Generally
General
1215

La mamma di Desirée  in aula. «Lei soffriva,  io ho chiesto aiuto»

La mamma di Desirée  in aula. «Lei soffriva,  io ho chiesto aiuto»

Roma, il processo per la 16enne morta di overdose. «Noi due siamo state felici»


Load more
Read full article on: roma.corriere.it
unread news
unread news
FBI Official: Russia Wants to See U.S. ‘Tear Ourselves Apart’
David Porter spoke at an election security conference on Capitol Hill
time.com
Letters to the Editor: If Wells Fargo were a person, it'd be in prison by now
Wells Fargo effectively stole its customers' money. The officers who knew this should be criminally charged; instead, the company will pay a fine.
latimes.com
Couple forced teen cyclists off road over Trump flags, cops say
An Indiana couple swerved their car toward two teenage boys who had pro-President Trump flags on their bikes — and were caught after posting videos of the incident online, according to a report. Kyren Perry-Jones, 23, and Cailyn Smith, 18, filmed themselves swerving their Chevrolet Malibu toward the 14-year-old boys as if they “wanted to...
nypost.com
Residents on the lookout for bobcat tracking collars
edition.cnn.com
Buttigieg accused of plagiarizing Obama in motivational weekend tweet
Former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg is facing plagiarism claims over a weekend tweet of his that resembled a motivational statement from former President Obama.
foxnews.com
Trevor Noah thinks President Trump could make comedians' jobs 'harder'
Trevor Noah has a theory about President Donald Trump: The outspoken head of state makes a comedian’s job of writing good jokes “harder.”
foxnews.com
US confirms 53 coronavirus cases, including evacuated cruise passengers
The US now has 53 confirmed cases of the coronavirus, including 19 new patients diagnosed over the weekend, health officials said Monday. The stateside cases include 39 evacuees from the virus-hit Diamond Princess cruise ship and the Chinese city of Wuhan at the center of the outbreak, according to the US Centers for Disease Control...
nypost.com
House to vote on legislation making lynching a federal crime
Lawmakers in the House of Representatives are set to cast a historic vote this week to designate lynching as a federal crime.
edition.cnn.com
Trump makes first state visit to India
President Trump made his first state visit to India on Monday. The trip comes as Mr. Trump is looking to make a new trade deal with the country. Ravi Agrawal, the managing editor of Foreign Policy, joins CBSN's "Red & Blue" to provide a closer look at why he believes the trip is just about "optics."
cbsnews.com
TurboTax owner Intuit to buy personal finance site Credit Karma for $7.1 billion
TurboTax owner Intuit announced Monday that it plans to acquire consumer finance company Credit Karma in a $7.1 billion deal.       
usatoday.com
On the trail: Buttigieg heckled, Bloomberg and Sanders tussle on vandalism, guns
Democratic presidential hopeful Michael Bloomberg on Monday clashed with front-runner Bernie Sanders over vandalism at Bloomberg's Chicago office and their gun control stances, while centrist rival Pete Buttigieg was heckled at a labor march.
reuters.com
Italian national becomes third case of coronavirus in Spain
An Italian man has tested positive for coronavirus in Tenerife in the Canary Islands, the region's health authorities said on Monday.
reuters.com
9-year-old asks Pete Buttigieg about coming out
During a campaign rally in Colorado, a 9-year-old asked Pete Buttigieg for advice about coming out as gay. The Democratic presidential candidate invited the boy on stage, where he told him, "I don't think you need a lot of advice from me on bravery.”
cbsnews.com
Google manager arrested in connection to wife's disappearance released pending an investigation
Hawaiian police have identified a body found near Anaehoomalu Bay as the missing Microsoft manager and mother of two, but said they have released her husband, a Google manager, who was arrested in connection to her disappearance.
foxnews.com
Jeff Bezos loses $4.8B as world’s richest see fortunes drop by $30B
It was a bad day to be a billionaire. As stocks plummeted worldwide Monday on coronavirus fears, the 10 richest people in the world lost a collective $30 billion, according to Forbes. Amazon boss Jeff Bezos — the world’s wealthiest person despite weathering the costliest divorce in history last year — saw his net worth...
nypost.com
Assange fight draws in Trump's new intel chief
Lawyers for the WikiLeaks founder plan to use newly obtained recordings and screenshots to argue that Assange's prosecution is political in nature.
politico.com
NHL trade deadline provides whirlwind of action
The NHL trade market was booming ahead of Monday’s 3 p.m. deadline. Several Stanley Cup contenders made one last push to gear up before the playoff, while rebuilding teams stacked draft picks. At least one Cup-deprived veteran center on the Sharks landed with a postseason favorite and hey, Chris Kreider still is a Ranger. The...
nypost.com
Harvey Weinstein convicted of criminal sex act and rape
Harvey Weinstein has been found guilty of committing a criminal sex act in the first degree involving one woman and rape in the third degree involving another woman. CNN's Brynn Gingras reports.
edition.cnn.com
Guy Fieri hits the club scene during Miami food festival
The bleached-blond Food Network star was serving up some serious dance moves.
nypost.com
Amazon Fire TV Stick, Fire 10 Tablet, and more up to 35% off during flash sale
Amazon is having another major sale on tech items, with the retailer’s latest discounts pricing down popular Amazon Fire devices. During the one-day event, you can take up to 35% off Fire products like the Fire 10 Tablet, the Fire TV Cube, and the Fire TV Stick.  Each device is Alexa-enabled, has WiFi compatibility, and...
nypost.com
McDonald's worker punched by customer over free cup of water: report
A McDonald’s worker was reportedly assaulted during a bizarre interaction with a customer.
foxnews.com
The winners, losers of 2020 NHL trade deadline
The Hurricanes sent a message to NHL that they are ready to contend after their trio of moves Monday. Here's a look at the rest of winners, losers.       
usatoday.com
Feminism Claims to Represent All Women. So Why Does It Ignore So Many of Them?
My first marriage ended in divorce, and afterward, I was on food stamps, I had a state-funded medical card that gave me and my son access to medical care, and I was living in public housing. Today, I have an advanced education, a wonderful family and a career I enjoy. 
If this were the usual…
time.com
National Register of Historic Places Often Ignores Slavery’s Significance on American South
The register’s written entries on the plantations tend to say almost nothing about the enslaved people
time.com
From Louis Vuitton golf bags to bed covers, foreign dignitaries shower Trumps with expensive gifts
Foreign leaders shower President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump with expensive gifts totaling more than $81,000.       
usatoday.com
Former University of Texas tennis coach sentenced in admissions scam
A former tennis coach at the University of Texas at Austin who accepted $100,000 in bribes in the college admissions scam was sentenced to six months in prison Monday, prosecutors said.
edition.cnn.com
Michael Jordan remembers his 'little brother' Kobe Bryant. Read his entire speech.
Michael Jordan spoke at Kobe Bryant's memorial, sharing stories of how the two ribbed and drove each other during and after their NBA careers.      
usatoday.com
Michael Jordan jokes about ‘Crying Jordan’ meme during Kobe Bryant memorial
A tearful Michael Jordan brought a moment of levity to the somber memorial for Kobe Bryant on Monday when he joked about the “Crying Jordan” meme. Tears streamed down the NBA legend’s face as he paid tribute to Bryant, prompting him to tell the capacity crowd at Los Angeles’ Staples Center that he was ready...
nypost.com
Your free TurboTax alternative now belongs to TurboTax
TurboTax is one of Intuit’s big product — and Credit Karma’s competitor. | Kimberly White/Getty Images for TurboTax Intuit just spent $7.1 billion to buy Credit Karma, the popular free credit monitoring and tax filing service Financial software giant Intuit just bought itself another online personal finance startup — and the data of that startup’s tens of millions of customers. On Monday afternoon, the company announced that it was purchasing Credit Karma for $7.1 billion in cash and stock. Credit Karma began as a free credit monitoring service in 2007, but it recently expanded to offer savings accounts as well as tax preparation and filing software, making Credit Karma an up-and-coming competitor to Intuit’s popular TurboTax software. The big selling point for Credit Karma is that — in stark contrast to TurboTax — its services are free. Instead of money, you give Credit Karma your financial data and endure targeted credit card and loan advertisements. For many, this has been a good deal. Credit Karma’s tax preparation software helped the company more than double its users from about 45 million at the end of 2015 to over 100 million worldwide in the beginning of 2020. Put differently, that amounts to many millions of people who are not paying for TurboTax. Another selling point for Credit Karma for many of its taxpayer users is (well, was) that it isn’t TurboTax, which has been dogged by allegations of ethical shadiness. Last year, a ProPublica investigation revealed TurboTax’s decades-long quest to stop the Internal Revenue Service from creating its own free tax software. TurboTax instead said it would offer free filing options for lower income taxpayers, but it also made those free options difficult to find and promoted its own “free” TurboTax services that ultimately forced many taxpayers to upgrade to its paid services. All that in mind, Credit Karma seemed like an appealing alternative to many taxpayers who didn’t like the idea of getting ripped off. Now, not only does the more appealing option for tax services belong to Intuit — now the parent company of both TurboTax and Credit Karma — but your data probably does, too. Credit Karma’s 90 million-plus user base in the United States includes almost half of all American millennials. (It seems the rumors that millennials are financial dunces who spend all of their money on avocado toast have been greatly exaggerated. It is also possible that they are using Credit Karma to save money so that they may buy even more avocado toast.) Credit Karma wouldn’t comment on what will happen to their data, so let’s take a look at its privacy policy: We may disclose and transfer information about you to a third party as part of, or in preparation for, a change of control, restructuring, corporate change, or sale or transfer of assets. If such a business transfer results in a material change in the treatment of your Personal Information, you will be notified by e-mail (using the primary email address on your account) or by a prominent notice on our site. So yes, it does indeed look like all that financial data will go to Intuit. But if Intuit decides to change up how it handles your personal information, at least the company says it will give you a heads up. This isn’t unusual. Most privacy policies include passages like this, because that user data is often part of (or even all of) what makes the company being acquired so valuable. Let’s face it: Intuit is not paying $7 billion for Credit Karma’s easily replicable software or business model. Just look at what it did to Mint, another online financial manager startup it acquired in 2009 for $170 million. Like Credit Karma, Mint makes money when its users purchase products from affiliates. Mint’s fate under Intuit might give us a sneak peek at what’s to come for Credit Karma. It ain’t great. As Fast Company wrote last month, the budget tracker has remained free but it’s been operating in what its founder Aaron Patzer described as “maintenance mode,” which means the platform is adequately performing its base functions but offering little by way of updates or innovation. The Credit Karma acquisition also a reminder that when you give sensitive information over to one company, you aren’t only trusting it to keep your data safe; you’re also trusting whatever company acquires it to do the same. This also could include whatever random company buys up its assets in the event of a bankruptcy. That dating site you’re on? That genealogy database you handed your DNA test results to? Your doorbell? All gobbled up by bigger companies along with your data. Unless its privacy policy explicitly states that user data will not be transferred even in the case of an acquisition, merge, or asset sale (and even the ones that do say this can always change them), you should never assume that the company you’re giving your personal information to today is the company that owns your personal information tomorrow. Then again, in an age where antitrust hawks are paying much closer attention to tech companies, there’s always a chance the acquisition won’t happen. Intuit and Credit Karma said they expect to close the deal until the second half of 2020, and they’ll need regulators to sign off on it before that happens. Open Sourced is made possible by Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists.
vox.com
Weinstein verdict marks new era for sexual assault survivors, one I worried might not come
I'm sure I wasn't the only one concerned that Harvey Weinstein would skate. But his lawyer asked jurors to do what they knew was right — and they did.      
usatoday.com
Harvey Weinstein is convicted. Now what?
Harvey Weinstein's conviction is a landmark event, writes Kara Alaimo, but it's a beginning, not an ending. Alaimo says lawmakers need to do two things now to start to make real change: prioritize laws governing the use of non-disclosure agreements and work harder to help educate the most vulnerable about their rights to fight back against abuse and harassment.
edition.cnn.com
Stocks tumble, oil falls, gold spikes as virus fears grip markets
Stocks across the globe fell by the most since mid-2016 on Monday and oil prices tumbled as a jump in coronavirus cases outside of China drove investors to the perceived safety of gold and government bonds on fears of the impact on the global economy.
reuters.com
Agent: Vontaze Burfict working to clean up game to conform to NFL rules
Oft-suspended linebacker Vontaze Burfict is working this offseason to adapt his play to fit modern NFL rules on player safety, his agent said.        
usatoday.com
At 25 Years, Understanding The Longevity Of Craigslist
While other sites keep updating, Craigslist just looks old. "It's like a shark that's never had to evolve," says Jessa Lingel, who's written about the history of Craigslist.
npr.org
Kobe and Gianna Bryant honored with memorial at Staples Center in Los Angeles
Thousands of people packed the Los Angeles Staples Center -- known as "The House that Kobe Built" -- to pay tribute to Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna, who died along with seven others in a helicopter crash last month. CBS News' Nichelle Medina and Mola Lenghi have more about the emotional celebration.
cbsnews.com
Flint mayor honors longtime businessman with Key to the City
edition.cnn.com
Cincinnati Children's Hospital receives $36 million
edition.cnn.com
Arlington cops get help from Forth Worth officers
edition.cnn.com
Truck catches fire while cleaning up after parade
edition.cnn.com
Dress drive keeps beautiful prom dreams alive
edition.cnn.com
Woman searching for lost dog after house fire
edition.cnn.com
Students says package went missing after shipping
edition.cnn.com
Dow Drops More Than 1,000 as COVID-19 Outbreak Threatens Economy
It was the worst day for the stock market in two years
time.com
Under Trump, America is less prepared for an outbreak
The coronavirus that emerged from Wuhan, China, last year is causing alarm across the world, with fear that this could become the next pandemic. Late last month, the World Health Organization declared the virus, named COVID-19, a "Public Health Emergency of International Concern" and urged an immediate international response.
edition.cnn.com
Under Trump, America is less prepared for a coronavirus outbreak
Chelsea Clinton and Devi Sridhar write that the coronavirus threat could not come at a worse time for Americans, as President Trump has eliminated the position of Global Health Czar and repeatedly proposed cuts to important global health funding.
edition.cnn.com
Several Democratic Campaigns Face Cash Crisis Ahead of Super Tuesday
"You are on a wing and a prayer when you run out of money. Miracles can happen but it's rare," said Matt Bennett, co-founder of the centrist Third Way think tank.
newsweek.com
Dak Prescott gets vote of confidence from Cowboys: ‘He’s our quarterback’
The Cowboys fully intend on keeping Dak Prescott in Dallas. Cowboys vice president Stephen Jones told the Dallas Morning News that despite the lack of negotiations thus far, there is “absolutely not” a chance the team moves on from its 26-year-old signal-caller. “Dak’s our quarterback,” Jones said. “He’s our quarterback for the future. We have...
nypost.com
Shaq honors Kobe Bryant by recounting colorful 'motherf---er' episode
Shaquille O’Neal honored former teammate Kobe Bryant in front of a packed crowd at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, calling the NBA legend "my little brother," "heaven's MVP" and dropped an F-bomb while recounting a story about the pair. 
foxnews.com