Generally

Miért titok Magyarországon az, hogy hány egészségügyi dolgozó fertőződött meg a vírussal?

Miközben Orbán Viktor szerint "ma a legnagyobb feladat éppen az, hogy őket védjük, mert ők lesznek azok, akik a többieknek tudnak majd segíteni".


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Trump is at war with the truth, not Twitter
President Donald Trump might tell you different in his fight with Twitter and over-reaching executive order, says John Avlon, but fact checks are not censorship. There's no moral equivalence between people who buy into a lie -- such as those Trump has spread about voting by mail -- for partisan reasons and people who try to calmly state the facts, Avlon writes.
edition.cnn.com
Jon Jones asks Dana White for release from UFC contract: ‘F–king liar’
Jon Jones asked UFC president Dana White to release him from his contract as their very public battle over the negotiations for the light heavyweight champion’s potential move up to heavyweight escalates. Jones used a long Twitter rant on Friday to respond to White’s comments from earlier in the day during a media scrum prior...
nypost.com
Chicago mayor tells Trump 'F-U' after tweet about Minneapolis looting
Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot blasted President Trump and invoked an expletive Friday in response to his tweet after three days of protests in Minneapolis, Minn., when he called the protesters "THUGS" and tweeted that "when the looting starts, the shooting starts."
foxnews.com
NYC’s DOE has given up on education during coronavirus lockdown
How many of the city’s 1.1 million K-12 students are actually receiving live instruction amid the lockdown? The city Department of Education can’t say. And don’t even think of asking how many are learning. “We don’t have exact data on how many students are receiving it or for how long,” the DOE’s chief academic officer,...
nypost.com
People rent by-the-hour spaces to escape loved ones, homes during lockdown
How much would you pay to get away from your quaranteam for a bit?
nypost.com
George Floyd Protesters Smash Windows at CNN Center in Atlanta
Onlookers watched while others lobbed water bottles, rocks and other projectiles while CNN employees watched inside the building from behind its glass edifice.
newsweek.com
'What is it going to take to get people to listen?': George Floyd protests continue in Minneapolis, nationwide
Protests in the wake of George Floyd's death continued in Minneapolis and nationwide following the arrest of fired police officer Derek Chauvin.        
usatoday.com
Opinion: College football coaches mostly silent on conversation surrounding George Floyd, racism and police brutality
College football coaches, who rely on African-Americans to earn bloated salaries, have taken a pass on the conversation around police brutality.       
usatoday.com
Trump decision to leave WHO endangers global health, medical groups say
Groups representing infectious disease doctors, pediatricians and general physicians all protested President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from the World Health Organization on Friday, saying it will make it harder to fight the coronavirus pandemic.
edition.cnn.com
Customs and Border Protection drone flew over Minneapolis to provide live video to law enforcement
As protests continued and buildings burned, a US Customs and Border Protection drone flew to Minneapolis on Friday to provide live video to law enforcement on the ground, according to a senior CBP spokesperson.
edition.cnn.com
White House placed on lockdown as urban unrest spreads to Atlanta, DC, NYC after George Floyd death
The White House is under lock down Friday night, as protests over George Floyd’s death are spreading nationwide and have reached the U.S. capital.
foxnews.com
Minnesota AG says don't treat National Guard 'the way you might react to' police
Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison cautioned residents on Friday not to treat the National Guard the way they might treat the Minneapolis police department, with whom they "associate unfair conduct."
foxnews.com
Klobuchar's vice presidential hopes take hit amid unrest in Minnesota
Amy Klobuchar's chances of becoming Joe Biden's running mate, already weighed down by her record as a prosecutor in Minnesota's largest county, have taken a significant hit as widespread racial unrest roils her home state, Democrats say.
edition.cnn.com
Righteous rage over George Floyd’s death has taken a turn that helps no one
Now-ex-cop Derek Chauvin has been charged in the killing of George Floyd, as he should be. But rage over the incident has led to even more equally senseless behavior — none of which honors the man whose life was brutally cut short at 46. Heartbreaking video shows the white policeman with his knee on the...
nypost.com
A nation rages over the death of George Floyd. As Trump tweets, Biden leads
Joe Biden's remarks on the death of George Floyd struck a sharp contrast with the rudderless Donald Trump on Friday as nationwide protests continued.
latimes.com
Quavo is looking for a new superstar who’s ‘ready to work’
"I'm looking for a superstar … Someone unique and real."
nypost.com
Watch: Melee Breaks Out in D.C. as George Floyd Protest Turns to Chaos
In the District of Columbia, police scrambled to control a large crowd protesting Floyd’s death.
breitbart.com
WWE 'Friday Night SmackDown' Results: Jeff Hardy is Arrested Ahead of Intercontinental Championship Tournament
What's next for SmackDown Women's Champion, Bayley?
newsweek.com
Thousands rally for Houston native George Floyd
Thousands rallied in Houston for George Floyd, the unarmed black man killed after being restrained with a knee on his neck by a white police officer. Floyd grew up in Houston. (May 29)       
usatoday.com
Anti-coronavirus lockdown protests are the Tea Party reborn
It’s 2009 again, or feels like it. That was when spontaneous, grassroots protests against overweening government sprang up and were widely derided in the media as dangerous and wrongheaded. Protesters then were inveighing against Obamacare; protesters now are striking out against the coronavirus lockdowns. The anti-lockdown agitation shows that, despite the revolution in Republican politics...
nypost.com
US and Europe 'missed early chance to slow coronavirus'
edition.cnn.com
In CA: It's showtime as the biggest U.S. county starts reopening. Is L.A. ready?
Los Angeles County gets the go-ahead to reopen restaurants, barbershops and hair salons, even as it remains the center of the state's coronavirus outbreak. And to help ease the state's budget woes, two lawmakers offer a help in two words: sports betting. Plus, bike riding is having a moment.        
usatoday.com
Alex Rodriguez, Jennifer Lopez taking second shot at buying Mets
J-Rod are re-circling the wagons on their dream of becoming the king and queen of Queens. Multiple sources close to the situation tell The Post that Alex Rodriguez and Jennifer Lopez are now working closely with very senior bankers at JPMorgan Chase on a new bid to buy the Mets after their initial approach failed...
nypost.com
White House on Lockdown Due to George Floyd Protests Outside Gates
Protests over the death of George Floyd in Washington, D.C. on Friday caused Secret Service agents to place the White House under lockdown.
newsweek.com
Dinosaur-killing asteroid created massive magma chamber that lasted millions of years, study shows
The asteroid that slammed into Earth some 66 million years ago and wiped out the dinosaurs also produced a gigantic pool of magma many times larger than the crater at the center of Yellowstone National Park, new research reveals.
foxnews.com
Protesters outraged over George Floyd death shut down 101 Freeway in San Jose
George Floyd death: Protesters shut down 101 Freeway in San Jose
latimes.com
Texas State Senator Calls for Governor to End 'Morally Wrong' Contact Tracing Program
The state's lieutenant governor has also expressed dismay over the quick awarding of a nearly $300 million contract to a little-known north Texas company.
newsweek.com
NYPD Officers Who Made Violent Social Distancing Arrest Set to Face Disciplinary Charges
The incident culminated in an NYPD officer kneeling on a man's back or neck
time.com
'RuPaul's Drag Race All Stars 5' Release Date, Contestants, New Rules: All You Need to Know
"RuPaul's Drag Race" may have just finished its current season, but "All Stars 5" is following in its high-heeled footsteps on VH1 with a new batch of fan-favorite queens.
newsweek.com
Kathy Griffin talks hair cuts, as-seen-on-TV products and Stevie Nicks friendship
Kathy Griffin talks to USA TODAY's Hannah Yasharoff about her quarantine and why she values her friendship with Stevie Nicks more than ever.       
usatoday.com
Ruby Rose joins long line of TV stars’ early exits
The show must go on -- with or without its star.
nypost.com
New York’s nursing home horrors are even worse than you think
Patricia Castillo remembers when the Newfane Rehab and Health Care Center, where her mother lived, notified her that a patient had just been admitted from a nearby Niagara County hospital with COVID-19. Jill Sawyer, whose father lived at the same nursing home, remembers getting notified, too. “It was just a death sentence,” said Sawyer. The...
nypost.com
White House under lockdown as protests over Floyd's death reach nation's capital
The protests over George Floyd's death hit the nation's capital the same day the president tweeted about rioters in Minneapolis.       
usatoday.com
Al Sharpton says destruction of 'black-owned stores' in Minneapolis is 'reckless'
Reverend Al Sharpton condemned the destruction that took place in Minneapolis this week, particularly the black-owned businesses that were vandalized by the carnage following the death of George Floyd. 
foxnews.com
Six Super Bowls? Bill Belichick-led Jets had unlimited potential
Jan. 4, 2000, is a day that forever will live in infamy for diehard Jets fans. As shocking as Bill Belichick’s sudden resignation as the “HC of the NYJ’’ was that day — a missive scrawled on a crumpled piece of paper — it felt like a blessing in disguise considering how Belichick, for all...
nypost.com
Zuckerberg finally explains why Facebook is doing nothing about Trump's posts
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained Friday night why his company would take no action on posts in which President Trump threatened "looting" in Minneapolis would lead to "shooting." That explanation came roughly 16 hours after Twitter did take action and despite Zuckerberg's having previously told Congeress that posts inciting violence would not be tolerated on Facebook.
edition.cnn.com
Trump to resume in-person fundraisers in June
As the country begins to reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic, the president's campaign will soon be ending its suspension of in-person political events.
cbsnews.com
Young Minneapolis mayor in spotlight after police killing, protests
Shaken and angry, Minneapolis' telegenic young mayor stood in front of television cameras over and over this week - first to decry the police killing of George Floyd, and on Friday to impose a curfew as parts of his city burned in ongoing protests.
reuters.com
U.S. cutting ties with World Health Organization
The United States will end its relationship with the World Health Organization over the body's handling of the coronavirus pandemic, U.S. President Donald Trump said on Friday, accusing the U.N. agency of becoming a puppet of China.
reuters.com
Indigenous Chilean Flag, Symbol of Leftist Riots, Appears in Minneapolis
The flag of the Mapuche indigenous people of Chile, whose use became prominent among violent leftist protesters in that country last year, was spotted amid anti-police brutality protests in Minneapolis on Thursday.
breitbart.com
Twitter ignores far worse than Trump — time to stop singling him out
Donald Trump and Twitter are at it again. Like star-crossed enemies, the president and the platform that helped create him have entered into a new fight over how the social-media giant treats conservative users. Thursday night, Twitter flagged a tweet in which Trump, talking about the protests in Minneapolis, said that “when the looting starts...
nypost.com
Brian Stelter, Washington Post face backlash for comparing arrest of CNN crew to George Floyd's death
CNN media correspondent Brian Stelter and the Washington Post are facing intense backlash for attempting to compare the arrest of a CNN crew while covering the Minneapolis riots to the tragic death of George Floyd. 
foxnews.com
Feds flew an unarmed Predator drone over Minneapolis protests to provide “situational awareness”
Customs and Border Protection regularly uses Predator surveillance drones to surveil the border, but on Friday, one took a detour. | Gary Williams/Getty Images The US has a long history of surveilling protesters, but the technology used to do so has grown more powerful. On Friday, a Predator surveillance drone operated by United States Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) diverted from its normal route along the Canadian border in order to circle the skies over Minneapolis. Hours earlier, a third night of protests had escalated as thousands demonstrated following the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a police officer held his knee to Floyd’s neck for several minutes. (The officer has since been fired and charged with third-degree murder.) And while federal authorities say the unarmed drone was there “to provide situational awareness,” the presence of a military-grade aircraft watching protesters in Minnesota added to an already anxious day in America. A couple of hours before reports about the Predator drone over Minneapolis, President Trump tweeted, “When the looting starts, the shooting starts.” Though his use of this charged phrase with racist origins suggests a threat against the protesters, Trump later tried to walk back his statement, and it seems unlikely that his rhetoric had anything to do with the drone flight. Still, to know that a drone was circling the protesters as the president was making these charged remarks is unsettling. According to CBP, however, the Predator drone that flew over Minneapolis was there to help the police. “Earlier today a US Customs and Border Protection, Air and Marine Operations unmanned aircraft system was preparing to provide live video to aid in situational awareness at the request of our federal law enforcement partners in Minneapolis,” a spokesperson for CBP told Recode in an email. “The unmanned aircraft system provides live video feed to ground law enforcement, giving them situational awareness, maximizing public safety, while minimizing the threat to personnel and assets.” The spokesperson said that “arriving in Minneapolis airspace, the requesting agency determined that the aircraft was no longer needed for operational awareness and departed back to Grand Forks.” The CPB spokesperson also added that the agency “routinely conducts operations with other federal, state, and local law enforcement entities to assist law enforcement and humanitarian relief efforts.” The specific law enforcement agency that requested the drone was not named. Here’s what else we know about the flight. The drone CPB 104, which is an unarmed version of a Predator drone, departed from Grand Forks, North Dakota, around 9 am CT, according to data collected from the flight-tracking tool ADS-B Exchange. Flying at around 20,000 feet, it made a loose hexagon-shaped route around Minneapolis and then began to fly away from the city. The drone flight might have gone unnoticed if it hadn’t been spotted by Jason Paladino, an investigative reporter with the Project on Government Oversight, who shared the news in a tweet. Motherboard followed up with a fuller report. NOW: @CBP Predator Drone #CPB104 circling over Minneapolis at 20K feet. Took off from Grand Forks Air Force Base. #Minneapolisprotests #surveillance #planespotting pic.twitter.com/hVYF4GXe1Y— Jason Paladino (@jason_paladino) May 29, 2020 “No government agency should be facilitating the over-policing of the Black community, period. And CBP has no role in what’s happening in Minneapolis at all,” said Neema Singh Guliani, senior legislative counsel at the American Civil Liberties Union, in a statement. “This rogue agency’s use of military technology to surveil protesters inside US borders is deeply disturbing, especially given CBP’s lack of clear and strong policies to protect privacy and constitutional rights.” As Guliani suggests, the drone’s deployment is part of a larger trend in which government agencies, including police, are using increasingly powerful surveillance tools for monitoring activists. The use of the military-grade drone technology also raises concerns about the federal government deploying sophisticated drone technology typically only used in war zones and along the border — an already highly alarming practice — to conduct surveillance operations inside the US. “This is what happens when leaders sign blank check after blank check to militarize police, CBP, etc while letting violence go unchecked,” tweeted Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in response to news of the drone flight. “We need answers. And we need to defund.” Surveillance tech deployed at the border is coming into the US The technology used to monitor the US border has become increasingly high tech, and members of both parties have become interested in the idea of a “smart wall” along the border. While Donald Trump has called for a physical border wall, officials have come to look at, and sometimes use, all sorts of technology, including Lidar, artificial intelligence-powered cameras, facial recognition, and cellphone data monitoring to regulate people near or crossing the border. Human rights advocates and civil liberties advocates have strongly opposed the use of such technologies, pointing out that they can exacerbate racial inequities and privacy violations. But drones have been used at the border for more than a decade. As Recode’s Shirin Ghaffary reported, CBP has been using Predator B aircraft at the border since 2006. The CBP 104 drone has been in use since October of that year, according to a March 2007 report from Government Technology magazine that described how the new unmanned aerial system had been used to find people suspected of crossing the US border without authorization. US Customs and Border Patrol This document from CBP describes the various features of Predator drones, including CBP 104. Meanwhile, CBP documents from 2012 identify the CBP 104 as a Predator drone equipped with radar and satellite communication links, not to mention radio communications with law enforcement. As the Washington Post reported in 2014, flight logs show how CBP has historically allowed its drones to be used by other federal agencies, such as the Coast Guard and the Drug Enforcement Administration. In response to Recode’s request for comment, the CBP spokesperson also said that its air and marine operations aircraft is used throughout the country, not just at the border, and that it regularly works with federal, state, and local law enforcement. The spokesperson claimed that the drone has been used in humanitarian relief efforts as well as to help agencies like FEMA. The US has a long history of surveilling protesters The fact that the government uses a range of technology to surveil protesters, including black activists, is by no means new. Martin Luther King and Malcolm X were both surveilled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). But the technology that police departments and federal authorities now have access to is much more powerful than what was around in the 1960s. Some of these tools, like Predator drones, would not be out of place on foreign espionage missions, and now they’re increasingly deployed to monitor activists and protesters inside US borders. Examples from recent years are especially alarming. Following the 2014 protests in Ferguson, Missouri, the Department of Homeland Security kept tabs on the Black Lives Matter movement through organizers’ social media accounts, according to an Intercept investigation. Just a year later, the American Civil Liberties Union released a report detailing how companies, including Facebook and Twitter, provided social media data for a surveillance product that was marketed to law enforcement agencies as a way to track activists and protesters. The New York Police Department, specifically, has deployed a variety of tools over the years to surveil activists, including those involved in the Black Lives Matter Movement and Occupy Wall Street. Aerial surveillance is also not a new tactic being used by cops, either. During the 2015 Baltimore protests following the death of Freddie Gray, the FBI used a spy plane to record the protests as well as smaller gatherings, according to the ACLU. Since then, the Baltimore police have fought — and won — the ability to regularly use surveillance planes that are armed with cameras, despite the objections of activists and civil liberties advocates. The Minneapolis Police Department is not different in its affinity toward surveillance technology. BuzzFeed reviewed the many types of surveillance the department likely has at its disposal. They include Clearview AI’s facial recognition software, automatic license plate readers, audio-based gunshot detection tools, and other data aggregation tools. Still, as Friday’s Predator drone flight suggests, it can be incredibly difficult to understand just how much technology law enforcement actually has access to at any point in time. Many of these tools are often hidden from public view, leading journalists and advocates to turn to require public records requests and lawsuits to learn more about how they’re used. While CBP says the drone has been directed away from Minneapolis, it is possible to track where the drone is now; its flight path is documented on this website. As of early Friday evening, the drone appeared to still be in flight, traveling a hexagon-shaped route close to the Canadian border. Support Vox’s explanatory journalism Every day at Vox, we aim to answer your most important questions and provide you, and our audience around the world, with information that has the power to save lives. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. Vox’s work is reaching more people than ever, but our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources — particularly during a pandemic and an economic downturn. Your financial contribution will not constitute a donation, but it will enable our staff to continue to offer free articles, videos, and podcasts at the quality and volume that this moment requires. Please consider making a contribution to Vox today.
vox.com
Beauty Brand Coty Sees Shares Tumble After ‘Forbes’ Report Questions Kylie Jenner’s Wealth
'Forbes' previously labeled Kylie Jenner a billionaire. Now, the magazine claims, she isn't
1 h
time.com
Justice Department releases more FBI memos from Mueller investigation
The Justice Department released Friday another 218 pages of notes from major witness interviews conducted during former special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation, adding to the record what's known about the interviews with Trump campaign and administration officials.
1 h
edition.cnn.com
Justice Department Says Maine's 2-Week Quarantine Rule Discriminates Against Tourists
Many but not all out-of-state visitors were told to self-quarantine because of the coronavirus. The Justice Department says that is unconstitutional. Some other states have the same rule.
1 h
npr.org
Donald Trump Contacts Members of George Floyd's Family
"I spoke to members of the family, terrific people, and will be reporting as time goes by," Trump said, calling the incident a "horrible, horrible, situation."
1 h
breitbart.com
California County Enters New Reopening Phase Despite Reporting More Than 14,000 New Cases in Last 14 Days
Hair salons and barbershops in California's Los Angeles County can immediately reopen and in-person dining at restaurants can resume, despite more than 14,000 new cases of COVID-19 being reported in the county over the last two weeks.
1 h
newsweek.com