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Howard scores 20-plus again, No. 17 Kentucky women win

Rhyne Howard scored 23 points with four 3-pointers, Maci Morris added 17 points and No. 17 Kentucky beat Alabama 68-53        
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Michael Cohen, Robert Kraft, R. Kelly: Your Friday Evening Briefing
Here’s what you need to know at the end of the day.
NYT > Home Page
Karl-Anthony Towns Ruled out vs. Knicks with Concussion from Car Crash
Minnesota Timberwolves big man Karl-Anthony Towns will not play Friday against the New York Knicks , as T'Wolves head coach Ryan Saunders told ESPN's Ian Begley that Towns is in concussion protocol...
bleacherreport.com
Trump to Nominate Kelly Knight Craft as U.N. Ambassador
The president announced the selection days after Heather Nauert, his choice to succeed Nikki R. Haley in the position, withdrew from consideration.
NYT > Home Page
Apple is prioritizing AR — and that’s a good thing
When harnessed for the public good, not simply frivolous enhancements to the gaming world, AR has the potential to usher in transformative progress.
VentureBeat | Tech News That Matters
Laura Loomer protested her permanent ban at Twitter NYC (again)
Laura Loomer protested at the Twitter building in New York a second time It was a cold and overcast Wednesday in New York when Laura Loomer returned to Twitter’s New York City headquarters to protest. Last November, the right wing activist and provocateur handcuffed herself to the building, calling for Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to unban her and remove other people she believed had violated Twitter’s terms of service. “We’re posting in real life,” Loomer tells me that day. “I’ve been banned on Twitter, and so here I am.” Loomer was permanently suspended from Twitter at the end of November 2018; according to BuzzFeed News, the ban came after she “tweeted a series of anti-Muslim falsehoods about Ilhan Omar, a Somali refugee who is one of two Muslim women elected to Congress.” At the time, Loomer had more than a quarter of a million followers, and was known for “consistently [misidentifying] suspects during breaking news situations and, during the midterm elections, [spreading] hoaxes about voter fraud.” The crowd assembled around Loomer for her second protest was a motley crew, a rotating group made up of between 15 and 25 people, many of them livestreaming, there to complain about what they felt was unfair censorship on the social network. Adrienna DiCioccio, the event’s co-organizer, told me as much. “When you go online, and you’re trying to search things, and you get errors like 404 or 451, that means censorship. That means you’re not allowed to find information that you are truly looking for,” she said. (A 404 error means that a server could not find the requested page; a 451 error means something has been taken down for legal reasons.) “We’re posting in real life” DiCioccio continued: “So when we go on platforms that we agree to by contract with TOS terms, and a company is not, you know, complying with their terms? That is a problem. And that’s why we’re here. We are here to show people truly what’s going on behind the algorithms, behind active, active user, you know, active daily users things that are going on. Basically, we. Want. Free. Speech.” She conceded that users should be banned if they break a website’s terms of service. “You know when 2 Live Crew was banned in the ’90s when they were trying to sing? ‘We live in America. We should not be banned in the USA for what we’re trying to say.’ Do you get what I’m saying?” (The rappers in 2 Live Crew were arrested and tried on obscenity charges in the early 1990s, which was overturned by a federal judge after a years-long First Amendment battle over sexually explicit lyrics from their seminal album As Nasty As They Wanna Be.) There were at least three megaphones, which were passed around like a bong, and people took turns shouting at the brick Twitter building, which did not reply. “Social media companies like Twitter and Facebook get to decide whether or not you get pertinent information about national security issues in your country,” Loomer yelled. “If your congresswoman is a Sharia advocate and is advocating for ISIS terrorists, don’t you think ought to know about it without having that information silenced and banned on social media?” She claimed Dorsey had lied to Congress in his testimony last September — where he said that that the company doesn’t use political ideology to make decisions — and said that he should be locked up, as lying to Congress is a crime. (There is no evidence Dorsey lied.) Asked about the protest, a Twitter spokesperson said that “Twitter was founded on freedom of expression and we welcome the public to express their views. We apply the Twitter Rules impartially and not based on ideology.” Loomer went on: “Who is Jack Dorsey protecting? Who are the social media companies protecting when they ban people for reporting facts about Islamic Jihad and sharia in America? Who? Who are they protecting? Islamic terrorists, that’s who they’re protecting.” She continued: “And so when I handcuffed myself many people, mocked me, and they said that it was ridiculous that I was talking about Sharia law when I handcuffed myself, and I was talking about how these companies are upholding Sharia by banning people. Did you know that Twitter is now sending —” And here she paused, dropping her voice to a normal level. “This one is losing battery, I think,” she said to an associate, about her loudspeaker. “Let me use the louder one.” The building remained silent. Afterward, Loomer texted me to say that the event had trended online. There is no record that was actually the case. In 2016, Milo Yiannopoulos lost his Twitter verification; the former Breitbart writer and right-wing darling had apparently run afoul of the company’s internal rules, and, at the time, Twitter declined to comment on the move. (One executive, who said he wasn’t speaking for the company, implied that it may have been because Yiannopoulos had said someone deserved to be harassed.) Yiannopolous was banned permanently from Twitter later that year, after he incited a racist, targeted harassment campaign against the actress Leslie Jones, who was then starring in the Ghostbusters reboot. It was the start of the narrative that Twitter and other social media companies were biased against conservatives, which has since morphed into a belief that these platforms are somehow discriminatory; the companies involved rarely explain what specific action has violated a specific rule. Twitter didn’t tell Loomer why she was banned This January, the technology writer John Herrman published a piece about how platform secrecy enables tech paranoia: “Everything that takes place within the platform kingdoms is enabled by systems we’re told must be kept private in order to function,” he wrote. “We’re living in worlds governed by trade secrets. No wonder they’re making us all paranoid.” Twitter didn’t tell Loomer why she was banned, which has contributed to her feeling that conservatives have been censored online. DiCioccio, the co-organizer, told me she’d tried to do something about it. “I just tried getting an app developed because Twitter is censoring accounts, shadow banning, et cetera, you know what I’m saying? Followers are going down. Views are going down,” she says. “So I was talking to an app developer trying to get something that would contradict their algorithms. But you know, this private company that says they’re not socialist and they’re not trying to make a bias have APIs up where nobody can make an app and even try to go against that.” (APIs, otherwise known as application programming interfaces, are a suite of tools used by developers to make applications; it wasn’t immediately clear what DiCioccio was trying to say.) Many people at Wednesday’s protest felt similarly frustrated, which revealed that they either had not read the terms of service they agreed to and were banned for violating them, or that they lacked the technical knowledge to understand how platforms are moderated. It seemed like they’d all been suspended, at least briefly — one man shouted his account had been temporarily disabled because of he’d tweeted “stance that the Y chromosome determines sex,” which if true would violate Twitter’s policy against hate speech — but what they all had in common was a set of politics. The gathering had the feeling of an amateur support group, at times; at others, it was a debate club. (Loomer told me later she had been involved in college debate, which explains both the vibe and her insistent way of arguing. At press time, I wasn’t able to confirm with her alma mater whether that was true or not.) A podcaster who went by Brad Chadford and his cameraman had come down from Boston, as token liberals to debate Loomer and her group. “I think when these companies like Twitter and Facebook start, they never like conceived that this would eventually become a problem,” he said, referring to the politics that spring up around social media bans. “Where we have a disagreement — me and Adrienna and Laura and all these people that organize this stuff — is that they think that they’re just being targeted because they’re conservatives. I think it’s just kind of like an... inept management that’s going on at Twitter that’s actually causing the problem,” he said. “I just don’t ascribe, like, a nefarious motivation to it, and they do, you know, because they’re fucking crazy.” If Twitter considers itself a public utility, then how can it ban anyone? “I came out here for the protest, obviously,” said Craig Brittain, the ex-revenge porn purveyor who is suing Twitter and who is a former 2018 Senate candidate. He’d flown in from Arizona to take part in Loomer’s action, and said he was also planning to run for Senate again in 2020. “I’ve had members of my staff banned from Twitter when Twitter established a world leaders policy that was supposed to guarantee to protect all candidates, world leaders, and agencies from being blocked or prohibited from spreading their message and reaching their voters and constituents on social media.” (Twitter’s world leaders policy does, in fact, exist; it does not, however, appear to extend to candidates, because they are not world leaders.) Earlier in the day, Brittain had taken up one of the loudspeakers and expounded on a theory of why Twitter had become successful — a sort of alternate history. “What happened was they went from 57,000 members to over 3 million members in three months after President Barack Obama won the election of 2008 because John McCain at the time was ill-equipped to handle social media,” Brittain told the assembled crowd, who didn’t seem to be paying that much attention. “After that, the valuation of the company skyrocketed as a direct result of Barack Obama’s activity with the company. This resulted in multiple town halls and official government events scheduled with Jack Dorsey in which there were numerous press photos and handshakes, and all sorts of events, government money spent, taxpayer dollars invested in the company. And what happened is between 2007 and 2011 the company went from a $3 million valuation to a $23 billion valuation.” (None of this is true. Twitter was worth $35 million near the end of 2007, when it raised its Series B round of funding that October; by the summer of 2011, that had jumped to $9.25 billion, after a Series G.) “Where did the money come from?” Brittain asked. “The money came from the taxpayers. It came from the politicians and government officials and suddenly wanted a piece of this emerging platform,” Brittain said, as a kind of trump card, before he got to his larger point. “Now at the time Dick Costolo was the CEO. And the big statement that he made in 2009 was that Twitter is a public utility. Like water, or electricity. Jack Dorsey would echo that sentiment in the New Yorker in 2011” — it was 2013 — “and again in 2013 in an interview with The New York Times.” (I couldn’t find the Times piece in question, though they wrote a lot about Dorsey in 2013.) What he meant to say: if Twitter considers itself a public utility, then how can it ban anyone? “That’s how bad censorship is,” Brittain continued. “When you can have your water or electricity on in a day just by paying the bill. But you can’t get your Twitter account back. You can’t get your Facebook account back. You can’t get your YouTube account back.” But nobody pays for Twitter, or Facebook, or YouTube. Online, in this metaphor, the utilities are Internet Service Providers. Donald Trump’s FCC has done away with net neutrality, which means that now ISPs are legally allowed to discriminate against traffic to certain sites, like, say, Twitter, or Netflix. Similarly, social platforms operate under their own terms and conditions, even though they undergird much of the infrastructure of modern life. The confusion about what platforms are and the role they play in society extended across the crowd; it was hard for people to separate a platform’s actions — moderating users — from what it means to be deplatformed in an increasingly digital world. “My life has become extremely hard,” said Loomer. “I am banned on Twitter. I’m banned on Uber. I’m banned on Lyft. I’m banned on Venmo. I’m banned on GoFundMe. I’m banned on PayPal. I’m banned on Uber Eats. I can’t even order a sandwich. I now had access suspended from my online Chase banking yesterday,” she continued, the last of which was impossible to verify. While there are non-digital equivalents for most of these services (aside from crowdfunding, as chain letters that request money are illegal), there might not be in the future; as an example, modern cities across the globe have started to go cashless, which means those locked out of the banking system for whatever reason will be further excluded from mainstream society. It’s not hard to imagine a future where you can authenticate yourself in physical space with an online profile, one where if you don’t have a presence you don’t, technically speaking, exist. (By way of analogy: If you match on a dating app, and you Google the person and they don’t appear to have an online trail, how likely are you to still go on the date?) Loomer told me she lost 90 percent of her income after she was banned from PayPal, where she solicited donations, and has claimed she’s since gone into $40,000 of credit card debt. Newsweek confirmed the cancellation, and PayPal provided them with a statement. “PayPal works to ensure that our platform and services are not used for purposes that run counter to our core values,” a spokesperson toldthe magazine. “Our decision and actions are values-based, not political.” Loomer lost 90 percent of her income after she was banned from PayPal To Loomer, PayPal only wrote that they were terminating her account “pursuant to PayPal’s User Agreement,” which says that PayPal can delete your account for any reason and at any time. In an Instagram post about her ban from PayPal, Loomer reacted. “Essentially I can’t even exist in society because the actual Nazis in tech and on the left constantly ban me because I post facts,” she wrote. “How am I supposed to pay my bills? I can’t get a regular job because I have been accused of being a Nazi. Am I supposed to be homeless? I guess these people won’t be happy until I reach a breaking point and just die.” Existentialism aside, there’s one plausible explanation for why PayPal might have banned Loomer from its service: her fervent islamophobia. PayPal’s user agreement stipulates that you may not use your account to “to display, upload, modify, publish, distribute, disseminate, transmit, update or share any information” that “[i]s grossly harmful, harassing, blasphemous defamatory, obscene, pornographic, paedophilic, libellous, invasive of another’s privacy, hateful, or racially, ethnically objectionable, disparaging, relating or encouraging money laundering or gambling, or otherwise unlawful in any manner whatever,” it reads. Presumably “hateful” covers religious bigotry. Loomer was banned from both Uber and Lyft in November 2017 after she posted a series of anti-Muslim tweets in which she tagged both companies. “Someone needs to create a non Islamic form of Uber or Lyft because I never want to support another Islamic immigrant driver,” she tweeted. NBC News reported that the tweet was “the beginning of a daylong anti-Islamic social media attack that blamed all Muslims for ISIS terrorism,” and she was banned permanently from both services later that day. In her words, they were the first services to really ban her. “There have been multiple instances of Muslims being hired by Uber and Lyft — raping women, killing women. There was a Muslim Uber driver who killed a woman because her dress was too short. So he raped her and killed her,” she tells me at Wednesday’s protest, before claiming that a Muslim Uber driver had kicker her out of a car on Rosh Hashanah, an important Jewish religious celebration. She continued to inveigh against people who are Muslim, generally, until I interrupted her. Do you think the drivers represent the company? “Well, the CEO of Uber is a Muslim. So yeah, I do,” she says. “Why would I want to get a car with an Islamic immigrant when Uber and Lyft aren’t doing background checks, and they have a documented history of hiring ISIS terrorists? It freaks me out,” she says. “And then when I look at Islam as an ideology, and I see that it calls for the killing of Jews, and then Uber doesn’t do anything when a Muslim driver kicks me out for being Jewish. It freaks me out!” At the protest, the only person Loomer expressed empathy for was herself. “You’re never going to know what it’s like to not be able to make money. You’re never going to know what it’s like to wake up one morning and have 90 percent of your income gone,” she says. “You’re never going to know what it’s like to, you know, be told that you deserve to not exist online simply because of your politics.” “How would you feel if the roles were reversed and all the executives were Republicans and they were like, ‘You know what I don’t like this guy. I don’t like his politics I’m just going to ban him. And I’m going to ban him from banking. And I’m gonna make his life very hard and when he’s walking around and taking cabs I’m going to deactivate his credit card so that you’re stranded with no money,’” she says. “How would you feel if the roles were reversed?” It’s the American way that private companies are allowed to do anything they want to, short of breaking the law. (And even then, as in the 2008 financial crisis, breaking the law doesn’t have so many consequences if the company you’re a part of is ensconced in American society.) If a social network decides to remove a person from its platform, for any reason, there’s no legal recourse, because nothing illegal has happened; and moreover, once you sign a terms of service agreement, regardless of whether you read it in full or not, you have agreed to abide by the rules of the place. When a bartender bans you from their establishment, you’re done. That’s it. By entering you agree to obey the rules of the place, even if you think they’re silly. In that sense, the difference between a bar and Twitter or Uber or Paypal is negligible (although bars don’t yet sell your personal drinking data). In another, however, they couldn’t be more different: social media companies are inextricably part of the fabric of modern society, and getting banned means being excluded from a larger and larger sector of society. But that’s hard to explain on a cold New York City sidewalk, when the forecast promises snow. It started coming down in earnest around noon, four or so hours into Loomer’s protest. The building didn’t shiver, and it had nothing to say.
The Verge
Gould understands speculation about possible Chicago return
Kicker Robbie Gould understands the speculation about a possible return to the Chicago Bears        
USATODAY - News Top Stories
Verizon trials Stitch Fix-like mystery box service to sell gadgets
Verizon has launched a mystery box service that delivers gadgets to customers’ homes, lets them try the gadgets for two weeks, and then charges them for what they choose not to return. The service, called Tech Pack, was announced today through emails sent out to select customers. Verizon is limiting how many people can sign up to start and expects to run out of slots by the end of the weekend. The service works like Stitch Fix or any number of other mystery box delivery services. When signing up, you take a short quiz about what kind of things you like, and Verizon uses that information to choose which gadgets it’ll send you. Verizon will mail out a box of three tech products every so often, and you can keep or return as many as you’d like. If you don’t return a product within 14 days, you’ll be charged for it. Discounts are given if you buy multiple products Verizon says customers can expect to receive gadgets like a Google Home Mini, a Mophie battery pack, Canary’s Flex camera, LG’s Tone Pro neckbuds, Ryze’s Tello Mini Drone, and a Belkin car charger. You won’t know what you’re getting until the box arrives. Once you’ve received them, Verizon says you’ll get free demos, tutorials, and tech support while you try them out. The boxes include a prepaid shipping label for returns. There’s no subscription fee to sign up. Verizon wouldn’t tell us the exact prices it’ll be charging for the gadgets, but a spokesperson indicated they would be similar to what Verizon already sells them for. Customers will get discounts on the products based on how many they keep from each box. For now, Verizon isn’t saying how often boxes will be delivered. Most mystery box services deliver products on a monthly basis, but Verizon says Tech Pack is a “trial” and that it’s still exploring how often to send stuff out. The service is meant to give customers a way to test out gadgets before committing to them. But it also seems like a potentially very expensive twist on a mystery box. Canary’s Flex camera sells for $180 through Verizon, which is a lot of money to decide to spend because a product suddenly showed up at your house. Verizon also sells Google’s Home Mini sells for $50, which would be a bad price to pay since it’s constantly on sale for closer to $30.
The Verge
Trump announces Kelly Knight Craft as UN ambassador pick
President Donald Trump announced on Friday he was nominating Kelly Knight Craft as the next U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.        
USATODAY - News Top Stories
YouTube pulls ads from anti-vax conspiracy videos
YouTube has removed ads from videos that promote anti-vaccination content, citing a ban on “dangerous and harmful” material. BuzzFeed News reported the news this afternoon, saying YouTube had confirmed the decision after the publication contacted seven companies who were unaware that their advertisements were running on anti-vaccination videos. It’s the latest of several ways YouTube has recently restricted conspiracy theories and other objectionable material on its platform. BuzzFeed reports that the demonetized accounts include anti-vaccination channels LarryCook333 and VAXXED TV, as well as “alternative medicine” channel iHealthTube. The three channels have a total of roughly 473,000 subscribers. “We have strict policies that govern what videos we allow ads to appear on, and videos that promote anti-vaccination content are a violation of those policies,” a spokesperson said. YouTube already adds Wikipedia article links to some searches that are likely to show anti-vaccination content, attempting to counteract misinformation. YouTube is trying to restrict the spread of conspiracy videos At least one company BuzzFeed contacted, vitamin seller Vitacost, said it had already pulled ads over a separate controversy involving child predators communicating on YouTube — an issue that YouTube has spent the past few days scrambling to fix. “We had strict rules to prevent our ads from serving on sensitive content and they were not effective as promised,” it told BuzzFeed. Last month, YouTube said it would limit the reach of videos featuring conspiracy theories in general, responding to concerns that its recommendation algorithm pushed users down extreme ideological paths. A recent study of “flat earth” believers, for instance, found that nearly all its 30 subjects had been recommended flat earth content after watching videos about other types of conspiracies. YouTube has had some difficulty distinguishing “harmful” conspiratorial misinformation from programs intended for entertainment, but advocating against vaccines poses clear public health risks. US Representative Adam Schiff recently sent Facebook and YouTube’s parent company Google a letter raising concerns about vaccine-related misinformation, and Facebook is reportedly exploring new options to limit it. The image board site Pinterest, meanwhile, simply stopped returning results for searches about vaccination — saying it was “better not to serve those results than to lead people down what is like a recommendation rabbit hole.”
The Verge
UPDATE 2-Brazil judge suspends Embraer-Boeing tie-up negotiations -court document
A Brazilian judge on Friday suspended negotiations for the tie-up of Brazilian aircraft maker Embraer SA and Boeing Co, according to a court document.
REUTERS
CORRECTED-Microsoft workers demand it drop $480 mln U.S. Army contract
Several Microsoft Corp employees on Friday demanded that the company cancel a $480 million hardware contract with the U.S. Army and stop developing "any and all weapons technologies."
REUTERS
NASCAR's new rule package shrouded in unknowns before debut
NASCAR will introduce a new rule package at Atlanta Motor Speedway and the drivers aren't sure what to expect        
USATODAY - News Top Stories
No more MOUs! USTR Lighthizer tweaks trade terminology after dispute with Trump
In trade talks between the United States and China, Memorandums of Understanding - the building blocks of what would be a historic deal - are officially out.
REUTERS
Bears to release kicker Cody Parkey after costly misses, per report
The Bears are moving on from the kicker who was unable to convert a potentially game-winning 43-yard attempt against the Eagles in the wild-card-round        
USATODAY - News Top Stories
Robert Kraft prostitution scandal exposes depth of modern slavery, sex trafficking industry
Sex trafficking won't stop until the costs are high enough to make rich, powerful men feel that buying Chinese girls from a local spa isn't worth it.        
USATODAY - News Top Stories
MLB is trying a pitch clock in spring training
A 20-second pitch clock will be used in spring games beginning this weekend Major League Baseball on Friday announced the implementation of a pitch clock on a trial basis this spring, one day before the full slate of games begin in Arizona and Florida. For the first week or so the 20-second pitch clock will operate between pitches though with no enforcement, allowing players and umpires to get used to the process. After that, umpires will between innings inform teams which players are violating the rule, though again no penalties will be attached. MLB said that “later in spring training” and after negotiating with the MLB Players Association, only then would it have umpires assess ball-strike penalties for rule violations. There are a few details to the pitch clock that will be used in spring training: Timer only starts after the first pitch of the at-bat. Clock starts once the pitcher has the ball in the dirt circle around the pitching rubber and the catcher is in the box. Before the 20 seconds are up, the pitcher must begin his windup or motion to come set. The pitch itself doesn’t have to be thrown before the 20 seconds are up. Any pickoff attempt, wild pitch or passed ball would reset the timer, as would even feigning a pickoff throw or stepping off the mound. The timer won’t be used on the first immediate pitch after a foul ball, a dead ball, or a mound visit. The timer won’t be used on the first pitch after time is called though, “if time was called solely for purposes of resetting the clock, or changing a baseball, the timer shall start on the umpire’s signal.” MLB discussed adding a pitch clock last year though ultimately decided against it, instead implementing a limit on mound visits and a reduction of time between innings. The pitch clock for the regular season can technically be implemented by commissioner Rob Manfred, though the league has expressed a willingness to compromise with the players union. As of now no decision has been made whether to implement it during the 2019 regular season. Opinions vary among players. Dodgers left-hander Rich Hill told the L.A. Times the pitch clock was “ridiculous,” while Pirates right-hander J.T. Brubaker told MLB.com, “For the most part, it’s something you don’t really notice.” Batters are affected, too Pitchers aren’t the only ones scrutinized by a pitch clock, though they will understandably bear the brunt of most punishments under any new rule. Batters are required to be “in the batters box and alert” by the five-second mark of the timer. As of now there are no penalties built into the pitch clock, but MLB notes that any potential penalties enforced by umpires will be “ball-strike” related. 20 seconds is a long time The last pace-related rule implemented by MLB was a limit on the number of mound visits in 2018, to six per team for a nine-inning game. Players and teams hemmed and hawed over this during spring training, but for the most part the change worked with nary a hitch. Teams rarely even approached the mound visit cap last year; they were able to easily make the necessary adjustments. This was a far cry from previous years. Dodgers manager Dave Roberts mentioned a game in August 2017 during which the Diamondbacks visited the mound 19 times against them. Nineteen! Though these are more about pace, the average game time in MLB in 2018 was three hours, four minutes, down four minutes from 2017. MLB games have averaged at least three hours for the last seven seasons. Grant Brisbee two years ago painstakingly analyzed video of two games three decades apart and found the bulk of the difference in game times between 1984 and 2014 was captured in the time between pitches. That’s what this pitch clock will try to combat. Source: MLBtv “The waiting is the hardest part.” -Thomas Petty Taking a gander at Yasiel Puig‘s home run in Game 4 of the 2018 World Series, there were five pitches in the at-bat, the last four of which would be measured against a pitch clock if this rule was in place then. This isn’t exact, but a rough estimate shows that Eduardo Rodriguez took more than 20 seconds all four times: Before 0-1 pitch: 22 seconds 1-1 pitch: 21 seconds 2-1 pitch: 22 seconds 3-1 pitch: 26 seconds Rodriguez averaged 25.7 seconds between pitches using PITCHf/x data during the regular season in 2018. And he’s not alone. Of the 468 pitchers to throw at least 30 innings last year, all but six averaged more than 20 seconds in between pitches using this metric. Though it is more of an estimate that sometimes captures delays like stepping off a mound, for instance, this pace metric gives us a rough idea of who some of the slowest workers in the game are. Six pitchers averaged more than 30 seconds in between pitches, and they seem more likely to be most affected by this new rule, if implemented. While you could feature a full-length commercial between the pitches of this sextet, on average, they all happened to perform well in 2018, posting a collective 3.22 ERA while averaging 10 strikeouts per nine innings. For now, we have roughly four weeks worth of spring training games to see of the pitch clock experiment will work. My guess is players will adjust, eventually, and this is something we’ll mostly forget about until a pitcher gets assessed a ball penalty and walks in a run in the World Series.
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From fridges to fireplaces, the most luxurious home items you can’t afford
KBIS 2019 was a chance to see what's new in kitchen and bath tech, including all kinds of cool appliances. Some of these are the over-the-top luxury items that are destined for a very small number of mansions. The post From fridges to fireplaces, the most luxurious home items you can’t afford appeared first on Digital Trends.
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Say goodbye to Facebook Moments: You don't have long to save your photos
Facebook Moments is shutting down on February 25 because people weren’t using it. If you did, there are ways to save your photos before it's too late.        
USATODAY - News Top Stories
Twitter co-founder and former CEO Ev Williams is stepping down from company board
Twitter co-founder and former CEO Ev Williams, who also founded Blogger and Medium, is leaving the Twitter company board.        
USATODAY - News Top Stories
Fed's policy pause sets stage for broad overhaul
When Federal Reserve policymakers last month put a three-year rate-hike campaign on hold and backed ending a yearlong push to shrink their $4 trillion balance sheet, they cited increased risks to U.S. economic growth and the need for more time to sort through the data.
REUTERS
Flattening U.S. yield curve in late 2018 'flashing red' on economy: Fed's Williams
A flattening U.S. yield curve in December, which was close to being inverted, was "flashing red" about a deceleration in U.S. economic growth heading into 2019, despite some solid data at the time, New York Federal Reserve President John Williams said on Friday.
REUTERS
DeAndre Ayton opens up on why Suns have struggled
SportsPulse: DeAndre Ayton is open and candid about his first year with the Suns while speaking to Trysta Krick during NBA All-Star Weekend.        
USATODAY - News Top Stories
Report: Cody Parkey to Be Cut by Bears; Missed Game-Winning FG vs. Eagles
The Chicago Bears will release kicker Cody Parkey at the start of the 2019 league year on March 13, per Ian Rapoport of the NFL Network. Per Over the Cap , Parkey is signed through 2021 but only has guaranteed money on the Bears books in 2019...
bleacherreport.com
AP Top Stories February 22 P
Here's the latest for Friday February 22nd: Singer R. Kelly charged; Patriots owner Robert Kraft charged with soliciting prostitute; House Democrats block President's national emergency declaration; Memorial fly-by in UK.        
USATODAY - News Top Stories
NY governor takes aim at Facebook over data
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo on Friday ordered two state agencies to investigate a media report that Facebook Inc may be accessing far more personal information from smartphone users, including health and other sensitive data, than had previously been known.
REUTERS
Tiger Woods Thrives, Shoots 5 Under in 2nd Round of WGC-Mexico Championship 2019
Tiger Woods is in the hunt at the 2019 WGC-Mexico Championship at Club de Golf Chapultepec in Mexico City after posting a five-under 66 in the second round Friday...
bleacherreport.com
Charles Barkley called out critics who argued Zion Williamson should sit out the rest of the year to stay healthy for the NBA after his shoe exploded
@NBAonTNT / Twitter Duke superstar Zion Williamson was forced to leave Wednesday night's game after his shoe blew out in the opening seconds. The injury prompted many in the NBA world to call on Williamson to hold off returning to the court until he was drafted. On the other side of the debate was NBA legend Charles Barkley, who insisted that basketball is more than money. Duke superstar Zion Williamson was forced off the court with an injury just seconds into the Blue Devils' game on Wednesday night after his foot busted right through his shoe. With Williamson projected as the top overall pick in the 2019 NBA Draft, the injury scare led to many in the basketball world to suggest that he sit the remainder of the season out, regardless of the severity of his injury.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: Tom Brady and Gisele Bündchen have a combined net worth of $580 million. Here's how the power couple makes and spends their money.See Also:Charles Barkley roasted Jussie Smollett on 'Inside the NBA': 'Do not commit crimes with checks'Puma came under fire for a tweet that appeared to mock Nike and Zion Williamson's injuryZion Williamson's exploding shoe isn't as uncommon as you might think
Business Insider
NASCAR at Atlanta 2019 Qualifying Results: Aric Almirola Wins Pole Position
Aric Almirola secured the pole position for Sunday's Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500 after posting the best time in the final round of qualifying Thursday at Atlanta Motor Speedway in Hampton, Georgia...
bleacherreport.com
Trump's fight against Amazon is looking bleak as a major USPS partner ditches the postal office for the e-commerce behemoth
AP Photo/The Republic, Joel Philippsen USPS lost a big partner this week when Stamps.com terminated their long-standing exclusive arrangement with the postal service. In the call where he announced the end of the partnership, Stamps.com CEO Ken McBride lauded Amazon's delivery network. It's a major loss for President Donald Trump's long-standing feud against Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. Among other sentiments, Trump has accused Amazon of swindling the USPS.    The long-standing e-commerce partner of the US Postal Service dumped the post office this week.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: Take a look inside Alfa Romeo's plant in Italy and watch how the Giulia sedan is madeSee Also:Cruise-line workers reveal the grueling schedules they must keep while on the jobElon Musk's promises about self-driving cars are 'almost unethical,' AutoNation CEO saysConsumer Reports no longer recommends Tesla's Model 3SEE ALSO: Trump is doubling down on his claims that Amazon uses the US Postal Service as a 'delivery boy,' and it could be a major blow to countless American businesses
Business Insider
Digital Trends Live: Self-lacing shoes, the future of humanity, and more
On episode 71 of Digital Trends Live, host Greg Nibler and company explored the tech world's biggest stories and talked to some fascinating guests, including media theorist Douglas Rushkoff. The post Digital Trends Live: Self-lacing shoes, the future of humanity, and more appeared first on Digital Trends.
Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Reds begin quest to fill center field with Hamilton gone
The Cincinnati Reds begin their search for a center fielder this weekend when they open spring training play        
USATODAY - News Top Stories
Apple's VP of Health Says Apple Has 'Good' Relationship With FDA, Will Continue to Do Great Work in the Health Space
Apple's VP of Health Dr. Sumbul Desai recently sat down for an interview with MobiHealthNews where she discussed Apple's health products, the company's relationship with the FDA, the success of the ECG feature on the Apple Watch, and more. On the topic of Apple's relationship with the FDA, Desai said that while Apple has a "good" relationship with the FDA, the FDA asked "hard questions" about the ECG feature in the Apple Watch, which received De Novo clearance in the U.S. ahead of its release. Apple gets no special treatment from the FDA and undergoes the same scrutiny any other company does.With regards to the FDA, we have been working with them for years and we have developed a relationship. ... So we have a good relationship with the FDA. However, they held us to task. I mean, they asked us really hard questions and, given the size and impact we had, were very critical of our products and making sure that we're doing the right thing and thinking about the user first and the customer's safety first -- which they should do.On the ECG feature, which was added in the Apple Watch Series 4 and is available in the U.S., Desai said that customer stories "have been amazing." Cook has gotten a "number of letters" from people who were able to detect atrial fibrillation and get help earlier than they might have otherwise been able to. Response from doctors has also been "pretty decent," but cardiologists are still working on the best way to handle that kind of data coming from patients. In response to a question about ECG and another new health feature, fall detection, being targeted to an older demographic that may not own the Apple Watch, but Desai says that these features can help everyone.With regards to fall detection, I know that was the immediate place that people took it, but if you look at the stats, falls are one of the most common reasons for people to go into the emergency room across all age groups. So you can imagine, and this has happened to me, going up on your step stool to try to get some flour or sugar, no matter what age group you're in, and having a fall. And that happens. And so we really built fall detection for everyone.Atrial fibrillation is also a condition that "affects everybody," and Apple has received positive responses from younger people diagnosed with the condition that were able to get help. Desai says that Apple is "very interested in the health space" and will "continue to do great work" in health. She agreed with Tim Cook's recent statement suggesting health is the area where Apple may ultimately have the greatest impact on mankind. Apple has a lot to share in the future, says Desai, and is still "in the first inning."We think health is an area where we can have incredible impact and meaningful impact. And how do you not work in a space, at the scale that we're at, and not have impact? So that is what drives us. What drives us is hearing from our customers that we've had an impact in terms of their health and we've really moved towards thinking about how do we democratize data, health and education, and really democratize being well for everyone. We're excited about the work we do and there's a lot of exciting things ahead, but we take it day by day. I think Tim has also said that we're in the first inning, and I think we all recognize that as well.Desai's full interview, which is worth reading for anyone interested in Apple's health initiatives, can be found over at the MobiHealthNews website.Tags: health and fitness, Health TechnologiesThis article, "Apple's VP of Health Says Apple Has 'Good' Relationship With FDA, Will Continue to Do Great Work in the Health Space" first appeared on MacRumors.comDiscuss this article in our forums
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Sabres place Kyle Okposo on IR; demote Pilut to AHL
The Buffalo Sabres have placed forward Kyle Okposo on injured reserve and demoted defenseman Lawrence Pilut to the minors        
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Deadspin Patriots Owner Bob Kraft Charged With Soliciting Prostitution | Jezebel Jussie Smollett’s S
Deadspin Patriots Owner Bob Kraft Charged With Soliciting Prostitution | Jezebel Jussie Smollett’s Supposed Hoax Is His Defining Performance | Splinter Oh My GOD These New Amy Klobuchar Allegations | The Grapevine R. Kelly Indicted on 10 Counts of Aggravated Sexual Abuse, No-Bail Arrest Warrant Issued [Updated] | News …Read more...
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Espanyol draws 1-1 with last-place Huesca in Spanish league
Espanyol was held to a 1-1 home draw by last-place Huesca as it missed a chance to move further away from the relegation zone in the Spanish league        
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Hamilton still full of drive as he chases 6th F1 world title
At the age of 34 and with five world titles, Formula One champion Lewis Hamilton is still showing no sign of waning motivation        
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Major highway closed after tanker crash spills 6,000 gallons of fuel in New Jersey
A crash involving two tanker trucks is causing major delays and evacuations in the area.        
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FCA sets $14 million annual target compensation for CEO Manley: filing
Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV (FCA) has set an annual compensation target for Chief Executive Officer Mike Manley consisting of pay, cash and equity bonuses of $14 million, the automaker said in a regulatory filing on Friday.
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REUTERS
Virgin Galactic sends its first passenger to the edge of space
Virgin Galactic sent its first test passenger into sub-space today. The company's chief astronaut instructor Beth Moses accompanied two pilots on a flight 55.85 miles above the Earth, just a few miles below the internationally recognized space bounda...
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Engadget | Technology News, Advice and Features
Dubious Hernandez goal helps West Ham beat Fulham 3-1
A controversial goal by Javier Hernandez helped West Ham to a 3-1 come-from-behind victory against relegation-threatened Fulham in the Premier League         
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FIFA strips Peru of U17 World Cup hosting rights
FIFA has stripped Peru of Under-20 World Cup hosting rights, citing concerns about the infrastructure        
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Boeheim to coach Syracuse vs. Duke after fatal car crash
Boeheim to coach Syracuse against top-ranked Duke on Saturday in team's 1st game since fatal car accident        
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See what's inside the $100,000 Oscars gift bag
See Also:10 Oscar-winning movies everyone forgot about3 women with different skin tones test Tarte’s new Face Tape Foundation13 artists who take painting to a whole new level
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Business Insider
Hagelin's playoff past makes him familiar with Capitals
Forward Carl Hagelin has faced the Washington Capitals so often in the playoffs, he didn't require much of an introduction before his first practice with Washington        
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USATODAY - News Top Stories
Everything to know about the Florida spa at the center of the Robert Kraft sex scandal
Joe Raedle/Getty Images A day spa in Florida has become the center of a massive prostitution and human trafficking bust involving multiple spas and massage parlors. Orchids of Asia Day Spa in Jupiter, Florida, is where Patriots owner Robert Kraft allegedly paid for sexual services. He was charged Friday with 2 counts of soliciting prostitution. The spa, which police found through illicit massage website rubmaps.com, is located in a strip mall about 30 minutes from Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort. It offers services including waxing, anti-aging facials, acne treatment, and 11 different types of massages, including a "Tokyo Ultimate 4 Hand" massage. Orchids of Asia Day Spa in Jupiter, Florida, has become the epicenter of a large-scale human trafficking and prostitution investigation involving multiple spas and massage parlors. Patriots owner Robert Kraft was charged Friday with two counts of soliciting prostitution. He was allegedly a customer at Orchids of Asia Day Spa in Jupiter, Florida, which is about 20 miles from Palm Beach and 30 minutes from Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago club. Jupiter police say Kraft paid for sexual services at the spa and that there is video evidence of Kraft in both instances. Kraft has denied any illegal activity. So far, 173 people have been charged with crimes in relation to the ring. Police say women lived in the parlors and were coerced into having sex for money. Read more: Reviews on an illicit massage website helped Florida police crack a massive sex trafficking and prostitution ring that Patriots owner Robert Kraft has been tied to The spa offers services including waxing, anti-aging facials, acne treatment, and 11 different types of massages, including a "Tokyo Ultimate 4 Hand" massage. Here's everything we know about the spa at the center of a prostitution scandal. Orchids of Asia Day Spa in Jupiter, Florida, has become the center of a massive prostitution and human trafficking bust involving multiple spas and massage parlors. Orchids of Asia Day Spa/Facebook Source: Business Insider Robert Kraft, owner of the New England Patriots NFL team, was charged Friday on two counts of soliciting prostitution. He is accused of paying for sexual services at Orchids of Asia Day Spa. Police say there is video evidence linking him to the incidents. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson Source: Business Insider Kraft's arrest comes as part of a large-scale human trafficking and prostitution bust in Florida involving multiple spas and massage parlors. Police say women lived in the parlors and were coerced into having sex for money. Joe Raedle/Getty Images Source: Business Insider See the rest of the story at Business InsiderSee Also:How the sex trafficking ring allegedly solicited by Robert Kraft worked, according to investigatorsI've owned an Amazon Echo for over three years now — here are my 19 favorite featuresBrothers who cofounded a $100 million company say a question their mom asked every night at dinner inspired their businessSEE ALSO: NFL insider Adam Schefter says Robert Kraft 'is not the biggest name involved' in Florida prostitution ring
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Business Insider
Has Kim Jong-Un broken Trump’s promise on nuclear weapons
Donald Trump and Kim Jong-Un meet in Vietnam to discuss denuclearization, the vague promise they ma        
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USATODAY - News Top Stories
Connor McDavid Suspended 2 Games for Illegally Checking Nick Leddy
The NHL suspended Edmonton Oilers superstar forward Connor McDavid for two games Friday for his illegal check to the head of New York Islanders defenseman Nick Leddy...
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bleacherreport.com
Tesla’s Model 3 was the best-selling EV in the world last year
The Tesla Model 3 was the best-selling electric car in the world in 2018, according to data firm JATO Dynamics. JATO says the Silicon Valley automaker sold about 138,000 Model 3s, beating out contenders like the flagship EV of state-owned Chinese automaker BAIC (92,000) and the Nissan Leaf (85,000). In total, Tesla sold more EVs than any other automaker in 2018, JATO reports. The news comes at the same time that Tesla is starting deliveries of the Model 3 in China, the largest market in the world for electric cars. Tesla also recently started delivering Model 3s in Europe for the first time ever. Adding those new markets for the Model 3 is supposed to help Tesla increase sales of the car by more than 100,000 in 2019, according to recent... Continue reading…
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The Verge