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Shirtless Shawn Mendes sets up a basketball hoop and more star snaps
Shawn Mendes makes sure he can play hoops, Sam Smith goes for a full 80's workout fantasy and more...
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nypost.com
Chris ‘Mad Dog’ Russo almost at a loss for words over ‘totally different’ WFAN
Chris “Mad Dog” Russo, alongside Mike Francesa, helped build WFAN into a sports-talk giant, having the No. 1 afternoon drive-time show in the area for years. Now, watching from a distance, he isn’t sure what to make of the station’s direction. So many of its big names are gone, Russo pointed out, from Don Imus...
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nypost.com
Justin Timberlake: 24-hour parenting is ‘just not human’
Timberlake and Biel are doing their best in quarantine, even if their son doesn't think so.
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nypost.com
Jeff Bezos makes surprise visit to Amazon warehouse, Whole Foods
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos visited one of his company's warehouses as well as a Whole Foods grocery store on Wednesday, making rare public appearances as employees have raised complaints about working conditions.
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nypost.com
Florence Pugh hits back at cyberbullying about boyfriend Zach Braff's age
Actress Florence Pugh, 24, shamed trolls on Instagram for criticizing the age gap between her and boyfriend Zach Braff, 45. Said Ariana Grande: You go, girl.
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latimes.com
'Be the light': Why high schools across America are burning stadium lights
There's nothing like those Friday night lights.
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus in NY: De Blasio to make decision on fate of school year this week
The fate of the city school year will be determined in a matter of days, Mayor de Blasio said Thursday morning. “I think we are a couple of days away — two, three days away — from getting to that decision,” Hizzoner said during a press conference at City Hall. With the nation’s largest school...
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nypost.com
Internal Senate memo warns Zoom poses ‘high risk’ to privacy, security
Two federal overseers have also advised agencies not to use Zoom’s free or commercial service.
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politico.com
Can Pets Contract the Coronavirus? What About the Tiger?
Here’s what to do if your cat starts coughing.
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slate.com
'This Is Not Humanity's First Plague,' Pope Francis Says Of Coronavirus
The pope says the COVID-19 pandemic is exposing hypocrisy and misplaced priorities in the modern world, as he calls on people to remember their shared humanity.
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npr.org
Grassley, in bipartisan letter, seeks 'detailed' explanation from Trump on IG firing
GOP Sen. Chuck Grassley and a bipartisan group of fellow senators are calling on President Trump to provide a "detailed" written explanation for his decision to remove the intelligence community inspector general from his post, in an effort to protect watchdog independence.
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foxnews.com
Social distancing isn’t a personal choice. It’s an ethical duty.
A social distancing sign on the floor of a post office on April 9, 2020, in Penarth, Wales. | Stu Forster/Getty Images Why we should foreground our commitment to the common good in the fight against coronavirus. Social distancing is inconvenient at best, truly burdensome at worst. What hasn’t helped matters is the confusing messaging of why we should social distance at all. We’ve been conditioned to think social distancing is only about us — lowering the risk to one’s self and one’s family. And yet we’ve also been told that this is something we need to do to protect others. While not necessarily incorrect, both ways of thinking about it are not equal to the task before us. What we need is an exhortation to act that is grounded firmly in an ethical foundation, one that not only gets at the deeper purpose of social distancing, but that also lays the groundwork for a more resilient society on the other side of this crisis. We as a global society need to see social distancing as nothing less than an act of solidarity, an intentional choice that binds us in a common cause. Some US leaders have started making this rhetorical shift. In one of his daily press briefings on the coronavirus, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) leaned into the message: “We are united, and when you are united there is nothing you can’t do.” This echoed what former Vice President Joe Biden said after the Democratic primaries when calling for social distancing; this is “a moment where the choices and decisions we make as individuals are going to collectively impact on what happens, make a big difference in the severity of this outbreak.” Biden added, “It’s in moments like these we realize we need to put politics aside and work together as Americans. ... We are all in this together.” Both statements implicitly appeal to solidarity. Last week, New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy (D) appealed to solidarity outright, embracing the claim that social distancing is another name for social solidarity, “because by staying apart we are actually coming closer together in common cause to defeat Covid-19.” Cuomo, Biden, and Murphy are onto something: framing the need for social distancing as solidarity in action is much more meaningful and motivational than wonky (if accurate) discussions of “community mitigation strategies” and “flattening the curve.” Appealing to solidarity gives us a better chance of convincing people to practice social distancing. It is also the right move philosophically. But what exactly do we mean by solidarity? In one sense, when we say we are in solidarity with others, we are foregrounding a common purpose and describing an empathetic response based on the recognition of mutual needs and shared identity. We are one human family, whatever our national, racial, ethnic, economic, and political differences. Inherent in human nature is not only our interdependence as finite beings but our need to form associations for emotional and economic welfare. Appealing to solidarity in this sense is not novel. Not too long ago, Barack Obama called on people in the US to commit to mutual flourishing. In his farewell speech as president, he said that “democracy does not require uniformity.” However, he added, “democracy does require a basic sense of solidarity — the idea that for all our outward differences, we are all in this together; that we rise or fall as one.” Cuomo hit this note when he said: “Black and white and brown and Asian and short and tall and gay and straight. New York loves everyone. ... And at the end of the day, my friends, even if it is a long day … love wins. Always. And it will win again through this virus.” In the context of the coronavirus pandemic, the term gains even greater urgency. Solidarity becomes nothing less than an ethical stance. It speaks to a reorientation of an individual’s will to commit to doing what will protect and promote the common good (not to be confused with the greater good, a term from utilitarian philosophy that can call for the sacrifice of fundamental needs of some for the good of all). Solidarity as an ethical virtue doesn’t just depend on feelings, but on a deeper sense of commitment to a cause bigger than yourself. By grounding social distancing in an ethical posture, we don’t just increase the likelihood of buy-in to deal with the present crisis — we cultivate a virtue that ensures we’ll stay the course. The virtue of solidarity also includes a commitment to social justice. The vulnerable and marginalized among us need particular care and attention to make sure that the common good is being met. So when we ask people to practice social distancing for the good of those who are most likely to get seriously ill, we are asking them to see their social responsibility in light of the many overlapping communities to which they belong (families, friends, neighbors, New Yorkers, Americans, humans, etc.), and to appreciate that the vulnerable have a particular ethical claim on all of us to promote their well-being. Why solidarity is an enduring basis for social distancing Recent articles have discussed the ethics of social distancing, but in terms of altruism. By definition, altruistic acts typically entail personal sacrifices that are considered “above and beyond duty,” with no ulterior motivation or benefit. But rooting social distancing in altruism isn’t as robust a motivation as you might think as framing it as an ethical duty. Social distancing really can save lives and protect long-term health. In other words, we really shouldn’t think of it as an optional act that we perform out of the kindness of our hearts. The downsides of not social distancing can be so severe that we need to think of it as an ethical duty to our fellow human beings. Then there’s the second type of appeal: to our self-interest. We’ve been told to stay in for ourselves and for our families. While it’s not untrue that staying in will obviously redound to our and our families’ benefit, such appeals fail to get at the interconnected nature of the problem we face. If we decide to take the risk of not sticking with social distancing, it’s not just ourselves we’re putting at risk — it is also our neighbors, our grandparents, our friends who might get hurt. We are seeing this with the tragic rise in numbers of sick and dying within extended families and within local communities. The health care system has been overwhelmed and the economy is suffering precisely because we are all vulnerable to each other. Solidarity then is a more apt foundation for social distancing than either altruism or narrow self-interest. And the fact is the impulse of pulling together is already there — we just need to articulate it more explicitly. The reality of our shared fight and plight has drawn those of us practicing social distancing together, closer with loved ones, neighbors, and in many instances strangers, even as we are physically apart. We are finding alternative ways to connect to build and maintain our emotional and economic bonds. In addition to social distancing, collaborative efforts to aid those who are in social isolation and the economically vulnerable are growing across the country. When we return from social distancing, it is up to us to make this inchoate commitment to our fellow human beings and the common good the new normal. Some skepticism is certainly in order. Individualism is encoded in Americans’ national DNA. But solidarity is just as central to American identity as individualism. “Live Free or Die” co-existed with “Join or Die.” When I was young, my grandfather shared stories of his experiences after the US entered World War II. One of the memories he shared was living through a period of gas shortages. The rubber supply for the US military was critically low. Despite great pressure from the business sector, FDR in 1942 instituted strict gas rationing, meaning less driving and therefore less wear and tear on tires. It amounted to a de facto ban on pleasure driving, a popular leisure activity. Many Americans who are now over the age of 80 remember having to give up all the joys associated with pleasure-driving as part of the war effort. Efforts to increase public support included posters with messages such as “When you ride ALONE, you ride with Hitler! Join a Car Sharing Club TODAY!” (similar to today’s more encouraging #togetherathome and #stayhomesaveslives). It wasn’t until the war was over when people could take to the open roads again. We were all in it together, my grandfather said, speaking to the sense of shared sacrifice and purpose that defined the time. We face a common threat in Covid-19. Few of us will remain untouched. We are all in this together. Solidarity demands we do our part by holding each other accountable, as we hold each other dear (but not too near). Sarah-Vaughan Brakman is a professor of philosophy at Villanova University. Sign up for the Future Perfect newsletter and we’ll send you a roundup of ideas and solutions for tackling the world’s biggest challenges — and how to get better at doing good. Future Perfect is funded in part by individual contributions, grants, and sponsorships. Learn more here.
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vox.com
With USS Theodore Roosevelt Crew Member in Intensive Care, General Says Coronavirus Outbreaks Likely to Strike More Navy Ships
416 USS Theodore Roosevelt crew members are now infected with COVID-19 while 1,164 others are awaiting results
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time.com
Scientists successfully reversed stroke damage in rodent tests
Over the years, doctors and healthcare professionals have learned a lot about what increases the risk of a person having a stroke. Things like high blood pressure, smoking and heart disease can all play a major role in whether or not a person will suffer a stroke during their lifetime, but treatment after a person...
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nypost.com
Tom Brady explains why he left the Patriots for Tampa Bay
SportsPulse: USA TODAY Sports Nancy Armour analyzes a recent interview between Tom Brady and Howard Stern where the pair discussed the quarterbacks departure from New England.        
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usatoday.com
Pink details her ‘terrifying’ experience with coronavirus
"At one point I was crying, praying ... I thought they told us our kids were going to be ok."
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nypost.com
Ryan Young: Detroit hospitals are in 'dire circumstances'
Detroit hospitals are in dire need as ventilators and bed space become scarce due to Covid-19. Two people have died while waiting in emergency room hallways. CNN's Ryan Young reports.
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edition.cnn.com
Tyler Perry pays grocery bill for thousands of high-risk shoppers
Hollywood star Tyler Perry footed the grocery bill for thousands of senior citizens and other high-risk shoppers while the coronavirus pandemic stretches peoples’ wallets thin. Shoppers at dozens of Kroger’s and Wynn Dixie stores in Atlanta and New Orleans were delighted and relieved to hear their bill was taken care of when they were checking out. Perry also tipped $21,000 to the out-of-work employees of his favorite Atlanta restaurant.
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cbsnews.com
Donald Trump's secret theory about Barack Obama's endorsement
President Donald Trump is, at heart, a provocateur. One of his favorite tools to stir up trouble is by embracing of conspiracy theories -- and sometimes even starting ones of his own.
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edition.cnn.com
Lockdowns shouldn't be fully lifted until vaccine found, study warns
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edition.cnn.com
Snake party busted for not social distancing
“It looks like more than a party of 10,” a park manager joked after stumbling upon more than a dozen snakes huddled together in North Sioux City, South Dakota. The self-proclaimed nature lover, Jody Hartnett, couldn’t help but notice the garter snakes, which are mostly harmless, weren’t “social distancing,” as the rest of the world...
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nypost.com
How to Make a DIY Face Mask for Coronavirus
Amid a shortage of medical-grade face masks, such as surgical masks (loose-fitting, disposable masks that block large droplets but don’t filter small particles) and N95 respirators (tight-fitting face coverings that filter out small particles), the U.S. federal government recently changed its recommendations, suggesting now that all residents wear homemade facial coverings when they have to…
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time.com
Self-Isolating 97-Year-Old Veteran Plays Harmonica to Wife Through Glass Door
Lou serenaded his wife Jackie while they were separated because of social distancing. They have been married for 38 years and reside at the Soldiers' and Sailors' Home in Erie.
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newsweek.com
Nevada man stole hundreds of masks from VA facility: feds
An ex-Marine from Nevada is accused of stealing about 200 surgical masks from a Veteran Administration hospital, federal prosecutors said. Peter Lucas, 35, appeared in court Wednesday after allegedly ripping off at least four boxes containing 50 masks apiece from the Ioannis A. Lougaris VA Medical Center in Reno over a five-day span late last...
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nypost.com
These doctors work for free on coronavirus front line: 'You step up to the plate'
A non-profit doctors' group is going above and beyond to help frontline first responders, who are being drowned by an unprecedented volume of 911 calls, amid the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Booker, Graham call on WHO to ban 'wet markets' globally amid coronavirus
Sens. Cory Booker, Lindsey Graham and more than 60 congressional lawmakers urged the World Health Organization on Thursday to ban and permanently close all wet markets globally amid the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Axelrod: Sanders must make 'active case' for Biden
Christiane speaks with David Axelrod, former Senior Adviser to President Obama, about Bernie Sanders dropping out of the race for the Democratic nomination.
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edition.cnn.com
Coronavirus: We're in this together
Stories connect us and heal us. These powerful, human stories offer some good news: our families, friends and neighbors are moving forward amid coronavirus.       
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usatoday.com
U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Health 'Continues to Improve' After Third Night in Intensive Care
Johnson, who tested positive for COVID-19, is "in good spirits" after spending a third night in intensive care at a London hospital.
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newsweek.com
From symptom trackers to games, these apps will help you get through the pandemic
James Bareham for Recode/Vox How to stay informed and entertained during the Covid-19 crisis. So the coronavirus pandemic has you sitting around your house with very little to do and few places you’re allowed to go. It’s not the best setup, but it doesn’t have to be the worst, either. As a wise woman once said, you can spend this time “looking at apps.” That Kim Kardashian tweet was later deleted, but the point stands: Apps can be your friend during this pandemic. There are Covid-specific apps that allow you to help scientists and researchers stay up to date on the latest coronavirus news, and to check your symptoms and recommend if you should be tested for the virus or not. Some apps that have been around longer than the pandemic can also improve your mind and body. So here’s a guide to help you get started looking at apps. Coronavirus information Several apps have sprung up to keep the public informed about the pandemic. Apple recently debuted its coronavirus information clearinghouse, which it developed in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the White House coronavirus task force. The app is a pretty simple screening tool, allowing you to enter your symptoms and then recommending if you should seek medical care based on them. It also has guides for things like social distancing. Apple also worked with Stanford University to build an app just for first responders in California’s Santa Clara and San Mateo counties, which has information and a symptom checker, the goal being that the user will get tested at Stanford Health Care. Google has an educational website about the virus, though it’s not quite what President Trump advertised a few weeks back. There is no accompanying app as of yet, but Google’s wide reach into seemingly every facet of our lives means its website has everything from basic information about the virus to YouTube video guides for exercising and cooking in your home. The CDC and the World Health Organization have apps, too. They’re not coronavirus-specific (although the WHO is currently working on one), but they do, obviously, have information about the virus and the latest guidelines. The CDC’s app also gives you its latest stats on cases in the country. What’s more useful is the Healthynked Covid-19 tracker, which has coronavirus newsfeed and uses WHO data to map out cases (you can also report your own case to be included on the map). There’s also a chat feature for “real-time chat,” which might come in handy if you’re especially lonely. And don’t forget to check out your insurance company or care provider’s mobile apps — many have added coronavirus information and symptom checker sections. Symptom trackers Several companies and researchers are hoping that crowdsourcing will help them gain insights about the virus, how it spreads, whether preventive measures such as social distancing are effective, and how it affects different demographics. These apps typically ask users to check in every day to report how they feel and if they have any symptoms. Be sure to read each app’s privacy policies before you download or use them, especially since some of them ask for a good amount of personal data. The most popular of these is COVID Symptom Tracker, which initially launched in the United Kingdom and recently came to the United States. It’s currently one of the top medical apps in Apple’s App Store and boasts more than 500,000 installs on Google Play. The How We Feel Project is similar but less popular. Other health organizations have symptom tracker websites, such as Boston Children’s Hospital’s COVID Near You and regional efforts like Stop COVID NYC from Mount Sinai and the University of Alabama Birmingham’s HelpBeatCOVID19. There’s also the Kinsa smart thermometer’s app, which wasn’t designed to track coronavirus cases but has become a predictor of where the virus might break out next — according to Kinsa, anyway — based on the atypically high number of fevers that suddenly appear. You don’t need to own a Kinsa thermometer to use the app, which also gives general health advice and recommendations for when you should see a doctor. Telehealth solutions If you can’t see a doctor in person, there are a variety of telemedicine apps available. The Department of Health and Human Services has temporarily relaxed HIPAA laws to allow apps such as FaceTime and Skype to be used for virtual doctor appointments. That said, you’re best off using a dedicated, HIPAA-compliant app like Amwell, Teledoc, or Doctor on Demand. Your doctor’s office or health insurance provider may have its own telehealth apps (speaking of health insurance, make sure yours covers telehealth services before you use them). Still have questions? Check out our guide to teleheath as well as this Vox guide to finding a virtual therapist. Physical and mental health It’s easy to feel down and anxious when you’re stuck inside during a pandemic. We’ve already covered some of the mental health apps and digital tools, from chatbots to crisis lines to apps that say they will connect you with a licensed therapist who offers virtual sessions. None of these tools are meant to be a substitute for in-person therapy sessions, but finding one of those right now is next to impossible depending on where you live. Meditation is a great stress reliever, too. There are a ton of meditation apps out there, including Calm and Headspace, which recently introduced a dedicated section just for New Yorkers (though it’s probably fine to use no matter where you live). Many of these also offer sounds and songs to help lull you to sleep. You can also try dedicated sleep sound apps like Relax Melodies and Slumber. White noise apps are great to either drown out your loud neighbors who are always home now or help you snooze (or both). While you may not be able to go to your real gym, a place that’s a big source of anxiety relief for many, there are apps that will mimic the experience while you try to sweat it out in your living room. Vox has a good roundup of those here. Yoga apps like Glo, Daily Yoga, and Yoga Studio bridge the gap between mindfulness and working out. If you’re allowed to get outside to exercise, apps like Fitbit (which is temporarily offering some of its premium features for free) are a good way to remind you to take a walk and keep track of your steps, so you can play catch-up at the end of the day if you haven’t met your daily goal. And there are running apps from Map My Run to Zombies, Run! that will help you get moving. Finally, there is no better stress relief than fun. For some people, having fun is not an option right now. But if it is for you, there are the very timely and popular Pandemic: The Board Game, Dominion, and group chats and activities (you might want to read this before you use Zoom). So there you have it: apps for you to not only look at but also use and hopefully benefit from. You may be largely restricted to your home’s four walls, but that small device in the palm of your hand can make your world seem a little bigger. Open Sourced is made possible by Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists. Support Vox’s explanatory journalism Every day at Vox, we aim to answer your most important questions and provide you, and our audience around the world, with information that has the power to save lives. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. Vox’s work is reaching more people than ever, but our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources — particularly during a pandemic and an economic downturn. Your financial contribution will not constitute a donation, but it will enable our staff to continue to offer free articles, videos, and podcasts at the quality and volume that this moment requires. Please consider making a contribution to Vox today.
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vox.com
Senate Democrats block $250 billion for coronavirus small business loans
Senate Democrats on Thursday blocked legislation to add $250 billion to a small-business loan program designed to prevent layoffs during the coronavirus outbreak. The move means that Congress won’t pass an expansion of the Paycheck Protection Program, which is running out of money, until next week at the earliest. The Senate adjourned until Monday after...
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nypost.com
Facebook group "RVs for MDs" lets health care workers self-quarantine safely
A North Texas woman got a helping hand when she turned to the internet in a desperate bid to help her husband, an ER doctor, find somewhere to rest without the risk of exposing his family to the coronavirus. She turned her experience into a movement called "RVs for MDs," a Facebook group which connects people in the medical profession needing to quarantine with nearby volunteers who are willing to lend their campers to them. Mireya Villarreal speaks to group founder Emily Phillips and several people who benefited from her initiative for our series A More Perfect Union.
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cbsnews.com
Former NFL player delivers help, and a thank-you, to those fighting coronavirus
Ex-Penn State and NFL lineman Brandon Noble was saved by health care workers a few times. Now, he gives back in his way during the COVID-19 crisis.       
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usatoday.com
'Fortnite' Shadow & Ghost Ollie Locations Week 8 Challenge Guide
'Fortnite' Skey's Adventure Challenges want skilled players to find Shadow or Ghost Ollie once all the main challenges are done. In this guide, we'll tell you where to find them.
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newsweek.com
Viral story of teen accidentally invited to wrong Thanksgiving by 'grandma' text takes a sad twist
Wanda Dench and Jamal Hinton have had Thanksgiving together for four years after an accidental text. Lonnie Dench died Sunday.      
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usatoday.com
Lonnie Hench, husband of woman who mistakenly invited stranger to Thanksgiving, dies
Lonnie Hench, the husband of the woman who mistakenly invited a stranger to Thanksgiving, died after battling coronavirus.        
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usatoday.com
Gwyneth Paltrow celebrates son’s 14th birthday with ‘socially distanced’ parade
The teen's pals pulled up to his home with decorated cars and a bag full of candy.
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nypost.com
France is building a 'Stop Covid' app, but privacy concerns could derail it
A number of different apps from countries and companies around the world have been created in an effort to stop the coronavirus pandemic, including ones from big tech companies such as Apple. Now, France is throwing its hat into the ring. 
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foxnews.com
Tyler Perry pays grocery bills for elderly shoppers
"You hear about these things, but you never expect for it to happen to you," one shopper said.
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cbsnews.com
Who Will Benefit From Federal Reserve's $2.3 Trillion Main Street Loans Program?
"Our country's highest priority must be to address this public health crisis, providing care for the ill and limiting the further spread of the virus," Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said in a statement.
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newsweek.com
Review: 'The Mindfulness Movement' offers an important message if you can only tune out the noise
'The Mindfulness Movement,' executive produced by Deepak Chopra and Jewel, details the ways mindfulness can combat anxiety, distraction and depression.
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latimes.com
TSA screens fewer than 100K travelers for 2 days in a row, hits 'record low' as coronavirus outbreak continues
The Transportation Security Administration screened fewer than 100,000 travelers two days in a row this week.
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foxnews.com
Children Seem to Be Less Vulnerable to the Coronavirus. Here’s How the Pandemic May Still Put Them at Risk
Of the many ways that the pandemic is making us rethink our humanity, none is more important, or urgent, than the overall protection of children. They may not be as susceptible to the virus as other groups, but they are especially vulnerable to so many of the secondary impacts of the pandemic on society. The…
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time.com
The Final Fantasy VII Remake Shouldn’t Exist — But I’m So Glad it Does
Remaking 'Final Fantasy VII' is like remaking 'Casablanca,' but developer Square Enix pulled it off
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time.com
Woman takes third job at assisted living facility to spend time with quarantined mother
Janie Kasse already had full-time and part-time jobs, but after her mother's assisted living facility closed its doors to visitors amid the Covid-19 pandemic, she knew she needed a third job.
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edition.cnn.com
All the Countries That Are Flattening The Coronavirus Curve
While the novel coronavirus continues to spread across the globe, a number of different countries have begun to flatten the curve.
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newsweek.com
24 Hours: The Fight for New York
Before the pandemic swept in, New York City lived up to its own hype. Then the coronavirus all but shut it down. Now the hush, is broken mostly by the wail of ambulances. Over 24 hours, New Yorkers of all stripes join the battle for their city. (April 9)       
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usatoday.com
17 NYC patients on ventilators transferred from hospital in Queens
Seventeen ventilated patients have been transferred from Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in Queens – including 10 to the Navy ship USNS Comfort – as a “preventative measure” amid a high demand for oxygen, officials said Thursday. In addition to the group sent to the ship, five patients were sent to a hospital in Albany and...
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nypost.com