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Texas family hosts ‘prom on the porch’ after coronavirus cancels school dance
Once a prom queen, always a prom queen. One thoughtful family in Texas wanted to ensure that their high-schooler would still get a chance to enjoy prom this year, even though the annual dance had been canceled amid the coronavirus pandemic. So, in lieu of the big event, her folks threw a “prom on the...
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nypost.com
Henrik Lundqvist’s Rangers end is hard to digest
The last two months of the season must have been exactly what Henrik Lundqvist envisioned at the 2018 post-Letter deadline purge when he chose to remain with the Rangers after he was given the chance to opt out of an embryonic rebuild program and pursue his Stanley Cup dream somewhere else. Because here were the...
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nypost.com
Breshad Perriman’s Jets goals after turning ‘tiny glimpse’ into $8 million
New Jets wide receiver Breshad Perriman believes the end of the 2019 season was just the beginning for him. Perriman had a monster finish for the Buccaneers last year. In their final five games, he caught 25 passes for 506 yards and five touchdowns. It was the most production he has shown in five years...
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nypost.com
Coronavirus could worsen US childhood obesity crisis
Public health experts believe one impact of the school closures mandated by the coronavirus pandemic will be an increase in childhood obesity across the United States. Andrew Rundle, associate professor of epidemiology at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, and his colleagues expect that COVID-19-related school closures will double out-of-school time this year for...
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nypost.com
Letters: Lack of sports during a pandemic may test the frustration level
Sports letters to the editor.
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latimes.com
How parents tackle new reality of kids’ birthday parties
Just a year ago, Roberta Melo-Brodis threw a party with 15 kids — and 45 adults, including friends and family members — for her younger daughter Kelsy’s first birthday. “It was a Minnie Mouse theme and everyone had a blast,” she says. “We bought a bouncy castle, and it was a big hit.” For Kelsy’s...
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nypost.com
Beyond Dungeons & Dragons: A guide to the vast, exciting world of tabletop RPGs
Do you need all of this stuff to play Dungeons & Dragons? Not really, but it looks cool. | Simon Hayter/Toronto Star via Getty Images Role-playing games let you tell a story with your friends, and most are available to play online. Tabletop role-playing games like Dungeons & Dragons, long stereotyped as the provenance of geeky shut-ins, are having a moment. They’ve spurred big, hit podcasts. They’ve been featured on TV shows. And they’ve spawned more than a few trend pieces in the media about how tabletop role-playing games like Dungeons & Dragons are having a moment. Sarah Whitten at CNBC explains: For four decades, Dungeons & Dragons has been on hobby and specialty shop shelves and played in basements out of sight. However, a shift in the popularity of geek culture, an update of the game itself and the rise of video platforms like Twitch and YouTube has helped the tabletop game grow its revenue for the last six years. “Last year was our 45th anniversary and our biggest year yet,” Nathan Stewart, vice president of the Dungeons & Dragons franchise, said. “So, that’s kind of crazy when you think about a brand of this size continuing to grow.” RPGs have moved beyond their typical audience, to say the least. I’m frequently surprised to learn that a friend I never would have expected to be into D&D is playing in a campaign with other friends, often thanks to the magic of video conferencing software. After all, the game allows players to use a system of rules to tell a story together, rolling dice to resolve conflicts and playing out scenes that take place between their characters. And what’s more fun than telling a story with your friends? But so much of the chatter about Dungeons & Dragons and the tabletop RPG boom has obscured a very real issue that potential players might face: Many RPGs have a steep learning curve, and the medium itself isn’t always the most user-friendly. Dungeons & Dragons is a fun game, but to get the most out of it, you need to have at least a few people at the table who really know what they’re doing and understand the rulebook backwards and forwards. That level of preparation often intimidates newcomers. So thank goodness that the boom in tabletop RPG fandom has coincided with a boom in terrific, well-designed RPGs that are perfect for beginners, many of which you can play with a handful of dice or a deck of playing cards. Plus, tabletop RPGs are eminently easy to play over video chat services if you can’t gather with your friends in person — something that RPG fans have known for ages and that many folks are newly discovering in this age of sheltering in place. Even better, websites like Roll20 and numerous others have sprung up online to support RPG groups by offering digital versions of core rulebooks and virtual dice to roll. That makes it far easier to gather with friends online to tell stories together, whether you’re several time zones apart or just staying at home. And even if you’re not on Roll20, the vast majority of RPGs are available as PDFs you can instantly download from sites like DriveThruRPG, and there are plenty of virtual dice simulators out there. Having a printer with which to print out character sheets and other materials is helpful but not strictly necessary. If you’d like to dive into this increasingly popular world, here’s your guide to becoming an RPG expert, from orientation to advanced level classes, with plenty of fun to be had along the way. Orientation: Getting your feet under you Listen to an RPG podcast: If you’re testing the RPG waters and not quite sure what these games are all about, allow me to recommend any of the great RPG podcasts out there. Most are focused on Dungeons & Dragons, as it is, after all, the most popular RPG of them all. But there are plenty of great podcasts focused on other games as well. My favorite is James D’Amato’s One-Shot, which tells a short story in a handful of episodes, each time using a different game. You’ll hear the players fill in the details of the story but also hear them work through the actual game mechanics, creating characters, rolling dice to overcome challenges, and so on. It’s a great way to get a sense of the full breadth of what the RPG world has to offer and a great way to get a crash course in RPG rules. And if that’s not to your liking, consider The Adventure Zone, the absurdly popular (and good!) RPG podcast from podcasting super-family the McElroys (it’s mostly Dungeons & Dragons, though other games are played); Join the Party, my favorite of the D&D podcasts; and Friends at the Table, which covers a variety of games and takes a storytelling-first approach, putting interesting characters and worlds ahead of the games themselves. For the Queen: Designer Alex Roberts is one of the RPG creators whose work most excites me right now, and For the Queen is her best game. It almost feels more like a card game than it does an RPG. You and a group of friends — ideally four or five, but the game scales both smaller and bigger remarkably well — are a party traveling alongside a queen on a very important mission. Each player draws a card that asks a question, about either who the player is or who the queen is, then answers that question, in as much detail as they want. Slowly but surely, both the characters created at the table and the queen — who is played by no one but described by everyone — are fleshed out, until someone draws a card that says the queen is under attack. Do you defend her or betray her? That’s up to you. For the Queen is an excellent introduction to RPGs because it uses a mechanic almost all of us are already familiar with — drawing cards — in service of the core idea behind RPGs: telling a story together. And if you don’t want to tell a story about a fantasy queen, the game allows you to tell a story about, say, a homecoming queen or a queen bee or a drag queen without any trouble. Your imagination is the only limit. It’s a game that makes telling a great story feel almost easy. If you like For the Queen, also try Roberts’s other big title, Star Crossed, a two-player game that simulates a romantic story using a Jenga tower. (Buy For the Queen here.) For beginners: Quick and easy RPGs for those just starting out Fiasco: For years, Fiasco was my “get newbies into RPGs” game, and it’s still one of my go-tos, even now that I have For the Queen. Created by indie RPG designer (and superstar) Jason Morningstar, Fiasco uses a variety of playbooks that contain potential details for characters and places in a chosen setting. Settings range from a worn-down spaceship to backstage at a high school play to a very loose riff on The Muppet Show, and the game always tells a story of things going very wrong, as characters hatch a crazy scheme, then watch it all fall apart around them. Fiasco beautifully simulates the mass chaos of a movie by the Coen brothers, without boasting complicated mechanics new players will struggle to learn. If you like Fiasco, also try Morningstar’s Winterhorn, a sobering look at how governments undercut activist groups via infiltration. (Buy Fiasco here.) The Quiet Year: My favorite RPG designer is Avery Alder, who’s created an astonishing number of great games and whose every release — even if it’s a deeply simple RPG designed to be played by one person in a few spare moments — shows immense thought and care. For my money, The Quiet Year is her masterpiece. The 2012 release takes place on a post-apocalyptic Earth, among a small band of people who’ve survived some terrible cataclysm. Using a deck of regular playing cards, players answer various prompts (each tied to a different card) and sketch in a map together of the community these survivors form. Still, every game ends the same way: with the arrival of renewed destruction. The Quiet Year works because it’s so simple that anybody can pick it up and play it, yet it also encourages meditation on community, survival, and mortality. If you like The Quiet Year, also try Alder’s Dream Askew, which is similar but much more focused on queer communities trying to survive in oppressive situations. (Buy The Quiet Year here.) Masks: The vast majority of RPGs take the form of a narrator — often called a game master or dungeon master — guiding players through a world the game master has constructed, with the players rolling dice to overcome obstacles they might encounter. In general, my tastes run toward games that give players as much power to construct the story as possible, which might be why I prefer games referred to as “Powered by the Apocalypse” (or PBTA — it’s named after the rule system developed for the game Apocalypse World, which has since been ported to numerous other games). In PBTA games, players roll two six-sided dice (or D6s) to determine whether they succeed or fail at tasks set for them by the game master. The GM, in turn, keeps things moving and tries to preserve a modicum of continuity. But the players also have extreme amounts of leeway to help shape the world and their relationships with other characters. That stripped-down simplicity makes PBTA games a natural fit for people spreading their wings either as players or game masters. One of my favorite PBTA games — and a great one for beginners — is Brendan Conway’s Masks, which asks players to sign on as a teen superhero in training. While the focus is on superheroics, it’s also on teens being teens and feeling things too deeply and making stupid decisions. Even as an adult, wrestling with those big emotions can be tremendously fun. And with superpowers involved, all of those very teen moments are heightened and blown way the fuck up. Add to that the idea that the players at the table are supposed to be coming together as a superhero team, and you have a recipe for disaster — in a fun way, of course. If you like Masks, also consider trying any of the scores of other PBTA games, but particularly Apocalypse World, Dungeon World, or Monster of the Week. And, hey, if you want to watch me play Masks, there’s a whole campaign of me doing just that with some friends available here. (Buy Masks here.) For intermediate players: More involved games for those who want a more complex experience Dungeons & Dragons: I rarely recommend that would-be RPG players begin their experience with Dungeons & Dragons, which involves a fair amount of number-crunching and stats, even in its most streamlined versions. (If you’re new to the world of D&D, the most recent fifth edition is probably the most stripped-down version of the game, and a good place to start.) D&D also requires a bunch of dice you might not have (though you could always download a virtual dice roller for that) and a dedicated game master who knows the rules back and forth. But you know what? I’ve had many friends get into RPGs via D&D, so maybe my reluctance is misplaced. For one thing, the sheer number of rules and stats often proves more welcoming to new players who want to know exactly what to do at every turn and are less comfortable with improvisation. For another, the game features a lot of combat, and “I hit the kobold in the face with a mace” is an easy answer to leap to when presented with a thorny dilemma. For yet another, to much of the public, Dungeons & Dragons is synonymous with role-playing, making it a seemingly natural place to start. I still hesitate to recommend it straight off, but if you have a friend who knows the game well and is willing to serve as game master — go for it. You’ll probably have a lot of fun. (Buy Dungeons & Dragons here.) Microscope: One of my favorite sub-genres of RPG is a game dedicated not to telling a story but building a world. These sorts of games attempt to take a high-level view of a place, digging into what makes it tick, often across centuries or millennia. My favorite designer in this category is Ben Robbins, whose Microscope is a must-play for those who think world-building sounds fun. Using a series of index cards, players chart the history of a world, from one point to another point, and each development can be as granular as you like. (If you’re using our own world as a setting, for instance, you might try “from the extinction of the dinosaurs to the rise of the first city” or “from World War I to World War II” or “from last Monday to today.”) Then, they dig in with more detail, fleshing out the world as much as they like. Sometimes, it might even become the setting for a session in another game entirely. If you like Microscope, also try Robbins’s own Kingdom, Caroline Hobbs’s Downfall, or Kimi Hughes’s Decuma. (Hughes is a friend of mine. Decuma is not yet commercially available, but it’s great and will be available soon.) (Buy Microscope here.) Blades in the Dark: Outwardly, Blades in the Dark has a lot of similarities to a PBTA game, but its mechanics actually operate significantly differently, in a way that allows for greater improvisation at the table between the game master and players, but also in a way that is slightly more convoluted and not recommended for newer players. These mechanics are different enough from PBTA that they have their own name — Forged in the Dark (FITD) — and have spawned a fleet of other games that use the same approach. Designed by John Harper, Blades in the Dark takes place in a fantastical city of Harper’s own invention, where rival criminal gangs compete to pull off gigantic heists. The game allows for players to reveal, when confronted with a seemingly insurmountable obstacle, that actually, they planned for that, by inserting a quick flashback scene on the fly. It’s incredibly fun when a game master knows the game inside and out, but can be hard to wrap your brain around if they don’t. If you like Blades in the Dark, try other FITD games like Scum and Villainy(set in space) or Band of Blades (a military fantasy). (Buy Blades in the Dark here.) For advanced players: These games will be better the more experience you have Girl Underground: Girl Underground, designed by Lauren McManamon and Jesse Ross, uses one of my favorite increasingly popular RPG mechanics: a character the entire table controls. On its surface, this game is just another PBTA game, themed around a young girl who falls into a magical world and meets companions there who help her find her way back to our world. (Think Dorothy, Scarecrow, and so on from Wizard of Oz.) But McManamon and Ross have come up with an ingenious way to get everybody at the table invested in the fate of that girl, who is the story’s protagonist: Everyone takes turns playing her. It’s often tricky to get an entire table invested in the journeys of each and every character. Girl Underground’s solution is to create one character everybody plays, then have that character be interested in all of the others. The mechanics of the game are simple — they’re the same as those of other PBTA games — but the trick of switching between playing the girl and playing one of her companions could prove complicated for a new RPG player. (My other favorite “shared character” game, Stonetop, in which all of the players come from the same town and, thus, control the fate of that town, is not yet commercially available.) (Buy Girl Underground here.) Fate: Most role-playing games provide a loose world and set of characters that the players can expand in any direction they want. But a handful of games offer players a base set of rules, then invite them to imagine absolutely anything they want. Such is Fate, a game that simply offers a series of mechanics intended to allow you to create any experience you can imagine. It’s almost too much freedom for some players, especially those who long for something more structured. But if all you want is an experience that can be anything at all, Fate can be a ton of fun. (Mike Olson, who worked on the most recent edition of Fate, is a friend of mine and also the person who got me into RPGs in the first place.) (Buy Fate here.) Vampire: The Masquerade: Sometimes you might want something more akin to, but still different from, D&D — different circumstances and a different setting, for example, while still having lots of rules and mechanics and stuff to fiddle with. There are plenty of games in this vein — generally called “rules-heavy,” compared to the “rules-light” games that mostly occupy this list — but my favorite is Vampire: The Masquerade. A classic from the early ’90s, Vampire: The Masquerade goes out of its way to force you to think and play like a vampire, by making you think about how long it’s been since you drank blood and so on. But the game also has a rich mythology and vampire world to futz around in, and experienced RPGers will probably get a kick out of being a blood-sucking ghoul. (Buy Vampire: The Masquerade here.) No matter what level of RPG player you are, remember that all of the games above are just starting points. If you like any of them, dive into other games like them or try out another game on the list. There are so many RPGs, and so many of them are good. Grab some friends, and hit the table, real or virtual.
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vox.com
People meeting Trump or Pence must now take rapid coronavirus test
WASHINGTON — Anyone meeting President Trump or Vice President Pence will now be subjected to rapid COVID-19 tests to prevent the leaders from becoming infected with the virus, the White House said Friday. Starting immediately, people expected to be in close approximately with either Trump or Pence will be given a the test to “to...
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nypost.com
How to make DIY no-sew face masks with fabric and hair elastics
Now that experts suggest that wearing a mask or face covering is helpful against the coronavirus, folks are scrambling to make their own rather than tap into the supply of surgical face masks needed by essential workers. This easy face-mask tutorial from DIY blog Japanese Creations has gone viral, and to make one, you don’t...
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nypost.com
15 gifts to get someone whose graduation was canceled
From the Kindle Paperwhite to a Keurig coffee maker to the Gravity weighted blanket, these are the best gifts for someone whose graduation was canceled due to the coronavirus.       
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usatoday.com
Government's new program for small businesses hurt by coronavirus is slowed by snags
The federal government's $350-billion coronavirus bailout for small businesses, which was supposed to start Friday, ran into confusion and delays.
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latimes.com
Union calls Powell's Books announcement of staff rehires 'misleading'
A union statement is "disappointed" with how Powell's Books has been informing the public about staffing after laying off most of its employees.
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latimes.com
Stocks drop for the week as layoffs spook Wall Street
The Dow slumped on Friday after U.S. employers cut 701,000 more jobs than they added, the first drop in a decade.
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cbsnews.com
New this weekend: Free HBO, Duchess Meghan's Hollywood return and more
HBO's free content, Drake's new song, the ACM's country music special and Meghan Markle's Hollywood return highlight the weekend.       
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usatoday.com
NYPD unions give cops coronavirus supplies, hospitals food
The Sergeants Benevolent Association was making its way to every precinct, housing bureau and transit district to deliver 80,000 bottles of hand sanitizer and 500 galloons of bleach.
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nypost.com
Man carries large American flag on 7-mile run to honor workers battling coronavirus
When his community needed some support, Chris Wauben came running. Wauben, a resident of Holiday, Fla., recently set out for a seven-mile run while carrying a 6-foot-by-10-foot American flag as part of his efforts to honor the brave health care workers battling the coronavirus crisis. “I’ve been running with the American flag for probably about...
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nypost.com
Billionaire Investor Mark Cuban on Which Stocks Are Buys, Sells and Holds
"When we get to the other side of this, call it America 2.0, the more entrepreneurs we have coming up with unique ideas, the sooner we will recover," Mark Cuban tells Newsweek.
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newsweek.com
‘Ritual Grounds Us.’ Amid Coronavirus, Here’s How People Are Planning to Take the Passover Seder Experience Online
Passover is just one spring holiday effected by coronavirus
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time.com
LA retailer Buck Mason makes masks for the masses to protect against coronavirus
In an exclusive interview with Fox News, Buck Mason co-founder Sasha Koehn explained that making face masks was an easy move for his company.
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foxnews.com
‘It Started as a Joke:’ Laughter and tears at beloved Brooklyn comedy fest
Arts festivals can be truly life-changing. They can also be ripe for mockery, which is what happened to comedian Eugene Mirman and his friends back in 2008. Their good-natured satire, the Eugene Mirman Comedy Festival, surprised them by becoming the real deal, selling out shows and running for a decade. “It Started as a Joke,”...
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nypost.com
Jared Kushner’s ventilator remarks contradicted a government website. Hours later, the site was changed.
Jared Kushner speaks at the White House on Thursday. | Win McNamee/Getty Images The first son-in-law would have you believe that the federal stockpile is “not supposed to be states’ stockpiles.” Jared Kushner would have you believe the Strategic National Stockpile of medical supplies wasn’t meant to be the main national resource in the event of a medical crisis — and now, the stockpile’s official website agrees. It’s an Orwellian twist that shows the lengths to which the Trump administration is going to tell states they need to fend for themselves as the number of coronavirus cases in the US continues to climb with no peak yet in sight. To back up: Kushner created quite a negative stir with comments he made during Thursday’s White House coronavirus task force press briefing characterizing the Strategic National Stockpile as “our stockpile” instead of “states’ stockpiles that they then use” — remarks at odds with language on the stockpile’s website that described it as a resource for “state, local, tribal, and territorial responders” to obtain “the right medicines and supplies ... during an emergency.” But within hours of Kushner making those widely decried remarks, language on the stockpile’s website was changed to be in line with the view he espoused about it belonging to the feds but not necessarily the states. “The Strategic National Stockpile’s role is to supplement state and local supplies during public health emergencies,” the website now says. “Many states have products stockpiled, as well. The supplies, medicines, and devices for life-saving care contained in the stockpile can be used as a short-term stopgap buffer when the immediate supply of adequate amounts of these materials may not be immediately available.” The change was first noted by journalist Laura Bassett: This is what the website for the federal stockpile said yesterday vs what it says today, after Kushner was caught lying about how states aren’t supposed to be using it. It was changed to say, “Many states have products stockpiled, as well.” https://t.co/kbNXiwaJbX pic.twitter.com/xAtPKIyHnA— Laura Bassett (@LEBassett) April 3, 2020 Kushner has been running a coronavirus task force operating in the shadow of the official one overseen by Vice President Mike Pence. His work so far has reportedly been unfruitful. On Tuesday, the New York Times quoted an unnamed senior administration official who described Kushner’s effort as “a ‘frat party’ that descended from a UFO and invaded the federal government” and reported that members of his task force used “the website FreeConferenceCall.com to arrange high-level meetings.” Thursday’s briefing represented a rare public appearance before the media for the president’s son-in-law. It did not go particularly well. Kushner’s opening statement was so replete with meaningless startup-style jargon that it resembled a Saturday Night Live cold open come to life. At one point, he said the word “data” four times in 20 seconds without ever detailing what all that “data” was being used for. Here's Jared Kushner going for the world record of most meaningless corporate buzzwords used in a single one-minute video clip pic.twitter.com/Vy1QJEhLQa— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) April 2, 2020 During the Q&A portion of the briefing, it became clear that the point of Kushner being there in the first place was to contribute to President Trump’s ongoing effort to shift blame for scarcities of ventilators and personal protective equipment (PPE) for health care workers away from the federal government and onto states. “The notion of the federal stockpile was it’s supposed to be our stockpile. It’s not supposed to be states’ stockpiles that they then use,” Kushner said. JARED KUSHNER: "The notion of the federal stockpile was it's supposed to be our stockpile. It's not supposed to be states stockpiles that they then use." pic.twitter.com/9Q7j8QBCMv— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) April 2, 2020 Kushner’s claim contradicted language on the HHS website detailing the purpose and history of the federal stockpile — but aligned perfectly with the administration’s overall response to the crisis. The Trump administration’s philosophy is that states are mostly on their own Thursday’s press briefing came amid reports that New York may as soon as next week run out of the ventilators the state needs to treat Covid-19 patients, forcing hospitals to ration care. And it isn’t alone — as the number of coronavirus cases continues to grow nationwide, states such as Washington and Michigan are also reportedly running low on ventilators. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) has repeatedly pleaded with the federal government to do more to provide states like his with ventilators, as well as decrying the current system in which prices are driven up by states not only bidding against one another for medical supplies but also competing with the federal government. CUOMO: "How can we be in a position where you can have New Yorkers possibly dying because they can't get a ventilator, but a federal agency saying 'I'm going to leave the ventilators in a stockpile.' I mean, have we really come to that point?" pic.twitter.com/8XqAh99Bka— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) March 24, 2020 Cuomo has said his state will need 30,000 ventilators to meet the demand, but he reportedly only has 2,200 in the state stockpile. But instead of using all the tools at his disposal to help, Trump has indicated that he doesn’t believe Cuomo actually needs that many. Though Trump later tried to walk back those comments, Kushner is apparently on the same wavelength. According to Vanity Fair’s Gabriel Sherman, Kushner described Cuomo as an alarmist during a recent White House meeting. According to an unnamed source who talked to Sherman, Kushner said during the meeting, “I have all this data about ICU capacity. I’m doing my own projections, and I’ve gotten a lot smarter about this. New York doesn’t need all the ventilators. ... I don’t believe you need 40,000 or 30,000 ventilators.” Kushner touched on that same I-know-best theme in his comments during Thursday’s briefing, saying at one point that “some governors you speak to, or senators, and they don’t know what’s in their state ... most governors didn’t know off the bat what they needed.” Trump echoed those comments, saying “the states should have building their stockpiles ... we’re a backup. We’re not an ordering clerk.” The whole point of the federal stockpile is to help the states Despite what Kushner would have you believe, the entire purpose of the Strategic National Stockpile is to help states obtain resources they don’t have the means to acquire themselves during crises. The Washington Post’s Aaron Blake detailed the background: The Strategic National Stockpile was formerly known as the National Pharmaceutical Stockpile. In a description of what was then known as the NPS in 2001, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acknowledged that states couldn’t be counted on to have sufficient supplies in situations such as biological or chemical terrorism and that’s why the federal stockpile was needed. “Few U.S. state or local governments have the resources to create sufficient pharmaceutical stockpiles on their own,” the report says. “The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, under U.S. Congressional mandate, has developed and implemented a National Pharmaceutical Stockpile (NPS) to address this need.” In other words, the program was designed to supplement the states and deliver supplies to them that, according to this U.S. government document, they won’t have because of budgetary constraints. Trump, however, has made abundantly clear he thinks it’s up to states like New York to fend for themselves. “Long before this pandemic arrived, they should have been on the open market just buying,” he claimed on Thursday. "Long before this pandemic arrived, they should have been on the open market just buying" -- Trump tries to shift blame for medical gear shortages to the states pic.twitter.com/vtw3xDC3o6— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) April 2, 2020 Thursday’s briefing came amid growing concerns that Trump is playing politics by being accommodating with requests for supplies made by Republican governors who support him but less so when requests come from people like Cuomo, whom he doesn’t see as on his side and who govern states that aren’t crucial to his reelection hopes. Judging from his performance on Thursday, Kushner’s role seems to provide an intellectual gloss on things. But to hear New York doctor Craig Spencer tell it, Kushner would be better served visiting an ICU like the one he works in instead of tinkering with models meant to prove that New York is asking for more than it needs. “if you’re not stepping foot in a hospital, if you don’t have a visual of what’s going on, then you can understand all the high-level modeling necessary to get the right amount of ventilators or the concerns about supply chains or PPE, but to stand by when [Trump’s] implication is that ‘maybe we don’t need all those ventilators,’ or ‘maybe the ICUs aren’t filling up’ ... that’s not our lived reality on a day-to-day basis,” Spencer told Vox on Tuesday, right after he finished his shift working at Columbia University hospital in Manhattan. “The first two patients I saw were [in] cardiac arrest from coronavirus. We couldn’t move one out of the room fast enough to get the other one in,” Spencer added. “That’s the reality.” The news moves fast. To stay updated, follow Aaron Rupar on Twitter, and read more of Vox’s policy and politics coverage.
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vox.com
Ilhan Omar says Trump's coronavirus response could cost 'hundreds of thousands' of lives
Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., argued that President Trump could cost "hundreds of thousands of lives" through his administration's "completely failed" response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
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foxnews.com
SiriusXM's new channel devoted to female comics is the laugh we need right now
SiriusXM has launched She's So Funny, a new comedy channel featuring star female comics Amy Schumer, Tiffany Haddish, Whoopi Goldberg, Ali Wong and others.
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latimes.com
Teenager arrested in deaths of University of Wisconsin doctor and her husband
The couple was found on Tuesday in the university arboretum.
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edition.cnn.com
Brooklyn doctor: We are on the front lines and need this to feel safe
Dr. Amy Plasencia, one of the many medical residents fighting Covid-19 in New York City, says she and other residents, interns and fellows who are on the front lines deserve better protections and a bill of rights to help keep them safe.
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edition.cnn.com
'Baywatch' star David Chokachi sheds longtime Miracle Mile home
Following 13 years of ownership, David Chokachi of 'Baywatch' fame has sold his Spanish-style home in the Miracle Mile area for $1.515 million.
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latimes.com
Kentucky orders quarantine-breakers to wear ankle monitors
Authorities have ordered Louisville residents who have been exposed to the potentially deadly virus but won't self-quarantine to wear a tracking device to ensure they don't leave the house, CNN affiliate WDRB reports.
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nypost.com
Feds ramp up probe of $2.1B Google-Fitbit deal amid privacy worries
The Department of Justice has stepped up its investigation of Google’s proposed $2.1 billion acquisition of Fitbit, a deal that critics say could pose increased threats to customer privacy, two sources close to the situation told The Post. In a move that typically signals increased scrutiny for a merger, regulators are now conducting a so-called...
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nypost.com
'We Are Swamped': Coronavirus Propels Interest In Raising Backyard Chickens For Eggs
"We've never seen anything like this and I've been here since 1964," the owner of one hatchery says. For anyone looking to start their own flock, an expert has advice on breeds.
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npr.org
Preakness Stakes postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak
The Preakness Stakes, the second leg in horse racing's Triple Crown, has been postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak.
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latimes.com
Pandemic Claims Doctors In The Philippines At Startling Rates
At least 136 people have died of COVID-19 in the Philippines. At least 14 of them, maybe more, were doctors.
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npr.org
White House Stresses Payments Will Come Soon, As Unemployment Soars
The Trump administration has promised that the first direct payments to taxpayers will arrive in two weeks. The White House has scheduled a briefing on its coronavirus response for 5 p.m. ET.
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npr.org
New York considers loosening requirements for funeral directors as bodies pile up
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politico.com
Cats can infect each other with coronavirus, study finds
Hold on to your cats! The rapidly-spreading coronavirus can be transmitted between your feline pets, according to a new Chinese study. Researchers at Harbin Veterinary Research Institute found that cats are not only susceptible to contracting COVID-19 but can pass it on to their furry friends as well. But other animals — such as dogs,...
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nypost.com
Vermont Directs Major Retailers to Halt In-Person Sale of 'Nonessential' Items
Vermont is directing major retailers in the state to refrain from conducting in-person sales of  "nonessential" items, the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development announced this week.
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breitbart.com
U.S. Postal Service could shut down by June, lawmakers warn
As funding runs low, U.S. Postal Service says it may not be able to keep operations going.
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cbsnews.com
Remains of 100 million-year-old flying pterosaur with 6-inch beak unearthed by scientists
A new species of pterosaur -- a flying reptile that lived 100 million years ago -- has been discovered by scientists in Africa.
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foxnews.com
‘Tootsie Slide’ into these surprising Drake facts
The world knows Drake as a music superstar, dropping dance jams from quarantine in Toronto, Canada. Even the biggest Drizzy fans, however, might not know these seven facts about the “Tootsie Slide” singer.   Subscribe to our YouTube!
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nypost.com
Disney announces new dates for 'Black Widow,' 'Mulan,' and more
Disney announced on Friday it's new release schedule for all the upcoming movies that were shifted around due to the coronavirus outbreak. 
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foxnews.com
Key GOP senator warns that U.S. needs millions of coronavirus tests by August
“The big test for the administration right now is: Can you scale up the production of hundreds of millions of tests," he says.
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politico.com
Rush Limbaugh: Democrats ‘Salivating’ over Coronavirus as Opportunity to ‘Decapitate’ U.S. Economy
Rush Limbaugh warned Americans of the Democrats’ attempt to use the coronavirus emergency as a means to “decapitate" the U.S. economy.
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breitbart.com
Storytime with Dana: 'Squeak, Rumble, Whomp Whomp Whomp!'
Today’s book is a treat: "Squeak, Rumble, Whomp Whomp Whomp!" And who better to read all of the onomatopoeia in this book than my husband Peter?
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foxnews.com
New York, Connecticut want details on Zoom’s privacy practices
At least two US state attorneys have sought information from Zoom Video Communications following multiple reports that questioned the privacy and security of the videoconferencing app. Zoom’s popularity has surged as employees at businesses, schools and millions of other organizations across the world work from home due to lockdowns imposed to slow the spread of...
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nypost.com
Trump Elevates Unqualified Judge As a Reward for Defending Kavanaugh
McConnell ditched coronavirus relief negotiations to celebrate Justin Walker's swearing-in. Now Walker is getting promoted.
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slate.com
Anick Jesdanun, longtime AP technology writer, dies at 51
Anick Jesdanun, deputy technology editor for The Associated Press, has died in New York City of coronavirus complications
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washingtonpost.com
This isolation system is how the Air Force will transfer coronavirus patients
The Air Force is training medical professionals to operate an isolation system used to safely transport patients with infectious diseases aboard military aircraft.
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abcnews.go.com
Could giant concrete 'umbrellas' stop a hurricane's storm surge?
Could giant "dual-purpose" concrete umbrellas provide shade on sunny days and then transform into protective barriers on stormy days?        
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usatoday.com
Hobby Lobby is temporarily closing all stores starting Friday night due to the coronavirus
After defying state shelter-in-place orders, Hobby Lobby announced it will temporarily close all stores starting Friday night due to coronavirus.       
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usatoday.com