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Bill Withers' 10 greatest songs
There's much more to Bill Withers' catalog than his immortal hits "Ain't No Sunshine" and "Lean on Me." Here, a deeper dive into his short but brilliant career.
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latimes.com
Mitt Romney's former Utah mountain retreat seeks $15.5 million
In the hills of Utah, a scenic retreat once owned by Sen. Mitt Romney is on the market for $15.5 million.
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latimes.com
Coronavirus cases increase dramatically in L.A. County in 48-hour period as testing ramps up
The number of new cases increased by more than 1,000 in 48 hours. Los Angeles County has emerged as California's coronavirus epicenter.
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latimes.com
N.J. Governor Wants More Ventilators From Stockpile: 'We Need The Feds To Step Up'
Phil Murphy says he asked federal officials for 2,500 ventilators and has so far received 850. Of those he's received, some "were not at the level they needed to be."
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npr.org
Peter Weber and Kelley Flanagan dating, ‘Bachelor in Paradise’ alum Clay Harbor confirms
"Homegirl’s dating Peter, right?”
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nypost.com
A Comedian Coughed — And Came Up With 'Coronavirus Rhapsody'
A cough on his couch led comedian Dana Jay Bein to write the parody song "Coronavirus Rhapsody." Then he tweeted it — and the Internet took it from there.
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npr.org
Did a high-end wedding lead to a violent episode between a millionaire husband and wife?
When police arrived at a wealthy couple's Florida home in 2018, they found a husband and wife both bleeding from stab wounds. Mike Reuschel told authorities an intruder broke in and started attacking, but his wife Sue has a different story. "48 Hours" correspondent Peter Van Sant joined CBSN to preview this week's episode, "Reuschel vs. Reuschel."
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cbsnews.com
People living in vans and RVs are getting squeezed during pandemic
Living full time in a van or RV has become increasingly popular, but that life is now getting tougher as parks close and free campsites shut down.
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edition.cnn.com
Here's when Disney's delayed movies are coming to theaters
Disney on Friday announced new release dates for films that were delayed because of coronavirus, including two of its biggest movies this year, "Mulan" and Marvel Studios' "Black Widow."
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edition.cnn.com
Here's how to spend your spring break volunteering with your kids when you're stuck at home
For many kids spring break is just around the corner. Instead of breaking off to the beach this year, however, many families will find themselves in the same place -- home.
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edition.cnn.com
Wisconsin governor asks Legislature to delay primary election
Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers on Friday signed an executive order calling the state Legislature to meet for a special session on Saturday in a last-minute bid to delay the state's primary election.
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edition.cnn.com
New York is merging all its hospitals to battle the coronavirus
New York hospitals are beginning to operate as one system under a new plan by Gov. Andrew Cuomo as the state tries to increase its medical capacity to stop the coronavirus pandemic. | Spencer Platt/Getty Images “We’re in an almost apocalyptic crisis, which requires cutting through the bullshit.” Right now, New York’s hospitals are no longer operating as independent facilities. Under the plan announced this week by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, there is effectively one big New York state hospital system fighting off the coronavirus. As one VoxCare reader who works in health insurance put it to me, “This verges on the socializing of the entire system.” To be clear, they were being descriptive, not pejorative — and while that is a little hyperbolic, it’s not as far off as you might think. Cuomo announced this week that he had met with New York hospital leaders and come up with a plan to, in effect, merge them into one operating system with many different locations. From Buffalo to NYC, hospitals will be sharing staff, patients and supplies for the foreseeable future, with Albany overseeing the distribution of resources. ”It’s not unusual for a time of an emergency for regulatory authorities to basically say, ‘Hospitals, you must do this.’ Usually there are provisions in state law that enable that to happen,” Susan Dentzer, a senior policy fellow at the Duke University Margolis Center for Health Policy, told me. Hurricane Katrina is one recent example she gave. But the plan is still remarkable. There are about 200 hospitals in New York state, totaling 53,000 beds before Cuomo told them to double their capacity. About 20,000 of those beds are in New York City. It is a matter of necessity, as New York has already seen more than 100,000 Covid-19 cases and 1,500 deaths — with the peak still projected to be a week away, according to the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation’s estimates, requiring as many as 100,000 beds. ”This is on a scale that has not ever happened in the United States ever, with the possible exception of 1918,” Dentzer said. “Nothing on this scale has ever happened in at least 100 years.” I asked Peter Viccellio, associate chief medical officer at the Stony Brook emergency department in Long Island, about the New York hospitals plan. I want to share his response in full: We’re in an almost apocalyptic crisis, which requires cutting through the bullshit. If hospital A has resources and hospital B doesn’t, it’s in the best interest of the patient that hospital A and B work together. Protective equipment should be available to all health care providers, not just those who work at a place with a better procurement officer. We ALL need the proper equipment to treat the patient, and adequate space. Fighting against each other for resources – this isn’t the time. Resources need to be distributed in a rational way. The current rugby scrum is nonsense. The top priority in Cuomo’s plan is moving staff from less affected hospitals to those buckling under a surge of Covid-19 cases. Doctors and nurses from upstate hospitals will be transferred to NYC facilities. Likewise, hospitals will try to send patients from overcrowded hospitals to those with available beds. Ventilators, which support critical patients’ breathing, could also be shuffled between hospitals based on need. The New York state department of health will manage the movement of staff and resources, in conjunction with hospitals. It will set certain thresholds for the number of occupied ICU beds or ICU Covid-19 cases that would trigger some of these transfers. The state will also coordinate the distribution of the protective gear that helps keep doctors and nurses healthy and able to work from the various state and hospital stockpiles. (You’ve probably seen the news about the hospital ships and Central Park tents and Cuomo calling for medical volunteers, but the rest of the state has a lot of existing capacity that can be put to use without requiring new construction or traveling across the sea.) It is an unprecedented organizing challenge — but we are dealing with an unprecedented crisis. ”My impression is that now more than ever, we need to recognize that health is a public good,” Karen Joynt Maddox, assistant professor at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, says. “It’s not just an individual state of being. And it’s to everyone’s benefit to work together to try to get people healthy.” Joynt Maddox said that in St. Louis, the three big hospital systems have been holding frequent calls to share data on admissions and ICU transfers so they can better plan how to increase their capacity when and if cases surge there. This kind of coordination is relatively commonplace within a single hospital system that has multiple facilities. What’s unique here is the scale: an entire state merging all of its hospital systems into one. And that will present plenty of challenges both logistical (what happens when patients move from an in-network hospital to an out-of-network one?) and personal (are patients going to be moved far away from their families?). A few more questions, via the Kaiser Family Foundation’s Larry Levitt: What are the payment rates and who is paying? Do hospitals have to pay each other when one sends another resources? ”I do think it’s going to be incredibly messy and complicated to sort out reimbursement of all this on the back end,” he said. Another one: Is Congress going to provide more funding to bail out hospitals in New York and elsewhere, which have taken a brutal financial hit as they cancel elective surgeries to free up more beds and staff to battle Covid-19? We’ll need answers to those questions. But the time for radical action is here. As Joynt Maddox put it, “If not now, when?” ”This is the kind of organization we need in a pandemic, with very clear guardrails around the scenarios under which it’s put into place and under which it no longer applies,” she said. “I can see plenty of potential problems, but plenty of upside too.” New York is the first state to take such a dramatic step as the coronavirus takes its toll there. But it may not be the last. This story appears in VoxCare, a newsletter from Vox on the latest twists and turns in America’s health care debate. Sign up to get VoxCare in your inboxalong with more health care stats and news. Join the conversation Are you interested in more discussions around health care policy? Join our Facebook community for conversation and updates.
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vox.com
Democrats say paid leave law's business exemptions too broad amid COVID-19 pandemic
The Trump administration and Democrats remain at odds over who should qualify for paid leave amid the coronavirus pandemic.
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abcnews.go.com
Martha Stewart is missing her glam team during quarantine
"I think about you all daily as I attempt my own daily ablutions and preparations."
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nypost.com
Over 4,400 new NYC coronavirus cases, 180 deaths reported in 24 hours
Queens continued to top the five boroughs with the most coronavirus cases at 17,832 as of Friday morning.
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nypost.com
Supreme Court delays oral arguments scheduled for April
The Supreme Court said on Friday that it will postpone the remaining two weeks of oral arguments that were set to begin on April 20 and it is considering rescheduling some of the 20 or so cases that it has had to put off so far in response to the coronavirus pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
Another cougar visits Chilean capital amid coronavirus lockdown
SANTIAGO – Chilean authorities captured a second cougar in little more than a week late Wednesday after the cat was spotted strolling through an upscale suburb of Santiago amid the evening quiet imposed by a nationwide, nighttime curfew due to the coronavirus pandemic. Video taken by a resident shows the cougar, a 48.5-pound female bounding...
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nypost.com
Former CDC Chief Tom Frieden: Coronavirus – These simple steps can make a real difference
Reducing the spread of COVID-19 means disrupting many of our normal activities, but physical distancing and good hygiene are our best defenses.
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foxnews.com
NJ family pleads for experimental drug for man on life support
It’s been a “difficult time" for the family of Michael Goldsmith, a 34-year-old father of two who is on life support after being diagnosed with the coronavirus. 
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foxnews.com
What could 'Phase 4' coronavirus bill include?
Here's what to expect with a potential "Phase 4" coronavirus response bill, which could be passed by the end of April.
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foxnews.com
Google data reveals massive plunge in movement, the communities obeying coronavirus orders
Google location data released Friday presents a stark picture of how the coronavirus pandemic has upended the lives of more than 3.9 billion people -- half the world's population -- who are under some form of lockdown, causing massive shifts in human behavior.
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foxnews.com
Brooke Baldwin tests positive for coronavirus
Jake Tapper shares that CNN's Brooke Baldwin has tested positive for coronavirus.
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edition.cnn.com
Republicans Want Twitter to Ban Chinese Communist Party Accounts. That’s a Dangerous Idea.
Removing the Chinese Communist Party from Twitter would push forward the agenda of those seeking to replicate national borders online.
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slate.com
Comptroller Scott Stringer’s mom dead from coronavirus
Arlene Stringer-Cuevas, a former city councilwoman in the 1970s and mother of Comptroller Scott Stringer, passed away Friday morning from complications of the coronavirus. She was 86 years old. The comptroller announced his mother’s death on Twitter Friday, saying it’s a “heartbreaking moment for me, my wife, and our entire family.” Stringer called the Bronx-born,...
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nypost.com
The Earth is shaking less under coronavirus lockdowns
During the coronavirus pandemic, people are moving less — and so is the planet.
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cbsnews.com
How Staples Center fund is helping concession workers, others during coronavirus shutdown: 'Burden being lifted'
Lakers, Clippers and Kings, along with Staples Center, started fund to pay workers affected by coronavirus shutdown. Here's how that money is helping.        
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usatoday.com
Lockdowns and Curfews Are Nothing New on the West Bank
"The Israelis stopped my freedom to move before; what does it change that I have no freedom to move now?”
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slate.com
Kushner: The federal stockpile is ours, not the states'
CNN's Anderson Cooper speaks to Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) about White House senior adviser Jared Kushner's recent comments on the strategic national medical stockpile.
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edition.cnn.com
Fauci: All 50 states should be under stay-at-home order
"If you look at what's going on in this country, I just don't understand why we're not doing that," he said. "We really should be."
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cbsnews.com
Prime Minister of Georgia explains why the country has had no deaths from coronavirus
As the coronavirus body count continues to rise in almost all crevices of the globe, there is one country that is remarkably bereft of any official deaths: the former Soviet country of Georgia.
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foxnews.com
Christopher Cross calls coronavirus ‘worst illness I’ve ever had’
We know it’s crazy, but it’s true. Five-time Grammy winner Christopher Cross confirmed that he was battling coronavirus in a Facebook post Friday. Cross, whose smooth hits “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)” and “Sailing” were part of the soundtrack of the early 1980s, wrote, “I’m sorry to report that I am among the...
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nypost.com
7 case studies that show how coronavirus spreads before you know you’re sick
A couple wearing protective masks travel by bus after work on April 2, 2020, in Singapore. | Suhaimi Abdullah/Getty Images A new study from Singapore shows how presymptomatic spread of coronavirus works. One of the things that makes the novel coronavirus so challenging to contain is asymptomatic and presymptomatic transmission: If you’re infected, you can get someone else sick before you know that you have the disease. As my colleague Julia Belluz reported, researchers in China found that people shed the most virus — potentially exposing others — just as they started to show symptoms, or even before. And in one case, someone had high levels of the virus without ever experiencing any symptoms themselves. Since then, evidence has been accumulating that this presymptomatic or asymptomatic transmission is not just a possibility that shows up in the lab — it’s a major route by which the coronavirus spreads. The latest piece of evidence? A new study from Singapore paints the clearest picture yet of how people are getting each other sick before they even realize they’re sick themselves. The researchers, who looked at all of the 243 confirmed coronavirus cases reported in Singapore between January 23 and March 16, found seven clusters of cases in which 10 infections were attributed to presymptomatic transmission. (To be clear,there were other cases they couldn’t trace at all, as well as cases where presymptomatic transmission couldn’t be ruled out, so this shouldn’t be taken to imply that only 6 percent of cases feature presymptomatic transmission.) Zakaria Zainal/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images Singapore has implemented its strictest measures yet in its attempt to control the spread of the coronavirus, closing schools and most workplaces effective April 3. The case studies make one thing clear: Authorities can’t control the coronavirus outbreak just by quarantining sick people. They have to dramatically reduce contact among the rest of the population, too. Feeling good or having an absence of symptoms doesn’t mean you can’t infect someone else. And the recommendation to wear masks only when you’re sick just won’t cut it — which is why experts are reconsidering the advice to not wear them if you’re healthy. Seven case studies of presymptomatic transmission In the first cluster the researchers looked at, a wife and husband traveled on January 19 from Wuhan, China, to Singapore, where they visited a church the same day. Three other people who attended church that day later developed symptoms. One of them came into the church after the couple had left but sat in the same pew, as seen in closed-circuit camera footage. “Investigations of other attendees did not reveal any other symptomatic persons who attended the church that day,” the study reads. The travelers from Wuhan had an onset of symptoms on January 22 and January 24, while the person who sat in their pew developed symptoms on February 3. In the second cluster, a woman attended a dinner on February 15 and was exposed to someone with a confirmed case of Covid-19. She attended a singing class on February 24 and developed symptoms two days later; another woman at the same class developed symptoms three days after that. In another three clusters, a person who had been exposed to Covid-19 went home and exposed the people they lived with; in all three cases, the initial patient and their wife, husband, or housemate developed symptoms on the exact same day (so the transmission must have happened before the symptoms started). In the sixth cluster, a woman who’d been exposed to Covid-19 on February 27 went to church on March 1. She started showing symptoms on March 3, as did one of the people she’d likely infected at the church service. Another person who attended church that day started showing symptoms on March 5. In the seventh cluster, a man who’d been exposed to Covid-19 met a woman on March 8. He started experiencing symptoms on March 9, and she on March 12. There are some important caveats here. While Singapore has been very thorough in its contact tracing and case identification work, it’s always possible that one or more of these patients was actually infected by someone else. “Given that there was not widespread community transmission of COVID-19 in Singapore during the period of evaluation and while strong surveillance systems were in place to detect cases, presymptomatic transmission was estimated to be more likely than the occurrence of unidentified sources,” the researchers wrote. But in any specific case, another exposure could not be categorically ruled out. Suhaimi Abdullah/Getty Images Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong on Friday announced significantly stricter measures to contain the spread of Covid-19 cases in Singapore, including the closure of non-essential workplaces beginning April 7. There’s also the potential for recall bias — especially in cases of mild illness — where people mistakenly misreport the day on which their symptoms began. But even with those caveats in mind, the Singapore study is the latest contribution to an overall picture of the virus, corroborated by other data: People are likely getting each other sick while feeling perfectly healthy, leaving a trail of infections in their wake that they may not know they’re responsible for until several days later. You can read the case studies in full — they’re not very long — but one takeaway, the researchers wrote, is this: “These findings ... suggest that to control the pandemic, it might not be enough for only persons with symptoms to limit their contact with others.” That’s one of the key things making the novel coronavirus more dangerous than SARS, which actually had a much higher infection fatality rate. You couldn’t pass on SARS until you were symptomatic, so quarantining sick people was enough to bring the outbreak under control. With the novel coronavirus, that’s simply not true. In other words, even if you feel healthy, stay home. And if you have to leave the house, assume you might be sick and wear a mask — if you can get or make one without reducing their supply for health care workers. Sign up for the Future Perfect newsletter and we’ll send you a roundup of ideas and solutions for tackling the world’s biggest challenges — and how to get better at doing good. Future Perfect is funded in part by individual contributions, grants, and sponsorships. Learn more here.
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vox.com
28 ways to actually be excited for spring this year
Not sure how to welcome the new season? Allow us to offer a few suggestions.       
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usatoday.com
Safe scavenger hunts for kids — with Teddy bears and rainbows
The city’s kids can’t go to school, can’t see their friends and now even the playgrounds are closed. Instead, they’re going hunting. Teddy bear hunting, that is. Neighbors across the five boroughs have been doing simple acts to help distract and entertain kids who are cooped up at home. They’re creating scavenger hunts so kids...
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nypost.com
Member of Kennedy family identified as boaters who vanished on Chesapeake Bay
A member of the Kennedy family and her 8-year-old son have been identified Friday as the two boaters who are still missing after vanishing yesterday in Chesapeake Bay. 
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foxnews.com
ER Visits for Coronavirus-Like Illnesses Drop in Washington Hospitals
It's possible people with mild cases are staying out of the hospital and recovering at home, Eric Holdeman, director of the Center for Regional Disaster Resilience told Newsweek.
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newsweek.com
These 10 states still don't have stay-at-home coronavirus orders
About 90% of Americans are living under stay-at-home orders — but some governors are still resisting.
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cbsnews.com
Frank Ocean channels these sad times with two new songs
R&B prodigy Frank Ocean has blessed us all when we needed it most. The “Thinkin Bout You” crooner dropped two new songs on Thursday on YouTube, which are featured on two newly minted vinyl singles. After delays in production, the records — each containing the standard track on side A and a remix on side...
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nypost.com
Three golfers’ intricate plan to beat coronavirus order blew up at McDonald’s
Not even a global pandemic was getting between these men and their golf. Three men from Massachusetts were charged with violating Rhode Island governor Gina Raimando’s order, which calls for out-of-state residents to self-quarantine for two weeks if visiting the state for purposes not related to work in light of the coronavirus outbreak, after getting...
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nypost.com
Accidental origin of vaccines explained: Why humans may have cows to thank
In "Fox Nation 101: Making Vaccines," one of the top infectious disease physicians in the United States explained what vaccines are, how this medical technology has saved countless lives and delved into the fascinating history of the discovery of vaccines.
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foxnews.com
Scientists Probe How Coronavirus Might Travel Through The Air
Simply talking could produce tiny particles of mucus and saliva that might carry the coronavirus, experts say. How much these airborne particles matter for the spread of this disease is controversial.
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npr.org
Joe Biden rejects Medicare for all, says it wouldn’t have slowed coronavirus spread
Joe Biden has again declared that he does not back Medicare for all — and said that it would not have made a difference in dealing with the escalating coronavirus pandemic.
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nypost.com
Federal judge: Coronavirus poses 'grave danger' in jails, prisons; 'swift' government action needed
A federal judge urged Congress and other government officials to take "swift" action to reduce the risks to inmates posed by the coronavirus.        
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usatoday.com
As the Pandemic Compels us To Ration Care, Transparency is Vital To Retain Public Trust | Opinion
The medical community, our patients, their families and legislators need to have all the information the require to understand the spirit and the specifics of an ethical approach to rationing during this critical time.
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newsweek.com
How ‘Real Housewives’ are caring for their hair at home during quarantine
"Even though we are under quarantine or stay-at-home order, we should feel beautiful," he told us.
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nypost.com
Clemson's Dabo Swinney has 'zero doubt' NCAA football season will start on time with 'packed' stadiums
Clemson coach Dabo Swinney said he believes the college football season will kick off as planned by August despite the coronavirus pandemic.        
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usatoday.com
Face masks transported by Patriots arrives in NYC
A truck owned by the New England Patriots delivered a shipment of 300,000 N95 face masks to the Javits Center in New York on Friday to help medical personnel there. (APril 3)       
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usatoday.com
Opening a new restaurant during a pandemic? Why some chefs are moving forward with business
Launching a new business seems illogical if not downright insane in the time of coronavirus — but these restaurants are doing just that.
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latimes.com