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Coronavirus Traces Found in Massachusetts Wastewater at Levels Far Higher Than Expected
This could potentially indicate that the number of confirmed cases in the area served by the wastewater facility in the study are a "significant" underestimate.
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newsweek.com
Sheree Whitfield of 'Real Housewives of Atlanta' seeking info on missing mother
Sheree Whitfield, a former cast member of "The Real Housewives of Atlanta," is seeking help from the public in finding her mother.
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edition.cnn.com
Prisons and jails across the US are turning into 'petri dishes' for coronavirus. Staffers are falling ill, too.
In the US, the largest known concentration of coronavirus cases outside of hospitals isn't on a cruise ship or in a nursing home. It's at a jail in Chicago.
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edition.cnn.com
White House to Create Second Coronavirus Task Force Focused on Economy: What We Know So Far
The White House will soon announce the creation of a second coronavirus task force to focus on re-opening the economy after weeks of social distancing measures.
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newsweek.com
People were painting and selling ostrich eggs thousands of years ago -- and we may finally know how they did it
A 5,000-year-old mystery surrounding how a collection of ostrich eggs got their colorful decorations may have finally been cracked.
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edition.cnn.com
People painted and sold ostrich eggs thousands of years ago. We may finally know how they did it
A 5,000-year-old mystery surrounding how a collection of ostrich eggs got their colorful decorations may have finally been cracked.
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edition.cnn.com
Leslie Marshall: Biden vs. Trump — 3 keys to victory for Democrats in November
Sen. Bernie Sanders acted in the best interests of the Democratic Party and the nation Wednesday when he dropped out of the presidential race.
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foxnews.com
‘Black box’ removed from Ruby Princess cruise ship in coronavirus homicide probe
Australian authorities said on Thursday they seized “black box” from a cruise ship, which was the country's deadliest source of coronavirus cases, as part of a homicide investigation.
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nypost.com
6.6 million jobless claims, new CDC guidelines: Thursday’s coronavirus news
A man rides his bike past a sign posted on a boarded up restaurant in San Francisco on April 1. | Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images Here’s what you need to know today. There are no good numbers. Last week, US unemployment claims reached 6.6 million. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in the United States has now exceeded 432,000, and deaths are nearing 15,000 as of April 9. Nearly 2,000 people died in the last 24 hours. Right now, the United States doesn’t seem to have a clear long-term plan for either the public health or economic catastrophes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued new guidelines for essential workers so they can return to work after they’ve been exposed to the virus, as long as they’re asymptomatic. It’s a start, but officials are still urging the rest of the public to continue staying at home, and practicing social distancing measures. The economic fallout of the coronavirus, of course, is not limited to the United States. The International Monetary Fund warned Thursday that the world is likely to see the “worst economic fallout since the Great Depression.” And lower-income countries might feel the effects of the pandemic even more deeply. According to a report from Oxfam, half a billion people could be pushed into poverty worldwide because of the coronavirus — between 6 and 8 percent of the global population. Here’s what you need to know today. 16.8 million jobless claims in less than a month The unemployment figures are staggering. This week, another 6.6 million jobless claims were filed, and the previous week’s record (of 6.6 million) was revised up to 6.9 million. Combined with the 3.3 million claims prior to that, Americans have filed a total of 16.8 million in unemployment claims in just three weeks. It is a Great Recession in a matter of weeks. Congress and the White House are negotiating another “interim” stimulus package that would include billions for small businesses, and if Democrats get their way, increased support for the food stamps program, hospitals, state and local governments, whose budgets are about to be decimated by both the pandemic response and the economic crisis. That would go on top of the $2 trillion stimulus package already passed by Congress. But even that might not be enough given the scale of the economic emergency the US is facing. The rest of the world is in for economic pain, too On Thursday, Kristalina Georgieva, managing director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), said the coronavirus pandemic could create the “worst economic fallout since the Great Depression.” The IMF warned that only a “partial recovery” is likely next year, even if countries can get the pandemic under control and businesses and supply chains restart. But that might still be an optimistic scenario. Either way, the worst economic crisis in a generation will likely not be short-lived. And as bad as this will be for major economies like the United States, poorer countries are going to be even more vulnerable to these economic shocks. The aid organization Oxfam is estimating that about half a billion people could be pushed into poverty because of the coronavirus pandemic, somewhere between 6 and 8 percent of the world’s population. The organization is calling on countries to come up a plan to mitigate this disaster, including forgiving developing countries’ debt and offering increased overseas aid packages — an effort that is going to be extraordinarily challenging as major donor countries focus on invest money at home to control the pandemic and provide relief for their own citizens. The CDC updates guidelines for essential workers The CDC has updated its guidelines for essential workers who might have been exposed to the coronavirus. The new recommendations say that healthcare workers, grocery store employees, food service workers, and other people on the frontlines who have been within six feet of someone who has tested positive for Covid-19 can still return to work if they do not show symptoms of the coronavirus and are not feeling sick. The CDC continues to recommend that those employees take their temperatures before work, and asks employers to take workers’ temperatures and monitor symptoms before people are allowed to return to work. The new guidelines also say employees should wear protective gear, such as masks, try to practice social distancing in the workplace as much as possible (like not gathering in large groups in break rooms and cafeterias), and avoid sharing equipment. Previously, the CDC recommended that anyone exposed to the coronavirus should self-quarantine for 14 days, but these new guidelines are intended to ease pressure on strained workforces. And some good news The US response to the coronavirus has at times been chaotic, with states and the federal government competing for vital supplies, from protective gear to ventilators. But in recent days, states have been trying to better coordinate — sending supplies to where they’re most needed, or turning down support so it can be directed to the states and hospital systems that are the most strained right now. California’s Governor Gavin Newsom, for instance, shipped out 500 ventilators to a bunch of states, including New York, New Jersey, and Illinois. It also included a nice note. CA's 500 ventilators will begin to ship out today:100->NY100->NJ100->IL50->MD50->DC50->DE50->NVCommitted to the health of every Californian. Practicing our duty as Americans to take care of one another. I know other states would do the same. pic.twitter.com/5y5hquISew— Gavin Newsom (@GavinNewsom) April 7, 2020 Messages on a shipment of ventilators from California.Thank you to the people of California and Gov. Newsom.We are so moved by the outpouring of support & solidarity pic.twitter.com/WZYnCUYMf6— Andrew Cuomo (@NYGovCuomo) April 9, 2020 Received this message on a shipment of ventilators from Governor @GavinNewsom and the people of California. Have faith – we will beat this if we all work together. pic.twitter.com/uagRbfrmOW— Governor Phil Murphy (@GovMurphy) April 9, 2020 In Washington, Governor Jay Inslee returned a basically returned a field hospital to the federal government as he no longer predicts the state’s hospitals will be overwhelmed by coronavirus patients. The field hospital, with 250 beds, had been set up in CenturyLink Field in Seattle (where the Seahawks), but Inslee asked that it be “deployed to another state facing a more significant need.” States, they can be united sometimes.
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vox.com
Bebe Rexha uses this $27 concealer to hide her severe dark circles
See the dramatic transformation.
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nypost.com
Lonnie Dench, husband of woman who mistakenly invited stranger to Thanksgiving, dies
Lonnie Dench, the husband of the woman who mistakenly invited a stranger to Thanksgiving, died after battling coronavirus.        
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usatoday.com
Prince William, Kate Middleton continue royal duties from home
William and Kate carry out a royal engagement — via video call.
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nypost.com
NYC restaurateur Keith McNally hospitalized in London for coronavirus
New York restaurateur Keith McNally is in a London hospital battling coronavirus — and posting about his battle on Instagram. McNally has created some of the city’s most successful restaurants, including the French-inspired bistros Balthazar and Pastis. Born in Britain, he was hospitalized in London on Sunday. He posted an Instagram photo of himself with...
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nypost.com
Coronavirus and warm weather: Fauci says 'one should not assume' virus will fade away
Just because warmer weather is in the weeks ahead does not mean that coronavirus will fade away, according to the nation's top infectious disease expert. 
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foxnews.com
Cuomo stunned NY coronavirus casualties have soared past 9/11 death toll
New York’s surging death toll from the coronavirus pandemic has so dramatically eclipsed that of Sept. 11 that Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Thursday that he can’t even describe the devastation. “9/11 was supposed to be the darkest day in New York for a generation,” Cuomo said during his daily news conference in Albany. “We lost...
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nypost.com
'Survivor' winner shares coronavirus isolation tips he learned after beating cancer twice
Ethan Zohn, a former “Survivor” winner who also beat cancer twice, is sharing some advice he picked up throughout his journey of being in isolation for long periods of time. 
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foxnews.com
China Is Underreporting Coronavirus Infections and Deaths, Most Britons Believe: Poll
A Newsweek survey found 12 percent of British adults believed China had honestly reported its coronavirus numbers.
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newsweek.com
Ron Rivera gives big hint on Chase Young, Redskins’ draft strategy
The prospect of trading the No. 2 overall pick in NFL Draft 2020 comes with the risk of losing a shot to pick star edge rusher Chase Young. First-year Washington Redskins head coach Ron Rivera is not taking that lightly. “If you’re gonna make a trade, and you’re gonna go back, that guy you’re gonna...
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nypost.com
Pink details 'terrifying' asthma attack amid coronavirus battle
Pink is one of several celebrities who has shared details of her battle with the coronavirus, and in a new interview, the singer breaks down in tears as she details an asthma attack she suffered when she was in the thick of her symptoms.
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foxnews.com
FBI, US government warn on spike in coronavirus scams
Fraudsters are seizing upon the COVID-19 crisis to mount fresh attacks to get your money, the FBI and DHS said in separate advisories this week.
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foxnews.com
Get your goggles on: Any GOAT discussion must include Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
An ESPN tournament, in lieu of any actual games, somehow had the master of the "Sky Hook" falling out early to Shaquille O'Neal. I'm here to set the record straight on a legend.
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washingtonpost.com
Russian Governor Fears Chinese Citizens Have Spread Coronavirus in His Region After Beijing Closes Border
China has closed its border with Russia but a governor in the Russian far-east, Oleg Kozhemyako, fears the virus may have already spread throughout his region.
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newsweek.com
Trump’s case against mail-in voting has become increasingly desperate. His latest briefing showed it.
Trump in the Brady Press Briefing Room on April 8. | Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Pressed to produce evidence of fraud, Trump cited a “pants on fire” lie. President Donald Trump was challenged on Wednesday to substantiate his claims about massive mail-in election fraud benefiting Democrats. The only thing he could come up with was a “pants on fire” falsehood. The idea of more states moving toward a mail-in system ahead of November’s election is gaining steam amid the coronavirus pandemic. The dilemma Wisconsin voters faced on Tuesday between staying safe at home or heading to polling places to vote is one most states are interested in helping their citizens avoid. Trump, however, has other, more self-interested concerns. Not only is the president leading Republican efforts to prevent federal funds from being used for mail-in efforts, but the briefing on Wednesday revealed he really doesn’t have any good reasons for his position. Trump was pressed on the point during the White House coronavirus task force briefing by CNN’s Jim Acosta. Acosta referenced claims the president made the day before about why he thinks mail-in voting is bad — “You get thousands and thousands of people sitting in somebody’s living room, signing ballots all over the place,” Trump said — and asked him to back it up. Acosta mentioned that five states (Utah, Colorado, Hawaii, Washington, and Oregon) already conduct all elections almost entirely by mail, and added, “You’ve been talking about voter fraud since the beginning of this administration. Where is the evidence?” Suffice it to say, no evidence was forthcoming. Here’s a transcript of the first part of Trump’s response (emphasis mine): I think there is a lot of evidence, but we’ll provide you with some. There’s evidence that’s being compiled just like it’s being compiled in the state of California, where they settled with Judicial Watch saying that a million people should not have been voting. You saw that? I am telling you, in California, in the great state of California, they settled and we could’ve gone a lot further. Judicial Watch settled where they agreed that a million people should not have voted, where they were 115 years old and lots of things and people were voting in their place. Pressed by @Acosta to provide evidence of electoral fraud, Trump promises to get back to him and then cites a Judicial Watch story that PolitiFact rated "pants on fire" https://t.co/0LYJBTwU5S pic.twitter.com/zDQe0pSwK2— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) April 8, 2020 Judicial Watch is a right-wing nonprofit led by staunch Trump loyalist Tom Fitton. The settlement Trump referred to is a January 2019 agreement between the organization and Los Angeles County that required the county to remove inactive registrations from the voter rolls. By definition, these people hadn’t voted — that’s why their registrations were inactive. Yet Trump has somehow spun this into an unfounded claim about a million people casting illegal ballots. The briefing on Wednesday was not the first time Trump made this claim. He said the same thing last summer during an interview on Meet the Press. At that time, PolitiFact fact-checked Trump’s claim and rated it a “pants on fire” lie. The PolitiFact piece quotes California Secretary of State Alex Padilla (D) as saying, “[n]o matter how much he repeats them, Trump’s lies about voter fraud are patently untrue. Specifically, the settlement with Judicial Watch, Los Angeles County, and the Secretary of State contains absolutely no admission to or evidence of ‘illegal votes.’” The rest of Trump’s answer wasn’t any better After citing a “pants on fire” lie, Trump referred to the aforementioned five states that already have robust mail-in voting systems and said, “every one of those states you have mentioned is a state that happens to be won by the Democrats.” That’s also not true. Utah, for instance, is a deep-red state. Trump concluded by simply restating the unfounded allegations that Acosta asked him to substantiate, saying of mail-in voting, “thousands of votes are gathered. And they come in and they’re dumped in a location then all of the sudden you lose an election that you think you’re going to win. I won’t stand for it.” Ironically, the only instance of large-scale mail-in election fraud possibly swaying an election in recent history is a Republican scheme in North Carolina in 2018. Other states with mail-in systems, such as Oregon, have safeguards preventing that sort of fraud from happening. After Wednesday’s briefing, Trump took to Twitter to try and make a distinction between absentee voting — which he apparently is fine with (he even voted absentee in Florida’s recent election) — and mail-in voting. “Absentee Ballots are a great way to vote for the many senior citizens, military, and others who can’t get to the polls on Election Day. These ballots are very different from 100% Mail-In Voting, which is “RIPE for FRAUD,” and shouldn’t be allowed!” he wrote. Absentee Ballots are a great way to vote for the many senior citizens, military, and others who can’t get to the polls on Election Day. These ballots are very different from 100% Mail-In Voting, which is “RIPE for FRAUD,” and shouldn’t be allowed!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 8, 2020 But this distinction doesn’t make sense. There’s no reason to think mail-in voting for in-state residents is any more susceptible to fraud than absentee voting for residents who are traveling or temporarily living elsewhere. None of Trump’s claims about election fraud make sense — but he keeps making them anyway The backdrop to all this is the coronavirus pandemic, which threatens to make it unsafe for people to go to the polls in November and has made mail-in voting an increasingly attractive option. A Reuters/Ipsos poll released Thursday morning found that significant majorities of both Democrats (79 percent) and Republicans (65 percent) support a requiring for mail-in voting for November’s election, with 72 percent of US adults supporting it overall. Trump, however, is convinced mail-in voting hurts Republicans in general and him in particular. He even came perilously close to admitting this in a tweet he posted on Wednesday in which he claimed the system “for whatever reason, doesn’t work out well for Republicans.” Republicans should fight very hard when it comes to state wide mail-in voting. Democrats are clamoring for it. Tremendous potential for voter fraud, and for whatever reason, doesn’t work out well for Republicans. @foxandfriends— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 8, 2020 In fact, Republicans in mail-in states like Utah and Colorado have had a lot of success. But it’s been GOP orthodoxy for decades that anything driving up voter turnout is bad for the party. That belief is a big reason why Trump has been pushing bogus claims of election fraud for years and using them to argue on behalf of a voter ID system that would make it harder for poor people to vote. In addition to winning the Electoral College in a landslide, I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 27, 2016 The exchange with Acosta illustrated how flimsy these claims are while at the same time showing that even amid a deadly pandemic, Trump prioritizes his perceived political self-interest — even if it means that some people end up abstaining from voting for fear of getting sick. Support Vox’s explanatory journalism Every day at Vox, we aim to answer your most important questions and provide you, and our audience around the world, with information that has the power to save lives. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. Vox’s work is reaching more people than ever, but our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources — particularly during a pandemic and an economic downturn. Your financial contribution will not constitute a donation, but it will enable our staff to continue to offer free articles, videos, and podcasts at the quality and volume that this moment requires. Please consider making a contribution to Vox today.
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vox.com
Ex-NFL running back Chris Johnson accused in murder-for-hire plot related to 2015 gang hit: report
Former Tennessee Titans running back Chris Johnson has reportedly ben accused of being involved in a gang-related murder-for-hire plot related to a 2015 shooting in Florida that resulted in the death of his friend. 
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foxnews.com
The Coronavirus Pandemic Will Trigger the Worst Economic Recession Since the Great Depression, Says IMF Chief
About 170 of the 189 member countries in the International Monetary Fund organization are projected to have negative growth.
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newsweek.com
Kaiser closing many Southern California clinics to slow coronavirus spread
Kaiser will stop or limit services at locations including Los Angeles, San Diego, the Antelope Valley and Orange, Kern and Ventura counties.
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latimes.com
NYC cathedral turning into coronavirus field hospital
The Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine in Morningside Heights, the seat of the Episcopal Diocese in New York, will serve as a field hospital during the coronavirus outbreak, according to a report. The cathedral’s dean, the Right Rev. Clifton Daniel III, told The New York Times that nine climate-controlled tents capable of holding...
1m
nypost.com
Jessica Simpson parodies her Rolling Stone ‘Housewife of the Year’ cover
Things have changed a bit in 17 years.
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nypost.com
It just got harder to get, refinance a mortgage: Who will face more difficulty
A 'refinancing bonanza' continues as mortgage rates remain low but the economic shutdowns across most of the country mean some won't qualify.       
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usatoday.com
AG Barr says ‘draconian’ coronavirus restrictions should be reevaluated
Attorney General William Barr called the restrictions intended to slow the spread of coronavirus “draconian” and said they should be reexamined next month. Government officials, Barr said on Fox News Wednesday evening, should be careful to ensure “that the draconian measures that are being adopted are fully justified, and there are not alternative ways of...
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nypost.com
Fed boosts support for small businesses, local governments
The central bank announced a new $2.3 trillion round of loans that include even more support for small businesses and consumers — and, for the first time, for states, cities and municipalities, too.
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edition.cnn.com
Liz Cheney: China is responsible for the coronavirus pandemic
Rep. Liz Cheney said on Thursday that she forecast potential issues with China’s wet markets for a long before the coronavirus outbreak.
1m
foxnews.com
Chilling video reveals how coronavirus spreads from a single cough in a supermarket
Researchers in Finland have created a chilling video that models how coronavirus could spread from a single cough in a supermarket.
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foxnews.com
When Are Stimulus Checks Being Deposited Into Bank Accounts? What You Should Know
The IRS says it is developing a portal for taxpayers to quickly provide the agency with direct deposit information to help facilitate payments.
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newsweek.com
A Rural Health Center With a Pandemic Plan
The Rowland B. French Medical Center is the primary health-care facility for the residents of Eastport, Maine, a tiny Down East fishing town, population 1,400. Eastport was one of the first of some 50 towns that Jim and visited during our reporting across America for our book, Our Towns. We have returned there a half-dozen times since 2013.The French Center, along with two others in nearby Calais and Machias, together compose the Eastport Health Center. They operate on a community-based health-care model, which began as part of a rural health initiative from the era of Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty to aid the underserved.When I first learned about the rural health-care centers in Ajo, Arizona, and then Eastport, they struck me as unusually personal and almost quaint in their attention to the local detail of the environment and the people they served. Outwardly, the two couldn’t seem more different, The Desert Senita Community Health Center in a former copper mining town in the middle of the Sonoran Desert, and the the Rowland B. French Medical Center on the powerful tidal waters of the Bay of Fundy.In another way, the centers shared a foundation that seemed efficient and smart in design and operation. Today, in the horrible and confusing pandemic era, I would tack on a few more adjectives for their model: prescient and exemplary.The key element is that long before the current emergency, both of them were designated as Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC); they are two of roughly 1,400 FQHCs that serve more than 28 million people around the U.S. today. And with this designation, it meant that two of America’s smallest and most remote communities were required to make preparations for a public-health disaster like the one underway now.As I wrote earlier: FQHC designation is a godsend for rural health-care centers. It ensures that the centers will receive, among other things, enhanced reimbursements for patients covered by Medicaid and Medicare, and will offer a sliding scale for those without any coverage. It promises federal malpractice-insurance coverage for providers, extra partnerships for the centers, and more specialist care. Each center is unique in its profile, depending on the community’s needs. For example, the Rowland B. French Medical Center has providers for behavioral health counseling, podiatry, radiology, nephrology, and social support. Desert Senita has a regularly visiting cardiologist and ophthalmologist, a certified Spanish translator, and a special phone line with third-party translators for multiple languages. Being a FQHC comes with requirements and perks. In Ajo, I saw the stacks and stacks of paperwork required of FQHCs by the government to document every step of their compliance with governance, finances, and regulations. I also learned about the one-stop shopping so they could supply services to cover everything from dentistry, x-rays, pharmacy, translation services, rotating visits from specialists, and emergency preparedness. At the time, Jane Canon in the Ajo center described that emergency preparedness meant “self-ready” for everything from a massive power outage to an ebola outbreak. At the time, we both chuckled at “ebola outbreak.” That doesn’t sound funny anymore.I spoke by phone last Sunday morning with Ellen Krajewski, the director and CEO of the Eastport Health Center, to learn how emergency preparedness in Eastport has played out so far.We started with a few weeks ago, when it was business as usual at Eastport’s Health Center. People were coming in for their primary-care appointments, drop-ins, the usual. Then came the identification by the CDC of the coronavirus as a pandemic. As an FQHC, said Krajewski, echoing my conversation in Ajo, we are required to have emergency preparedness plans. “So,” she said, “we had a pandemic plan.” The trigger was pulled and Eastport immediately kicked into gear to engage the protocols and adhere to guidelines from the feds and the states for pandemic operations. Here’s what the plan looks like and here’s how it has worked in reality:The pivots: The health center shifted from being an all-purpose primary care provider to accepting only acute visits in person and providing all other visits remotely, either by phone or virtually. It was tricky: While operations were clear to those inside the building, not all the residents in Eastport were aware of the news and, understandably, what that would mean to their usual healthcare behaviors. As now throughout the rest of the country, word needed to get around Eastport that the first step was not showing up at the center, but calling on the phone. The center set up a series of questions by phone to determine how best to provide needed care, from those with what appeared to be illness unrelated to coronavirus to triaging patients with what may be coronavirus symptoms. The very sickest people go to the hospitals; the middle group may come to the center; the least sick generally stay at home.Some of both the regular patients and the potential COVID-19 positive patients needed to be seen in person, so the center set up work-arounds for organizing their physical space. They scoured the possibilities and came up with separate locations for seeing potentially COVID-19-positive patients and regular patients. They flipped a board room into a sterile room, with a trained nurse to administer COVID-19 tests. Krajewski told me that the center has a limited supply of tests, and they follow the CDC guidelines on who is eligible to be tested.Within 10 days, all the providers were trained and using remote technologies. “It meant a huge, gigantic change,” Krajewski said. But it was one they were generally equipped to do, despite their relatively-older, less tech-savvy provider population. Being a FQHC, the center was already heavily teched-up, and familiar with using the technology required to comply with all the usual FQHC reporting and protocols.On the patient end, it was more complicated. Eastport is a rural, remote area, where broadband coverage is spotty, and the population is less likely than much of the U.S. to be able to afford computers and internet subscriptions. Compounding the problems, Washington County—where Eastport is located—has one of the oldest populations in Maine, a state that has the oldest population of any in the country—meaning overall comfort with technology is more rare than usual.The equipment and testing: As of our last conversation, Eastport has an adequate, though limited, number of test kits; more have been promised. Test results have been slow in coming, but the speed is improving. They have not yet recorded a single positive test for COVID-19. Maine has promised some community testing sites around the state, but tiny Eastport won’t be one of them. Those will be located in a more populated area, far away from Eastport.Their original supply of equipment has sufficed. There are enough PPEs and masks, although the center has already back-ordered and duplicate-ordered, just in case. Eastport doesn’t have an ICU or a ventilator. The nearest so-equipped hospitals are in Machias and Calais, which are 60 and 30 minutes away, respectively.The staff: During our travels, we frequently heard about rural America’s challenge to entice new young staff into professional positions like doctors, nurses, dentists, and teachers. In fact, Eastport, in another far-sighted effort, has already set up scholarships for high-school students pursuing medical professions, hopefully giving them a reason to stay and practice in their hometown.Today, the staff and providers at the center are generally older and are more likely to have co-morbidity issues that come with age. The pandemic presents a new challenge to this provider base, where they naturally fear their constant exposure and feel more personally vulnerable.The finances: Finances for the center and payments for services are complicated now. On one hand, there has been some easing on federal rules and regulations for payments and coverage, making the system work more smoothly. On the other hand, fewer patients are coming to the clinic. Patients are reluctant to show up, and they are delaying their well visits. When Krajewski and I talked, the center’s roughly 150 visits per day had dropped to 22. Already 12 employees in the three centers of the Eastport Health Center network have been furloughed, and five others are working reduced hours. And while virtual visits are increasing, they are not replacing in-person visits either in number or revenue.The culture: For all of us, the specter of COVID-19’s arrival into our communities is scary and looming and bizarre. For all of us, there is a sense of unreality—until it becomes real—that maybe it won’t get here, maybe we can be immune from this tragedy. Because part of the cultural appeal of living in remote towns like Eastport and Ajo is being a good arm’s length away from national issues or intrusions, it makes sense that this instinct or temptation of “not me/not us” could be even stronger. It is a familiar and attractive idea that the virus will remain far away, like some other 21st century disasters.We will stay in touch with our friends in Ajo and Eastport to see what their futures hold.
1m
theatlantic.com
Maryland jobless claims more than 108,000 last week
Maryland is reporting that more than 108,000 unemployment filings were made last week as jobless claims continue to rise sharply due to shuttered businesses because of the coronavirus
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washingtonpost.com
Mason Fine: 5 things to know about the 2020 NFL Draft prospect
Mason Fine is a quarterback who is looking to make the jump from college to the pros.
1m
foxnews.com
Why Some Doctors Are Now Moving Away From Ventilator Treatments for Coronavirus Patients
The concern from some medical professionals is that the machines could be harming certain patients
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time.com
'Families of the Mafia' star Karen Gravano explains why dad Sammy ‘The Bull’ is appearing on MTV reality show
Sammy “The Bull” Gravano is getting ready for his close-up.
1m
foxnews.com
Naomi Campbell says she’s wearing Elizabeth Taylor’s caftans during quarantine: ‘I’m not counting days’
Naomi Campbell is keeping things glamorous while practicing social distancing.
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foxnews.com
Investment firm dangled up to 175% returns to investors using US aid programs
A New York investment firm pitched wealthy investors in recent days on a way to make returns of 22 percent to 175 percent using US government programs designed to help Americans keep their jobs.
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nypost.com
Forecast Map Predicts Counties at Greatest Risk from Surge in COVID-19 Cases
The Columbia University map shows which parts of the country will exceed the number of beds they have for critical care over the next six weeks.
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newsweek.com
Coronavirus pandemic forces funeral homes, morgues into the frontline fight
In the hardest-hit coronavirus crevices of the country, funeral homes and morgues are being vanquished and exhausted in the quest to keep up with the number of victims succumbing to the novel pathogen, officially termed COVID-19.
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foxnews.com
Oil prices pare earlier gains as OPEC+ works on output cut deal
Oil prices were up almost 2% on Thursday, pulling back from an earlier surge as OPEC and other crude producers work on a deal to drastically cut output in response to a collapse in global demand from the coronavirus.
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reuters.com
New York's coronavirus outbreak came from Europe and other parts of the United States, research projects suggest
Two separate research projects suggest that the novel coronavirus may have been circulating in New York City earlier than thought and the earliest cases likely originated with travelers coming from Europe and other parts of the United States, not Asia.
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edition.cnn.com
Powell says recovery can be 'fairly quick,' 'robust' but Fed in no hurry to pull back aid
Fed Chair Powell Says the recovery from the coronavirus ecession can be d 'robust' but the Fed is in no hurry to pull back the aid it has provided       
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usatoday.com
Andrea Bocelli on Easter quarantine concert: ‘Music can become a prayer’
The coronavirus crisis may prevent you from going to church on Sunday, but you can still worship the talent of Andrea Bocelli when he brings an Easter concert directly to your home.
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nypost.com
'Pokémon Sword and Shield:' Zarude's Signature Attack Jungle Healing Revealed
Jungle Healing will restore HP and heal status effects.
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newsweek.com