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Israel prepares to demolish homes on Jerusalem outskirts, stoking Palestinian fears

Israeli forces began preparations to demolish homes near a military barrier on the outskirts of Jerusalem under the cover of darkness on Monday, in the face of Palestinian protests and international criticism.
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Video: Watch Kenan Thompson Spoof Myles Garrett-Mason Rudolph Fight on SNL
Myles Garrett got the Saturday Night Live treatment. In the show's cold open—a soap opera-style spoof of the impeachment hearings against President Donald Trump—Kenan ...
bleacherreport.com
25 times Trump was soft on Russia
President Donald Trump has an Achilles' heel when it comes to Russia.
Politica
Misty-eyed ‘heritage’ shows like The Crown only feed a Brexit narrative | Callum Alexander Scott
These shows too often distort history and romanticise a glorious Britain pastIt has been nearly two years since Gary Oldman won an Oscar for his performance in Darkest Hour. As one of the few working-class British actors making a living in Hollywood, Oldman’s portrayal of Winston Churchill – an eccentric English aristocrat – was worthy of the praise it received. However, it should not be forgotten that the film contained a number of historical fabrications and uncritically glorified a man who, if alive today, would almost certainly be reviled for his racist views. Nonetheless, the film was met with international acclaim, with reports of standing ovations in cinemas and an outpouring of Churchill-worship across the media. As film critic Mark Kermode said, Darkest Hour is the film that Britons are “not allowed to dislike” for fear of seeming unpatriotic.The problem is that the most successful films and television shows present a distorted image of the country Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
I took trains all the way from Istanbul to London, and eastern and western Europe felt like different worlds
Ben Mack / Insider The Cold War ended about 30 years ago — but many of the differences between eastern and western Europe remain. I witnessed many of them firsthand during a recent eight-day journey by train across Europe, from Istanbul to London. Some of the differences were obvious, like eastern European train stations usually seeming less busy, and things generally being less expensive. However, there were also a striking number of similarities, like friendly, helpful people everywhere I went. With many eastern European countries now part of the EU, it seems likely things will only become more similar. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The Iron Curtain came down a long time ago — a good three decades, for those who are counting (November 9 was the 30-year anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall).  Yet while roughly half of the world's population had not even been born when it happened, many of the stark differences between western and eastern Europe that emerged during the Cold War remain — even though many former Soviet bloc nations have been members of the European Union for several years now.  This observation surprised me on a recent trip in which I traveled across Europe — from Istanbul to London — by train. Here are some of the biggest differences I noticed.It may be easy to travel across Europe today, but 30 years ago it wasn't so simple, because of the Cold War. Ben Mack / Insider While the Berlin Wall is the most infamous example, there were barriers all across Europe that prevented people from going from east to west, and vice-versa. This was described by former British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill, who said in a 1946 speech: "From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an iron curtain has descended across the continent." In the coming decades, the term "iron curtain" would become synonymous with Europe's separation. Today, however, things have changed. The Berlin Wall is even a tourist attraction. Ben Mack / Insider No longer the symbol of separation and sorrow that it once was, the Berlin Wall is today a major tourist attraction (and has now been down longer than it stood). It's something many people might have thought almost inconceivable three decades ago — just like how many people might have never thought former communist nations and republics of the Soviet Union would become members of the European Union, like many (such as Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania) now are, and transform into popular tourist destinations. Yet as soon as I began my journey from Istanbul to London, I could already tell there were still major differences. Ben Mack / Insider I'd lived in Sweden and Germany for several years before and spent a fair bit of time traveling throughout western European nations, so I knew what homes and buildings there often looked like. The buildings I saw in Bulgaria — particularly in the villages I saw from the Balkan Express train I was traveling on to the capital of Sofia a few days exploring Istanbul — were not anything like Germany or Scandinavia at all. Many of them seemed to be in poor condition, with rotting roofs or crumbling walls, if they looked inhabited at all. Still others had large amounts of trash lying around them — again, something I didn't often see in Germany, or especially in Sweden. Part of this simply comes down to economics: while the average person in Sweden and Germany makes $53,442 and $44,470 per year respectively, according to the World Bank, the average Bulgarian takes home only about $8,032 per year — about six times less. See the rest of the story at Business InsiderSee Also:19 gift ideas that won't kill the environmentHuman-like monkeys, jumping bunnies, and teeth-baring lions all feature in this year's most striking nature photosThis village of tiny houses in the Arctic is actually a hotel — and it's about as far away from other humans as you can get
Business Insider
Saudi Aramco in race for IPO record with $1.7 trillion top value
Saudi Aramco is worth up to $1.7 trillion at the price range set by the oil giant on Sunday, below the $2 trillion sought by Saudi's crown prince but putting it in the running to become the world's biggest IPO.
Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
Philippe Albert: ‘Keegan would buy fish and chips and the drinks for our Newcastle team’
The former Newcastle defender on Asprilla, that goal against Manchester United and working as a greengrocer after football“When we travelled back to Newcastle from London, we often had five or six hours to kill on the coach. On the way Steve Watson used to bring videos and Viz comics. Even if we didn’t understand everything, Kevin and the whole team were always laughing. On the way back, before we got on the motorway, Kevin used to stop the coach at a petrol station, go and buy some drinks out of his own pocket and bring them back for the team: red wine, white wine, lager, water, soft drinks. Then, when we passed a certain place on the M1, he would buy us all fish and chips.” Related: Pierre van Hooijdonk: ‘I told Ron Atkinson he was a pub manager’ Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
"Porn literacy" class picks up where standard sex ed leaves off
Access to porn has never been easier, but teens need help understanding how real-life relationships are different
CBS News - Breaking News, U.S., World, Business, Entertainment & Video
Crisis-swept Lebanon in gridlock after Safadi withdrawal
Lebanon slipped deeper into political crisis on Sunday after the withdrawal of a top candidate for prime minister narrowed the chances of creating a government needed to enact urgent reforms.
Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
CNN projects: Louisiana governor wins reelection
Louisiana Democratic Gov. John Bel Edwards narrowly won reelection, CNN projects, beating out Republican challenger Eddie Rispone, who was backed by President Donald Trump.
Sport
'Crown jewel' Aramco stirs loyal Saudi demand for giant IPO
From taxi drivers to clerics, Saudis clamoring to own part of state oil giant Aramco went online and to local banks on Sunday at the start of a long-delayed share sale for what could be the world's biggest initial public offering.
Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
Trump's health 'very good' after unscheduled physical exam
The White House dismissed concerns about the exam's timing, saying he "remains healthy".
BBC News - Home
Microsoft sends a new kind of AI processor into the cloud
Innovative chip from Graphcore could push AI applications to greater heights.
Ars Technica
Eric Abidal Says Lionel Messi, Ansu Fati Engaged in Barcelona Contract Talks
Barcelona sporting director Eric Abidal has said both Lionel Messi and Ansu Fati are talking to the club about signing new contracts...
bleacherreport.com
Months After Massive ICE Raid, Residents Of A Mississippi Town Wait And Worry
The biggest workplace immigration raid ever in a single state occurred on Aug. 7 in Mississippi. In Morton — a town that's about 25% Latino — the effects have rippled throughout the community.
News : NPR
The Week in Business: Google Is Coming for Your Health Records
The New York Times
Bowl Predictions 2019: College Football Playoff Predictions for Top Teams
The top of the College Football Playoff rankings should not change after Week 12. LSU, Ohio State and Clemson were three of nine top-10 teams to come out victorious Saturday...
bleacherreport.com
NFL Week 11 Live Stream Guide, Game Times and TV Schedule
Another Sunday of the NFL season has arrived, and in Week 11, there are some solid matchups to enjoy. The Baltimore Ravens and Houston Texans will face off in what should be a high-scoring contest between two of the top teams in the AFC...
bleacherreport.com
How to Lock Down Your Health and Fitness Data
Apps like FitBit and Apple Health collect some of the most sensitive data you have. Here's how to control what they can see, and what they can do with it.
WIRED
Why Is Google Slow-Walking Its Breakthroughs in AI?
The company’s new facial-recognition service comes with limitations to prevent abuse, which sometimes lets competitors take the lead.
WIRED
The Brand Investment in Esports Report
Phil Ellsworth/ESPN Images Esports viewership is on the rise. Thanks in part to streaming services such as Twitch, the number of esports fans globally is anticipated to surge 59% over the next four to five years.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderSee Also:I'm a financial adviser and there are 6 reasons I don't think $2.5 million of life insurance is too much for my familyLeaked papers on China's Muslim mass detention policies show President Xi Jinping urging the ruling party to use the 'organs of dictatorship' to round up the ethnic minorityThe US needs to copy China’s tech strategy to remain the top economy in the world
Business Insider
Orphée review – disquieting and beautifully done
Coliseum, LondonThe final instalment of English National Opera’s Orpheus series is a troubling piece of theatre that more than holds its own beside the company’s previous Philip Glass stagings‘We watch ourselves grow old in mirrors. They bring us closer to death,” Jean Cocteau wrote of his 1950 film Orphée, the screenplay for which forms the libretto for Philip Glass’s 1993 opera of the same name, now taken into English National Opera’s repertory, in a new production by Netia Jones, as the final instalment of the company’s Orpheus series.The film and opera are ambivalent parables about the metaphysical nature of creativity and artistic immortality, and in each, mirrors are doorways to a world beyond the grave that constantly impinges on the living, allowing the Princess, the emissary of death, to fall in love with Orphée and seek to claim him as her own. Both works are also, to some extent, bittersweet reflections on loss and transience. In his memoir Words Without Music, extracts from which are printed in the programme, Glass reflects on how he was drawn to the film following the death of his partner, Candy Jernigan, in 1991. Cocteau’s screenplay, meanwhile, is haunted by the memory of one of his lovers, the novelist Raymond Radiguet, who died aged only 20, and who hovers over two of the work’s principal characters: Cégeste, the tearaway writer killed too soon who later dictates Orphée’s poetry to him over the radio; and the angelic Heurtebise, the Princess’s chauffeur, who is in love with Orphée’s wife Eurydice and is selflessly guiding human destiny at every turn. Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
Corbyn: Labour immigration policy would allow 'lot of movement'
Leader suggests liberal EU deal, but stops short of saying free movement would continueLatest election coverage – liveJeremy Corbyn has said he would want his government to allow “a great deal of movement” of people, in a sign Labour would look to keep a liberal immigration regime with Europe if Brexit goes ahead.The Labour leader stopped short of saying free movement would be allowed to continue in its current form, but argued for immigration to help with shortages in the NHS and for an expansion of the rights of migrants to bring family members to the UK. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Sri Lanka strongman Rajapaksa wins presidency by big margin
Sri Lanka's former civil wartime defense chief Gotabaya Rajapaksa was declared the winner in the presidential election on Sunday, after promising to secure the country against militant threats following Easter bombings this year.
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Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
Hong Kong campus protesters fire bows and arrows, set fires
Hong Kong protesters shot bows and arrows and hurled petrol bombs from a barricaded university campus on Sunday, as police charged and charged again, firing tear gas and blue liquid from water cannon after fiery clashes overnight.
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Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
British government and army accused of covering up war crimes
Alleged evidence implicates UK troops in murder of children in Afghanistan and IraqThe UK government and the British army have been accused of covering up the killing of children in Afghanistan and Iraq.Leaked documents allegedly contain evidence implicating troops in killing children and the torture of civilians. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Dueling Matteos Battle for the Future of Italy
Former Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and the popular anti-migrant leader Matteo Salvini may be out of power. But their sparring has come to dominate Italy’s political life.
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NYT > Home Page
Christmas gift ideas for food lovers 2019
From stocking fillers to hampers, great Christmas presents for foodies, selected by Observer Food MonthlyHoney & Spice biscuits Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
The challengers: six candidates out to topple the big names of UK politics
Senior politicians – including Iain Duncan Smith, Sajid Javid and even Boris Johnson – could be at risk in this election. We meet the people out to unseat themChingford and Woodford Green Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
A relationship expert believes couples can be stronger after cheating, but there are 4 important steps to rebuilding trust again
Flickr/Sascha Kohlmann Cheating may feel like the ultimate end to a relationship. But according to relationship expert Jenn Mann, this may not be true. She told Insider the bond between couples can actually become stronger after infidelity. But there's a catch — they need the "four Rs of apology" to make it work — remorse, taking responsibility, recognition, and remedy. "In order for the relationship to be able to heal, the couple has to be able to process what happened, why it happened and how to avoid it in the future," Mann said. "When the cheater stays defensive or unwilling to process the hurt he or she has caused, the relationship is unlikely to achieve a positive outcome." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. When someone cheats, the reasons are always bad. But according to a relationship expert, the act itself may sometimes lead to something good — a stronger partnership. Jenn Mann, the author of "The Relationship Fix," told Insider the main reasons people stray is a lack of connection in the relationship and sexual dissatisfaction.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: Behind the scenes with Shepard Smith — the Fox News star who just announced his resignation from the networkSee Also:Being in an open relationship isn't the same as being polyamorous. A sex researcher explains the difference.A model didn't realize she was pregnant until she was giving birth, but 'cryptic pregnancies' happen more often than you might thinkPeople who think they'd be too jealous in an open relationship may have bigger problems
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Business Insider
These are the 3 best photos of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle from 2019, according to the royal family's photographer
Samir Hussein/WireImage/ Getty Images Insider asked the royal family's photographer to choose his 3 favorite photos of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle from 2019. Samir Hussein has captured the couple's best moments all year — from their first post-birth appearance at Trooping the Colour to their royal tour with baby Archie.  The duke and duchess just announced their plan to take an extended break in the US over Christmas, so it might be a while before we see them together again. Until then, scroll through the photos below — all taken by Hussein — along with why he thinks they're the best snapshots taken of the couple this year. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. 1. This photo of Markle dancing with locals in Cape Town is an 'unusual' display of 'a royal cutting loose,' according to Hussein. Samir Hussein. The photo was taken on the first day of Harry and Markle's tour of Africa with baby Archie in September of this year.  "This is a very unusual royal photo because it shows a royal cutting loose and dancing with locals, fully enjoying the moment," Hussein told Insider. "This photo was taken on tour with Meghan and Harry in South Africa as they visited a township in Cape Town. "A group of female dancers approached Meghan and she was only too happy to join in, producing this great moment of joy and spontaneity." Harry eventually tried to join in as well, and an awkward video of the moment surfaced online shortly after. 2. This moment between Markle and Prince Harry in Morocco 'showed the solidarity' between them. Samir Hussein. "Harry and Meghan often seem a lot more relaxed when on tour, enjoying the local hospitality," Hussein said. "This was very true in Morocco at the beginning of the year. "Here I captured them in the Atlas mountains watching local school children take part in a game of football. "Instinctively Meghan, pregnant at the time, leaned into Harry and put her head on his shoulder as he looked at her and gave a big smile. This was just a few months before Archie was born and showed the solidarity between the two of them." 3. They waved to the cameras at Trooping the Colour for their first joint appearance after the birth of baby Archie. Samir Hussein. "I photographed Meghan and Harry at Trooping the Colour, not long after the birth of baby Archie," said Hussein.  "The public were out in force, excited to see the couple as they travelled by carriage down the Mall towards Buckingham Palace. They both looked very proud, Harry in uniform and Meghan looking striking. "What made the photo was both of them turning in my direction and Meghan giving a wave." Read more: Meghan Markle was filmed dancing with Cape Town locals, and Prince Harry awkwardly tried to join in 19 adorable photos of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle from their royal tour of Morocco Kate Middleton gave a subtle nod to Meghan Markle and Prince Harry with her Trooping the Colour outfit See Also:Hillary Clinton reportedly paid a secret visit to Meghan Markle at Frogmore Cottage, and she even got to cuddle with baby ArchieThe 26 most iconic royal fashion moments from the past decade10 times royals broke their own protocol in 2019
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Business Insider
Saudi Arabia puts $1.7 trillion price tag on its oil monopoly
Saudi Arabia believes its giant state oil monopoly is worth as much as $1.7 trillion.
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CNN.com - RSS Channel
Impeachment, Santa Clarita, Leonids: Your Weekend Briefing
Here’s what you need to know about the week’s top stories.
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NYT > Home Page
Iran petrol price hike: Supreme Leader condemns 'hooligan' protesters
Ayatollah Ali Khamenei blamed "hooligans" and counter-revolutionaries for days of violent protests.
2 h
BBC News - Home
There Will Be No Victory in Dishonor
None of the services seems happy with President Trump’s decision to pardon two service members accused of war crimes, and reverse the demotion of a third. The Navy's reply, however, sets some kind of record of disdain. The Twitter account of the U.S. Navy's Chief of Information Office wrote on November 15: As the Commander in Chief, the President has the authority to restore Special Warfare Operator First Class Gallagher to the pay grade of E-7. We acknowledge his order and are implementing it. Those icy words breathe the mood of the admonition from Band of Brothers: “We salute the rank, not the man.”To understand why the Navy—and the other services, too—reacted so negatively to the pardons, here's a story I heard on a visit to Germany a couple of months ago. I had the chance to talk to a senior U.S. officer in that country.The officer had been posted all over the world over his long and distinguished career, but his very first overseas assignment took him to Stuttgart in 1983. The move into the apartment left behind a mess in the street: packing tape, that kind of thing. He knew how conscientious the Germans are about litter. But he had little children then, he was exhausted after the move, so he fell asleep intending to wake up early the next day to finish the job.He did rise early, only to find that somebody had done the job for him. He interpreted this as passive-aggressive criticism by a neighbor, so he knocked on the next door to apologize. The door was answered by an older man who spoke clear, although strongly accented, English. Yes, the neighbor had cleaned up the mess. No, no apology was necessary. He had noticed that the officer had a young family, and he understand how difficult it was to move with children. The neighbor had wanted to extend a welcome, for he was a great admirer of the U.S. military.“Where did you learn such good English?” asked the officer of his new friend."In Louisiana.”“Do you have family there? A job?”“No, I was a prisoner of war. I was captured in Tunisia in 1943.”“I’m sorry you met America that way.”“Don’t be. I ate better in America than I ever ate in the Afrika Korps. And I’m alive, which I would not be if I had not been captured. So when I see American soldiers, I always try to say, ‘Thank you.’"The American officer who told me the story would later lead part of the clean-up effort at Abu Ghraib, after the exposure of maltreatment of prisoners there. He told his troops in Iraq: The way the U.S. Army had treated German POWs in 1943 paid security dividends for 40 years afterward. The way the Army treats its prisoners today will matter just as much 40 years from now.The armed forces of the United States do their outmost to fight lawfully and humanely not only because it is the right thing to do. They do their utmost because it is also the smart thing to do. Every war ends. The memories from that war persist for decades.War is horrible enough when fought honorably. To join dishonor to horror is no victory for any American cause.
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World Edition - The Atlantic
Oculus and Unity offer new intermediate-level guide to making VR games
Facebook’s Oculus and Unity Technologies are offering a 20-hour intermediate guide to building a virtual reality game.
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VentureBeat | Tech News That Matters
Just how much is getting through to voters? Very little
History teaches us that less is more when it comes to making campaign pledgesThis election comes at a time when there is much to fix. BritainThinks’ Mood of the Nation study, reported here in the summer, laid bare the deep pessimism felt by many, especially the young. Asked to describe Britain at the start of the campaign, the words chosen in focus groups were “divided”, “confused”, “angry” and “broken”.The electorate is weary. Faith in politics and politicians – never high – is now at an all-time low. Just 6% say that politicians understand “people like me”, Boris Johnson has poorer ratings as PM than any of his recent predecessors at a similar stage in their premiership, and Jeremy Corbyn has the worst opposition leader ratings since polling began. Nearly three-quarters (74%) now believe that our politics is “no longer fit for purpose”. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Why is UK unemployment still low? We are working longer hours
Pay hasn’t recovered from the 2008 crisis so staff work longer to fill the gap, boosting labour supply and limiting wage risesTurn the clock back a decade. The economy is just about to emerge from its worst recession in living memory. Since the start of 2008, output has contracted sharply quarter after quarter. The banks have been saved but the official unemployment rate has hit 8%, a 12-year high.Now imagine that you had a crystal ball which could foresee what would happen over the next 10 years. Hard though it is to believe, your crystal ball tells you that there will be no real recovery from the slump. Productivity growth – which had been averaging 2% a year up until 2008 – will collapse. The economy in 2019 will be at least 15% smaller than it would otherwise have been had the financial crisis never happened. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Sri Lanka finance minister quits after ruling party candidate defeated in presidential poll
Sri Lanka’s Finance Minister Mangala Samaraweera resigned from his post on Sunday saying he had lost the mandate after voters rejected the ruling party's candidate in a presidential election.
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Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
Democratic presidential candidates court labor support in Nevada
Retired letter carrier Leslie Maxwell Burton has a message for Democratic presidential contenders campaigning in the early voting state of Nevada this weekend: She won't vote for anyone who tries to take away her hard-won union health plan.
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Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
Prince Andrew's press advisor reportedly quit 2 weeks before his BBC interview after urging him not to do it
AP/Sang Tan Prince Andrew's press advisor reportedly quit two weeks before his sit-down interview with the BBC. He urged the Duke of York to not do the interview with BBC Newsnight, which was aired on Saturday, over fears that it could backfire. In the interview, BBC presenter Emily Maitlis grilled the Prince on his links to disgraced financier, Jeffrey Epstein, and the allegation that he had sex with a 17-year-old in 2001. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Prince Andrew's chief spin doctor reportedly quit his role just two weeks before the Duke of York's sit-down interview with the BBC, after strongly advising him against doing the interview. Jason Stein left by mutual consent just four weeks into his role as the Prince's press advisor, The Times newspaper reports.See the rest of the story at Business InsiderNOW WATCH: Here's how to escape a flooding vehicleSee Also:Prince Andrew says the picture of him with his hand around Virginia Roberts' waist might not be realPrince Andrew says he has 'no recollection' of meeting an alleged Epstein abuse victimPrince Andrew says he couldn't have had sex with a 17-year-old because he was at a Pizza Express on the day in question
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Business Insider
Jets vs. Redskins: Preview, predictions, what to watch for
Costello’s Call The Jets are a bad team. The Redskins are worse. The offense puts together a good performance and the defense forces two Dwayne Haskins interceptions. Jets 24, Redskins 10 Marquee matchup Redskins QB Dwayne Haskins vs. Jets defensive coordinator Gregg Williams The Jets face a rookie quarterback for the second straight week. Giants...
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New York Post
Simon Hopkinson’s Christmas lunch recipes
Roast goose stuffed with mashed potato, onions a la monegasque and marsala custards – the year’s biggest meal sorted“Nothing like a nice festive sherry to fortify the taste buds,” says Auntie Jean, while quietly drinking a pre-prandial Christmas amontillado. This 11-year old, meanwhile, is helping to trim the sprouts by the sink with Dad, who mutters aside that he’ll soon be pouring himself a gin and French once the bread sauce is put to simmer. I always thought that Dad’s drink was absolute filth: half a tumbler of gin, with the remaining volume topped up with Noilly Prat. No ice. No lemon. And then he will probably sneak in a quick top-up while Mum, my brother, Auntie Jean and I are in the sitting room watching the Queen. All that having been said, our Christmas Day feast was always, but always, quite brilliant. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Micheal Ward: ‘Everywhere I go it’s good vibes’
In just a year, Micheal Ward has risen from online model to leading man in the crime drama Blue Story. He still can’t believe it – nor can his mumA few hours before I’m due to meet Micheal Ward, I get a text from his publicist. The photoshoot for this interview has finished more than an hour early – could I come a bit sooner? I race to a café in Blackheath, plush south London. When I arrive, Ward has already finished lunch. These shoots normally overrun, I say. How come this one was over so quickly? “I tried to warn them I was a model,” he smirks. “I know what I’m doing.”He certainly seems to. A year ago, Ward was entirely unknown as an actor. He was working for the e-commerce sites of brands like JD Sports, modelling athleisure. (Apparently there’s still a picture of him somewhere, deep in the bowels of the JD sports website.) Now 21, he’s bagged leading roles in two of the most high-profile portrayals of British gang life in years. In the first, Netflix’s revival of Top Boy, he plays Jamie, an east London boy climbing the rungs of a Hackney drug-dealing gang while simultaneously looking after his two young brothers. And there’s the upcoming feature film Blue Story, based on the spoken word performer Rapman’s wildly popular YouTube series about south London gang violence, in which Ward plays the brother of a gang member who gets dragged into a postcode war. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Endland by Tim Etchells review – once upon a time on England’s sink estates
Funny and fantastical, this collection of urban fables turns a broken mirror on broken BritainIn the 1990s, Tim Etchells – an experimental theatre-maker with the Sheffield-based Forced Entertainment – wrote a series of scabrous short stories, published as Endland: Or Bad Lives. Since then, he has intermittently written further tales from the same universe: Endland is a distorted version of England, where social divisions and geopolitical chaos are taken to absurd extremes.All 39 stories are brought together here, with an introduction by Jarvis Cocker. Almost all depict the lives of a deprived underclass. Endland is a place of grotty estates, exploitative jobs and crap pubs. But these urban fables are a world away from dour realism: dragons and ogres feature alongside alcoholics and sex workers. Etchells makes sparks fly by allowing the mythic to rub against grubby everyday existence: there are disruptions to the space-time continuum in Doncaster; Greek gods with names such as Herpes, Apollo 12 and Stormzy drink too much and get caught up in the migrant crisis. This is scorching, bitter satire of how society is continually screwed by inequality. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Britain’s top 10 coastal retreats
These winter winners offer great stays for an off-season break – of windswept walks or just being cosy – and feature lighthouses, inns, forts and crofters’ cottagesIn good weather, you can see 20 miles in either direction: to the left, the white stone of Portland; to the right, Golden Cap and the distant slopes of Devon. Running between them is Chesil Beach, the setting made famous by Ian McEwan’s novel-turned film. The National Trust has restored this peaceful stone cottage overlooking the sea. There’s a spacious master bedroom on the first floor and another double in the attic. The sitting room has a charming inglenook fireplace. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
A Young Immigrant Has Mental Illness, And That's Raising His Risk of Being Deported
Behavioral problems, criminal arrests and limited access to health care leave a father worried that his 21-year-old son will be deported to Mexico.
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News : NPR
Today's Democrats aren't for Michael Bloomberg. He should run as an independent, instead.
Business mogul Michael Bloomberg doesn't fit today's Democratic Party. But his candidacy as an independent could serve an important purpose.       
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