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Merrick Garland testifying before Congress amid fierce criticism over controversial memo

Attorney General Merrick Garland is testifying before the House Judiciary Committee amid intense criticism over a memo he released this month.
Read full article on: nypost.com
Chris Cuomo Offered His 'Sources' to Learn if More Women Would Accuse Brother of Harassment
"It's not my job to handle it, okay?" Chris Cuomo said to investigators during a testimony recorded in July 2021.
8 m
newsweek.com
Omar issues statement after speaking with Boebert on anti-Muslim remark
Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn, said she had an "unproductive" call with Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., on Monday after Boebert suggested last week she was a terrorist.
9 m
abcnews.go.com
South Africa's Omicron Work Deserves a Prize
Rewarding the nation for detecting and reporting the Omicron variant would give other countries an incentive to report new variants.
9 m
nytimes.com
Beverly Hills cops probe anti-Semitic fliers as Hanukkah begins
Cops in California are ramping up patrols after anti-Semitic fliers were found in the yards of some Beverly Hills residents just hours before the start of Hanukkah.
nypost.com
Christian McCaffrey is done for the season
Panthers running back Christian McCaffrey will miss the remainder of the season after suffering an ankle injury in Sunday's loss to the Dolphins.
nypost.com
Duke jumps to No. 1 in reshuffled AP Top 25; Purdue to No. 2
Mike Krzyzewski’s final team at Duke has reached a familiar milestone: No. 1 in The Associated Press Top 25 men's college basketball poll.
foxnews.com
Woman gets her unsuspecting grandparents to design her latest tattoo
One woman asked her grandparents for drawings which she ended up getting made into tattoos, and her grandparents had no idea. Emily McNeil, 23, from Ireland revealed that she managed to get a drawing of all four grandparents. Taking to her TikTok account Emily showed how she approached each grandparent for a small drawing, in...
nypost.com
Take It From a Trucker: There's No Trucker Shortage. It's a Pay Shortage | Opinion
The trucking industry has blamed a driver shortage for goods not getting from port to shelf. But the truth is, there is no trucker shortage; there's a pay shortage.
newsweek.com
Pentagon to build up US bases in Guam and Australia to meet China challenge
The Pentagon will focus on building up bases in Guam and Australia to better prepare the US military to counter China, a senior defense official said on Monday.
edition.cnn.com
Buttigieg slammed for urging electric car buying to counter gas prices
Secretary Pete Buttigieg was ripped by critics after he argued that more Americans should purchase electric vehicles so that they "never have to worry about gas prices again."
nypost.com
The Fashion Awards 2021 red carpet: All the celebrity looks
Hosted by style darling Billy Porter and held at London’s Royal Albert Hall, the event is set to honor the best and brightest in British fashion talent.
nypost.com
Porsha Williams’ fiancé Simon Guobadia’s grandfather had 25 wives
"Where I come from, there's nothing abnormal about having different women," the Nigerian-born entrepreneur said during the premiere of "Porsha's Family Matters."
nypost.com
Common and Tiffany Haddish break up after over a year of dating
The "Girls Trip" star and "The Hate U Give" actor began dating in 2020 after going on a Bumble date together but had originally met on the set of "The Kitchen."
nypost.com
Max Scherzer, a Met? Man, that doesn’t feel right.
Sports are cruel, but Washington's future Hall of Famer stomping around the Nationals Park mound wearing the blue-and-orange of the visiting Mets is especially brutal.
washingtonpost.com
Rams' Jalen Ramsey: Team is 'way too good for us to be losing games like this'
Jalen Ramsey knows the Los Angeles Rams should be playing better than they are.
foxnews.com
Dolphins' rookies coming up big during Miami's surge
The current class of Miami Dolphins rookies all tend to hang out together. They often go to dinner together. When the team has a community service-type event that players are asked to attend, they go to those together.
foxnews.com
NBA power rankings: Phoenix Suns, Golden State Warriors 1-2 heading into Tuesday's showdown
The Suns overtake the Warriors for the top spot in the latest Top 5 power rankings, with the Nets, Heat and Raptors also landing some top spots.       
usatoday.com
Pentagon Chief Orders New Inquiry Into U.S. Airstrike That Killed Dozens in Syria
A four-star Army general will review reports that dozens of civilians were killed in a 2019 strike and that top military officers and civilian officials sought to conceal it.
nytimes.com
U.S. Has Donated Just a Third of Promised COVID Shots to U.N.'s Global Vaccine Effort
The Associated Press released a report detailing the struggles of the COVAX program and how vaccine hoarding could most impact poorer nations.
newsweek.com
Stream It Or Skip It: ‘All Light, Everywhere’ on Hulu, a Heady Doc About Objectivity, Perspective and Police Bodycams
This is one of those the-more-we-know-the-less-we-know philosophical-type nonfiction films.
nypost.com
Lee Elder, first black golfer to play in Masters, dead at 87
Lee Elder, who broke down racial barriers as the first Black golfer to play in the Masters, has died at the age of 87.
nypost.com
Opinion: Mets spend big to land Max Scherzer, but it will take more than money to win
Steve Cohen won't shy away from opening his checkbook but has yet to prove he can run a baseball franchise and turn the Mets into contenders.      
usatoday.com
David Gulpilil, Indigenous actor known for 'Crocodile Dundee' and 'Australia' roles, dies
Gulpilil, Australia's most acclaimed Indigenous actor, found his widest audiences through his roles in the films 'Crocodile Dundee' and 'Australia.'
latimes.com
Congress faces looming deadlines to pass president's agenda and approve funding
Congress is back in session and faces looming deadlines to pass President Joe Biden's social spending bill, fund the government and raise the debt ceiling. CBS News congressional correspondent Nikole Killion joins CBSN's Tanya Rivero for more.
cbsnews.com
Another retirement spells even more trouble for House Democrats
On Monday, New York Democratic Rep. Tom Suozzi announced he plans to leave his 3rd District seat behind to run for governor in 2022.
edition.cnn.com
The Supreme Court is about to prove just how political it is
If the conservatives destroy Roe v. Wade without overturning it explicitly, they can no longer claim to be above politics.
washingtonpost.com
Man slashed in face in Times Square subway station, police say
The 25-year-old victim told cops his attacker, who is also homeless, knifed him in the chin around 12:40 p.m. in the NQRW station at West 40th Street.
nypost.com
The Misguided Thinking That Could Lead Biden to Blow His Chance at a Deal With Iran
Nuclear talks between the U.S. and Iran restart this week. The impasse has grown.
slate.com
Steelers living out purgatory promised by salary-cap crunch
The Pittsburgh Steelers took a flyer on Mike Hilton five years ago, and the undersized cornerback repaid their faith by becoming one of the most versatile defensive backs in the NFL, a relentless 5-foot-9 tornado who maximized every last ounce of his talent.
foxnews.com
These ‘Living Robots’ Self-Replicate—and It’s Not Terrifying
Douglas Blackiston and Sam KriegmanYou might have missed the debut of the Xenobots last year when the world was falling apart, but they made quite a splash in the science and tech community. These Pac-Man-shaped synthetic organisms designed by supercomputers can organize into larger groups and be programmed to fulfill specific functions. They’re certainly not robots in the traditional sense, but they’re also too artificial to qualify as typical living organisms. They’re part cell, part machine, and completely one-of-a-kind.As if all of that wasn’t already wild enough, the inventors of the Xenobots have just added one more trick up their creations’ sleeves—the ability to self-replicate. The implications of the new breakthrough, published Monday in the journal PNAS, are enormous. Scientists were already jazzed about the idea of one day using Xenobots for clinical applications and for cleaning up the environment. But the ability to replicate means this technology, if controlled, could be allowed to fulfill those tasks with more autonomy and on a larger scale.“We found Xenobots that walk. We found Xenobots that swim. And now, in this study, we've found Xenobots that kinematically replicate,” Joshua Bongard, a computer scientist and co-author of the new study, said in a press release. “What else is out there?”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast here
thedailybeast.com
Who is Erica May-Scherzer? Welcome Max Scherzer’s wife to New York
With Max Scherzer and his family now officially heading to Flushing, here's what you need to know about his favorite teammate.
nypost.com
Tisha Campbell jokes she used to get her ‘ass beat’ over ‘Soul Train’
The actress recalled karate coming on TV after the music show, which often resulted in her brothers acting like "they were ninjas" and attacking her.
nypost.com
South Florida vs. Boston College prediction, total: Defense will dominate
The South Florida Bulls travel to Massachusetts to face Boston College on Monday looking to hold a sixth straight opponent to 58 points or fewer to start the season.
nypost.com
Americans are busy shopping all year round. Where did that leave Black Friday?
Customers are not lining up for Black Friday as they had before, but they aren’t buying less. | Leon Neal/Getty Images Black Friday wasn’t as big a deal this year, but consumers are still spending at record levels. For millions of Americans, the days (and sometimes hours) after Thanksgiving are a frenetic haze of shopping and spending. There’s Black Friday and Small Business Saturday, a brief reprieve on Sunday, and finally, Cyber Monday. Consumers have been warned for months now that holiday shopping will be a mess. With supply chain issues and inflation in the foreground, in-demand items are hard to get ahold of and prices are noticeably higher. Data from this past weekend, though, suggests that Americans are still showing up on the biggest shopping weekend of the year, although their buying habits have changed from years past. Retailers, too, are no longer entirely banking on the post-Thanksgiving weekend to rake in sales. Many stores, including Macy’s, Target, and Walmart, remained closed on Thanksgiving Day. Target said that distribution and call centers will have some staff on Thanksgiving, but all of its stores remained closed; Walmart decided to close as a “thank you” to its employees. Since the pandemic, most malls have curbed their holiday shopping hours from being open around the clock to simply opening early the day after Thanksgiving. Buffalo News reported that a local fashion outlet used to host an annual midnight party to kick off Black Friday, but opted to open at 8 am instead. Retailers have struggled to staff up this year, but the gradual decline of in-person Black Friday shopping is not a direct result of fewer workers. Seasonal mall jobs have grown scarce in recent years, especially in 2020. Stores have increasingly shifted their focus toward e-commerce and sought to hire more warehouse workers. Black Friday deals were less discounted than usual, something experts had expected, and most major retailers have moved away from doorbuster events — the significant discounts only offered in the early hours of Black Friday. This setup, of course, used to lead to long lines and rowdy crowds. Customers were prone to fighting, arguing, or even stealing items, and stores often had to hire extra security and workers to handle the shopping mobs. Since the pandemic, it seems as though stores are shying away from using the term “doorbuster” in their ads. “If consumers see 25 percent off, they should feel really good about that,” Rob Garf of Salesforce told Bloomberg News, adding that these are “some of the lowest average discount rates that we’ve seen in recent history.” Customers, to that end, are not lining up as they had before. They aren’t buying less, though. Instead, many Americans are shopping earlier than before. I’ve previously reported on this early fall shopping push: By nudging the holiday season earlier and earlier, retailers convinced customers of the benefits of buying early and reducing their annual holiday stress — which, this year in particular, was bound to be compounded by supply chain delays. Stores competed with each other to launch pre-Black Friday deals, which has transformed the event from a single weekend into a monthslong affair. “Online sales on big shopping days like Thanksgiving and Black Friday are decreasing for the first time in history, and it is beginning to smooth out the shape of the overall season,” according to Taylor Schreiner, director of Adobe Digital Insights, in an emailed press release. “What we know as Cyber Week is starting to look more like Cyber Month.” Consumers have already spent  $99.1 billion (about a 13 percent year-over-year increase) since the start of November, according to Adobe data, which “shows not only the effectiveness of early deals in October, but also how much consumers have taken supply chain issues seriously.” Most of this spending was spread out across the month, however. Adobe reported that Black Friday and Thanksgiving did not drive significant sales compared to years past. Instead, consumer spending reportedly decreased on those days. Despite how prices for consumer products are at a 30-year record high, shoppers are not deterred. “We saw a little bit of a decline in what [consumers] said they intended to purchase for gifts, but nothing really substantial,” Conference Board’s Lynn Franco told Vox’s Emily Stewart. Online shopping and the popularity of direct-to-consumer brands have redefined how people approach their end-of-year buying sprees. With online shopping, consumers are less beholden to a traditional shopping calendar. They are able to buy at their convenience and are accustomed to the many deals and discounts offered by retailers year-round. While brick-and-mortar stores initially struggled with this shift to e-commerce, the pandemic made it clear that online shopping is here to stay. Many traditional retailers have poured more resources into e-commerce to compete with online-only businesses, which are raking in sales. Shopify reported that its merchants made $2.9 billion over the course of Black Friday. While consumers might be eager to scour for things in-person again after a year of lockdowns, Black Friday has grown much tamer, likely for the better. Holiday shopping, it seems, is no longer defined by jostling through a packed mall or staying up late to wait in line. Nowadays, Americans are celebrating the season by adding more things to their virtual shopping cart — and hoping it arrives in time for Christmas.
vox.com
NYC Mayor-elect Eric Adams promotes 'stop and frisk' after latest shooting that wounded 2 officers
New York City Mayor-elect Eric Adams reiterated support for “stop and frisk” in a new op-ed piece published Monday reacting to last week’s Thanksgiving Eve shooting that wounded two officers.
foxnews.com
A snowstorm stranded an Oasis tribute band, bar patrons and employees for three days at an inn
Dozens of pubgoers, an Oasis tribute band and others were stranded at an English inn for nearly three days due to a snowstorm.       
usatoday.com
Biden's COVID Vaccine Mandate Blocked in 10 States By Trump-Appointed Judge
Judge Matthew Schelp said blocking the mandate would ensure federal agencies are not overstepping their power, calling it "arbitrary and capricious."
newsweek.com
CBS Evening News, November 24, 2020
Coronavirus surge pushes hospitals to the brink; New York deli giving away food to families in need.
cbsnews.com
CBS Evening News, October 21, 2020
Obama hits campaign trail for Biden in Pennsylvania; 14-year-old girl works on potential cure for coronavirus
cbsnews.com
CBS Evening News, November 23, 2020
Millions stick to Thanksgiving travel plans despite urgent COVID-19 warnings; Grandmother and young man celebrate Thanksgiving together again after 2016 accidental text
cbsnews.com
CBS Evening News, December 9, 2020
U.K. warns against Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for those with severe allergies; 2 West Point cadets awarded Rhodes Scholarships.
cbsnews.com
CBS Evening News, December 1, 2020
CDC advisers vote health workers and nursing homes should get COVID-19 vaccine first; Charity provides blankets to children who are struggling
cbsnews.com
CBS Evening News, October 23, 2020
Trump and Biden battle for swing states in final stretch before Election Day; Porch restaurant caters to chipmunk
cbsnews.com
CBS Evening News, November 19, 2020
CDC urges against holiday travel as U.S. sees 170,000 daily cases; COVID-19 patient thanks medical staff by playing violin
cbsnews.com
CBS Evening News, December 10, 2020
FDA panel recommends approval of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use; Andrea Bocelli and daughter starring in online Christmas concert
cbsnews.com
CBS Evening News, December 21, 2020
Nations ban travel with Britain over more infectious COVID strain; "Season of Giving": Kindness becomes contagious among Minnesota strangers
cbsnews.com
CBS Evening News, October 15, 2020
U.S. battles coronavirus surge as states see record new cases; Teenagers come together to create podcast during pandemic
cbsnews.com
CBS Evening News, November 18, 2020
New York City schools close as U.S. coronavirus deaths surpass 250,000; Public can pick a name for this adorable panda cub at the National Zoo. 
cbsnews.com