Generally
General
628
unread news
unread news
Critical week ahead to fix initial roadblocks to coronavirus relief package
The success of the multi-trillion-dollar life raft that was floated into the cascading waves of business closures, job losses and the virtual shutdown of the US economy will likely be determined this week.
1m
edition.cnn.com
What Is Dalgona Coffee and How To Make This Whipped Coffee Treat at Home With Ease
You probably already have the four ingredients.
1m
newsweek.com
'Animal Crossing: New Horizons' Update 1.1.4 Reduces Amount of Eggs Found Until Easter - Patch Notes
Hopefully there are less Sea Eggs caught.
1m
newsweek.com
'Tiger King' character says the show is coming back
Jeff Lowe of the Netflix series "Tiger King" was seen in a Twitter video announcing an additional episode of the series set to air "next week." Netflix has not confirmed the episode.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Lonely 4-year-old sings 'All By Myself' in quarantine
The coronavirus quarantine is getting to 4-year-old Bryson and his mom caught a video of him singing "All By Myself" while he made a sandwich.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Argument erupts between Fauci, Trump aide over coronavirus drug: report
A fight broke out in the White House Situation Room over the weekend between Dr. Anthony Fauci and another member of President Trump’s coronavirus task force, with the exchange getting so intense that Vice President Mike Pence and others were left trying to calm down the country’s trade czar, according to a report. The argument,...
1m
nypost.com
In A Pandemic, The Paupers Of Professional Baseball Are Getting Help
With sports leagues on hiatus due to the coronavirus, most athletes are still getting paid. But not all. Minor League Baseball players have no guaranteed pay when they're not playing regular season.
1m
npr.org
Britain Finds its Way (Helped by the Queen)
Perhaps a testament to how close Britain has come to losing its way is the fact that it took a pandemic, an emergency of foggy complexity, for the country to get back on its path. This was a weekend that felt defining, not just for the immediate story, the coronavirus, but for British politics—and for Britain itself.It was not a good weekend. Prime Minister Boris Johnson was hospitalized, and Britain’s death toll jumped as another 621 people died over 24 hours. The gravity of the situation moved the Queen to deliver an emergency address to the nation, something she has done only a handful of times in her 68-year reign. This was not a weekend in which Britain reached, or even caught a glimpse of, the peak of the coronavirus outbreak—never mind found a route back down from it and off the mountain.Instead, the weekend was momentous because of the reemergence of something fundamental to the country, how it functions and sees itself—its core, institutional strength. These were 48 hours in which Britain reasserted its foundational stability, and in doing so made real change more likely once this is all over.The weekend was defined by three profoundly important moments. The first came on Saturday morning, when the Labour Party elected Keir Starmer its new leader, replacing Jeremy Corbyn as the official head of the opposition. The second and third are more obvious but no less profound, and came in disorientingly quick succession on Sunday night as the Queen attempted to reassure the nation at 8 p.m.—an hour before news broke that her 14th prime minister had been taken to the hospital.As long as Johnson recovers fully and quickly, Starmer’s election has the potential to be more consequential than either of the other two events, even if those are more immediately defining. Starmer’s elevation is of deep importance on a number of levels. First, after years of appalling ineptitude and moral vacuity under Corbyn’s catastrophic leadership, Britain’s opposition will be led by a credible alternative prime minister whose competence, professionalism, and patriotism are unquestioned. The government can now be held to account.Corbyn’s replacement is important not just for the Labour Party, but for the country. The former leader’s politics meant that effective collaboration with Johnson’s Conservative Party was impossible, even in areas where the parties shared consensus. Corbyn’s refusal to appear alongside then-Prime Minister David Cameron in the campaign against Brexit was emblematic of this, as was his subsequent refusal to play ball with Theresa May as she sought to introduce a “soft” form of Brexit with Labour’s support. That then paved the way for Johnson’s emergence as prime minister—and Labour’s crushing defeat at a general election in December.But the importance of this moment is rooted in more than effective opposition. Starmer is left-wing, perhaps radically so on the American spectrum, but he is not a teenage revolutionary. Taxes would go up under his leadership, foreign policy would be more idealistic, Britain would tilt more toward Europe. But he would be recognizable. It is hard to overstate how unrecognizable Corbyn was. For much of his life, until being catapulted into the position of Labour leader, he was a fringe figure even on the political fringes, driven by the moral anti-imperialism of the Cold War radical left, which saw him line up with every enemy of the West—and Britain—imaginable. He was a question mark over Britain. Take one small example: Corbyn had, to his eternal shame, allowed anti-Semitism to raise its head in the British left. Starmer’s first act as leader was to apologize on behalf of the Labour Party. By Sunday morning, the return to institutional normality was clear. Starmer, appearing on the BBC’s flagship political program, The Andrew Marr Show, broke with the Corbynite position, offering “constructive engagement” with the government. “We’ve all got a duty here to save lives and protect our country,” he said. A boring statement, but almost revolutionary after the Corbyn years.The leader of the opposition is a pillar of the British establishment, a role that is required for the system to work. Starmer holds special privileges, is allowed to keep state secrets, is awarded particular prestige, and gets additional funding. It is a staging post to become prime minister, though many, even most, don’t make it. It sits alongside other individual positions, instrumental to the functioning of the British state: the speaker of the House of Commons, the archbishop of Canterbury, the chief of the defence staff, the prime minister, and the monarch. On Sunday, the final two came to the fore.Longevity, the simple fact of time, gives the Queen an unmatched presence in British life. The way she has personally sought to carry out the role has added a power and solemnity to the position. Because she rarely intervenes—and never politically—each time she does carries weight. Last night, she made a special address to the nation for the first time since her diamond jubilee in 2012, itself the first time she had formally spoken out since her mother’s death in 2002. Before that, 1997 was the last time she had done so, because of an event so grave it was deemed necessary—the death of Diana, Princess of Wales. That she chose to again during this pandemic had the perverse effect of making the situation feel even more solemn.In hindsight, the two weeks of national lockdown preceding the Queen’s address were marked by an unnerving void. The prime minister, even before last night’s news, had been in self-isolation for more than a week after contracting the coronavirus. The health secretary had also caught it, along with the chief medical officer—the principal adviser informing the prime minister on his strategy. Meanwhile, the Labour Party was waiting for its interminable leadership process to reach its conclusion. All the while, the death toll was climbing ever closer to the hidden peak. The timing of the Queen’s intervention was crucial.Dressed in green and speaking from an ornate study inside Windsor Castle, the Queen set the crisis alongside the national struggle during the Second World War. She said she wanted to offer reassurance that if the country remained “united and resolute,” it would overcome this latest obstacle. “I hope in the years to come, everyone will be able to take pride in how they responded to this challenge,” she said. It was an old-fashioned call to arms. She finished, though, with hope. Although we will have more to endure in the coming weeks, she said, better days will return: “We will be with our friends again; we will be with our families again; we will meet again.” The payoff was a conscious nod to what had become the anthem of the Second World War, “We’ll Meet Again,” by Vera Lynn: “Don't know where / Don't know when / But I know we'll meet again some sunny day.”The Queen is the only public figure able to personally link the current fight against the pandemic to the Second World War, the prior struggle that still defines the country, at least in its own perception. The message was well pitched, nodding to the young and old, frontline and staying-at-home. It cast her as a spiritual leader, more than merely figurative.The message would soon be overshadowed by the news of the prime minister’s hospitalization, a question mark placed at the very heart of the state’s response to the crisis. Yet, as true as that is, this weekend nevertheless offered a tentative sense that the institutions and positions of state were not jamming, but clicking into gear, even if they remain old, grinding, and archaic. The National Health Service appears to be rising to the task, the military has been deployed, the BBC has found its voice after years of unease, and the political institutions—torn apart by the financial crash, Brexit, and Corbynism—have refound something of a common set of rules and purpose.The establishment is back. And British politics has some measure of its old self back. Both will be needed again soon, for once this immediate medical crisis is over, an economic one will emerge. Real change may soon follow.
1m
theatlantic.com
As coronavirus swamps India, hospitals turn away other sick people
Families say hospitals are rationing medical care for other life-threatening illnesses as India mobilizes its resources to fight the coronavirus.
1m
latimes.com
U.S. Supreme Court declines to hear religious clash on Washington transit ads
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a religious rights dispute brought by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington against the Washington area transit authority over its policy against allowing advertisements in its stations and on buses and trains on divisive issues including religion.
1m
reuters.com
The Coronavirus Crisis Threatens 2020 Voting Rights, Abortion, Other Civil Liberties, Watchdogs Say
Civil rights activists see danger in the choices being made between safety and liberty.
1m
newsweek.com
Lionel Richie remembers his friend Kenny Rogers in ACM concert
Some of country music's biggest names came together to celebrate the late Kenny Rogers on Sunday night.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Anne Tyler’s ‘Redhead by the Side of the Road’ is light on drama. Not that we could handle more drama now anyway.
Micah Mortimer is a milquetoast protagonist with a predictably quirky family.
1m
washingtonpost.com
U.S. Coronavirus Death Toll Could Be Highest in the World Within a Week
The daily death toll in the U.S. has surpassed that of Italy's for several days and its total death count could potentially reach nearly 40,000 in about a week, according to new projections.
1m
newsweek.com
Why Donald Trump's firing of the Intelligence Community IG is so, so egregious
President Donald Trump fired Michael Atkinson, the inspector general of the intelligence community, late on a Friday night amid the coronavirus pandemic in hopes that you wouldn't know what he did. Or you'd note it in passing, and then quickly move on to other pressing worries like, well, the coronavirus and its impact on the US economy.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Rex Ryan draws ire of McCourty twins after Amari Cooper ‘turd’ rant on ESPN
The McCourty brothers weren’t fond of how ESPN handled Rex Ryan’s outburst toward Cowboys wide receiver Amari Cooper. Ryan, 57, caused a stir last week when he criticized the Cowboys’ decision to give Cooper a five-year, $100 million contract extension earlier this offseason before referring to the four-time Pro Bowler as a “turd” during an...
1m
nypost.com
NPR Names Poynter's Kelly McBride As Sixth Public Editor
Media ethicist Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute has been named NPR's sixth public editor, an in-house advocate for listeners and newsroom watchdog.
1m
npr.org
'Doctors disagree all the time': Navarro drags Fauci feud into the public
The clash focused on the efficacy a controversial potential treatment for the coronavirus.
1m
politico.com
Trump threatens OPEC, Russia with tariffs
OPEC meeting postponed — DOE's 'alternative financing mechanism' for SPR
1m
politico.com
How to make substitutions for spices, herbs, dairy and meat in your everyday cooking
Pep talk: Your food will turn out just fine.
1m
washingtonpost.com
To the rescue, states
No bailout for cruises — Welcome, online tool
1m
politico.com
Ariana Grande surprises quarantined fans with ‘virtual love’ song
"My Everything" was dedicated to the fans.
1m
nypost.com
A summer without a superhero
The coronavirus pandemic makes caped crusaders seem powerless.
1m
washingtonpost.com
New York artists share tips with Californians on how to stay sane in crazy times
They were among the first to be furloughed. Now three Metropolitan Opera performers share their survival guide for those facing similar challenges.
1m
latimes.com
States weigh mobile voting
EAC tries to speed up election grant distribution — Interpol warns of ransomware attacks on health care networks
1m
politico.com
'There will be death': Hard week looms on coronavirus
Trump stays focused on unproven hydroxychloroquine — Tens of millions of Americans could lose private insurance
1m
politico.com
How coronavirus is affecting campaign fundraising
Wisconsin voting still on for Tuesday, despite pleas to postpone — House Majority PAC makes fall reservations
1m
politico.com
What’s next for airline aid
How cruise companies created their own predicament — An infrastructure 'will they or won’t they'
1m
politico.com
VA officially pauses EHR project
Tech companies roll out new coronavirus tools — A new reporting mandate in California
1m
politico.com
Zoom looks to reframe its narrative in the Beltway
Pandemic threatens STEM talent — Health care companies get antitrust OK
1m
politico.com
113 straight months of economic growth halted
Small business loan program has shaky start — New unemployment benefits give low-wage workers a boost
1m
politico.com
‘Aliens’ actor Jay Benedict dead at 68 from coronavirus
Actor Jay Benedict, who appeared in “Aliens” and “The Dark Knight Rises,” is the latest celebrity to die from the coronavirus. He was 68. “It is with profound sorrow that we must announce Jay’s death on the 4th of April due to complications arising from a COVID-19 infection,” his official website announced. His agency, TSG,...
1m
nypost.com
Food system faces ‘tsunami’ of changing demand
FDA rolls back egg regs — Dairy marriage open to objections
1m
politico.com
Trump bars 'unscrupulous' medical goods exports
Food system faces 'tsunami' of change due to pandemic — Mexico, Canada ready for USMCA to take effect
1m
politico.com
Roosevelt scandal heats up
Intelligence IG cashiered — Senate nuke ‘hearing’ this week
1m
politico.com
First Look: DeVos to announce new waiver flexibility for existing K-12 funds
Trump to nominate DOJ lawyer as Education Department’s top watchdog — Teachers’ control over course content in U.S., compared to other countries, a disadvantage during crisis, expert says
1m
politico.com
The cutest, coziest slippers to get you through the rest of quarantine
At this point, you're either living in your favorite house slippers, or desperately looking for a new pair. We rounded up our favorites from Ugg, Zappos, Nordstrom and more.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Mating flies preserved in amber have been doing it for 41 million years
Have you ever been caught in the act? You know the act I mean. I mean when someone walks in on you and your significant other during a beautiful moment of physical… activity. If you have, you know how traumatizing it can be, so just imagine the plight of these two flies which have spent...
1m
nypost.com
Inspector general fired by Trump sends a warning signal for American democracy
Michael Atkinson weighed in Sunday on his firing as intelligence community inspector general, suggesting it's part of a President Trump plot to undermine independent oversight.
1m
washingtonpost.com
Billionaires are failing us when we need them most
With coronavirus pushing the US economy to the brink of disaster, the ultra wealthy have an obligation to step up and use their money and power for the greater good, writes Morris Pearl, chair of the Patriotic Millionaires.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Watch live: Cuomo gives update on coronavirus crisis
Governor Cuomo said Sunday that a slight dip in new COVID-19 deaths in New York over the last 24 hours may be a glimmer of hope that the spread is slowing.
1m
cbsnews.com
PGA Championship pushed back to August due to coronavirus
The PGA Championship is returning to an August tee-off thanks to the global coronavirus pandemic. Originally scheduled for May 14-17 at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco, the tournament, like several others, was officially postponed on March 17 due to growing concerns over the rapid spread of COVID-19. The tournament has reportedly been rescheduled, returning...
1m
nypost.com
3D printer companies step in to fill hospitals' desperate need for face shields
Doctors and nurses on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic are in desperate need of face shields. So tech companies are stepping up to help.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Trump: Coronavirus-stricken cruise ships docked in Florida for ‘humanitarian reasons’
President Trump on Monday said two cruise ships with outbreaks of coronavirus aboard were allowed to dock in Florida for “humanitarian reasons” after failing to find safe harbor in other countries. “For humanitarian reasons, the passengers from the two CoronaVirus stricken cruise ships have been given medical treatment and, when appropriate, allowed to disembark, under...
1m
nypost.com
Duran Duran’s John Taylor reveals coronavirus recovery
"I want to let you know that it isn’t always a killer, and we can and will beat this thing."
1m
nypost.com
Superlative churches: Big, beautiful and unusual religious sites
These are some of the world's most impressive churches and cathedrals.      
1m
usatoday.com
U.S. Coronavirus Hotspot Updates: The Latest on COVID-19 Cases in New York, Detroit, New Orleans
The peak of the outbreak is expected to hit all three hotspots at the same time.
1m
newsweek.com
Dr. Drew Pinsky apologizes for equating coronavirus with the flu
"I wish I had gotten it right, but I got it wrong."
1m
nypost.com