Generally
General
755
unread news
unread news
Quarterback Jordan Love may become Patriots NFL Draft 2020 wild card
When early high school graduate Jordan Love and his mother arrived at his Utah State dormitory for the first time in January 2016, football coach Matt Wells and his wife, Jen, were there to accept the handoff. “When his mama dropped him off, she said, ‘Jen, take care of my baby. Matt, kick his butt,’...
nypost.com
Civil Rights leader Joseph Lowery dead at 98
ATLANTA— The Rev. Joseph E. Lowery fought to end segregation, lived to see the election of the country’s first black president and echoed the call for “justice to roll down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream” in America. For more than four decades after the death of his friend and civil rights icon,...
nypost.com
Italy now has more cases than China while US cases surpass 101,000
edition.cnn.com
Cycling movie ‘Breaking Away’ is a sports classic
During the coronavirus shutdown, each day we will bring you a recommendation from The Post’s Peter Botte for a sports movie, TV show or book that perhaps was before your time or somehow slipped between the cracks of your viewing/reading history. This entry happens to impressively cover all three mediums. Breaking Away (1979) Rated: PG...
nypost.com
Severe storms, tornadoes likely to erupt in Midwest
In all, nearly 30 million people may be at risk for severe thunderstorms at some point today, AccuWeather said.       
usatoday.com
How Oregon became NCAA Tournament’s original Cinderella
Long before we called it March Madness, they were our first Cinderella, in the first NCAA championship. On March 27, 1939, before integration, before World War II, before John Wooden’s UCLA dynasty, with James Naismith watching from the Patten Gymnasium stands, the Oregon Webfoots upset Ohio State 46-33 and took the train back from Evanston,...
1 h
nypost.com
Shipments of urns in Wuhan raise questions about China’s coronavirus reporting
Massive deliveries of urns in Wuhan have raised fresh skepticism of China’s coronavirus reporting. As families in the central Chinese city began picking up the cremated ashes of those who have died from the virus this week, photos began circulating on social media and local media outlets showing vast numbers of urns at Wuhan funeral...
1 h
nypost.com
For a brief period tonight, some parts of the world will go dark. It's Earth Hour
Don't be surprised if you find your neighbors turning off their lights for a full hour Saturday night. They're taking part in a global movement called Earth Hour.
1 h
edition.cnn.com
Alabama girl, 4, missing for 2 days found safe with her dog
A 4-year-old Alabama girl was found safe with her dog Friday afternoon a mile from her rural home after she went missing for two days.
2 h
foxnews.com
Losing Noah Syndergaard isn’t shaking Steven Matz’s Mets confidence
It’s anyone’s guess when — or if — baseball will be played this season due to the coronavirus pandemic, but Steven Matz says he believes the Mets will still be able to contend, even after the loss of Noah Syndergaard to Tommy John surgery. “It’s hard to replace a guy like Noah,’’ Matz said by...
2 h
nypost.com
Victor Davis Hanson says Trump's coronavirus policies now 'conventional wisdom'
President Trump's coronavirus outbreak.policies have become "conventional wisdom" amid the crisis, Fox News contributor Victor Davis Hanson said Friday.
2 h
foxnews.com
Bronx is a ticking coronavirus timebomb: health workers
The Bronx is a “ticking time bomb” when it comes to the coronavirus, and could soon become the epicenter for New York’s crisis with the deadly bug, local health workers told The Post. The borough had 4,243 recorded coronavirus cases as of Friday night, according to city officials — fewer than Brooklyn’s 6,095 cases, or...
2 h
nypost.com
Nets’ Kevin Durant intrigue only grows with NBA’s coronavirus pause
Part 6 of a series analyzing the Brooklyn Nets: Kevin Durant’s absence is the elephant in the room, the shadow hanging over this tumultuous season. His eventual return is the thing that will make the Nets contenders. But when will that be? Both Durant, who is rehabbing after Achilles surgery, and the Nets have insisted...
2 h
nypost.com
Lockdowns Are the New Normal
HONG KONG—As the number of confirmed coronavirus cases exploded in China early this year, Hong Kong, densely populated and connected to the mainland, was able to largely contain the virus’s spread. A combination of community response and official action held back the pace of infections, with the number of patients discharged from treatment until recently outpacing those remaining in the hospital. This month, civil servants on work-from-home orders were allowed to return to their office. Soon, private businesses started to do the same. Commuters began to refill the buses and subways. Bars and restaurants left largely vacant for weeks saw patrons remerge. As reports of outbreaks abroad worsened, Hong Kong appeared to be slowly returning to form.In recent days, this semblance of normalcy has vanished. The number of confirmed cases here has ticked upward at a much quicker pace than before, worrying health experts. The government reversed course on its easing of restrictions, sending workers back home, closing parks and city facilities, and reiterating calls for social distancing. It also introduced newer, more stringent measures, barring tourists and transit passengers from Hong Kong’s airport, one of the world’s busiest, and quarantining those who are allowed in. (A large portion of the recent confirmed cases are imported.) Another cluster of confirmed cases has been linked to bars and live-music venues, so gatherings of more than four people have been deemed illegal for the next two weeks; restaurants will reduce their capacity, and entertainment areas like cinemas and arcades must temporarily close.[Read: A glimpse of the coronavirus’s possible legacy]Hong Kong and Singapore were early examples of places that were able to contain the spread of the virus, which causes the disease COVID-19, offering a model of sorts for countries elsewhere to follow (even if most did not take the cue). Yet now, this city is a different kind of model, a glimpse into what awaits the hundreds of millions of people living under restrictions in places such as Britain, France, Italy, and parts of the United States, wondering what life will look like once the virus is brought under control. The tightening and easing, as well as tweaking, of restrictions under way in Hong Kong, an effort to control the ebb and flow of the disease into manageable waves without letting it run rampant, illustrates how one protracted lockdown is unlikely to be sufficient as researchers take part in a global race to create a vaccine for the virus.This tactic could keep health facilities from being overburdened, a reality now facing medical workers in New York City and parts of Europe, Gabriel Leung, one of the world’s experts on coronavirus epidemics who worked extensviely on the SARS outbreak and led Hong Kong’s response to the 2009 influenza pandemic, told me.“The suppression-and-lift strategy is the most talked about amongst my ilk and in governments all over the world,” said Leung, who is also the dean of medicine at the University of Hong Kong. “You would need to keep on these control measures to varying degrees until one of two things happen: One, is there is natural immunity by active infection and recovery, or there is sufficiently wide availability of an effective vaccine administered to at least half the population, to create the same effective herd immunity. These are the only two ways of going about it.” Leung added that we’ll go through “several cycles” of tightenings and easings “before we will have resolution.”Leung’s view is echoed in the scientific community. Research published by the COVID-19 Response Team at Imperial College London this month found that “intermittent social distancing—triggered by trends in disease surveillance—may allow interventions to be relaxed temporarily in relative short time windows, but measures will need to be reintroduced if or when case numbers rebound.” Writing for The Atlantic about how to cope with the virus in the United States, Aaron E. Carroll, a pediatrics professor, and Ashish Jha, a global-health professor, suggested a similar approach. “We can keep schools and businesses open as much as possible, closing them quickly when suppression fails, then opening them back up again once the infected are identified and isolated,” they wrote. “Instead of playing defense, we could play more offense.”The aim of these measures, such as social distancing, is not to bring the number of people infected down to zero, Leung said; “that is not possible.” Rather, they are an effort to protect older people, who have a much higher risk of becoming infected and dying, as well as to keep health-care systems functioning. “No country, no population, no city can be spared from COVID-19,” said Leung, who is advising the Hong Kong government on its response to the virus. “The big question is, how do you make sure that you do not overwhelm societal functions? How do you make sure that your hospital system does not collapse? How do you make sure that there are enough ICU beds and ventilators for those who need them? How do you make sure that you can minimize the morbidity and mortality burden on your population while protecting the economy and the livelihood of the people on a sustainable basis? These are the big questions that any society would have to grapple with and have been grappling with.”Leung was alerted to the new coronavirus by contacts in mainland China on December 31. His main concern at the time, he said, was the looming Chunyun—China’s spring festival, the largest human migration on the planet—set to begin just over a week later, on January 10. Wuhan, the epicenter of the virus, is a major transportation hub for China, a factor that caused particular consternation. As suspected cases began to emerge in countries popular with Chinese tourists, such as Japan and Thailand, Leung and his team were able to use airport, road, and train data to estimate the spread of the virus, telling reporters in Hong Kong on January 21 that the number of infected could be about 1,700 and that the virus had likely spread outside Wuhan across China. At the time, official Chinese figures put the number of cases at about 300. Leung said he received a call from the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention the following day, and on January 23 arrived in Beijing with colleagues to assist with the first epidemiological study of the virus, published in The New England Journal of Medicine.During the World Health Organization's mission to China the following month, Leung said, he observed a three-pillared approach that was effective in slowing the spread of the virus. The first pillar, which he described as “medieval,” was rigorous quarantine and isolation of patients. This was coupled with a “very, very robust, excellent community organization,” including severe restrictions on social mixing and social mobility that were taking place on a neighborhood level. This was buttressed by extensive use of technology—apps, big data, artificial intelligence—to further track and record peoples’ movements.[Read: How the pandemic will end]Yet China, too, is being forced to impose a new wave of restrictions even as parts of life have appeared to return to normal. Beijing, fearing its own raft of imported cases that could reignite domestic spread, is implementing some of the tightest travel restrictions, barring practically all foreigners from entering the country as well as stopping nearly all international passenger flights. Since battling back the virus, authorities in Beijing have attempted to wrangle the narrative of the virus, sowing doubt over its origins amid tensions with the United States. Chinese officials attempted to silence doctors in Wuhan who raised early alarm about a mysterious virus and have cracked down on journalists covering the pandemic. And while China has begun to ease restrictions in Hubei province, where Wuhan is located, citing a drop in cases, reporting from various outlets in recent days has cast doubt on the validity of the figures, pointing instead to less testing being carried out, as well as the number of deaths attributed to the virus.Leung said he couldn’t speculate about what was happening within China during the first weeks of the virus emerging, or about how other governments had handled outbreaks in their respective countries. Since he became involved in the response, Leung said his experience working with Chinese counterparts has been positive. During the WHO trip, Chinese officials were “very open, very transparent, a whole of government approach,” he told me. “Wherever we went, we were asking difficult questions and we were asking for the data, to look at the data and to discuss with their scientists, and they've been nothing but forthcoming.”“China bought the rest of the world time,” Leung said. “Whether or not it could have brought it under control earlier and quicker is a different question … Whether different countries in the world have actually used that time well, I think it’s for their own people to judge.” As the newly reimposed restrictions in Hong Kong and parts of China illustrate, the West may have more lessons to learn.
2 h
theatlantic.com
Joseph Lowery, civil rights leader and Martin Luther King Jr. aide, dies at 98
The Rev. Joseph E. Lowery, a veteran civil rights leader who helped the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, has died. He was 98.       
2 h
usatoday.com
New York suffered while Democrats pushed for 'liberal, fantasy wish-list items,' GOP lawmaker says
Democrats in Congress went overboard this week in pushing for "liberal, fantasy wish-list items" in the $2.2 trillion coronavirus aid bill that President Trump signed into law, a Republican congressman from hard-hit New York said Friday.
3 h
foxnews.com
Adam Fox making Rangers look smart for dealing Kevin Shattenkirk
Part 6 in a series analyzing the New York Rangers. How much more needs to be said after typing, “Adam Fox, the 22-year-old rookie out of Harvard, was the best Rangers defenseman this year?” We can tell you about the Jericho, L.I., native’s uncanny poise and vision on the ice; about his ability to elude...
3 h
nypost.com
Two hospitalized in Bronx apartment fire
Two people were hospitalized and another fears he has lost his home after a fire ripped through a Bronx apartment building Friday night.  The three-alarm blaze began around 8:57 p.m. on the top floor of the six-story building at 2528 Cruger Avenue in Allerton, just east of the New York Botanical Garden, an FDNY spokesman...
3 h
nypost.com
UFC must suspend Jon Jones for at least one year
Just when we were starting to trust Jon “Bones” Jones, he shows again his toughest opponent is himself. After a DWI arrest early Thursday morning on the streets of Albuquerque, N.M., Jones has gone from the GOAT to the DOAT, the UFC’s “Disappointment of All-Time.” Look, you don’t expect those who compete in combat sports...
3 h
nypost.com
Joseph Lowery, civil rights leader, dies at 98
The Rev. Joseph Lowery, a leader in America's civil rights movement, died Friday. He was 98.
3 h
edition.cnn.com
Mexico City doctors fear coronavirus pandemic leading to grim scenario
The global coronavirus pandemic that has turned most of the world upside down has largely left Latin America unscathed, but that all changed Thursday when Mexican President Andres Manuel López Obrador announced all non-essential activities would be suspended, bringing the bustling city to a grinding halt.
3 h
foxnews.com
Two sisters died days apart from coronavirus in Illinois. Family members didn't see them in their last moments
Richard Frieson told CNN the toughtest part was that his sisters had to die alone.
3 h
edition.cnn.com
America's civil rights movement leader Joseph Lowery has died: CNN
America's civil rights movement leader Joseph Lowery died on Friday at age 98, CNN reported.
4 h
reuters.com
Trump says this drug has 'tremendous promise,' but Fauci's not spending money on it
Despite President Trump's enthusiasm for the drug hydroxychloroquine to treat coronavirus, the federal funding powerhouse led by Dr. Anthony Fauci isn't spending any money on it, and clinical trials for it are lagging behind other drug studies, according to a CNN investigation.
4 h
edition.cnn.com
Aaron Rodgers’ frantic dash to escape Peru’s coronavirus lockdown
Aaron Rodgers is pleased to be at his home in Malibu, Calif., after describing a harrowing tale of his departure from Peru due to the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic. The Green Bay Packers quarterback told the tale on “The Pat McAfee Show” on CBS Sports Radio of how he and three other people were...
4 h
nypost.com
#CutiePie Trends on Twitter After Trump Uses Phrase on Reporter Who Asked Him About Ventilators
President Donald Trump warned ABC News reporter Jonathan Karl against being a "cutie pie" and a "wise guy" when he asked the president if people suffering from COVID-19 would have the ventilators they could need to stay alive.
4 h
newsweek.com
Dozens of women were allegedly forced into sexual slavery on an encrypted messaging app
4 h
edition.cnn.com
Newsom commutes prison sentences, including for murder
California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday pardoned five people who already served their time and commuted the sentences of 21 state prison inmates.
4 h
latimes.com
Five-star running back TreVeyon Henderson commits to Ohio State
The Buckeyes' 2021 recruiting class got even stronger as five-star running back TreVeyon Henderson announced his commitment to Ohio State.        
4 h
usatoday.com
Trump Says Michigan Governor Blames 'Everyone Else for Her Own Ineptitude' After She Says Medical Equipment 'Delayed'
"Yet your Governor, Gretchen "Half" Whitmer is way in over her ahead, she doesn't have a clue," Trump tweeted Friday.
4 h
newsweek.com
Rhode Island sending cops, National Guard to find New Yorkers seeking coronavirus refuge
Any New Yorkers in there? Rhode Island plans to send the National Guard out to knock door-to-door in an attempt to hunt down anyone who has arrived in the tiny state from New York City during the coronavirus pandemic. State police, meanwhile, have begun pulling over cars with New York state plates. Gov. Gina Raimondo...
4 h
nypost.com
Mayor defends using R-rated language in coronavirus Facebook post
Mayor Gabe Brown of Walton, Kentucky, talks to CNN's Don Lemon about the strong language he used in a Facebook post telling his constituents to stay home to help stop the spread of Covid-19.
4 h
edition.cnn.com
Third member of Ottawa Senators' traveling party tests positive for COVID-19
Ottawa Senators radio analyst Gord Wilson has tested positive for COVID-19. He is the third member of the NHL team's traveling party to have done so.
4 h
latimes.com
Gruber: Gov. Whitmer 'Knee-Jerk' Attacking Trump as Tryout to Be Biden’s Running Mate
Talk radio host Steve Gruber believes Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer's actions related to coronavirus are about one thing: being Joe Biden's pick for vice president.
4 h
breitbart.com
The US hits a grim new record as Trump continues to preach optimism
The US is now the world leader in coronavirus infections, with more than 100,000 as of Friday. That includes more than 25,000 in New York City, where hospitals are already overwhelmed.
4 h
edition.cnn.com
El Camino Real wins state Academic Decathlon, with altered format due to coronavirus
El Camino Real Charter High School has won this year's state Academic Decathlon, narrowly edging out its perennial rival, Granada Hills Charter High School.
4 h
latimes.com
Trump fires back at Michigan’s Whitmer, claims Dem governor ‘doesn’t have a clue’
President Trump took aim at Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer on Friday night, claiming in a Twitter message that the first-term Democrat was “way in over her head” amid the coronavirus outbreak and “doesn’t have a clue.”
4 h
foxnews.com
Coronavirus Live Updates: $2 Trillion Aid Bill Becomes Law as U.S. Cases Reach 100,000
President Trump said the government would buy thousands of ventilators, but it seemed doubtful they could be produced in time to help overwhelmed hospitals.
4 h
nytimes.com
Son accused of ordering hit on mobster dad at McDonald’s wants out of jail over coronavirus
The man accused of paying $200,000 to have his allegedly mobbed-up father whacked in the drive-thru of a Bronx McDonalds — while the wiseguy was ordering a coffee — wants to get out of jail to avoid catching coronavirus. Attorneys for Anthony Zottola Sr. said in papers filed late on Friday that he is willing...
4 h
nypost.com
This Day in History: March 28
America’s worst commercial nuclear accident occurs at Three Mile Island; Virginia Woolf dies and more
4 h
foxnews.com
Taj Gibson’s Knicks future comes with coach-search twist
Part 6 of a series analyzing the New York Knicks: If Tom Thibodeau becomes the next Knicks head coach, Taj Gibson can be assured of a spot on the roster. Otherwise, it’s going to be a tight squeeze. His team option is meaty despite the good work he put in this season as the Knicks’...
4 h
nypost.com
Joe Biden's Sexual Assault Accuser Wants To Be Able To Speak Out Without Fear of 'Powerful Men'
"These accusations are false," said Deputy Campaign Manager and Communications Director Kate Bedingfield.
4 h
newsweek.com
Strip club pressured into coronavirus compliance shut downs
Bliss Showgirls, in Avocado Heights off Valley Boulevard, was closed Friday after an uncover sting showed the establishment flouting COVID-19 guidelines.
4 h
latimes.com
‘Wheel of Fortune’ contestant shocks with quick puzzle solve
“Wheel of Fortune” fans were left shocked after a contestant solved a puzzle almost immediately with only one letter on the board. The popular game show has continued to air its catalog of previously filmed episodes as people settle in to watch while quarantining themselves amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. During a recent episode, one...
4 h
nypost.com
L.A. expands sick leave amid coronavirus — but only for employees at big companies
The L.A. City Council voted to increase paid leave for workers who are ill or need to care for family — but only for workers at businesses with 500 or more employees nationwide.
4 h
latimes.com
Arizona congressman calls for closing Grand Canyon immediately to help social distancing
Arizona Rep. Raúl Grijalva urged the Trump administration to close Grand Canyon National Park in light of coronavirus restrictions on crowds.       
4 h
usatoday.com
Citing virus, judge orders release of two men from California immigrant detention center
Attorneys call Adelanto Detention Center "a breeding ground for the virus."
5 h
latimes.com
Her daughter who beat medical odds at birth tests positive for virus
Elizabeth Fusco, who lost four family members to the novel coronavirus, tells CNN's Chris Cuomo that she and her daughter have tested positive for coronavirus. She shares that neither of them are showing symptoms despite her daughter having compromised lungs.
5 h
edition.cnn.com