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Martha Stewart is missing her glam team during quarantine
"I think about you all daily as I attempt my own daily ablutions and preparations."
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nypost.com
Over 4,400 new NYC coronavirus cases, 180 deaths reported in 24 hours
Queens continued to top the five boroughs with the most coronavirus cases at 17,832 as of Friday morning.
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nypost.com
Another cougar visits Chilean capital amid coronavirus lockdown
SANTIAGO – Chilean authorities captured a second cougar in little more than a week late Wednesday after the cat was spotted strolling through an upscale suburb of Santiago amid the evening quiet imposed by a nationwide, nighttime curfew due to the coronavirus pandemic. Video taken by a resident shows the cougar, a 48.5-pound female bounding...
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nypost.com
Brooke Baldwin tests positive for coronavirus
Jake Tapper shares that CNN's Brooke Baldwin has tested positive for coronavirus.
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edition.cnn.com
Republicans Want Twitter to Ban Chinese Communist Party Accounts. That’s a Dangerous Idea.
Removing the Chinese Communist Party from Twitter would push forward the agenda of those seeking to replicate national borders online.
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slate.com
Comptroller Scott Stringer’s mom dead from coronavirus
Arlene Stringer-Cuevas, a former city councilwoman in the 1970s and mother of Comptroller Scott Stringer, passed away Friday morning from complications of the coronavirus. She was 86 years old. The comptroller announced his mother’s death on Twitter Friday, saying it’s a “heartbreaking moment for me, my wife, and our entire family.” Stringer called the Bronx-born,...
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nypost.com
The Earth is shaking less under coronavirus lockdowns
During the coronavirus pandemic, people are moving less — and so is the planet.
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cbsnews.com
How Staples Center fund is helping concession workers, others during coronavirus shutdown: 'Burden being lifted'
Lakers, Clippers and Kings, along with Staples Center, started fund to pay workers affected by coronavirus shutdown. Here's how that money is helping.        
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usatoday.com
Kushner: The federal stockpile is ours, not the states'
CNN's Anderson Cooper speaks to Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) about White House senior adviser Jared Kushner's recent comments on the strategic national medical stockpile.
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edition.cnn.com
Fauci: All 50 states should be under stay-at-home order
"If you look at what's going on in this country, I just don't understand why we're not doing that," he said. "We really should be."
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cbsnews.com
Prime Minister of Georgia explains why the country has had no deaths from coronavirus
As the coronavirus body count continues to rise in almost all crevices of the globe, there is one country that is remarkably bereft of any official deaths: the former Soviet country of Georgia.
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foxnews.com
Christopher Cross calls coronavirus ‘worst illness I’ve ever had’
We know it’s crazy, but it’s true. Five-time Grammy winner Christopher Cross confirmed that he was battling coronavirus in a Facebook post Friday. Cross, whose smooth hits “Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do)” and “Sailing” were part of the soundtrack of the early 1980s, wrote, “I’m sorry to report that I am among the...
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nypost.com
7 case studies that show how coronavirus spreads before you know you’re sick
A couple wearing protective masks travel by bus after work on April 2, 2020, in Singapore. | Suhaimi Abdullah/Getty Images A new study from Singapore shows how presymptomatic spread of coronavirus works. One of the things that makes the novel coronavirus so challenging to contain is asymptomatic and presymptomatic transmission: If you’re infected, you can get someone else sick before you know that you have the disease. As my colleague Julia Belluz reported, researchers in China found that people shed the most virus — potentially exposing others — just as they started to show symptoms, or even before. And in one case, someone had high levels of the virus without ever experiencing any symptoms themselves. Since then, evidence has been accumulating that this presymptomatic or asymptomatic transmission is not just a possibility that shows up in the lab — it’s a major route by which the coronavirus spreads. The latest piece of evidence? A new study from Singapore paints the clearest picture yet of how people are getting each other sick before they even realize they’re sick themselves. The researchers, who looked at all of the 243 confirmed coronavirus cases reported in Singapore between January 23 and March 16, found seven clusters of cases in which 10 infections were attributed to presymptomatic transmission. (To be clear,there were other cases they couldn’t trace at all, as well as cases where presymptomatic transmission couldn’t be ruled out, so this shouldn’t be taken to imply that only 6 percent of cases feature presymptomatic transmission.) Zakaria Zainal/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images Singapore has implemented its strictest measures yet in its attempt to control the spread of the coronavirus, closing schools and most workplaces effective April 3. The case studies make one thing clear: Authorities can’t control the coronavirus outbreak just by quarantining sick people. They have to dramatically reduce contact among the rest of the population, too. Feeling good or having an absence of symptoms doesn’t mean you can’t infect someone else. And the recommendation to wear masks only when you’re sick just won’t cut it — which is why experts are reconsidering the advice to not wear them if you’re healthy. Seven case studies of presymptomatic transmission In the first cluster the researchers looked at, a wife and husband traveled on January 19 from Wuhan, China, to Singapore, where they visited a church the same day. Three other people who attended church that day later developed symptoms. One of them came into the church after the couple had left but sat in the same pew, as seen in closed-circuit camera footage. “Investigations of other attendees did not reveal any other symptomatic persons who attended the church that day,” the study reads. The travelers from Wuhan had an onset of symptoms on January 22 and January 24, while the person who sat in their pew developed symptoms on February 3. In the second cluster, a woman attended a dinner on February 15 and was exposed to someone with a confirmed case of Covid-19. She attended a singing class on February 24 and developed symptoms two days later; another woman at the same class developed symptoms three days after that. In another three clusters, a person who had been exposed to Covid-19 went home and exposed the people they lived with; in all three cases, the initial patient and their wife, husband, or housemate developed symptoms on the exact same day (so the transmission must have happened before the symptoms started). In the sixth cluster, a woman who’d been exposed to Covid-19 on February 27 went to church on March 1. She started showing symptoms on March 3, as did one of the people she’d likely infected at the church service. Another person who attended church that day started showing symptoms on March 5. In the seventh cluster, a man who’d been exposed to Covid-19 met a woman on March 8. He started experiencing symptoms on March 9, and she on March 12. There are some important caveats here. While Singapore has been very thorough in its contact tracing and case identification work, it’s always possible that one or more of these patients was actually infected by someone else. “Given that there was not widespread community transmission of COVID-19 in Singapore during the period of evaluation and while strong surveillance systems were in place to detect cases, presymptomatic transmission was estimated to be more likely than the occurrence of unidentified sources,” the researchers wrote. But in any specific case, another exposure could not be categorically ruled out. Suhaimi Abdullah/Getty Images Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong on Friday announced significantly stricter measures to contain the spread of Covid-19 cases in Singapore, including the closure of non-essential workplaces beginning April 7. There’s also the potential for recall bias — especially in cases of mild illness — where people mistakenly misreport the day on which their symptoms began. But even with those caveats in mind, the Singapore study is the latest contribution to an overall picture of the virus, corroborated by other data: People are likely getting each other sick while feeling perfectly healthy, leaving a trail of infections in their wake that they may not know they’re responsible for until several days later. You can read the case studies in full — they’re not very long — but one takeaway, the researchers wrote, is this: “These findings ... suggest that to control the pandemic, it might not be enough for only persons with symptoms to limit their contact with others.” That’s one of the key things making the novel coronavirus more dangerous than SARS, which actually had a much higher infection fatality rate. You couldn’t pass on SARS until you were symptomatic, so quarantining sick people was enough to bring the outbreak under control. With the novel coronavirus, that’s simply not true. In other words, even if you feel healthy, stay home. And if you have to leave the house, assume you might be sick and wear a mask — if you can get or make one without reducing their supply for health care workers. Sign up for the Future Perfect newsletter and we’ll send you a roundup of ideas and solutions for tackling the world’s biggest challenges — and how to get better at doing good. Future Perfect is funded in part by individual contributions, grants, and sponsorships. Learn more here.
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vox.com
Safe scavenger hunts for kids — with Teddy bears and rainbows
The city’s kids can’t go to school, can’t see their friends and now even the playgrounds are closed. Instead, they’re going hunting. Teddy bear hunting, that is. Neighbors across the five boroughs have been doing simple acts to help distract and entertain kids who are cooped up at home. They’re creating scavenger hunts so kids...
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nypost.com
Member of Kennedy family identified as boaters who vanished on Chesapeake Bay
A member of the Kennedy family and her 8-year-old son have been identified Friday as the two boaters who are still missing after vanishing yesterday in Chesapeake Bay. 
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foxnews.com
ER Visits for Coronavirus-Like Illnesses Drop in Washington Hospitals
It's possible people with mild cases are staying out of the hospital and recovering at home, Eric Holdeman, director of the Center for Regional Disaster Resilience told Newsweek.
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newsweek.com
These 10 states still don't have stay-at-home coronavirus orders
About 90% of Americans are living under stay-at-home orders — but some governors are still resisting.
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cbsnews.com
Frank Ocean channels these sad times with two new songs
R&B prodigy Frank Ocean has blessed us all when we needed it most. The “Thinkin Bout You” crooner dropped two new songs on Thursday on YouTube, which are featured on two newly minted vinyl singles. After delays in production, the records — each containing the standard track on side A and a remix on side...
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nypost.com
Three golfers’ intricate plan to beat coronavirus order blew up at McDonald’s
Not even a global pandemic was getting between these men and their golf. Three men from Massachusetts were charged with violating Rhode Island governor Gina Raimando’s order, which calls for out-of-state residents to self-quarantine for two weeks if visiting the state for purposes not related to work in light of the coronavirus outbreak, after getting...
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nypost.com
Accidental origin of vaccines explained: Why humans may have cows to thank
In "Fox Nation 101: Making Vaccines," one of the top infectious disease physicians in the United States explained what vaccines are, how this medical technology has saved countless lives and delved into the fascinating history of the discovery of vaccines.
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foxnews.com
Scientists Probe How Coronavirus Might Travel Through The Air
Simply talking could produce tiny particles of mucus and saliva that might carry the coronavirus, experts say. How much these airborne particles matter for the spread of this disease is controversial.
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npr.org
Joe Biden rejects Medicare for all, says it wouldn’t have slowed coronavirus spread
Joe Biden has again declared that he does not back Medicare for all — and said that it would not have made a difference in dealing with the escalating coronavirus pandemic.
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nypost.com
Federal judge: Coronavirus poses 'grave danger' in jails, prisons; 'swift' government action needed
A federal judge urged Congress and other government officials to take "swift" action to reduce the risks to inmates posed by the coronavirus.        
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usatoday.com
As the Pandemic Compels us To Ration Care, Transparency is Vital To Retain Public Trust | Opinion
The medical community, our patients, their families and legislators need to have all the information the require to understand the spirit and the specifics of an ethical approach to rationing during this critical time.
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newsweek.com
How ‘Real Housewives’ are caring for their hair at home during quarantine
"Even though we are under quarantine or stay-at-home order, we should feel beautiful," he told us.
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nypost.com
Clemson's Dabo Swinney has 'zero doubt' NCAA football season will start on time with 'packed' stadiums
Clemson coach Dabo Swinney said he believes the college football season will kick off as planned by August despite the coronavirus pandemic.        
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usatoday.com
Face masks transported by Patriots arrives in NYC
A truck owned by the New England Patriots delivered a shipment of 300,000 N95 face masks to the Javits Center in New York on Friday to help medical personnel there. (APril 3)       
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usatoday.com
Opening a new restaurant during a pandemic? Why some chefs are moving forward with business
Launching a new business seems illogical if not downright insane in the time of coronavirus — but these restaurants are doing just that.
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latimes.com
Prisons Breed the Coronavirus. We Can Safely Free Thousands of Inmates.
Nonviolent offenders, the medically vulnerable and those near the end of their sentences should be released. Those who remain deserve much better medical care.
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nytimes.com
Judge rips Astros, Red Sox but dismisses suit by DraftKings gamblers
A Manhattan federal judge on Friday tossed a suit by online baseball gamblers who claimed a sign-stealing campaign by the Boston Red Sox and Houston Astros created an unfair wagering platform — but still ripped the teams for “shamelessly” breaking the rules of America’s past time. Judge Jed Rakoff sided with the two clubs and...
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nypost.com
Coronavirus cancellations: DOT clarifies airline refund requirements during pandemic
The policy applies to flights to, within, or from the United States.
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foxnews.com
Spain Briefly Passes Italy In COVID-19 Cases But Officials See Growth Rate Slowing
Despite the increase, Spain's figures suggest the rate of new infections has begun to slow, according to a spokeswoman for the government's health emergency center.
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npr.org
Kennedy family member, her 8-year-old son missing after canoe trip, Maryland governor says
Rescuers are searching for two missing boaters. Reports identity them as RFK granddaughter Maeve Kennedy Townsend McKean and her son Gideon.       
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usatoday.com
Airline cancel your flight due to coronavirus crisis? You're still due a refund, DOT says
The DOT warning comes as travelers have blasted United and other airlines skirting its policies on cash refunds for canceled flights.       
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usatoday.com
Wisconsin governor makes last-minute plea to delay Tuesday election
In a reversal, the Democrat calls for an all-mail election with a deadline to return ballots of May 26.
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politico.com
Ireland Baldwin dyes her hair pink during quarantine: 'Just did a bad thing'
Ireland Baldwin has made a drastic change to her appearance while at home in quarantine.
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foxnews.com
White House To Give Coronavirus Test To People 'In Close Proximity' To Trump, Pence
President Trump told reporters on Thursday that he had taken a second coronavirus test, which was negative.
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npr.org
11 board games to play at home during coronavirus quarantine
It took a quarantine for Johanna Pinzler to finally appreciate her husband Avri Klemer’s collection of more than 900 board games, most of which are stacked throughout their Kensington, Brooklyn, apartment. Klemer — a 44-year-old finance director of a Jewish summer camp who created a board game of his own, Penguin Soccer — amassed the...
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nypost.com
Experimentation. Reflection. Wild ensembles. Photos show 5 L.A. artists working under quarantine
Previous pandemics — smallpox in the Americas, the plague in Europe — reshaped the ways artists worked. How artists are adapting to coronavirus.
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latimes.com
Ellen DeGeneres, Wendy Williams to start remote talk shows Monday
UPDATED: Another talk show, whose production had been shut down over the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, is returning to television. “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” will be back on Monday, April 6, with remotely produced new episodes filmed at DeGeneres’ home amid the health crisis. Also starting Monday, April 6, fellow nationally syndicated daytime talker, “The Wendy...
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nypost.com
Gavin Newsom pushes back on Behar's suggestion he has to feed Trump's 'ego' for coronavirus help
California Gov. Gavin Newsom defended President Trump's coronavirus response after "The View" co-host Joy Behar suggested that he and others had to feed Trump's "ego" in order to get assistance.
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foxnews.com
Chef Nancy Silverton tests positive for coronavirus
Chef Nancy Silverton has tested positive for coronavirus. The crisis relief program she operated at Chi Spacca will move to Jessica Koslow's Sqirl.
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latimes.com
Questioned Over Coronavirus Deaths, China Tries to Curb Grief
Officials are pushing for quick and quiet burials and suppressing discussion of fatalities amid skepticism about the true size of the epidemic’s toll.
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nytimes.com
Brooke Baldwin is second CNN anchor to test positive for coronavirus
Afternoon anchor says "I'm OK" after feeling symptoms. She's the latest of several TV journalists who've contracted the virus.
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latimes.com
What should investors expect in April from markets hit by coronavirus pandemic?
Stocks fell on Tuesday, marking the end of a volatile March. The coronavirus pandemic has caused major market swings. Melissa Armo, CEO and founder of The Stock Swoosh, joined CBSN at the end of the trading day to talk about what we're seeing on Wall Street.
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cbsnews.com
Nebraska Cloisters move online, open 34-week 'retreat' for those who can’t make in-person, silent one
The Cloisters on the Platte Foundation, which operates a 930-acre Ignatian retreat facility in Gretna, Nebraska, will offer a 34-week retreat-like program online 
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foxnews.com
Norman Reedus and Diane Kruger enjoy PDA-filled quarantine break
They grabbed some takeout, too.
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nypost.com
A nightly bright spot: On Instagram Live, hip-hop/R&B hitmakers wage good-natured battle, and fans go wild
Amid the deluge of news bad and worse, nightly D\J battles between Gen X R&B and hip-hop hitmakers have become a desperately craved bright spot.
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latimes.com