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Vienna’s horse-drawn carriages now delivering lockdown meals
VIENNA – Under coronavirus lockdown, one aspect of modern Vienna might look familiar to victims of plagues past – horse-drawn carriages delivering meals to those most at risk during the pandemic. So-called ‘fiaker’, derived from the French term ‘fiacre’, have been a feature of Vienna life since it was the capital of a vast empire....
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nypost.com
Mad magazine illustrator Mort Drucker dies at 91
One of Mad Magazine’s most loved and enduring illustrators has died
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washingtonpost.com
Majority of Americans With 'Conservative News Diet' Believe Coronavirus No More Deadly Than Seasonal Flu, New Poll Shows
Health experts estimate that the coronavirus is at least 10 to 20 times more deadly than the common seasonal flu.
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newsweek.com
Charlie Kirk: Trump Is Putting America First to Fight Coronavirus—And I, for One, Am Grateful | Opinion
The mainstream media may not like it, but imagine if we had a president more concerned with the U.N. than the U.S. at a time like this.
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newsweek.com
Uzo Aduba As Feminist Trailblazer Shirley Chisholm in the Hulu Series 'Mrs. America'
"There are a lot of young people who don't know the name Shirley Chisolm," Uzo Aduba, who plays her in 'Mrs. America' (Hulu, April 15), told 'Newsweek.'
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newsweek.com
LAPD Academy manager arrested for allegedly stealing firearms, selling them to officers
The manager of the L.A. Police Academy gun store was booked on suspicion of felony grand theft after nearly 40 firearms disappeared from the store.
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latimes.com
President of Harvard’s Federalist Society Chapter Brought a Gun to Zoom Class
The student already has a prestigious clerkship lined up with a federal appeals court judge.
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slate.com
Prince Andrew accuser Virginia Roberts Giuffre tests negative for coronavirus
Virginia Roberts Giuffre has repeatedly claimed that Jeffrey Epstein forced her to have sex with Prince Andrew.
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nypost.com
Wisconsin parks to close after crowds ignore social distancing mandates
Swarms of nature lovers flocked to Wisconsin’s great outdoors and flouted social distancing mandates during the coronavirus crisis, forcing officials on Thursday to shutter dozens of parks across the state. Gov. Tony Evers ordered the parks department to close 40 Wisconsin state parks, forests, recreational and other natural areas until further notice, the Milwaukee Journal...
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nypost.com
Grocery store clerk, 27, dies from coronavirus
Leilani Jordan, who had cerebral palsy, left her family a "goodbye" video on her phone.
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cbsnews.com
Coronavirus may not diminish in warmer weather, new study finds
The novel coronavirus that has ravaged the globe and brought the world's economy to a standstill may not diminish significantly in warmer weather, according to a report from a panel convened by the National Academy of Sciences.
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foxnews.com
'A silent explosion': Coronavirus deaths continue to climb
COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. surpass 15,000. In New York, new hospitalizations slow, affirming signs that stay-at-home orders are slowing coronavirus spread.
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latimes.com
22 ways you can help arts groups devastated by coronavirus closures
Donate the cost of a canceled ticket, take an online dance class, buy a piece of fine art: Here are 22 ways to help artists weather the coronavirus storm.
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latimes.com
Commentary: MOCA should not be furloughing staff during the coronavirus crisis. Here's why
The $2.2 trillion CARES Act was designed for small businesses like MOCA. Using relief funds would help to keep the staff at full employment.
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latimes.com
Hero of the Day: Out-of-work waitress serves food to her community
She’s not hanging up her apron just yet. Brooklyn waitress Shakeyra Stewart has made feeding New Yorkers her full-time job — even after the diner where she worked was forced to stop serving amid the coronavirus outbreak. “It’s not like I’m busy — I’m unemployed,” said Stewart, 27, who spends nearly every weekday delivering groceries,...
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nypost.com
Short on Cash? Here's Some Advice For Families Stretching Their Budgets
Many people who have lost jobs during the pandemic still await their unemployment checks and are figuring out which of their bills to prioritize. Experts share unusual advice for these unusual times.
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npr.org
Florence Pugh defends 21-year age gap with Zach Braff: 'I don't know when cyber-bullying became trendy'
Florence Pugh is speaking up after the star received hateful comments about her 21-year age gap with boyfriend Zach Braff.
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foxnews.com
Dr. Amy Acton, the Ohio Department of Health director, overcame a childhood in poverty to lead the state's battle against coronavirus
When she was a child growing up in Ohio, Amy Acton says, people looked down on her and her brother because they were poor -- really poor. Now she is delivering the hard facts about coronavirus as director of the state Department of Health.
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edition.cnn.com
Coronavirus helpers bring hope amid pandemic: 'The urgency of this compassion is really breathtaking'
Despite the fear and anxiety of the coronavirus outbreak, a plethora of volunteers are stepping up and offering help.
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latimes.com
The pandemic is playing to almost every one of Amazon's strengths
As the coronavirus pandemic has forced people to stay inside, few companies have proven themselves as essential as Amazon. From groceries to cleaning supplies, shipments from Amazon have become lifelines for many who are steering clear of supermarkets and other physical retail stores. Company executives have likened the surge in demand to the annual holiday shopping crush.
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edition.cnn.com
Which State Lockdowns in the U.S. Have Been Extended?
Amid the coronavirus pandemic that has spread across the U.S., a number of states have extended their lockdown orders, in an effort to combat the spread of the virus.
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newsweek.com
French publishers win decisive battle against Google
Europe’s copyright directive proves its mettle as France orders the US search giant to pay for press content.
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politico.com
Viral Arizona grandma who mistakenly invited teen to Thanksgiving loses husband to coronavirus: reports
The husband of an Arizona grandmother who went viral four years ago after mistakenly inviting a teenager she never met before to her family’s Thanksgiving dinner has died from complications caused by the coronavirus, according to reports Wednesday.
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foxnews.com
Florence Pugh defends age gap with boyfriend Zach Braff, calls out 'horrid' comments
Florence Pugh is slamming critics of her age-gap relationship with Zach Braff after her Instagram was flooded with mean comments.        
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usatoday.com
Recovered coronavirus patient on donating plasma to help others: 'A great feeling'
It was an amazing experience to be able to donate plasma and potentially save lives, aerospace engineer and recovered COVID-19 patient Jason Garcia said Thursday. 
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foxnews.com
6 iPhone features you aren't using and totally should be
We were impressed when Apple launched the iPhone 11, and especially loved the spectacular camera setup of the 11 Pro and 11 Pro Max.
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edition.cnn.com
Issa Rae balances busy, booked career; as ‘Insecure’ returns
The HBO hit “Insecure” typically airs during the summer, but series creator Issa Rae has been moving like the Energizer Bunny, with a schedule so booked and busy, the show’s return had to be delayed
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washingtonpost.com
California woman arrested after allegedly licking items in grocery store
Amid the spread of COVID-19, there have been several incidents around the nation of people licking items inside grocery stores.       
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usatoday.com
India seals off coronavirus hot spots to stop spread
The world’s second-largest country, already under nationwide lockdown to fight coronavirus, is now sealing dozens of hot spots as it looks to ease restrictions in less impacted areas. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced the three-week lockdown on March 24. People in India, a country with 1.3 billion inhabitants, are allowed to leave their homes...
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nypost.com
Drag performers sew masks during club closures
Gary Marion, best known as drag queen "Sushi" in Florida's Key West, has been sewing colorful face masks for hospital staffs, local government officials, airline employees and other workers during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. (April 9)       
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usatoday.com
Astronomers clock extremely high winds on an object outside of our solar system
For the first time, scientists have been able to measure the wind speed on an object outside of our solar system, according to a new study. The object, known as a brown dwarf, is 33.2 light-years away from Earth.
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edition.cnn.com
Crew of prehistoric monkeys rafted across the Atlantic to South America
A crew of now-extinct monkeys made a treacherous transatlantic journey on a natural raft from Africa to settle in South America around 35 million years ago, according to a study of fossilized teeth found in Peru.
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edition.cnn.com
How Do You Safely Split Custody During a Pandemic?
Is it OK to keep a child at your house in the name of safety without discussing it with your co-parent?
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slate.com
Winds of 1,500 MPH Recorded on 'Failed Star' 33 Light-Years Away in First Observation of Its Kind
"While we have long been able to directly probe the winds of the bodies in our own solar system, we've had to conjecture what they're like in other kinds of bodies," researcher Peter Williams said.
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newsweek.com
“Human challenge trials,” where healthy volunteers would be exposed to Covid-19, explained
Amanda Northrop/Vox Advocates say human trials could speed up the development of a coronavirus vaccine. As a journalist who covers philanthropy, one of the most frequent questions I get about the coronavirus crisis is how ordinary people can help. A couple things leap to mind. GiveDirectly is giving money to poor Americans struggling with unemployment and other hardships; you can also donate money to other public health charities helping poor countries handle a sudden surge in demand for doctors and hospitals. Now, a bioethicist and two epidemiologists are proposing a bolder option: You can volunteer to get infected yourself. In a recent article published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, bioethicist Nir Eyal and epidemiologists Marc Lipsitch and Peter G. Smith called for “human challenge studies” to test the effectiveness of coronavirus vaccines as they’re developed. These studies would involve testing the vaccines on a group of volunteers who have been knowingly exposed to the novel coronavirus that causes Covid-19. The hope is that it will allow researchers to ascertain more quickly and conclusively the effectiveness of the proposed vaccine. Human challenge studies are commonly conducted with less lethal diseases like malaria or schistosomiasis. My colleague Kelsey Piper interviewed John Beshir, a volunteer in a malaria vaccine trial, last year; Beshir is an active donor to anti-malaria charities and saw his volunteering as an extension of his monetary support for the cause. But malaria, if properly treated, has a low death rate for young and healthy people (that it still kills hundreds of thousands of people every year is partially a reflection of the poor availability of treatment in heavily affected African countries). Covid-19 is different. About 0.66 percent of people who are infected die from the disease. And while a recent study showed that death rates are much lower for younger people (0.03 percent for people in their 20s, the data on which it’s based is from the early stages of the Chinese outbreak in February. There’s still a lot we don’t know about the disease and its lethality. Activist Josh Morrison, whom I know from his day job advocating for living kidney donors (like me), has started a website soliciting volunteers willing to take on that deadly risk for the sake of speeding up vaccine development. As of this writing, about 450 people have expressed provisional interest in volunteering (including me, though I may not be eligible with only one kidney). Signing up doesn’t commit you to anything, and the website isn’t recruiting for any current trial. No vaccine is in the stage of development where a human challenge trial would make sense. The Milken Institute counts 51 different vaccines currently in development, with only a small handful in Phase I trials, which involve making sure the vaccine isn’t dangerous to humans. After that comes Phase II trials, which use a larger sample and do preliminary tests for efficacy and to find an optimal dose with the best balance of side effects and effectiveness. Some studies combine Phases I and II, which could speed the process up. Eyal, Lipsitch, and Smith propose using a human challenge trial to replace Phase III, where larger-sample effectiveness tests take place (and which are, at the very least, months in the future). Instead of a typical Phase III, a human challenge trial could involve fewer people and run for a much shorter period of time, since researchers would not have to wait for volunteers to be exposed to the virus. A real human challenge trial would involve intensive health screening for volunteers, as well as voluminous risk disclosures to ensure that volunteers know exactly what they (we) are getting into. But the push to sign up volunteers is forcing a broader conversation about whether this kind of trial is necessary or ethical, given the death toll that coronavirus threatens to leave in its wake. The ethical question here is knotty, and depends on both empirical questions — Would a human challenge trial actually speed up vaccine development? How many lives would be saved by speeding up development by, say, one month? — and values questions. The big one: Is it acceptable to ask volunteers to risk their lives to speed up vaccine development? And if so, should they be eligible for nominal compensation (like lost wages) or something more? “We’re all looking for a Hail Mary, and it’s easy to see challenge studies as exciting and having a lot of promise,” says Seema Shah, professor of medical ethics at Northwestern University Medical School and a practicing medical ethicist at Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago who has written about the ethics of human challenge trials. “But a lot of things need to fall into place to achieve that promise.” How human challenge trials work Testing something like a coronavirus vaccine normally happens by gathering a group of healthy people, giving half of them the experimental vaccine and the other half a placebo, and waiting for them to get infected with the relevant disease in the course of their regular lives. Then you compare the groups. The problem with the coronavirus is that if you’re a healthy person who’s practicing social distancing, you probably aren’t going to get infected. That makes it hard to do a real comparison between the vaccinated and unvaccinated groups. Maybe they both end up the same because no one in either group was exposed to the pathogen. If that’s the case, the trial hasn’t told us anything useful. A human challenge trial replaces that process with one in which all of the trial volunteers are exposed to the virus that causes Covid-19 after being dosed with a vaccine or placebo. That way, you get a much clearer sense of how the vaccine performs when actually confronted with the disease it’s intended to guard against. “To allow for a high portion to get exposed, the standard trial would have to take at least several months,” Eyal, the bioethicist who co-authored the Journal of Infectious Diseases article calling for human challenge trials, told me. “By contrast, in a coronavirus challenge ... the success or failure of the vaccine to protect against the disease becomes apparent much faster.” What’s more, a human challenge trial could be conducted with fewer people than a standard Phase III trial. A Covid-19 vaccine being developed at Oxford, for instance, aims to have 5,000 volunteers for Phase III. A human challenge trial, Eyal argues, could happen with only about 100 people. The total number of participants needed would likely be higher than that, since (among other reasons) multiple vaccine candidates need to be tested, but the total would be much lower compared with a conventional study. The risks of conducting a human challenge trial, and how to mitigate them The downside to doing this is obvious: Covid-19 is a dangerous disease, and it’s possible that volunteers in the placebo group especially — but also in the treatment group, given that all vaccines have a failure rate — will become badly ill, need weeks of hospitalization, and/or die. Eyal has a number of answers to this objection. He anticipates that the volunteer pool would be limited to healthy people between the ages of 20 and 45. “Preexisting conditions that increase the risk of bad outcomes upon coronavirus infection” — such as asthma and other chronic lung diseases, HIV and other immunocompromising conditions, obesity, diabetes, liver disease, and chronic kidney disease — “should exclude a volunteer,” Eyal says. That should help reduce the odds of an infection leading to death. Currently, per a team at Imperial College London, only 0.031 percent of people in their 20s infected with the virus causing COVID-19 died — and that includes people with underlying conditions. That’s almost identical to the risk of death from living kidney donation, which medical facilities treat as acceptable. What’s more, volunteers would be “isolated from their families in special facilities, potentially facilities for flu challenge trials, which exist in a few developed countries, converted to this usage,” Eyal says. “They should remain in isolation until they stop being infectious. Upon detection of infection they should get excellent medical care for Coronavirus disease — much more than we can say about the general health system in the upcoming time of crisis.” He and his coauthors also want to recruit “people who reside in high-transmission environments” like New York City, so that “being in the study would hardly increase, or in fact decrease, their net risk.” Reasons for apprehension Shah, the Northwestern bioethicist, believes that the risks of a human challenge trial might be acceptable if the benefits are sufficiently large. “If you were really careful about who you enrolled — people who are 18-25 for instance, and carefully evaluated so they have no other condition — you could get the risk down to a low level,” she explains. You would want to make sure that the risks to third parties, like the families of volunteers and medical personnel asked to treat them, are reduced to a low level as well. And you have to do more than weigh the risks and benefits, she cautions. “When judging the ethics of doing a study, justice considerations also matter, such as whether the risks are fairly distributed,” Shah says. “There are also other criteria: community engagement, fair selection of participants, robust informed consent, and payment that compensates for time and inconveniences.” She cautions that estimating the benefits of a human challenge trial is difficult, and the magnitude of the benefits depends heavily on the ability to coordinate between vaccine trials and researchers. Researchers would need assurances that regulators like the Food and Drug Administration would actually accept a human challenge trial as evidence of effectiveness; the FDA might have its own ethical concerns or be wary of going around standard procedure. If the FDA doesn’t approve a vaccine that’s been human challenge tested, then the test might not speed up vaccine adoption at all. Similarly, Shah notes that you would need different vaccine teams to be using comparable doses and sharing data, so they can judge whose vaccine is showing the most promise. Given how international this effort is, this coordination would need to happen through an international body like the World Health Organization. Without those ducks in a row, Shah warns, the benefits to a challenge trial could be severely attenuated. Given how far we have to go until a human challenge trial would be applicable, now is a good time to get that kind of coordination in place: for the FDA to issue guidance on whether it would consider human challenge trial results acceptable as evidence; for the various biotech companies, research institutes, and governments working on vaccines to coordinate evidence and data-sharing; and for clinicians to offer input so the vaccines being tested on human subjects are ones likely to be of use in the field. Once those elements are in place, the case for human challenge trials will be much more compelling. Sign up for the Future Perfect newsletter and we’ll send you a roundup of ideas and solutions for tackling the world’s biggest challenges — and how to get better at doing good. Future Perfect is funded in part by individual contributions, grants, and sponsorships. Learn more here. Support Vox’s explanatory journalism Every day at Vox, we aim to answer your most important questions and provide you, and our audience around the world, with information that has the power to save lives. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. Vox’s work is reaching more people than ever, but our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources — particularly during a pandemic and an economic downturn. Your financial contribution will not constitute a donation, but it will enable our staff to continue to offer free articles, videos, and podcasts at the quality and volume that this moment requires. Please consider making a contribution to Vox today.
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vox.com
Likely false negative test puts COVID patient on his ‘deathbed’
This Alabama man felt like hell despite receiving a negative test for coronavirus. Brian Holloway was tested for COVID-19 at a drive-thru clinic in Birmingham on April 1. While the results came back negative, his doctor believes it was likely a “false negative” based on his symptoms — and advised the 38-year-old to self-isolate. As...
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nypost.com
'Tiger King' star Joe Exotic does not have coronavirus, husband Dillon Passage says
Joe Exotic, who rose to fame after the Netflix docu-series "Tiger King" went viral, does not have coronavirus after being quarantined in prison.
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foxnews.com
Oklahoma mayor: Closing restaurants was 'worst day of my life'
CNN's Dana Bash talks with Tulsa, Oklahoma Mayor G. T. Bynum about the backlash he faced in his city after pushing for Covid-19 restrictions.
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edition.cnn.com
The other time America desperately sought a miracle cure for a devastating disease
Back when he was a boy in the 50's, writes Charles McNair, there was a similarly terrifying disease afoot in the US: polio. It came "with a thunderclap of fear," it's other name infantile paralysis, led to lockdowns -- as with coronavirus -- and left people with disabilities, sometimes sending them into iron lungs to breathe. And worse. Then ... a vaccine.
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edition.cnn.com
It has come to this: Will Trump pardon Joe Exotic of 'Tiger King'?
In a sign that coronavirus might be getting the best of us, a reporter asked President Trump if he'd pardon Joe Exotic of Netflix's hit series "Tiger King."
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latimes.com
Celine Dion changes 'My Heart Will Go On' lyrics to suit the coronavirus pandemic
Celine Dion took to Twitter to share a lighthearted rewrite of one of her most famous songs to encourage her followers to practice social distancing amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. 
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foxnews.com
Doctor who warned Boris Johnson of supply shortage dies from coronavirus
Dr. Abdul Mabud Chowdhury, 53, a urologist at London’s Homerton Hospital, succumbed to the disease Wednesday after spending 15 days at Queen’s Hospital in Romford, according to Sky News.
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nypost.com
Explainer: Next from the Fed - Help for Main Street
The U.S. Federal Reserve responded fast to the coronavirus crisis with open-ended programs to keep financial markets running and ensure major companies could raise cash as they usually do through large capital markets.
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reuters.com
Aircraft carrier USS Nimitz reports it is now coronavirus-free
The ship was the Navy's fourth aircraft carrier to report an infection among crew members.
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politico.com
Big audience for Alaska girl's virus safety tips
A 5-year-old Alaska girl is really serious about wanting to help others keep safe during the coronavirus outbreak. Nova Knight made a video about it that drew the praise of Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and others. (April 9)       
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usatoday.com
Astronauts leave virus-plagued planet for International Space Station
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Three astronauts flew to the International Space Station on Thursday, departing the virus-plagued planet with little fanfare and no family members at the launch site to bid them farewell. NASA’s Chris Cassidy and Russians Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner arrived at the orbiting lab in their Soyuz capsule six hours after...
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nypost.com
McCarthy hits 'disgusting' Democratic push for mail-in-voting
The House minority leader echoed Trump's complaints even as the coronavirus outbreak continues to spread.
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politico.com
The L.A. Times Book Prizes ceremony will be virtual, and free, this year
Winners of the L.A. Times Book Prizes will be announced in a special, virtual Twitter ceremony this year because of the global health crisis.
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latimes.com