fighting against Covid-19. Most patients infected with the disease recover with no treatment. So scientists need to distinguish whether the drug is actually helping patients recover faster, or if they are getting better on their own, making sure that what they’re seeing isn’t due to chance. The small sample studies and anecdotes around hydroxychloroquine that have emerged so far don’t cut it. The gold standard for figuring out cause and effect is a double-blind randomized controlled trial. Here, patients are sorted randomly between those receiving the treatment and those in the control group, or those receiving a placebo. To make a study “double-blind,” not only do the patients not know if they are receiving the active treatment, the people administering it also don’t know (thus controlling for unintentional bias). These trials, when large enough, can yield robust results and overcome biases that emerge in smaller samples, like having a certain age demographic overrepresented in the study group. There are now larger studies underway to resolve questions about the effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine, some recruiting thousands of patients. Such trials are especially important because of the scale of the Covid-19 pandemic. Millions of people are likely to contract the virus, and without widespread treatment, many of them will suffer and die. On the other hand, a treatment like hydroxychloroquine could do more damage than good if prescribed to patients without proper testing to see which circumstances make the most sense to use the drug. But randomized controlled trials are expensive, and frustratingly time-consuming in the context of a mounting pandemic. It’s not surprising then that people are scrounging for whatever information is already available. What we currently know about using hydroxychloroquine for Covid-19 The anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, sold under the brand name Plaquenil, is also prescribed as an anti-inflammatory drug for conditions like arthritis and lupus. It’s a derivative of another anti-malaria drug, chloroquine. Hydroxychloroquine is an appealing prospect because it’s already been tested in humans and is available in a low-cost generic form. Doctors in several countries, including the United States, France, China, and South Korea, have reported success in treating Covid-19 patients with hydroxychloroquine, sometimes paired with the antibiotic azithromycin. But these are anecdotes that don’t offer much insight into how effective the drug could be in a wider population. A laboratory study of hydroxychloroquine showed that it could prevent SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind Covid-19, from entering cells in a petri dish. While it shows a plausible mechanism for the drug, the effects on cells in a dish can be different than in living people. Human trials of hydroxychloroquine, by contrast, have so far yielded mixed results. A tiny study by researchers in France found that the drug could clear the infection in a few days. But the study sample included only 36 patients, and the trial wasn’t randomized, meaning the administrators were deliberately picking which patients received the treatment, potentially skewing the results. Other studies have been even less promising.A study in China found that hydroxychloroquine was no better than standard medical treatments without the drug. This study was also small, 30 patients, but the treatment was randomized. Another study in France among 11 patients found that hydroxychloroquine was ineffective at best, with one patient dying, two transferred to an intensive care unit, and one patient who experienced a dangerous heart problem and had the hydroxychloroquine treatment stopped early. In Sweden, some hospitals have stopped offering the drug after some patients reported seizures and blurred vision. The listed side effects of hydroxychloroquine are long and well-known. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reported problems like irreversible retinal damage, cardiac arrhythmias, muscle weakness, and a severe drop in blood sugar. There are psychiatric effects as well, including insomnia, nightmares, hallucinations, and suicidal ideation. The drug can also have harmful interactions with medicines used to treat diabetes, epilepsy, and heart problems. These side effects are a big reason why the World Health Organization no longer recommends hydroxychloroquine as the routine treatment for malaria. High blood pressure and diabetes, for example, already make the infected more likely to suffer severely from Covid-19. So a treatment like hydroxychloroquine could worsen those underlying conditions, or could result in a dangerous interaction with the medicines used to treat those conditions. Some health workers have been hoarding hydroxychloroquine as a means to ward off the illness. Several patients who need the drug for approved uses have reported trouble getting their prescriptions filled. But there’s no evidence that the drug works as a prophylactic for Covid-19. Some of the rules for drugs like hydroxychloroquine have now been relaxed to allow doctors to experiment with treatments for patients in dire need during the pandemic. The FDA has granted emergency use authorization of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine to fight Covid-19. But expanding the use of these drugs to sick but not critical patients still warrants further testing due to the potential side effects. More than 50 clinical trials for the drug are now planned or underway around the world. But while randomized controlled trials do help health workers figure out how to safely deploy drugs, they don’t guarantee the drug will work for everyone, nor will they eliminate risks completely.
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vox.com
James Carafano: Coronavirus detente? US, China stepping back from pandemic name-calling
China has every reason to ramp down the blame game.
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foxnews.com
Israeli security agency says it arrested alleged Iran spy
Israel’s domestic security agency says it has arrested an Israeli citizen alleged to have spied for Iran
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abcnews.go.com
Harry and Meghan launching new charitable organization called Archewell
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex have revealed plans to launch a charitable organization called Archewell.
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edition.cnn.com
Priyanka Chopra: Festival will pressure companies to fight virus
Actress and philanthropist Priyanka Chopra Jonas speaks with Gayle King about her role in the event.
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cbsnews.com
German court proposes ending trial over fatal music festival
A German court has proposed ending a criminal trial resulting from a fatal mass panic at the 2010 Love Parade techno music festival because of questions over when the proceedings can resume due to the coronavirus pandemic
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washingtonpost.com
7-year-old piano prodigy Stelios Kerasidis pens ‘Isolation Waltz’
While most kids staying at home are driving their parents nuts, this piano prodigy in Nea Makri, Greece, is writing classical music. Meet 7-year-old Stelios Kerasidis, an award-winning piano prodigy, who began playing at the age of 2. The whiz kid is dedicating his latest composition, “Isolation Waltz,” to the world. “Let’s all be a...
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nypost.com
Rams and Chargers to double up on 'Hard Knocks' if there's an NFL preseason
If the NFL has a preseason — a big 'if' amid the coronavirus — the Los Angeles Rams and Chargers will be featured on HBO's 'Hard Knocks,' according to individuals familiar with the discussions.
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latimes.com
David Benham arrested outside North Carolina abortion clinic: 'It's government overreach'
Conservative activist David Benham was arrested Saturday for sidewalk counseling outside a North Carolina abortion clinic despite a stay-at-home order amid the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Comedians find new ways to their audience amid the coronavirus outbreak
The jokes are still out there just waiting to be heard.
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edition.cnn.com
Boris Johnson Is Unable to Govern While He Battles COVID-19. Here’s How the U.K. Is Running Without Him
U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is in intensive care with COVID-19, making him the first world leader to be forced to take a break from their role because of the coronavirus. On Tuesday, a spokesperson said he was in a stable condition and not on a ventilator. But he is taking time off from the…
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time.com
Demi Moore, Bruce Willis reunite to self-isolate with their daughters amid the coronavirus pandemic
Demi Moore is self-quarantining with ex-husband Bruce Willis and their daughters amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
William McGurn: Coronavirus crisis – Here's how we get our lives back
A partial reopening of the economy wouldn’t be perfect. But it’d be a huge step forward.
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foxnews.com
Grisham out as Trump's press secretary without having held a briefing
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edition.cnn.com
UCLA leading scorer Chris Smith declares for NBA draft
UCLA guard Chris Smith, who was the Pac-12's most improved player this season, announced Tuesday his intention to enter the NBA draft.
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latimes.com
Florence Pugh gives boyfriend Zach Braff an Instagram birthday shoutout
The "Scrubs" star turned 45 on Monday.
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nypost.com
What's open and closed this week? Trails, parks and beaches in Southern California
Amid coronavirus pandemic, these destinations have restrictions in place.
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latimes.com
Kourtney Kardashian is a ‘Tiger Queen’ in $3,600 gown
Joe Exotic had better watch his back.
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nypost.com
Keep your cats inside: Outdoor cats don't go far, but they kill a lot of wildlife, study finds
Researchers tracked the movements of nearly 1,000 outdoor cats and found while they don't venture far they can do a lot of ecological damage.       
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usatoday.com
3 murders in NYC over 24 hours disturbs peace amid coronavirus isolation
The city logged three murders over a 24-hour period — a stark turn-around from the relative peace Gotham has seen as residents isolate to stanch the spread of coronavirus. By contrast, just eight murders were reported across the Big Apple for the four weeks between March 16 and April 5, according to public data. The streak...
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nypost.com
Work. Kids. A global pandemic. Six tips from experts on how to handle it all
Many workers have taken on new roles recently: remote worker, caregiver and teacher.
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edition.cnn.com
Governor Cuomo working on plans to "restart" life and economy in New York
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo says widespread testing for the coronavirus will be key to a plan to start reopening the economy once the worst of the outbreak has passed. He said the state budget has been "decimated" and will need federal help. Watch his remarks.
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cbsnews.com
Coronavirus outbreak at Virginia nursing facility leaves dozens dead
The coronavirus-related death toll at the facility rose to 28.
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foxnews.com
When It Feels Like the World Is Ending, Start Watching No Tomorrow
The CW comedy set at an Amazon-style fulfillment center takes place in the shadow of the apocalypse ... maybe.
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slate.com
Jeff Bezos tops Forbes list of billionaires, again
Not even a nearly $40 billion divorce can topple Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos from being the world's richest person.
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edition.cnn.com
Travel limits are forcing Wuhan farmers to dump their crops
HUANGPI, China — Stuck in the same bind as many other Chinese farmers whose crops are rotting in their fields, Jiang Yuewu is preparing to throw out a 500-ton harvest of lotus root because anti-coronavirus controls are preventing traders from getting to his farm near Wuhan, where the global pandemic started. Chinese leaders are eager...
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nypost.com
Wisconsin primary polls open, long lines form amid concerns about coronavirus exposure
Polls are open and long lines have already formed in urban areas in Wisconsin as the state becomes the first in the nation to hold in-person primary voting during the height of the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
COVID-19 test backlog leaves tens of thousands in "constant worry"
Quest Diagnostics tells CBS News it is still working to clear 80,000 tests it is behind on, down from 160,000 nearly two weeks prior.
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cbsnews.com
Scientists find massive 'silly string' creature in deep sea
Scientists at the Schmidt Ocean Institute captured footage of a massive siphonophore in the Indian Ocean.
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edition.cnn.com