Generally
General
1197

Got Insomnia? CVS Health Has an App for You

The company is encouraging employers to provide a sleep app that could help push digital therapeutics into the mainstream.
Load more
Go to source www.nytimes.com
unread news
unread news (Demo user)
Recording Academy's own diversity task force expresses support for ousted boss Deborah Dugan
In a statement, the Grammys' diversity task force said that "those seeking to make... reforms need to be supported, not impeded."
8 m
latimes.com
How a tie in a Senate impeachment trial is decided
CNN Supreme Court analyst Joan Biskupic explains what would happen if a vote during the Senate impeachment trial ends in a tie.
edition.cnn.com
Nets didn’t waste any time playing Kyrie Irving heavy minutes
Kyrie Irving returned from his hamstring injury in time for Thursday’s national TV game against the Lakers and former teammate LeBron James. And Irving went right back to carrying the load, for better or worse, leading the Nets with 20 points in a team-high 33:13. Irving’s minus-26 was the worst of any player on the...
nypost.com
Former Jamaican police officer, two others charged with murder of Irvine man
All three men could be eligible for the death penalty if convicted on all charges
latimes.com
Libyan Militant Sentenced to 19 Years for Benghazi Attacks that Killed U.S. Envoy
The 2012 Benghazi attacks killed four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador
time.com
Are Italy’s ‘Sardines’ the Antidote to Populism?
For months, a burgeoning grassroots movement has staged flash mobs across Italy to express opposition to the country’s populist firebrand, Matteo Salvini. Its ability to pack city squares with tens of thousands of people—like sardines, as the group has come to be known—has offered one of the most visible examples of anti-populist mobilization in Europe.Spontaneously mobilizing scores of people to condemn Salvini’s rhetoric on issues such as immigration and the European Union is part of the group’s challenge; halting his seemingly meteoric rise is another. Salvini has proved a seismic force in Italian politics, going from the leader of the right-wing League, once a small, regional party, to Italy’s deputy prime minister. Despite his failures—the League was booted from government last year—Salvini has been resilient: His party is currently running neck and neck with the ruling center-left Democratic Party in the liberal stronghold of Emilia-Romagna, which will hold regional elections Sunday.The outcome of that election is already being linked to the influence of the Sardines, who are widely seen as an anti-populist block to Salvini’s success. Should Salvini win in Emilia-Romagna, his opponents fear that it could bring about the collapse of the country’s fragile governing coalition and snap elections—an outcome that would give Salvini another chance to seize power. Should he lose, it will signal that a grassroots anti-populist movement of this kind is possible. In the second scenario, the question that will undoubtedly follow is whether the Sardines’ playbook can be emulated elsewhere.To identify who the anti-populists are, it helps to understand what makes a populist—a question that has been the subject of much scholarship and debate in recent years. Though populist leaders come in a variety of forms and contexts, they share some notable similarities. As Catherine Fieschi, the director of the Global Policy Institute at Queen Mary University of London, writes in Populocracy: The Tyranny of Authenticity and the Rise of Populism, these include a claim to defend the true interests of (often homogenous) “real people” against the interests of elites, including mainstream political parties and the media. For right-wing populists such as Salvini—as well as Donald Trump in the United States, Viktor Orbán in Hungary, and Marine Le Pen in France, to name a few—this has manifested in nativist rhetoric, calls for tighter immigration controls, and the discrediting of political opponents as inherently “illegitimate.”What has been less clearly defined, however, is who the anti-populists are. In some countries, such as Germany, the primary opposition to populist parties such as the far-right Alternative for Germany and the far-left Die Linke is the mainstream groups they have pitted themselves against. In others, there are new, nonmainstream alternatives. Take, for example, French President Emmanuel Macron and his La République En Marche movement, which swept to power a year after its founding: Though led by Macron, a former minister in Socialist President François Hollande’s government, En Marche was regarded as being outside of France’s traditional two-party system, allowing the movement to distance itself from the anti-establishment rhetoric of Macron’s chief rival, Le Pen’s far-right National Rally (or as it was known at the time, the National Front).In Britain, the erstwhile Conservative minister turned independent mayoral candidate Rory Stewart declared his own ambition to start a new centrist movement—one that he told me could follow Macron’s En Marche model. Stewart said he would combat “populist extremes” by better engaging the electorate in the business of governing through citizens’ assemblies and, in doing so, undermine the populist narrative of elite betrayal. Unlike Macron, though, he doesn’t aim to do this at the national level, hoping instead to build his new centrist movement from the bottom up—or, in his case, from London city hall.The Sardines, of course, don’t resemble Macron’s En Marche or Rory Stewart. They are a grassroots movement—not a political organization or candidate. Like many protest movements around the world, the Sardines function without a clear hierarchy. They aren’t affiliated with a political party and, according to one of their founders, they have no ambition to become one. The group’s sole stated aim is to reassert values of tolerance and moderation into the public square as part of an “anti-fascist, pro-equality” movement that speaks out against racism, homophobia, and anti-immigrant sentiment. But this hasn’t stopped voters from viewing them as a de facto opposition: One poll found that 40 percent of Italians regard the Sardines as a greater threat to Salvini than his actual political opponents. Their success hasn’t escaped the notice of Salvini either. Though the League leader has previously expressed appreciation for the group—telling one interviewer that “the more people [who] participate, the better”—he has also taken to criticizing it on Twitter, stating his preference for kittens. (His reason: They eat sardines.)[Read: Populism is morphing in insidious ways]If what underpins populism is a claim to represent the interests of the “real people,” then what anti-populists such as the Sardines share is a desire and, thus far, an ability to refute that claim. In mobilizing thousands against Salvini, the Sardines “have basically turned [populism] on its head and said, ‘No, actually we are the ordinary people,’” Fieschi told me. “They did the quintessential Italian thing—they went down in la piazza ... They did exactly what ordinary people do.”For all the impact the Sardines have had, however, it’s virtually impossible to tell how they will be able to measure their success. Unlike anti-populist parties and figures, “you cannot vote for them. They are not a political alternative,” Francesco Giavazzi, an economics professor at Bocconi University, in Milan, told me. If Salvini loses in Emilia-Romagna, they will be able to claim a piece of that success. But then what?Giavazzi said that one option is for the group to “turn into a political entity,” just as the Five Star Movement did when it fielded its first candidates in Italy’s local elections, in 2009. Like the Sardines, the Five Star Movement began spontaneously—first as a series of internet-driven local meetings, led by the Italian comedian Beppe Grillo, then in the form of national rallies. Also like the Sardines, the Five Star Movement started out as a nonpolitical entity, stating in its early statutes that it “is not a political party nor is it intended to become one in the future.” Transitioning from being a protest movement to being a political entity isn’t easy, but others have shown the way: In Hong Kong, a similar effort to transform the city’s months-long demonstrations into a permanent prodemocracy movement is already under way.[Read: Hong Kong’s protesters finally have (some) power]So far, the Sardines have shown no signs of wanting to go down this route. To be successful as an anti-populist movement, though, they don’t necessarily have to. “It’s quite clear that their view is not to put forward ideas and things [that] need to be done differently,” Fieschi said. “They just want to take the wind out of [Salvini’s] sails. In a sense, it doesn’t go any further than that … It’s like taking the air out of [a] populist balloon.”
theatlantic.com
China's Qiang Wang eliminates Serena Williams from Australian Open
China's Qiang Wang has eliminated 23-time Grand Slam winner Serena Williams from the Australian Open, defeating the decorated American in three sets 6-4, 6-7 and 7-5 in Melbourne on Friday.
edition.cnn.com
NFL Says Number of Concussions Players Suffered Increased in 2019
The league said there were 224 reported concussions, 10 more than in 2018
time.com
The 7 juiciest revelations from Netflix's Taylor Swift documentary 'Miss Americana'
The seven juiciest revelations from the new Taylor Swift Netflix documentary "Miss Americana," which dropped at the Sundance Film Festival.
latimes.com
Video captures violent armed robbery outside Oakland home, report says
A front-door video camera filmed a horrifying robbery outside an Oakland home on Monday night that reportedly showed the assailant chase a woman at gunpoint until she fell and then robbed her.
foxnews.com
Jared Dudley knocks down a big shot for Lakers, who embrace his leadership
Jared Dudley doesn't have to be a star on the Lakers to be a leader. But when he comes through in big moments, like he did against the Nets, he can still shine.
latimes.com
Exclusive—‘You F*cking C*nt’: Stephanie Grisham Inundated with Sexist Hatred, Threats as Establishment Media Pile On
White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham has seen an increased level of overtly hateful messages and sexist threats since the establishment media have intensified criticisms of her in recent weeks, Breitbart News has learned exclusively.
breitbart.com
LeBron James, Lakers meet Bill Clinton after game in Brooklyn
LeBron James said it was "just surreal" to speak briefly with the former president on the floor after the Lakers defeated the Nets at Barclays Center.       
usatoday.com
What was the Senate chamber like while Rep. Adam Schiff made his final Thursday speech?
Rep. Adam Schiff decided to take Trump's directions to "read the transcript," noting Trump had told his Twitter followers to do so earlier.       
usatoday.com
Mexican security forces detain 800 migrants
Mexican authorities on Thursday adopted tougher measures against Central American migrants, detaining 800 of them who had entered Mexico illegally from Guatemala intending to reach the border with the United States. Michelle Hennessy reports.
reuters.com
Opinion: For Gracie Gold, 13th at U.S. Figure Skating Championships never looked so good
Gracie Gold completes improbable comeback at U.S. Figure Skating Championships following treatment for depression, anxiety and an eating disorder.      
usatoday.com
Air tanker dropped fire retardant shortly before fatal crash: Australian safety bureau
An air tanker that crashed in Australia on Thursday killing three U.S. firefighters dropped fire retardant shortly before the fatal accident, the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) said on Friday.
reuters.com
Schiff: Trump is 'dangerous to us, to our country'
Democratic Congressman Adam Schiff, the lead impeachment manager, concluded Thursday's arguments by saying that President Trump is a danger to the country and should be removed from office. (Jan. 24)       
usatoday.com
Student can't walk at graduation unless he cuts his dreadlocks
Texas high school senior DeAndre Arnold will be kept from walking at graduation if he does not cut his dreadlocks to comply with his school's dress code that specifies a maximum length for male students' hair. CNN affiliate KPRC reports.
edition.cnn.com
Antonio Brown has turned himself in after warrant issued for his arrest
Former NFL player Antonio Brown has surrendered to the Broward County Jail just one day after a warrant was issued for his arrest, according to CNN affiliate WFOR.
edition.cnn.com
China Puts 13 Cities on Lockdown as Coronavirus Death Toll Climbs
China is striving to contain a deadly virus outbreak the World Health Organization has termed a domestic health emergency
time.com
GOP lawmaker questions patriotism of Purple Heart recipient
Republican Sen. Marsha Blackburn attacked Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, a key National Security Council aide who testified before Congress on the Ukraine scandal, on Twitter, including questioning the Purple Heart recipient's patriotism.
edition.cnn.com
Sierra Canyon holds off Windward in a Gold Coast League thriller
Harold Yu's late free throws enable Sierra Canyon to turn back Windward
latimes.com
Photos of the Week: Impeachment Trial, Virtual Singer, Bat Clinic
The annual Women's March in New York City, the Tour Down Under cycling event in Australia, a newborn giant anteater in Germany, a firefighting robot in India, anti-government protests in Iraq, the 2020 Winter Youth Olympics in Switzerland, haute couture fashion in Paris, an elevator test tower in Germany, and much more.
theatlantic.com
Singapore ramps up virus fight, reviving memories of SARS pandemic
Schools in Singapore asked parents to declare overseas holiday plans as authorities screened travelers at air, land and sea checkpoints on Friday, to combat the spread of a deadly flu virus that has revived memories of the SARS pandemic in 2003.
reuters.com
China central bank raises limit on small bank payments amid virus outbreak
China's central bank said on Friday it would temporarily raise the limit on small bank batch payments to 500 million yuan ($72.42 million) from Friday until Jan. 30, to ease fund transfers amid a coronavirus outbreak.
reuters.com
Man leaps to death off Royal Caribbean cruise ship
A Florida man jumped to his death from a cruise ship billed as the “World’s Largest Gay Cruise” that was docked off the coast of Puerto Rico, a report said Thursday. The man, a 46-year-old from Naples, jumped off the Royal Caribbean cruise ship at about 7:50 p.m. on Wednesday, NBC News reported. Crew members...
nypost.com
Former NFL receiver Antonio Brown turns himself in at Florida jail following arrest warrant
Antonio Brown turned himself in at a Florida jail on Thursday night following accusations that he and his trainer attacked another man.       
usatoday.com
Impeachment managers dissect abuse of power charge
1 h
edition.cnn.com
British Entrepreneur Suggests Raising Money for Australian Bushfires by Selling Koala Fur Scarves
Ryan-Mark Parsons' proposal has been called "gross" and "sick."
1 h
newsweek.com
China shuts down transport, temples as virus death toll rises to 25
China stepped up measures to contain a virus which has killed 25 people and infected more than 800, with public transport suspensions in 10 cities, temples shutting, and the rapid construction of a new hospital to treat those infected.
1 h
reuters.com
US border officers were told to stop Iran-born travelers, officer says
US border officers working at Canadian border crossings were directed to stop travelers of Iranian descent for questioning following the killing of Iranian general Qasem Soleimani, an unnamed Customs and Border Patrol officer alleged in an email to an immigration attorney.
1 h
edition.cnn.com
Trump 2020 Campaign Video Stresses Commitment to ‘Right to Life’
President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign will introduce a new pro-life coalition on Friday that seeks to energize pro-life voters in advance of the 2020 presidential election.
1 h
breitbart.com
Ryan Strome on Islanders rock bottom, trade deadline, all things Rangers
Ryan Strome, the Ontario native and fifth-overall pick in the 2011 NHL Entry Draft, who bounced from the Islanders to the Oilers to the Rangers, speaks with Steve Serby on the eve of the All-Star break. Q: You’ve proven them wrong as a Ranger, but how did you feel about the naysayers who wondered if...
1 h
nypost.com
Antonio Brown turns himself in for allegedly attacking delivery driver
Antonio Brown turned himself in to Florida authorities Thursday night, one day after a warrant was issued for his arrest, a report said. The embattled wide receiver is facing charges of battery and burglary from a Tuesday night incident where he and his trainer allegedly got into a fight with a delivery truck driver outside...
1 h
nypost.com
Man who paid $3M for 2020 Corvette Stingray says he'll never drive it
Rick Hendrick spent $3 million for the first mid-engine Corvette. Here is the story of the dramatic sale and the man who waited 50 years to buy it.       
1 h
usatoday.com
Store closings pile up: With 1,200 closures already announced, retailers face another grim year
Any hope retailers would extinguish the fires consuming them in 2020 is fading fast, with closures by Macy's, J.C. Penney, Express, Pier 1 and others.      
1 h
usatoday.com
National Peanut Butter Day 2020: Peanut Butter Deals at Walmart, Target and More
We look at the history of the classic legume spread and where to get the best peanut butter discounts and offers.
1 h
newsweek.com
Adam Schiff piles pressure on Republicans under fire
Senators are soon going to start seeing Adam Schiff in their sleep. The lead House impeachment manager is pressuring the handful of GOP jurors who are considering a vote to call witness and delay the acquittal that President Donald Trump craves from his impeachment trial.
1 h
edition.cnn.com
Schiff piles pressure on Republicans under fire
• Impeachment managers dissect abuse of power • Schiff gets choked up in emotional speech
1 h
edition.cnn.com
Takeaways from Day 3 of Trump's impeachment trial
President Donald Trump has said, repeatedly, that people should "read the transcript" of his fateful July 25 call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky.
1 h
edition.cnn.com
MSNBC Host Argues With GOP Rep. Mark Meadows Over Whether Trump Seeking Biden Probe Was 'Proper': 'Not a Hypothetical'
GOP Rep. Mark Meadows argued with MSNBC host Ari Melber about whether President Donald Trump allegedly attempting to pressure Ukraine into launching an investigation of former Vice President Joe Biden would be "proper" or "hypothetical."
1 h
newsweek.com
JSerra standout Ian Martinez's lofty expectations fueling his NBA hoop dreams
San Juan Capistrano JSerra guard Ian Martinez hopes to one day become the first player from Costa Rica to play in the NBA.
1 h
latimes.com
Psychologist Who Helped Create Interrogation Methods Says CIA May Have Gone Too Far
James Mitchell testified at a trial at Guantanamo that a man accused of helping finance the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks was subjected to "excessive" abuse.
1 h
npr.org
FBI says monitoring of Trump campaign adviser Carter Page should've ended sooner
The FBI obtained a warrant in 2016 to eavesdrop on the former Trump national security aide on suspicions that he was secretly a Russian agent.
1 h
cbsnews.com
News Analysis: NCAA president Mark Emmert tries to rally administrators as athletes' pay becomes issue
NCAA president Mark Emmert discusses demands for college athletes to be able to receive compensation for contributions that help bring in millions of dollars to schools.
1 h
latimes.com
Wang Qiang bounces Serena Williams out of Australian Open
In their only previous meeting, Serena Williams beat Wang Qiang 6-1, 6-0 in 44 minutes at last year's U.S. Open quarterfinals.
2 h
latimes.com
Serena Williams shockingly eliminated from Australian Open
MELBOURNE, Australia — Serena Williams’ bid to win a 24th Grand Slam title has been falling short with losses in finals. At this Australian Open, she didn’t make it nearly that far. Serving only so-so, failing to convert all but one of her break chances and missing groundstrokes with alarming regularity, Williams stunningly exited in...
2 h
nypost.com