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Amateur Bakers, Cooped Up at Home, Are Making Flour a Hot Commodity
Sales of baking yeast were up 457% over last year for the week ending March 28, according to Nielsen data. Flour was up 155%, baking powder up 178%, butter up 73% and eggs up 48%
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time.com
Mitt Romney Joins Lindsey Graham in Bipartisan Call for China to Close All Wet Markets Over Coronavirus Link
The group of senators, led by Republican Sen. Graham and Democratic Sen. Chris Coons made its plea in a letter to Chinese Ambassador to the United States Cui Tiankai.
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newsweek.com
A muscular example of midcentury modern
The architect designed this “definitely amazing” Rockville, Md., house for himself.
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washingtonpost.com
Magic Johnson: 'We need sports especially in a time like this. But only if everybody is safe'
Magic Johnson, the Los Angeles Lakers legend who is part of the Los Angeles Dodgers ownership group, says while he hopes sports can return in May, players need to be safe, and numbers need to be stabilized as well. He also believes sports will return without fans first.
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edition.cnn.com
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's dad says his son needs time to 'rest up' from coronavirus
Boris Johnson's father Stanley says his son needs time to recuperate before returning to work as prime minister.        
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usatoday.com
Signs that New York's coronavirus curve is flattening
There are signs that the number of coronavirus cases in New York is leveling off while cities across the US are dealing with challenges of the pandemic. CNN's Nick Watt reports.
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edition.cnn.com
Berlusconi puts lavish superyacht on the market for $11 million
With a list of past and present owners that includes media mogul Rupert Murdoch and controversial former Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi, superyacht "Morning Glory" has a long history of playing host to the rich and famous.
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edition.cnn.com
Bulls tab Nuggets' Karnisovas to lead operations
The Bulls hired Denver Nuggets general manager Arturas Karnisovas to run their basketball operation, a person familiar with the situation said Thursday night.
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foxnews.com
Earthquake: 3.6 quake near Coalinga, Calif.
A magnitude 3.6 earthquake was reported at 1:59 a.m. Friday 21 miles from Coalinga, Calif., according to the U.S. Geological Survey.
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latimes.com
What You Need to Know Today: Coronavirus, Economy, Joe Biden
Coronavirus, Economy, Joe Biden: Here's what you need to know.
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nytimes.com
Official: Saints emails on clergy crisis should stay secret
Hundreds of emails detailing the New Orleans Saints’ efforts to conduct damage control for the area's Roman Catholic archdiocese amid its clergy sexual abuse crisis should remain shielded from the public, a court official recommended Thursday.
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foxnews.com
Climbing the height of Mount Everest from the comfort of your own home
When the going gets tough, the tough get going. Or in the case of John Griffin, the tough get walking. There are 30 steps in his three-story house and for a minimum of six-and-a-half hours every day he's been going up and down them.
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edition.cnn.com
Slugger Mark Reynolds says he's retiring after 13-year run
Slugger Mark Reynolds is retiring after hitting 298 homers over 13 seasons with eight teams.
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foxnews.com
Italian PM May Extend Lockdown to Early May to Keep Coronavirus at Bay
The premier is expected to announce the new extension of the lockdown as early as Friday
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time.com
Unclaimed NY coronavirus bodies may be buried on island, officials say
New York officials say that Hart Island, which for decades has been used as the final resting place for those who died unclaimed, will now also be used for unclaimed coronavirus victims.
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edition.cnn.com
Berlusconi puts lavish superyacht on the market for $11 million
The controversial Italian former prime minister is selling his superyacht "Morning Glory" just over two decades after buying it from media tycoon Rupert Murdoch.
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edition.cnn.com
Does air pollution increase risk from COVID-19? Here's what we know
Harvard researchers recently found that increased exposure to air pollution can lead to more severe outcomes from COVID-19.
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abcnews.go.com
Judge orders home confinement for accused COVID-19 fraudster, citing virus outbreak
The "professional fraudster" allegedly ran a mask scheme while out on bond.
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abcnews.go.com
No ice, big problem: Nothing mimics skating for NHL players
Taking ice away from NHL players has caused some to resort to desperate measures.
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foxnews.com
Italian newspaper's obituaries filled 1 page. Now it's 13.
Italian mayors tell CNN their information indicates the actual death toll from coronavirus in northern Italy may be more than twice the numbers officially reported. CNN's Ben Wedeman looks into the cases of some who died with Covid-19 symptoms, but weren't recorded as coronavirus victims.
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edition.cnn.com
How 1 State Says It's Being Left Out Of Airlifted Supply Chain
The Trump administration says it's directing critical medical supplies "to the right place at the right time." But Gov. Steve Bullock says Montana isn't seeing any of that help.
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npr.org
Walking up the height of Everest ... indoors
People have been turning their stairs into a virtual Everest in the coronavirus lockdown. British "climbers" arranged to virtually conquer the height of the world's tallest mountain.
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edition.cnn.com
The EU has bungled its response to coronavirus and it might never fully recover
The pace at which Covid-19 spread around the globe left governments and international institutions paralyzed. But few experienced the scale of the whiplash currently being felt in Brussels.
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edition.cnn.com
The EU has bungled its response to coronavirus and it might never fully recover
• A global deal to slash oil production is at risk after Mexico objects
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edition.cnn.com
HBCU NFL hopefuls adjust after canceled pro days, combine
De’Montrez Burroughs looked at it as his best shot to accomplish his NFL dream.
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foxnews.com
The best comedy films on Amazon Prime
Everybody loves a good laugh.
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foxnews.com
Legal Fight Heats Up In Texas Over Ban On Abortions Amid Coronavirus
The state banned all elective medical procedures, including abortions, amid the outbreak. Abortion-rights activists say Texas is "exploiting this crisis to ... ban abortion in the U.S."
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npr.org
Coronavirus May Reshape Who Votes And How In The 2020 Election
This week's primary in Wisconsin, which produced long lines of voters waiting in protective gear to cast their ballots, is a dire warning of what could lie ahead.
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npr.org
Joe Biden Won The Primary. Now He's Trying To Win Over Progressive Groups
Now that Bernie Sanders is out of the presidential race and Joe Biden is the presumptive nominee, his campaign is reaching out to progressive groups.
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npr.org
The Oldest String Ever Found May Have Been Made By Neanderthals
Bits of twisted plant fibers found on a stone tool show that Neanderthals used sophisticated yarns and cords. It pushes the date of the earliest-known fiber technology way back in time.
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npr.org
The acting Navy secretary stepped down and a ship’s captain was fired. This question remains about the USS Roosevelt.
3 things to know about Navy port calls.
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washingtonpost.com
D.C.-area forecast: Wind-chilled today, but turning warmer and calmer this weekend
We warm again by Sunday with 70s, as a rainy storm system approaches.
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washingtonpost.com
‘Bachelor’ star Colton Underwood recalls his coronavirus battle: ‘I just thought that I had the flu’
Colton Underwood is grateful for feeling better after fighting coronavirus.
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foxnews.com
Mom creates DIY 'McDonald's' meal for kids amid coronavirus lockdown, complete with 'Happy Meal' packaging
"I started thinking… if we can't go to McDonald's then let's bring it to us."
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foxnews.com
CDC Director: 'Very Aggressive' Contact Tracing Needed For U.S. To Return To Normal
We're in shutdown mode for now, but what comes next? Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is working on a plan to safely reopen the country.
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npr.org
The mysterious connection between the coronavirus and the heart
The novel coronavirus mainly attacks the lungs. But doctors have been increasingly reporting cases of another battlefield raging within the body: the heart.
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foxnews.com
Racial Slurs And Swastikas Fuel Civil Rights Pressure On Zoom
Civil rights groups warn that white nationalists and others are using the video-meeting platform Zoom to target people based on their race, sexuality and religion.
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npr.org
James Carafano: After coronavirus — We still need Europe and they need us. Here's what has to happen
Why should the U.S. be there for Europe? Because for us to be successful, we need Europe to succeed. 
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foxnews.com
6 restaurants serving complete Easter dinners
Easter is looking a little different this year, with mandatory restaurant closures, grocery stores running out of stock and, of course, shelter-in-place orders.
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foxnews.com
Searching for Salvation During a Pandemic
Jimmy Dorrell is the kind of Texas pastor who slips into preaching mode within the first five minutes of conversation, who has to tell two stories before finishing the first. His jokes can skip right past you if you’re not paying attention. On Palm Sunday, the fast-talking 70-year-old stood in the middle of Waco’s Webster Avenue, near Baylor University, wearing a light-blue face mask and a black hoodie, surrounded at six-foot intervals by homeless men and women waving palm fronds. Beside the street’s double yellow lines, a tattooed Jesus washed the feet of one of the men, while volunteers in masks and gloves waited on the sidewalk to put food from a slow cooker onto Styrofoam trays.This is what church looks like during a pandemic: distanced, clouded by the threat of disease, but stubbornly persistent. Dorrell, whose congregation started meeting under a bridge close to I-35 nearly 30 years ago, is sad that his people can’t meet the way they used to on Sundays, that the crews who cook for the homeless are limited to 10 to 15 people at a time. As weird as this time is, though, remaining faithful through a period of fear and illness is exactly what faith is about, he says. “Protestants, we don’t do very well when it comes to dealing with the suffering of Christ,” he told me. Despite the many parts of the Bible that depict intense pain, “we middle-class Christians don’t like those passages, because we don’t want to suffer. We just want the good stuff.”[Read: The ancient math that sets the date of Easter and Passover]Easter weekend is usually a celebratory and social time of year, with pastel outfits and egg hunts and elaborate family brunches. The story it marks is one of joy for Christians: Jesus’s resurrection, offering the fulfillment of a promise and the hope of human salvation. This year, most people will spend the holiday alone, maybe tuning in to an online worship service or communicating with family members over Zoom. Many Christians will carry sorrow and worry, wondering about the health of their elderly neighbors or friends in big cities. But perhaps there’s theological insight to be gleaned from a painful Easter. “Most of us have taken the shallow way—we want to have Jesus as savior and get to heaven. They’re missing the Gospel,” Dorrell said. “It’s entering the pain, getting off of my place of safety and security, moving in among the poor, working among the broken, suffering with people.” In a time when many Americans are mourning their usual life, this may be a season of clarity about what it means to be a person of faith.At the end of March, as the number of COVID-19 cases and deaths was sharply rising, President Donald Trump declared that he wanted “the country opened up” by Easter. When a reporter asked why he had selected that date, he replied, “I just thought it was a beautiful time.” Public-health officials were quick to caution that lifting restrictions so soon would be dangerous, and the president soon backed off his statements. But his comments illustrate how unthinkable this moment is: Most of the country will be shut down through one of the biggest Christian holidays of the year. It’s hard for anyone not to yearn for a different reality.While Dorrell would never wish a pandemic on the world, in a certain sense he seems to relish the normal ways of religious life getting turned upside down. “I grew up in that religious culture where we all had to have new clothes, and we all had to sit in the family row together” on Easter, he said. This is “the superficiality of most of the Christian Church in America: It’s pretty. We have a big building and a gorgeous place with choir robes and stuff.” Dorrell, who refers to himself as “a recovering Baptist,” describes his congregation, the Church Under the Bridge, as nondenominational in every sense of the word: middle-class and poor; black, white, and brown; ex-offenders and the homeless. “I’ve got Lutherans and Episcopalians,” he said, “and I’ve got wild-eyed charismatics.”(Courtesy of Jimmy Dorrell)In recent months, the group has been meeting in Waco’s Silos—the headquarters of the home-decor empire run by Chip and Joanna Gaines—while the I-35 bridge is under construction. The pandemic has derailed its typical 300-person worship services, however. Now each week consists of cooking burgers for the homeless, calling and visiting congregants who live alone or don’t have internet access, and trying to maintain a semblance of normalcy during this unusual Lent. A traditional Palm Sunday celebration for the Church Under the Bridge involves Jesus riding in on a motorcycle—it’s a long story involving an intransigent donkey—and it kept that up this year, with a guy on a hog riding around a block away from its socially distanced gathering.Dorrell delights in this kind of weirdness, which underscores how different his community is from the typical American church. Just as Dorrell is critical of the version of Christianity that hawks salvation at no cost, he’s skeptical of pastors who have refused to cancel church services during the pandemic. “I think a lot of times, it’s egocentric leadership that has this pulpit that says, ‘God will conquer everything. We’ll just get together, and we’ll show them that we’re not going to get sick,’” he said. “They really don’t love their people as much as they act like they do on the pulpit.”[Read: How are parents supposed to deal with joint custody right now?]The overwhelming majority of churches in America have shut down in accordance with government guidelines, with many putting their services online and guiding people on rites, such as taking Communion, at home. Saint Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City, for example, will live-stream its 10 a.m. Easter Sunday Mass. Lakewood Church in Houston will feature remote performances and comments from Mariah Carey, Kanye West, and Tyler Perry. These styles are very different from Dorrell’s, but each is a way of working around the quarantine to keep church going. “How can we break from the single-mindedness of ‘We all can’t get together in one big room’?” he said. “We can figure out ways to follow the guidelines and not be stupid.”Even still, he’s disappointed that his congregation won’t be able to celebrate Easter the way it normally does. In other years, his members all drive out to a camp about 40 minutes from Waco, where they worship outside. They perform baptisms in a river, just as the Bible describes Jesus’s baptism in the River Jordan. They eat together and pray together. It’s this joy in gathering, similarly cherished by Jews at Passover and Muslims during Ramadan, that will be missing for so many Americans this spring.And there will be other losses. Dorrell said his congregants are already starting to feel the effects of the pandemic and the resulting economic shutdown: a job that wasn’t great to begin with disappearing, bills piling up, families unsure of whether they can stay in their home. It’s one thing to read the Bible with a theoretical understanding of tremendous loss. It’s another to do so while living through it. “The theology of suffering is: God, if you’ve got to make me walk through those tough times for me to be closer to you and more faithful in my walk, I’m willing to let you do that,” Dorrell said. This may be an Easter of solitude. But Easter by the river will return again. “We’ll go back out,” Dorrell said, “and have baptism there when this thing cleans out.”
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theatlantic.com
War-Torn Yemen Confirms First Coronavirus Case
Yemen is a uniquely dangerous place for the coronavirus to spread
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time.com
Woods ready to play Masters and realizes it has to wait
Tiger Woods felt strong and fit enough to compete for another green jacket. He could sense the adrenaline starting to flow, along with a strange sensation.
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foxnews.com
Sumo wrestler tests positive for coronavirus
A Japanese sumo wrestler has tested positive for the coronavirus, further threatening postponement of next month’s Summer Grand Sumo Tournament which has already been delayed.
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foxnews.com
"Giant hug": Structures go blue to thank pandemic front line workers
Hundreds of facilities from coast-to-coast took part and organizers hope it was the first of many such tributes
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cbsnews.com
Southampton becomes 1st EPL club to defer player salaries
Southampton became the first Premier League club to announce an agreement with players to defer part of their salaries during the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Explaining Kurzarbeit, or Saving Jobs the German Way
The state-funded German safety net known as Kurzarbeit, which keeps salaries flowing to workers even when their work has dried up, is getting renewed attention as governments around the world grapple with the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic. The European Commission is using the German program as a model for a regional effort to encourage that workers are furloughed, not sacked. Even some in the U.S. are curious.
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washingtonpost.com
Sanders says he wouldn't 'drop dead' if Trump guaranteed health care for all amid coronavirus pandemic
Sen. Bernie Sanders in his first TV interview since ending his campaign said on Thursday he wouldn't "drop dead" if president Trump guaranteed health care to all people amid the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Clippers working out together -- via video -- during shutdown
The Los Angeles Clippers are getting together for workouts while the NBA season is suspended — via video conference calls.
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foxnews.com