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Global PPE manufacturer Top Glove hit by Covid-19 outbreak

In Malaysia, there’s been a serious outbreak of Covid-19 among workers at the world’s biggest manufacturer of medical gloves. The company, Top Glove, which supplies the NHS, was the subject of an investigation by this programme in June. We revealed shocking evidence about working and living conditions which put the migrant workforce itself at risk…
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Kamala Harris Sworn In Using Thurgood Marshall Bible to Honor Personal Hero
Vice President Kamala Harris has said that Marshall, the great-grandson of a slave who won a landmark civil-rights case and became the first Black Supreme Court Justice, is a hero of hers.
5 m
newsweek.com
Has Bachelorette Clare Crawley Addressed Split From Dale Moss? Everything She's Said
Moss confirmed the breakup on Instagram Tuesday, Crawley has not said anything directly about it.
7 m
newsweek.com
'Good Riddance!' China Celebrates Trump Departure
Chinese government media effusively celebrated the departure of outgoing President Donald Trump on Wednesday, describing the anti-communist leader as "negative and destructive" and exclaiming, "good riddance!"
7 m
breitbart.com
GOP Lawmaker Wants 481-Mile 'President Donald J. Trump Highway' in Florida
Rep. Anthony Sabatini tweeted his support for the proposal one day before "one of the greatest presidents in American history" left the White House.
7 m
newsweek.com
PS5 Restock Updates for Kohl's, Target, Newegg and More
Limited quantities of the PlayStation 5 are infrequently released and sell out almost immediately.
8 m
newsweek.com
Lady Gaga belts out emotional National Anthem at Biden inauguration
Check performing at a presidential inauguration off of Lady Gaga’s already impressive list of accomplishments. The “Stupid Love” singer — dressed  in a dramatic black and red gown, with a large gold eagle brooch  — gave an exuberant, emphatic performance of “The Star Spangled Banner.” Showing that she doesn’t need all of the razzle dazzle,...
9 m
nypost.com
Trump's Farewell Ceremony Attended by 5 White House Staffers, Sean Spicer and First Family
Trump addressed a small crowd at Joint Base Andrews in his final remarks as president before he departed for his Florida home.
newsweek.com
Monarch butterfly population moves closer to extinction
SAN FRANCISCO — The number of western monarch butterflies wintering along the California coast has plummeted precipitously to a record low, putting the orange-and-black insects closer to extinction, researchers announced Tuesday. An annual winter count by the Xerces Society recorded fewer than 2,000 butterflies, a massive decline from the tens of thousands tallied in recent...
nypost.com
Should COVID vaccination restore "basic rights" to avoid lockdowns?
Germany's Foreign Minister thinks so, and he's not alone, but his fellow cabinet members, and many experts say vaccination shouldn't bring privileges.
cbsnews.com
Why are so many women wearing purple at Biden’s Inauguration today?
In a sea of red, white and blue, there's a whole lot of purple.
nypost.com
Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president, as the Trump era ends amid a national rift
Trump skipped the inauguration — themed ‘America United’ — two weeks after inciting a deadly siege on the U.S. Capitol.
washingtonpost.com
Trumps swampiest pardons, ranked
President Trump came into office pledging to drain the swamp. He exits having extracted a bunch of allies who were neck-deep in the muck from it.
washingtonpost.com
WATCH: Biden Takes The Oath Of Office
At noon, the Biden presidency will officially begin, as he is sworn in as the nation's 46th chief executive.
npr.org
Navalny releases investigation into decadent billion-dollar 'Putin palace'
Even locked up in a detention center on the outskirts of Moscow, Kremlin critic Alexey Navalny continues to be a thorn in Russian President Vladimir Putin's side.
edition.cnn.com
Navalny releases investigation into decadent billion-dollar 'Putin palace'
Even locked up in a detention center on the outskirts of Moscow, Kremlin critic Alexey Navalny continues to be a thorn in Russian President Vladimir Putin's side.
edition.cnn.com
WATCH: Sen. Amy Klobuchar delivers opening inauguration remarks
Klobuchar noted that the inauguration ceremony "is a culmination of 244 years of a democracy."
abcnews.go.com
Rand Paul Slams 'Notorious Liar' Comey -- 'Should Be in Prison'
Wednesday ahead of Joe Biden's swearing-in as President of the United States, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) called for former FBI Director James Comey's imprisonment. This comes in response to Comey telling The Guardian that the GOP "needs to be burned down or changed."
breitbart.com
Pence leaves Biden report on COVID-19 Task Force
Vice President Mike Pence left a report for President-Elect Joe Biden on the past administration’s White House Coronavirus Task Force.
foxnews.com
Where are the best parks and public spaces in the United States?
Our shared public spaces have become more important than ever in the past year, giving us a place to get outside, get active and breathe the fresh air.      
usatoday.com
Donald Trump Said He'll Return, but Most Think He Shouldn't Be Allowed to Run Again
The outgoing president has previously alluded to running in 2024, with comments having hinted at feeling he has unfinished business.
newsweek.com
Make these homemade peppermint patties this week
A fun project with a delicious reward      
usatoday.com
Kamala Harris is poised to be a historic — and influential — vice president
Amanda Northrop/Vox As a tiebreaker in the Senate and a close adviser to the president, Harris takes on a unique role. With her inauguration, Vice President Kamala Harris has made history: She’s the first woman — and first Black and South Asian person — to serve in the role, and now the highest-ranking woman in US government. But beyond these firsts, Harris is poised to have a vice presidency unlike few others, in large part because of the singular role she’s expected to take on. Harris will be one of just a handful of vice presidents to preside over a 50-50 Senate, making her a pivotal tiebreaker in the upper chamber. And given her expertise as a lawmaker, she’s set to be an impactful voice as the US continues to combat ongoing public health and economic crises. President Joe Biden has also said Harris will be his top adviser — “the last person in the room” — with the ability to strongly influence White House policy. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Vice President-elect Kamala Harris delivers brief remarks during a memorial service to honor the more than 400,000 Americans who have died due to the Covid-19 pandemic in front of the Lincoln Memorial on January 19. “The way she’s approaching the vice presidency is very similar to the way Joe Biden approached the vice presidency with Barack Obama,” Harris press secretary Sabrina Singh previously told USA Today. “She’s walking into this office as a full governing partner to Joe Biden and is completely aligned and supportive of his priorities.” In the Senate, Harris’s 51st vote could be a key one: On everything from resolutions rolling back Trump-era rules to confirmations for Cabinet nominees to legislation that’s approved via budget reconciliation, her vote may well be needed to reach a simple majority. And while breaking tie votes is nothing new for vice presidents — Mike Pence did it 13 times during his tenure — it’s typically less common, with Democrats’ incredibly narrow margins suggesting that Harris could be doing it a lot more often. “Vice President Harris will be in a relatively unique role among modern vice presidents,” Joel Goldstein, a St. Louis University law professor and expert on the vice presidency, tells Vox. “The even division of the Senate, the polarization of the parties, and the demise of the filibuster regarding appointments means that she may have occasion to cast some important tie-breaking votes.” Harris could be a major tiebreaker on key votes Prior to this term, Dick Cheney was the last vice president to preside over a 50-50 Senate — though that split only lasted for a few months in 2001 before Sen. Jim Jeffords (R-VT) decided to switch parties. At the time, Cheney only broke two ties while the Senate was divided in this way — both of which were on budget amendments. Harris could have to do the same much more frequently, both because the Senate has grown more partisan since then, and because the threshold for approving Cabinet nominees and most judges has been reduced to a simple majority. “If there’s going to be a tie vote, it could easily come during nominations,” says George Washington University political science professor Sarah Binder. And though he never presided over an evenly divided Senate, Pence’s tiebreakers could provide a glimpse into the subjects Harris may have to step in on: His vote helped confirm former Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, advanced multiple judges, and allowed Republicans to roll back Obama-era regulations that enabled abortion providers to receive federal grants. In general, Harris could potentially break ties on few different types of votes: Cabinet nominees and judges: These nominees require 51 votes to be confirmed, and depending on how much GOP support they garner — could need a tiebreaker to move forward. Congressional Review Act votes: Using the Congressional Review Act, Senate Democrats are able to undo agency rules made within the last 60 legislative days if they have 51 votes to do so, and support in the House. Democrats could take this route to roll back Trump-era regulations, including changes to environmental protections. Budget resolution: A budget resolution, which could be used to pass more ambitious legislation, including more Covid-19 relief, only needs a simple majority of votes to pass — rather than 60 votes, the threshold most legislation must clear. The process for approving this measure is known as reconciliation. Just how many times Harris may have to use this power will depend on the opposition Senate Republicans put forth on issues like Cabinet picks and efforts to use the Congressional Review Act to undo the policies of the Trump administration. One factor is how united Democrats stay across legislative priorities and nominees: Because of the Senate numbers, every Democrat in the caucus will be needed to approve pretty much anything that requires a simple majority for it to be successful. “The two variables are the reaction of the Republicans and whether the measures on the floor can garner [moderate support],” says Binder. If Democrats can consistently hold their caucus together and peel off one or more moderate Republicans, tie-breaking may be less necessary, for instance. And while this procedural role is one that vice presidents have long held, Democrats’ bare majority in the Senate — and the expansive goals they’d like to achieve under the Biden administration — could put a spotlight on Harris. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images In the Senate, Harris’s 51st vote could be an impactful one: on everything from resolutions to rolling back Trump-era rules to confirmations for Cabinet nominees. “It certainly underscores the importance that she brings to the legislative agenda and will showcase her role,” former Sen. Tom Daschle, who was a minority leader in the last 50-50 Senate, told Vox. As a tiebreaker, the vice president’s focus is more to aid the party to get to a particular vote threshold than to shape the legislation itself — though Harris could potentially also take on the latter job. Harris, in a recent op-ed in the San Francisco Chronicle, said she would embrace this responsibility but urged lawmakers to find common ground. “Since our nation’s founding, only 268 tie-breaking votes have been cast by a vice president. I intend to work tirelessly as your vice president, including, if necessary, fulfilling this Constitutional duty,” she wrote. There are different policy areas that Harris could prioritize Much of the role of the vice presidency will depend on how Biden and Harris opt to structure their partnership, and his comments so far suggest that she could be quite influential. “Different presidents structure the responsibilities of the vice president in different ways,” former Democratic Senate staffer Jim Manley told Vox. “Both Joe Biden and Al Gore had a seat at the table for every major decision.” Biden has spoken about being how important it was for him to be the “last person in the room” when Obama made key decisions on everything from the Recovery Act to troop withdrawals in Iraq, and he’s committed to having the same type of relationship with Harris. “I told him I wanted to be the last person in the room before he made important decisions. That’s what I asked Kamala. I asked Kamala to be the last voice in the room,” Biden has said. Harris, too, said she looks forward to being a “full partner” to the president. “Vice presidents are only as powerful as their presidents let them be,” says Jody Baumgartner, a political science professor at Eastern Carolina University and expert on the vice presidency. This means the dynamic between the two leaders is often a deciding factor in how they coordinate governance responsibilities. Exactly how Biden and Harris will share labor isn’t yet clear. But given Harris’s work as a senator — and her position as a tiebreaker — one role she could fill is as the administration’s liaison to Congress. When he was vice president, since he’d served in the body for decades at that point, Biden worked heavily with legislators. “Whenever [then-Senate Majority Leader Harry] Reid had a problem with Republicans, one of his phone calls he would make would be with the vice president, who had good relationships with Capitol Hill,” says Manley. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images Much of the role of the vice presidency will depend on how Biden and Harris opt to structure their partnership. Because of Biden’s own background in Congress, this could be a continued focus for him as well. Harris has extensive experience she will bring on the legislative front and on specific issues. She was a leading author of the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, the Senate’s anti-lynching measure and the LIFT Act, which would expand tax credits for middle-class households. During her four years as a senator, Harris served on the judiciary and intelligence committees. Before that, she spent more than two decades as a California prosecutor, both as the state’s attorney general and San Francisco district attorney. She comes into her new role with deep expertise and a broad skill set. And as the first Black woman and first South Asian woman in this role, she’ll also be in a position to elevate the voices of women of color on different policy subjects. “I am interested to see whether and how her identity shapes her approach to this partnership,” Howard University political science professor Keneshia Grant told Vox. “I am hopeful that she is able to translate her lived experience at the intersection of race and gender into policies that are sensitive to the lives of everyday people.” With her background in criminal justice reform, this could be among the areas that Harris continues to focus on, with progressives likely to keep pressuring the administration on their stances. Spokesperson Symone Sanders previously told the Associated Press that the Biden administration hopes to take advantage of Harris’s wide-ranging expertise by having her be involved in every major issue the administration tackles. The four pillars the new administration has laid out so far to focus on are Covid-19, economic recovery, racial justice, and climate change. “She has a voice in all of those. She has an opinion in all those areas. And it will probably get to a point where she is concentrating on some of the areas more specifically,” Sanders said. “But right now, I think what we’re faced with in this country is so big, it’s all hands on deck.”
vox.com
Donald Trump Defends 'Popular' Melania Despite Worst Ever First Lady Rating in Poll
Donald Trump called his wife Melania "so popular with the people" in his farewell speech, despite her low ratings in recent polling data.
newsweek.com
Vice President Kamala Harris Takes The Oath Of Office
Harris has officially become the first woman, first Black person and first Asian American to be vice president.
npr.org
Kamala Harris sworn into history
Harris becomes the first woman, Black woman and Asian American to serve as vice president.
washingtonpost.com
California law enforcement preps for threats of violence on Inauguration Day
Law enforcement in California remains on high alert in preparation for threats that may arise in response to the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden.
latimes.com
Kamala Harris takes historic oath, becomes nation's first female, Black vice president
Kamala Harris cemented her place in history on Wednesday, becoming the first woman, and the first woman of color, to be sworn in as the vice president of the United States. 
foxnews.com
Joe Biden's Grandchildren Tell Jenna Bush Hager That They Urged Run for President
Each granddaughter also shared what they did to help manage election week stress.
newsweek.com
China Offers Joe Biden Advice As He Enters Office: Act 'Rational, Objective'
"We hope that the new U.S. government can meet China halfway, properly handle differences in a spirit of mutual respect, and conduct mutually beneficial cooperation in more areas," Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying said.
newsweek.com
Detroit Lions hire Dan Campbell as head coach. Here's what he faces
Dan Campbell joins Dick Jauron and Joe Schmidt as the only former Detroit Lions players to coach the team in the Super Bowl era        
usatoday.com
Magnitude 3.5 earthquake strikes in South Los Angeles
A magnitude 3.5 earthquake struck in South Los Angeles on Wednesday morning.
latimes.com
Rep. Crenshaw: Media pivoting right back to softer Obama-era coverage for Biden, Harris
Republican Texas Congressman Dan Crenshaw said on Wednesday that it is “frustrating” to “watch the press go right back to the Obama era” now that Joe Biden will be the next president of the United States.
foxnews.com
How Deion Sanders helped secure a pardon from Donald Trump for rapper Lil Wayne
Deion Sanders was cited for his support in Donald Trump's pardon of rapper Lil Wayne early Wednesday. Lil Wayne faced up to 0 years in prison.        
usatoday.com
Watch Mike Pence arrive at Biden's inauguration ceremony
Outgoing Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen arrive at the inauguration ceremony of President-elect Joe Biden. Outgoing President Donald Trump is not attending the inauguration. He is the first outgoing president to skip his replacement's inauguration in more than 150 years.
edition.cnn.com
Australian Open players in quarantine accused of feeding mice in their hotel rooms
More than 70 players and members of their entourages must remain in their hotel rooms for 14 days after passengers on their flights tested positive for the coronavirus.
washingtonpost.com
Jeff Passan rips Craig Carton over Jared Porter criticism: ‘Irresponsible garbage’
It’s ESPN against WFAN again, only instead of Michael Kay and Mike Francesa doing battle, it’s baseball insider Jeff Passan and new afternoon host Craig Carton. Carton and Evan Roberts went at Passan for waiting so long to release the story on former Mets general manager Jared Porter sexually harassing a female reporter. ESPN began...
nypost.com
Cole Sprouse not interested in a 'Suite Life of Zack and Cody' reboot
Sorry fans of "The Suite Life of Zack and Cody," but Cole Sprouse has moved on.
edition.cnn.com
Woman will get Moderna COVID-19 vaccine second dose despite allergic reaction to first
One woman who suffered an allergic reaction to Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine said she will "absolutely, positively" get the second dose citing concerns about the virus itself.
foxnews.com
‘A Candy-Colored Clown’: David Lynch’s Pop Musical Fixations
Lynch sees mid-20th century pop music as a palpable symbol of the era's wholesomeness, yet the way he utilizes these classic songs scrambles their easy sentimentality.
nypost.com
Trump releases pot prisoners jailed for life under Biden’s 1994 crime bill
President Trump on Wednesday released seven prisoners with life sentences for marijuana — including some jailed without parole under President-elect Joe Biden’s 1994 crime bill. Paraplegic Michael Pelletier, 65, and Corvain Cooper, 41, are among the men who received prison commutations from Trump. Pelletier had a life sentence for smuggling pot from Canada into Maine in...
nypost.com
Paulina Gretzky dishes on joys, challenges of growing up as Wayne’s daughter
Paulina Gretzky had the “best life ever” growing up as Wayne Gretzky’s daughter, but it wasn’t without challenges. Appearing Tuesday on “The Netchicks” podcast with Natalie Buck and sister-in-law Sara Gretzky, Dustin Johnson’s longtime love spoke about keeping herself in check while growing up in the public eye. “You have to always be reserved. The...
nypost.com
Greta Thunberg Turns Donald Trump's Words Against Him as She Mocks His Exit
The outgoing president had previously criticized the climate change campaigner, who had admonished him and other world leaders for "failing young people."
newsweek.com
Party polarization hit a high under Trump. Can Biden reel it back?
Gallup data offer a slight glimmer of hope.
washingtonpost.com
The Daily 202: Susan Rice plans to put racial equity at the heart of Biden's agenda
'I’ll be driving our efforts to ensure that matters of equity and justice are fully incorporated into all that we try to do,' the new Domestic Policy Council head said.
washingtonpost.com
What Time Does ‘Riverdale’ Season 5 Premiere on The CW?
It's prom season, baby!
nypost.com
The Hungry Mungry Trump
Donald Trump speaks at the Republican National Convention in 2016. | Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images The former president fits into a long line of ravenous, miserable literary characters. Shel Silverstein’s poem “Hungry Mungry” appears in the author’s 1974 collection Where the Sidewalk Ends, a favorite of giggling American kids. It’s the story of a kid named Hungry Mungry (what did his parents expect, giving him a name like that?), who has such a ravenous appetite that he eats everything: all the food, his parents, the United States, the world, and finally himself. It’s an absurd image from a poet who revels in silliness, a tale meant to tickle grade schoolers’ funny bones. But the pathos, however goofy, is undeniable. Hungry Mungry’s parents try to stop him, and he gobbles them up. Police arrive to halt his lawless rampage, and he chomps them down. The president sends the US military to halt his wanton munching, and they, too, go down the hatch. Hungry Mungry eats pyramids and puppies, churches and Chicago. No one can stop him. The final stanza paints a bleak picture: He started with the moon and stars and soon as he was doneHe gulped the clouds, he sipped the wind and gobbled up the sun.Then sitting there in the cold dark air,He started to nibble his feet,Then his legs, then his hipsThen his neck, then his lipsTill he sat there just gnashin’ his teethCause nothin’ was nothin’ wasNothin’ was nothin’ wasNothin’ was left to eat. Hungry Mungry, having fed his insatiable need to absorb the whole world into himself, is left utterly, completely alone. He is — to bastardize a misquote — like Alexander the Great: Weeping, for there are no more worlds to conquer. In the morass of my pandemic-era mind-mush, Hungry Mungry emerges as linked to a larger narrative archetype, a character who crops up consistently in stories that are absurd and surreal. He is the narcissist who must consume, colonize, destroy, or transform everything he touches into some reflection of himself. He is rapacious, grandiose, and utterly miserable, driven by a fear of some unbearable solitude. His solution is to fill the world with himself. He sounds, in so many ways, like a certain former president. He also sounds like Shakespeare’s Richard III, who — haunted by his hunchbacked appearance — has nurtured his soul into deformity, rendering himself incapable by his cruelty and cravenness to earn the love of either a woman or a country. So he must grab those things through fear and force, inspiring loyalty in some and imprisoning or slaughtering anyone who stands in his path. Richard III longs for everyone to bow to him and him alone; for his troubles, he is left abandoned on a battlefield, yelling for someone, anyone, to bring him a horse. Thurston Hopkins/Getty Images Sir Laurence Olivier as Richard III in 1955. He sounds like Norman Bombardini, a secondary character who looms over David Foster Wallace’s bizarre 1987 debut novel The Broom of the System. Bombardini is first glimpsed seated in a restaurant, ordering nine steaks for his dinner. When the waiter objects, Bombardini eviscerates him and orders the waiter to let him be: Tonight I will eat. Hugely, and alone. For now I am hugely alone. I will eat, and juice might very well spurt into the air around me, and if anyone comes too near, I will snarl and jab at them with my fork ... I’m going to grow and grow, and fill the absence that surrounds me with the horror of my own gelatinous presence. It transpires that Bombardini, a wealthy businessman who’s been left by his wife, has vowed to eliminate the possibility of loneliness by unorthodox means. “We each ought to desire our own universe to be as full as possible,” he pompously declares to our heroine, Lenore, who works for the company he owns. Bombardini has decided that “the Great Horror consists in an empty, rattling personal universe, one where one finds oneself with Self, on the one hand, and vast empty lonely spaces before Others begin to enter the picture at all, on the other hand. A non-full universe.” Bombardini’s plan, he tells Lenore, is to “fill the universe with Self” by growing to “infinite size.” By the end of the novel, Lenore discovers via a mutual acquaintance, a psychiatrist named Dr. Jay, that Bombardini has begun “talking with some earnestness about ... consuming people.” Lenore is horrified. “All metaphorical, I’m firmly convinced,” Dr. Jay hastens to add. We’re not so sure. Bombardini’s longing to live in a world where only he may exist, the better to avoid rejection, logically suggests a world that cannot contain anyone else. Like Hungry Mungry, he must consume them all. Variations on this same pathetic figure appear throughout Charlie Kaufman’s oeuvre — certain scenes from Being John Malkovich spring to mind — but his 2015 animated film Anomalisa is probably the best example. The main character, a miserable businessman named Michael Stone (voiced by David Thewlis), is spending the night in a Cincinnati hotel, one of those cookie-cutter corporate places that look the same no matter what city you’re in. He’s the keynote speaker at a convention for customer service professionals. Michael is a married father with a nice job, but hates everything about his perfectly pleasant life. As the movie begins, the main factor in his misery (whether it’s the cause or the effect) quickly comes into focus. For Michael, everyone on earth — cab driver, hotel desk clerk, ex-girlfriend, his own child — has the same bland face and the same bland voice. It’s not that he’s face-blind. Michael has just lost, or more likely ceded, the ability to see the world as populated by different people. To him, they are all one mass, a group of indistinguishable nothings. He has chosen to cope with his personal unhappiness by wiping out the feelings, the distinctiveness, the essential humanity of everyone else. He is utterly bored by anyone who isn’t himself, immune to the differences and dignity of those around him, and he copes by simply checking out. Paramount Pictures Michael in Anomalisa. Michael springs to life when in the hotel bar he suddenly hears the voice and sees the face of Lisa (Jennifer Jason Leigh), whom he finds fascinating because she is different. But the morning after they (awkwardly) have sex in the nondescript hotel bed, Michael comes to a horrifying realization over breakfast: Now that he has, in a sense, absorbed Lisa into himself, he’s incapable of keeping her humanity in view. Her Lisa-ness starts glitching out, her face and voice transforming into the same bland nothingness as everyone else. And Michael falls into deep despair. Unlike Richard, or Bombardini, Michael lacks the power to twist the world around him to his liking; he’s not out murdering people or eating everyone. But all three men share the same goal. Faced with a world they can’t control, and a loneliness they refuse to overcome in ways that would make them vulnerable to others, they set out to reshape the world into some reflection of themselves. To fill it with sameness and eliminate difference. To see themselves, or at least not anyone else, everywhere they look. But in the end, they find themselves ultimately more alone. Which, naturally, brings us to the most real-life exemplar of this character I’ve ever encountered: dubious businessman, tawdry celebrity, reality TV host, and 45th president of the United States Donald J. Trump. Trump’s need to stamp himself all over the world around him is indubitable. Any New Yorker saw it coming. Take a walk around the streets of Manhattan, and you’ll bump into some building with his name on it, probably a large one in a prominent spot — near Central Park, or on Fifth Avenue, or across from the New York Stock Exchange. It’s been that way for as long as most people can remember, and it’s pervasive. To cite just one notable example: After fighting for decades to develop land south of Lincoln Center into a massive apartment complex — first named “Television City,” then “Trump City,” and eventually Riverside South — Trump’s grand ambitions never came to fruition. But driving down the West Side Highway recently, just where “Trump City” would have been, I spotted an ADOPT-A-HIGHWAY sign sporting a familiar name. Trump’s skill at garnering media attention is part of the same impulse. It’s not just his full-throated melding with Fox News, which substantially predated his presidency and ensures that whenever he turns on the TV, he sees himself. Susan Mulcahy, a former Page Six editor and New York magazine columnist, wrote in the summer of 2016 that “if you worked for a newspaper in New York in the 1980s, you had to write about Trump,” partly because back then he still was landing big business deals but more often because he was simply outrageous. Others have reported that in the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s, Trump would pose as his own spokesperson, planting stories and grabbing headlines whenever possible. He knew how to make sure that no matter what newspaper landed on his desk that day, he’d find himself in it; in his most famous book, 1987’s The Art of the Deal, Trump boasted that “if you are a little different, or a little outrageous, or if you do things that are bold or controversial, the press is going to write about you.” Ron Galella/Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images Donald Trump at a publication party for his book The Art of the Deal in 1987. His penchant for belittling and insulting everyone around him, whether long-time foe or newly disloyal advisor, stems from the same place. If you aren’t of use to him, then you don’t deserve to exist. You are persona non grata. And if you don’t look like him — if he can’t see himself when he looks at you — you’re even worse, something less than human. Women, in general, fall into this category, which accounts for decades of degradation and alleged assaults. And Trump is far from the “least racist person” he claims to be. Trump’s election to the presidency was the culmination of his bulldozing, the natural end, for him, to warping the physical and virtual worlds to his match own image. Now, he could absorb people, too. Close advisors like Rudy Giuliani seemed to internalize both Trump’s personal vanity and his bizarre ways of satisfying it — possibly by using mascara to cover a septuagenarian’s gray hair, rather than hair dye, for instance. Young radical supporters donned a uniform — polo shirt, khakis, MAGA hat — that seemed oddly similar to the president’s golf ensemble. Millions of his followers picked up Trump’s pet phrases, his favorite ways to exaggerate and disparage: fake news, no collusion, believe me, China virus, enemy of the state, losers, witch hunt. They shouted “lock her up!” at rallies long past the point where the chant held meaning, wore identical red hats, and injected Trump-speak into press releases. To some Trump supporters’ family members and friends, it began to feel like their loved ones’ bodies were being taken over by the alien being of Donald Trump. That feeling has long palpable even if you can’t stand the guy — the urge to always talk about him, to read his tweets, to blame everything on his failures, to interpret every bit of pop culture through the lens of his looming silhouette. At times Trump’s tactics for hoarding attention seem borrowed from some of the livestreamers who, if they can’t get their audiences to adore them, court hate instead. Anything to keep from shrinking, or disappearing altogether. It is no shocker that Trump has found himself, at the end of the presidency — after inciting his followers to insurrection, then reportedly watching it with delight — slowly (too slowly) abandoned by former allies and advisors. This often happens when narcissists reach the end of their quest to own the world; if they’re not able to strongarm their way to absolute mastery, they wind up deserted by those who were only loyal as long as loyalty was expedient. They must confront an unflattering truth: They’ve made themselves impossible to truly love. Because thus far the world, outside of children’s poems and absurdist novels, refuses in the end to cow to one man’s will. People simply are not the same, and the world is too big to be contained within a single ego. Fascists succeed for a while, but not forever; there will always be pushback from those on the margins. Authoritarians seek to reduce the citizenry to a docile herd that will bend to their will; as the political theorist Hannah Arendt puts it, they wish to eradicate “spontaneity itself as an expression of human behavior and of transforming the human personality into a mere thing.” In The Origins of Totalitarianism, she describes the target of the would-be totalitarian as “difference” — the characteristics and desires that make us unique from one another, individuals with individual minds and bodies and histories living together. Affirming and celebrating that difference — in friendship and in the public square, Arendt says — is what keeps us from being wholly consumed by the Hungry Mungries, the Richard IIIs, the Bombardinis, the Michaels. Our pluralism is what keeps our democracy alive, however rickety it gets. Humans’ drive toward beautiful difference is the force that subverts, again and again, the narcissists’ need to consume us all. At the end of a long four years, merely the culmination and continuation of many more years, perhaps that lesson has grown more weighty. Maybe it’s more clear. Or maybe we’ll refuse to learn it and keep letting strongmen set the terms of engagement. For now, though, it’s time to pause, and breathe, and be glad that there’s still a world left to rebuild.
vox.com
Lady Gaga and Jennifer Lopez prep for inauguration performances
Lady Gaga and Jennifer Lopez are among the artists scheduled to perform at Wednesday's inauguration.
edition.cnn.com
Melania Trump gives farewell speech on her last morning as first lady
After departing the White House with President Trump, Melania Trump gives farewell speech on her last morning as first lady.        
usatoday.com