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Trump adviser: Politics has no place in this crisis
David Urban, senior adviser to the Trump 2020 campaign, discusses the President's leadership during the coronavirus crisis
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edition.cnn.com
12-year-old Belgian girl becomes Europe’s youngest known coronavirus death
A 12-year-old girl has died in Belgium after testing positive for COVID-19 — making her Europe’s youngest known victim, officials announced Tuesday. The girl — who was not identified — died Monday, Belgium’s crisis-center coronavirus spokesman Emmanuel Andre revealed, saying the loss “shook us.” Andre called it “an emotionally difficult moment, because it involves a...
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nypost.com
Southwest Airlines shares heartwarming photo of 'selfless' health care workers headed to NY
News about the coronavirus pandemic continues to be grim. Southwest Airlines' latest Instagram post is here to make you smile when you need it most.        
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usatoday.com
"Transformative" coronavirus test could produce result in five minutes
The FDA has authorized a coronavirus test that can produce a positive result in five minutes, and a negative result in 13 minutes. To deal with the soaring number of cases, President Trump also said the FDA has approved a process to sterilize the N-95 masks that many hospitals are currently lacking. Dr. David Agus weighs in on both new developments during an appearance on "CBS This Morning."
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cbsnews.com
US Open tennis site to be turned into temporary hospital amid coronavirus outbreak
Part of the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Queens will turn into a 350-bed temporary hospital beginning Tuesday.
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foxnews.com
Cuomo says ‘no’ when grilled by brother about possible presidential run
Gov. Andrew Cuomo, whose approval rating is near 90 percent as he leads the state’s response to the coronavirus pandemic, shot down having any thoughts of running for president during an interview with his brother, CNN’s Chris Cuomo. “With all of this adulation you’re getting for doing job, are you thinking about running for president?”...
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nypost.com
Trump boasts about U.S. virus response while governors complain of testing delays
President Trump suggested surgical masks were being stolen by health care workers during a Monday press conference while also claiming the country's governors were thanking him for the federal assistance they have received in fighting the coronavirus pandemic. A record of the call seems to refute Mr. Trump's claim, where Montana Governor Steve Bullock warned him that testing delays could soon overwhelm hospitals in rural areas. Weijia Jiang reports on what else the president covered during the task force press briefing.
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cbsnews.com
Fox News analyst Cathy Areu recovers from coronavirus: It's like the virus 'knows your weaknesses'
When Fox News analyst Cathy Areu contracted COVID-19, she didn't experience any of the top symptoms most commonly described. 
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foxnews.com
India cracks down on Muslim group emerging as coronavirus cluster
India sealed off the headquarters of a Muslim missionary group on Tuesday and ordered an investigation into accusations it held religious meetings that officials fear may have infected dozens of people with the coronavirus.
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reuters.com
Coronavirus Update, Map, As Global Cases Pass 780,000, Over 165,000 Have Recovered From Infection
The global pandemic continues, as Spain becomes the third country with more confirmed cases than China, while Moscow and Lagos impose lockdown measures.
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newsweek.com
Ford, GE Healthcare team up to produce 50,000 ventilators in Michigan
A new simple ventilator design, to be made by GE Healthcare and Ford Motor, operates on air pressure without the need for electricity.       
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usatoday.com
Sweden has few coronavirus restrictions. Here's why
Sweden has some of the fewest limits on social movement in any European country. Its containment of the novel coronavirus is largely based on voluntary action. CNN's Bianca Nobilo reports.
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edition.cnn.com
Twelve-year-old girl dies from coronavirus in Belgium
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edition.cnn.com
Florida Governor Ron DeSantis refuses to let Zaandam cruise ship dock
Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has had a limited response to the coronavirus pandemic, despite his state reporting the fifth highest number of cases in the U.S. A handful of counties have been ordered to shelter at home, while in others, beaches continue to be open for visitors. DeSantis has also so far refused to allow a cruise ship with four coronavirus fatalities to dock in Fort Lauderdale. Manuel Bojorquez speaks to one passenger who wants the ship to dock and sick passengers to be admitted to area hospitals.
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cbsnews.com
What is coronavirus and Covid-19? An explainer
Basic facts about coronaviruses and how they cause diseases such as Covid-19.
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edition.cnn.com
The coronavirus pandemic could push 11 million people in Asia into poverty, World Bank warns
The economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic could drive an additional 11 million people into poverty in East Asia and the Pacific unless "urgent action" is taken, the World Bank warned in a report released Monday.
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edition.cnn.com
Ford delays manufacturing restart indefinitely, but will build ventilators for coronavirus fight
UAW approves the move.
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foxnews.com
Masa Son's global tech empire is being rocked by the pandemic. Don't count him out just yet
Japanese billionaire Masa Son cast himself as a bold, visionary investor betting on the future. Now he's playing defense as the coronavirus pandemic threatens large swathes of his global tech portfolio and savages SoftBank's share price.
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edition.cnn.com
The Dow has spiked nearly 4,000 points in a week. That doesn't mean the crisis is over
The US stock market is racing back to life.
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edition.cnn.com
Struggling to pay the bills, restaurants, other small businesses find a friend in banks
Banks are being proactive to avoid massive defaults as temporary shutdowns across the economy take place to stem the tide of COVID-19.      
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usatoday.com
Goldman Sachs now expects US unemployment to hit 15%
After a dismal winter, China's economy is showing signs of life. But a recovery in Asia won't paper over problems in the United States and Europe as the world sinks into recession.
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edition.cnn.com
Empire State Building Siren Light Evokes a City Under Siege
The flashing light display is a tribute to emergency workers battling the coronavirus.
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slate.com
Man Charged After Allegedly Coughing on Packets of Noodles Refused Due to Coronavirus Purchase Limits
The suspect, a 34-year-old man from the suburb of Kooringal, tried to ignore the restrictions put in place as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak by purchasing four packets of noodles, police said.
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newsweek.com
New York's Central Park to house coronavirus field hospitals
More than 1,000 people, including at least three health care workers, have died from coronavirus in New York City. Newly built field hospitals have been set up in Central Park to deal with an expected overflow of patients. As the epicenter of the U.S.'s outbreak, New York also received military assistance in the form of a Navy hospital ship docking at a Manhattan pier, equip with 1,000 beds to assist with the city's non-coronavirus medical cases. Mola Lenghi takes a look at one of the city's field hospitals to report on how they are preparing for the worst of the pandemic.
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cbsnews.com
Innocent Prisoners Are Going to Die of Coronavirus
Editor’s Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here. While millions of Americans shelter in place, one group simply cannot escape the coronavirus: prisoners. Among them are hundreds of people who have plausible claims that they are innocent, whose cases were working their way through the courts—until the coronavirus ground regular court business to a halt. What these stories reveal is the threat the virus poses to prisoners, both innocent and guilty, and to the wider population as a whole.Walter Ogrod is one of those prisoners. February 28 brought the news that Ogrod had been waiting for ever since he was convicted of killing a 4-year-old girl and placed on death row 23 years ago: The Philadelphia District Attorney’s Office told a court that Ogrod was “likely innocent,” and that his conviction was a “gross miscarriage of justice” based on evidence that was “false, unreliable, and incomplete.” He should be released. The judge set a hearing for March 27, then rescheduled it for June. Delays happen. Most everyone believed that Ogrod would soon walk out of prison.[Read: How the pandemic will end]But on March 11, when he could almost taste his freedom, Ogrod fell ill. “He described his breathing as like breathing through sponge,” one of his attorneys, James Rollins, told me. His fever spiked to 103 degrees. He suffered bouts of coughing. These symptoms are typical of someone infected with the coronavirus. When the prosecutors and Ogrod’s attorneys learned of his illness, they quickly secured a court order instructing the prison to move him to a hospital so that he could be tested and treated for COVID-19. But the prison refused, arguing that two of its doctors said he needed no such test. “It took almost a week for him to actually get a decongestant to try to address his breathing,” Rollins said.“We have a testing infrastructure in place and are following the COVID-19 CDC guidelines,” says Maria Finn, a spokeswoman for the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections. “We are confident that any inmate who meets the criteria will be tested.”Patricia Cummings, who heads the Conviction Integrity Unit in the Philadelphia DA’s Office, is skeptical. “It’s your worst nightmare,” she says. Convicting an innocent man is tragic enough. Much worse would be if, after the state admits the mistake, the inmate were to die while the judicial system ambled to a conclusion. But the current situation is worse yet: Nothing was done to treat this potentially contagious prisoner, even though signs abounded that a viral “bomb” was about to explode, Cummings says. “It seemed like such a conscious indifference to not only Walter Ogrod’s well-being, but everybody in that prison.”The prison’s decision to forego testing was either lucky or correct. Ogrod has returned to his cell and is recovering. But to Cummings, an equally frightening nightmare could now be unfolding. “How many people did he infect, if in fact he [did] have COVID-19?” she asks. “And are we going to have a widespread pandemic in the prison system?”Across the country, innocence lawyers are filing emergency petitions to get their clients released from prison before the virus can kill them. In the space of 24 hours, I heard from attorneys representing some two dozen clients in much the same legal position as Ogrod: A trial judge or appellate court had found credible proof of their innocence, their convictions were overturned, and the state was told to release them or give them a new trial. But now they are trapped in prison as their hearings are delayed, prosecutors appeal to higher courts, reviews are stalled, or the decisions sit on the desks of judges who could make the final determination. Attorneys say that hundreds more wrongly convicted people have cases lingering in various stages of litigation; those hearings will go to the back of the line, behind new criminal cases, once courts reopen.[Lawrence Glickman: The conservative case against safety]The coronavirus reveals characteristics of the judicial system that will prove lethal. The virus is lightning fast, while the judicial system is glacially slow. The virus is nimble and opportunistic; the system is ponderous, inflexible in its rules, slow to reverse its mistakes, and quick to attach large punishments to small crimes. Experts say that America will now see the price of mass incarceration, and that it will be catastrophically high, both for people in prisons and for the communities around them.“Prisons are almost perfectly designed to promote the transmission of communicable disease,” says Homer Venters, the former chief medical officer at New York City’s Rikers Island. Forget about social distancing: Prisoners eat together, use the same showers, work or watch television side by side, and often sleep in the same dorm room with dozens of other inmates. Forget about hygiene: Prisons are “incredibly filthy, unsanitary places,” Venters says, where there’s often no soap, much less the freedom for hand-washing. But what makes prisoners especially vulnerable to this virus is the years of medical neglect. That’s particularly true of those claiming their innocence, who generally spend 10, 20, 30, or 40 years behind bars before they’re vindicated. But Josiah “Jody” Rich, a professor of medicine and epidemiology at Brown University, told me that the same applies to most inmates.“When we look at the health profile of people who have been incarcerated, they would appear to be about 10 years older than their chronological age,” he said. “Somebody who’s been in and out of prisons and jails their whole life—at age 50 they have the heart disease, the lung disease, the morbidity of somebody on the outside who’s age 60.” Rich, who has been seeing patients in Rhode Island state prisons for more than 25 years, noted that half of all prisoners have a chronic medical condition. And the prison population is getting old: Inmates over the age of 55 make up the fastest growing demographic. Think nursing home, not fight club.Donald Lucas, for example, was recently granted a new trial, two decades after he was convicted of sexual assault and attempted murder in Chicago. At 60, he has significant medical issues, including asthma, which has required several hospitalizations, and a severe seizure disorder. While he waits for a new trial, he is incarcerated at Cook County Jail, where more than two dozen detainees and staff have tested positive for COVID-19. The 73-year-old Jimmy Ates has seen his murder conviction overturned twice because the state failed to provide crucial evidence. Prosecutors in Florida will try him a third time. But his attorneys worry that he might not survive until then, as he has heart and respiratory conditions, as well as Type 2 diabetes—all of which make him vulnerable to COVID-19.For these prisoners, justice delayed could be a death sentence. At 37, Rosa Jimenez sits in a Texas prison as her Stage 4 kidney disease progresses. Fifteen years ago, she was convicted of murder in the death of a 21-month-old who choked on a wad of paper towels while she was babysitting him. Since 2011, four different judges have concluded that Jimenez did not receive a fair trial and is probably innocent; most recently, a federal-district-court judge tossed out the murder conviction. The judge gave prosecutors until February 25 to release her or give her a new trial. State prosecutors appealed, and the district attorney in Austin, Margaret Moore, said she would review the case.But now the pandemic has arrived and the court and the prosecutor’s office have closed their doors. “That has in effect halted” the review, says Jimenez’s attorney, Vanessa Potkin, who is also director of post-conviction litigation at the Innocence Project. She is being left “in limbo and in a place where she sits in a dorm with 33 other women. And as she said, if one woman in the dorm gets a cold, they all get a cold. It’s just a matter of time before COVID-19 enters the prison.” When it does, Jimenez has a good chance of dying, according to a kidney specialist Potkin consulted. In a letter, the specialist noted that patients with Stage 4 kidney disease “are 60 percent more likely” to contract viral illnesses and pneumonia. They will likely be “similarly susceptible to COVID-19 and carry a risk of greater complications, including death.”[Read: Mass incarceration is making infectious diseases worse]Defense attorneys say there are plenty of ways the state can release prisoners and still keep them close until prosecutors decide to retry them or not. For example, the court could set restrictions, such as home confinement or electronic monitoring, which is more likely to move them out of the pathogen’s way. “Before, it was about whether the accused would have their liberty back during this time period,” Potkin says. “Now it’s about their life.”There are within the bounds of law so many and varied ways to slow down the release of an inmate believed to be wrongly convicted. A prosecutor can oppose and then appeal every defeat—in state trial court, appellate court, and the state’s highest court. If a federal district court orders relief, she can shift the appeal to the federal appeals court, and ultimately to the U.S. Supreme Court. The state can also delay administratively, by, say, promising to launch an independent review, as in Jimenez’s case. Or a judge can simply neglect to rule on an innocence claim. All these approaches can take years, which may be infuriating in normal times but which is terrifying in the age of COVID-19.Christopher Smith should have been released from prison, or granted a new trial, months ago. In 2008, Smith was convicted of armed robbery in Cincinnati and sentenced to 18 years in prison. It took 12 years, exhausting all his options in state court, before a federal appeals court recognized the weakness of the state’s case. The perpetrator had worn a costume—a wig, sunglasses, and a mask—which was later found in a truck owned by Smith’s girlfriend. The lab performed a DNA analysis, but the full results were withheld from Smith’s defense lawyer. Only after Smith was convicted did his attorney obtain the full report. It showed that the DNA of another man was on every article, and that Smith’s DNA was absent. In June, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the conviction: “In a case with stronger evidence, the suppressed evidence might not be enough to create a reasonable probability of a different outcome,” the judges ruled in a unanimous decision. “But, here, it is sufficient to undermine confidence in the outcome of the trial.”The sixth circuit found in favor of Smith on a constitutional violation and sent it back to the lower court to finish final details. All that is left be to done is for Federal District Court Judge Timothy Black to approve the decision, which he’s had on his desk since November 7. Once that happens, Smith “will be presumed innocent,” says Michele Berry Godsey, Smith’s lawyer. “The state can choose to retry him, but he’s situated back to the very, very initial point where he’s presumed innocent.”[Barbara Bradley Hagerty: Can you prove your innocence without DNA?]Yet for whatever reason—a backlogged docket, the holidays, objections from the prosecutor—Judge Black has not acted, and four months later, Smith faces a new, deadly threat. “It’s kind of mind-boggling to think that after your innocence is acknowledged, you’re a sitting duck for a virus,” Berry Godsey says. Black’s court has shut down, making an emergency hearing impossible. Nearly two weeks ago, Berry Godsey requested a phone call with the judge and prosecutor to resolve the case. The prosecutor, William Lamb, objected. “It’s not clear … what the urgencies may be,” he wrote in a letter to the judge, adding: “Smith will likely be treated better in his current setting in prison if medical exigencies arise than if he were released.”“I have been dreaming of dying here lately,” Smith wrote to me in an email. “I feel like im being held captive. Or being held for ransom.” He has no soap or hand sanitizer, and the prison is not conducting daily checkups. “Everyone wants to be tough but you can see the fear and concern. once 1 person get this virus, we are in great trouble.”It’s tempting to think that what happens in prison stays in prison. But a virus doesn’t respect boundaries. It sneaks in with the guards and staff: Each day, three shifts a day, hundreds of potentially infected people walk into a prison and handle the inmates, shackle them, transport them, give them food and medicine. Once the virus gets inside prison doors, “it will go through the prison like a hot knife through butter,” said Rich, the Brown professor. Soon enough, transmission will run in the other direction. As prisoners are infected, they will infect the otherwise healthy staff, who return to their families.[Read: Why the coronavirus has been so successful]“Right now, we are on the cusp of really understanding how devastating the process has been,” says Venters, the former chief medical officer at Rikers Island. “Ignoring people behind bars, pretending like their health doesn’t matter, is now going to cause very serious consequences for them, and for the rest of us. Because it’s not just that we’re going to have preventable deaths in these places. It’s that it will drive this whole epidemic curve up when we’re trying to flatten it.” In other words, prisons are hot spots that America ignores at its peril.It gets worse: Prisoners are likely to affect if not overwhelm the hospital system on the outside. After two or three weeks, Rich said, critically ill prisoners will start arriving at hospitals, many of them rural hospitals with few ICU beds and ventilators. “And you get to the point where there’s no more beds, and somebody [from the community] gets into a bad car accident, or they have COVID-19, or they have a heart attack, or they have some life-threatening illness,” Rich said. “They cannot get into the ICU bed, because that prisoner is there.” The doctor faces a Hobson’s choice of whom to save.Multiply that by thousands of prisoners who are sure to become sick. “The epidemic is going to be already straining existing health-care systems,” Rich said. “They don’t need an influx of people coming from their local prisons.” Adds Potkin at the Innocence Project: “It’s unimaginable what’s about to happen.”
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theatlantic.com
'Much of it was junk': Trump, Pelosi claim credit for beating back bad ideas in coronavirus stimulus
To hear President Trump and Speaker Pelosi tell it, the early drafts of the $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus were loaded with junk before they saved it.       
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usatoday.com
Empire State Building lights up for first responders battling coronavirus outbreak in NYC
The Empire State Building lit up like an ambulance to show solidarity for first responders during the coronavirus outbreak.       
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usatoday.com
That Girl Was Ahead of Its Time. This Episode Shows Just How Far Ahead.
Marlo Thomas’ single-woman sitcom helped create a whole new subgenre of television.
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slate.com
The grim ethical dilemma of rationing medical care, explained
Hospital equipment being set up an emergency field hospital in New York City’s Central Park on March 30. | Stephanie Keith/Getty Images How hospitals decide which Covid-19 patients to prioritize when resources are scarce. With medical experts and politicians now predicting that coronavirus cases will dramatically exceed the capacities of hospitals across America, doctors and nurses face the prospect of picking which patients to prioritize for treatment. Though the term “triage” may conjure images of rough battlefield medicine and crude estimates of patients’ survival odds, excruciating decisions on whom to treat already confront doctors in some places and will likely soon be necessary in America. In Italy, infections have skyrocketed so quickly that its fatalities have surpassed China’s, where the outbreak started, and doctors are already weighing whom to treat as sick patients overwhelm the hospital system. The published guidelines for an Italian intensive care unit noted that it may become necessary to establish an age limit for access to intensive care. Doctors are reportedly weeping in the hallways as they decide which patients to save. “If you have a 99-year-old male or a female patient, that’s a patient with a lot of diseases. And you have [a] young kid that need[s] to be intubated and you only have one ventilator, I mean, you’re not going to ... toss the coin,” a surgeon and oncologist in Rome named Carlo Vitelli told NPR last week. The United States is likely not far behind, with the confirmed case count already above Italy’s, and the country may soon experience an equally severe scarcity crisis. In New York City, health care workers are reporting that their resources are or will soon be overwhelmed. “These decisions run counter to everything that we stand for and are incredibly painful,” tweeted Meredith Case, an internal medicine resident at Columbia/New York-Presbyterian Hospital, on March 25. “Our ICU is completely full with intubated Covid patients. … We are rapidly moving to expand capacity. We are nearly out of PPE. I anticipate we will begin rationing today.” Guidelines for rationing scarce resources differ by state, though many assign rankings based on a patient’s odds of both short-term and long-term survival. The federal government has not yet released official recommendations for the Covid-19 pandemic. But difficult moral questions about how to allocate scarce medical resources have received extensive consideration from both philosophers and doctors, and it’s been the subject of rigorous academic study among bioethicists. After Hurricane Katrina, professors at Stanford University developed a widely used framework to guide medical decision-making in situations of resource scarcity, such as pandemics and natural disasters. In an influential 2009 article in The Lancet, Ezekiel Emanuel, chair of the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania, and two co-authors gave a systemic analysis of moral principles of allocation and how doctors can use them. Some researchers have even developed mathematical models to help decide whom to treat first. As the coronavirus sweeps across America, these ethical principles will collide with the messy realities of limited medical resources in dramatic ways. Despite the best efforts of philosophers and physicians, the results will inevitably be imperfect compromises that invite a thousand more questions on how to judge whose life is worth saving. Deciding whom to treat comes down to an ethical dilemma There are three theories of how to make ethical triage decisions, according to David Magnus, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics: egalitarianism, utilitarianism, and prioritarianism. Doctors and nurses aren’t philosophizing about these approaches as they make long rounds and rush to treat patients. Rather, these frameworks allow health care professionals to streamline decisions and focus on medical tasks, not be mired in moral questions or burdened by guilt after making hard decisions. “As much as possible, we want to move away from forcing clinicians to make bedside decisions and to have broader decision-making about these issues in advance,” said Magnus. Each theory has its own moral logic. Egalitarianism seeks to treat patients equally; using a lottery system to select vaccine recipients is one example. Utilitarianism aims to maximize total benefit, generally measured by the remaining life years — or expected remaining high-quality years — that decisions will save. If a 20-year-old and an 80-year-old both required a ventilator, treating the 20-year-old would likely maximize life years. In a choice between two people of the same age, the quality of life that each could expect upon recovery would become relevant. Prioritarianism, or the “rule of rescue,” treats the sickest people first; emergency rooms operate on this principle, for example, choosing to treat the gunshot wound victim before the person with a broken leg. “If you have a patient on a ventilator and they have to be taken off – that is probably the most horrible of all decisions for a doctor or nurse” Though each of these appeals to certain moral intuitions, they all have serious problems. To treat patients equally, for example, is also to treat them indiscriminately — because egalitarianism does not distinguish between the age of patients or the severity of their conditions, it can easily seem like an arbitrary or wasteful use of resources. Utilitarianism confronts the notorious difficulty of ranking quality of life and ignores the moral imperative of urgency. Imagine that the same medical resources could be used either to save one 75-year-old from coronavirus or perform a dozen hip replacements for 65-year-olds. While the latter might ultimately create more years of happy, healthy life, most would consider it the wrong choice, as the recent cancellations of elective surgeries around the country show. Meanwhile, a rule to prioritize the sickest patients first can clash with the goal of helping the greatest number possible: Lavishing extensive resources on a single patient with only a small chance of surviving could mean refusing treatment to multiple patients who are less sick but more likely to live if treated. While analyzing trade-offs among these principles is vexing in theory, making and implementing decisions in real time can be excruciatingly difficult. “If you have a patient on a ventilator and they have to be taken off — that is probably the most horrible of all decisions for a doctor or nurse,” said Emanuel. “Vaccines are not always life-and-death. But if someone who doesn’t have a ventilator is going to die, having to withdraw that person is incredibly psychologically traumatic, and this is likely to happen.” And the nature of medicine makes some ambiguities inevitable. There’s space for individual judgment, for instance, about what constitutes an urgent versus elective surgery, or when respiratory failure is irreversible. If an older patient with coronavirus and a short life expectancy required CPR, it could be difficult to decide whether saving the patient justified exposing health care workers to significant risk. In normal circumstances, many patients on ventilators in America have only a very small chance of survival, Magnus explained. Family members often insist on continued treatment even when loved ones will almost certainly not recover. “In our society, the ICU often becomes a place for grieving and prolonging the dying process. It’s not obvious that this is a good use of resources even in normal circumstances, but it’s just not going to be possible now,” he said. What makes one life more worth saving than another? The ethical dilemmas posed by the coronavirus are real-world examples of deep moral questions philosophers have studied for centuries. Princeton’s Peter Singer, probably the world’s most famous living utilitarian philosopher and a vocal proponent of effective altruism, told Vox, “There’s always a scarcity of resources in medicine, but situations like this make it particularly clear.” Singer said he favors a utilitarian approach that considers multiple factors: the life expectancy of patients, some types of adjustment for quality of life, and perhaps the patient’s ability to help others. He gave the example of a patient with severe dementia or terminal cancer with a six-month life expectancy as cases where it might be reasonable to prioritize other patients. Attempts to rank quality of life are controversial, particularly in cases of disability, but they are also already widely used. In the United Kingdom, quality-adjusted life year, or QALY, scores are a crucial factor in health care decision-making and are calculated by multiplying years of life by quality of life. If a given medical treatment would allow a patient one year with full quality of life, the patient would have a quality score of 1. If the same treatment would produce a year of life with only half of the normal quality of life, they would have a quality score of 0.5. Numerical scores might give the illusion of objectivity, but the complexities of actual life inevitably complicate such decisions. Mental health, family size, income, temperament, pain tolerance, and professional, personal, and relationship satisfaction — a vast array of factors that escape quantification still influence the quality of one’s life but are not accounted for in current equations. These are incredibly challenging and controversial decisions to make. In particular, people with disabilities have spoken up about their concerns that they will be left behind whenever triage decisions are made. “People with disabilities deserve to have equal access to scarce medical resources,” wrote the American Association of People With Disabilities in a letter to Congress, “and should not be subject to resource allocation discrimination when needs exceed supply...we believe that during this difficult period it is especially important to protect patients with disabilities from discrimination.” The Office for Civil Rights at the US Department of Health and Human Services has also announced that it is investigating states rationing plans to ensure that they are compliant with civil rights law. As Alice Wong of the Disability Visibility Project told the New York Times, “I deserve the same treatments as any patient. As a disabled person, I’ve been clawing my way into existence ever since I was born. I will not apologize for my needs.” “The only way to solve this is through massive social collaboration” For a utilitarian, prioritizing those who can benefit others is a defensible choice. “The classic case might be the Army doctor whose treatment is prioritized because he will be able to treat others,”Singer said. “I suppose in the current situation maybe it’s possible to make a case that certain doctors would be in a similar position, but of course you would want to be careful that you were not just prioritizing the health of your colleagues.” In fact, prioritizing medical workers is one of the suggestions made by Emanuel in an article recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine making recommendations for triage in the Covid-19 pandemic. But defining what constitutes a benefit to others is also difficult and controversial. Elizabeth Anderson, a MacArthur “genius” grant winner and philosophy professor at the University of Michigan, cautioned against thinking in too “ruthlessly consequentialist” a manner. “In strictly consequentialist terms, you might ask who are the most valuable workers, but actually, that’s not the right way to think about it,” she told Vox. “In reality, if the CEO of a major corporation had a heart attack, they are actually more replaceable than the parent of young children, who need specific individuals to be there for them and have a very personal relationship with their parents. It’s an argument for prioritizing caretakers,” she said. One factor that doctors and philosophers agree should not be relevant is the wealth of patients. But it’s also an undeniable reality of American health care that wealth improves quality of care. “It’s a huge flaw in the American system compared to any other affluent society,” Singer said. Emanuel imagined a scenario in which a scarce supply of coronavirus vaccines became available on the open market. “You don’t want a vaccine that only the rich can buy,” he said, adding that some form of random selection like a lottery would be preferable. “There is no moral framework in which wealth plays a role.” As the number of cases continues to spike, American health care workers will likely face agonizing decisions on how to ration care — and soon. That’s why for now, self-quarantining and social distancing are themselves moral decisions we can all make that can have significant impacts. “How bad the triage will be depends enormously on the behavior of ordinary people now,” Anderson said. “The only way to solve this is through massive social collaboration.” Taking collective action to decrease the scale of infections will ultimately reduce the suffering not only of patients but of nurses and doctors. “Triage is awful — it’s traumatizing,” said Anderson. “Doctors who have dedicated their careers to helping people now have to turn people away. It’s dreadful. It’s really on all of us to pull together so that we don’t force these horrible triage choices.” Nick Romeo is an author and journalist whose work has also appeared in the New Yorker, the Washington Post, the Atlantic, National Geographic, and more.
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vox.com
Campaign advertising adapts to new coronavirus reality
In times of national crisis, campaigns try to make their candidates look compassionate and in command, while figuring out how to attack their opponents without looking exploitative or petty.
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edition.cnn.com
Mets' Pete Alonso defends Noah Syndergaard undergoing elbow surgery amid coronavirus pandemic
New York Mets first baseman Pete Alonso defended teammate Noah Syndergaard after the righty was forced to undergo Tommy John surgery last week in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Netflix’s ‘Tiger King’ prompts sheriff to seek leads in cold case
A Florida sheriff is scratching for new leads in a 23-year-old missing person case — thanks to the popular Netflix series “Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness.”
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nypost.com
Eye Opener: New York sees over 1,000 coronavirus deaths
New York has reported over 1,000 fatalities due to the coronavirus pandemic as a Navy ship docks in Manhattan to assist overwhelmed hospitals. Also, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis is refusing to let the Zaandam cruise ship dock in Fort Lauderdale, despite the four coronavirus deaths onboard. All that and all that matters in today's Eye Opener. Your world in 90 seconds.
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cbsnews.com
Roger Federer stays busy during coronavirus pandemic with tennis trick shots
The coronavirus pandemic has even legendary tennis player Roger Federer going a bit stir crazy.
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foxnews.com
Thomas Massie defends ill-fated coronavirus bill maneuver: 'I was just standing up for the Constitution'
"Congress should show up to work if they're telling truckers and grocery store baggers to show up to work," Rep. Thomas Massie said to Fox News.
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foxnews.com
US stocks are poised for a strong day
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edition.cnn.com
Pennsylvania Food Bank Draws Mile-long Line of Cars as Trump Approves State's Coronavirus Disaster Declaration
The Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank served 1700 families in need amid a spike in demand for emergency supplies across the U.S. due to the coronavirus shutdown.
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newsweek.com
Trump Is a Genius
Donald Trump is presiding over one of the worst calamities to befall the nation in living memory, and anyone who has followed his response since the coronavirus morphed from a worrisome outbreak in a Chinese province to a global pandemic knows the truth: Trump’s response has been disastrous. It’s no wonder that just a couple of weeks ago, a writer in this magazine concluded that, “The Trump presidency is over.”It seemed reasonable, logical. But once the polls started coming in, it turned out the American public—at least for now—disagrees. Despite his well-documented incompetence and lies, Trump is now enjoying some of the highest approval ratings of his presidency. Even more baffling, a majority of Americans—as many as 60 percent in one poll—think he’s doing a good job tackling the crisis.[Read: All the president’s lies about the coronavirus]Give the president his due: Trump is a genius. He is a master manipulator, a political alchemist capable of transmuting calamitous errors into political gold. Even as he continues to lie and deceive, the president has seized control of the narrative, taking possession of the national microphone to saturate the public with his self-serving version of events.And it’s working.All the fact-checkers, scientists, journalists, doctors, nurses, mayors, and governors may be telling a different story. But Trump takes to the White House podium day after day, crafting a narrative, offering the same staccato sentences over and over—“We’ve done a great job”—taking credit for each positive development, conjuring non-existent progress, blaming others for every failure, demanding that those around him sing his praises before the cameras, and extorting praise from governors in exchange for Federal aid. He repeats this until the extent of his failures, however well documented, fades from the minds of a large segment of Americans, desperate to feel protected in the face of a mysterious and frightening threat.When Trump stands at the podium and Vice President Mike Pence and others slather him with adulation, some viewers may find it stomach-turning. Those of us who have witnessed similar displays in dictatorships are sickened to see it in the United States. It may seem like pointless ego massaging for insecure man, but it has tactical value. Every desperate governor who refrains from pointing out Trump’s outrages, every Trump toady who lavishes praise, helps erect a monument to Trump’s greatness, obscuring the facts.That Trump failed in his responsibilities as president at the worst possible time should be beyond dispute. Shelves will creak under the weight of volumes describing all that made the pandemic explode out of control; dissertations will delve into the horrific mistakes not just by the Trump administration but by the president, personally.The virus is not Trump’s fault, and not every one of his decisions was a mistake, but his failings kept the United States from taking actions that might have prevented a crisis whose full toll, overwhelming as it already is, remains unknowable: thousands of deaths, trillions in government spending, trillions more in lost government revenues, personal bankruptcies, lost businesses, and national trauma.[Read: How the pandemic will end]The timeline of the pandemic is a story of Trumpian misinformation. Trump’s alternative reality has grown familiar, but this time the consequences are deadly.“Are there worries about a pandemic?” a reporter asked Trump in late January. “No, not at all,” he said, “we have it totally under control.” He repeated the message for weeks, as the caseload grew at home and abroad. “We’re going down, not up,” he said in late February, predicting once again that, “It’s going to disappear … it’s like a miracle.” It would disappear by April, he said.Was he simply misinformed? No. The information was there. In January and February, intelligence officials tried to persuade him that the risk was real. But he had no patience for them. He told Fox viewers, “It’s all under control.” Fox anchors repeated what he said, and Trump got his news from Fox in a deadly feedback loop.Even before the first cases of COVID-19 appeared in China, Trump should have been preparing for a pandemic, a threat that has long been near the top of strategists’ agendas. Just last year, Trump’s own Department of Health and Human Services ran a simulation of a pandemic originating in China. The simulation projected more than 100 million Americans could be infected, and found the U.S. underprepared. But Trump had dismantled the National Security Council’s office devoted to global-health threats, and had little tolerance for anyone warning of a looming disaster.When Nancy Messonnier, a top scientist at the Centers for Disease Control, raised the alarm over the novel coronavirus, saying we should be preparing for “significant disruption of our lives,” and exhorted “hospitals, schools and everyday people to begin preparing,” Trump was reportedly furious. Two days later, her boss, CDC chief Robert Redfield, all but apologized in Congress for Messonnier’s words.The signal to other government employees was clear: Stick to Trump’s message.After stocks crashed, Trump’s denial ended, replaced with a barrage of misinformation. He falsely claimed there were tests for anyone who wants them; he promoted unproven cures from the podium; and, most importantly, he proclaimed himself a master of pandemic response.[Francis Fukuyama: The thing that determines a country’s resistance to the coronavirus]Anything that went wrong was someone else’s fault. “I don’t take responsibility at all,” he memorably declared. “No one expected” a pandemic, he said over and over, lying about what he had been told.He resisted pleas from New York Governor Andrew Cuomo to use the unmatched power of the federal government to produce desperately needed ventilators. After inexcusable delays, prompted by pressure from businesses, he belatedly invoked the Defense Production Act—but has continued to suggest the need for ventilators is being exaggerated. He said he wanted to open up the country in time for “packed churches” on Easter, a course that would have worsened the catastrophe.Thankfully, on Sunday, he changed course—unveiling his latest gambit to emerge triumphant from one of the most colossal failures of leadership in the history of the United States. Trump cited a study that said up to 2.2 million Americans could die from COVID-19 unless appropriate measures were taken. Trump already knew about the widely publicized study when he touted lifting restrictions by Easter. But suddenly, Trump saw it as his lifeline.“You’re talking about a potential of up to 2.2 million. And some people said it could even be higher than that. So you’re talking about 2.2 million deaths—2.2 million people from this,” he said, repeating the number over and over, anchoring his audience’s expectations.“And so, if we can hold that down, as we’re saying, to 100,000—that’s a horrible number—maybe even less, but to 100,000; so we have between 100- and 200,000—we all, together, have done a very good job.” Trump has found a new marketing plan just in time for the November elections. If 200,000 Americans die on his watch, he will boast of having saved 2 million—and many Americans will see him as a hero.
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theatlantic.com
12-year-old girl dies from coronavirus
Dying from the virus at such a young age "is a very rare occurrence," said government spokesman Dr Emmanuel Andre, adding that her death "shook us".
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cbsnews.com
What happens to our food supply if American farmers can't farm?
The coronavirus could hit the US food supply if American farmers don't have enough skilled workers, or if their farming practices are disrupted because of the pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
When Will Stimulus Checks Be Sent And Who Will Get Them?
The president signed off a $2 trillion stimulus package last week that proposes to send individual checks starting at $1,200 to American households.
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newsweek.com
On This Day: 31 March 1889
Paris' iconic Eiffel Tower was completed. (March 31)       
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usatoday.com
To enforce coronavirus distancing, police say arrests are last resort
It is difficult to enforce COVID-19 stay-at-home orders.
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abcnews.go.com
ESPN moves up release for 'The Last Dance' documentary on Michael Jordan, 1990s Bulls, per report
The much-anticipated Michael Jordan/Chicago Bulls documentary "The Last Dance" will premiere April 19 instead of June, per the New York Post.        
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usatoday.com
AP Top Stories March 31 A
Here's the latest for Tuesday March 31st: NY Gov. Cuomo asks for medical volunteers; Penn. Gov. says schools to stay closed indefinitely; Residents with COVID-19 die in Mass. veterans home; Texas requires drivers coming from Louisiana to self-isolate.       
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usatoday.com
Day 20 without sports
Hall of Fame pitcher Roy Halladay gets star treatment as one of only two pitchers in MLB history to throw a no-hitter in the postseason.      
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usatoday.com
Bradley Blakeman: Coronavirus 'war bonds' — buy gift cards to save a business
President Trump promised and is delivering an “all hands on deck” response to defeating this pandemic. Every American can help too.
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foxnews.com
My company's confused about same-sex sexual harassment: Ask HR
Johnny C. Taylor Jr. advises a woman on addressing same-sex harassment and the use of respectful pronouns for a transgender co-worker.       
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usatoday.com