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Supreme Court Delays Oral Arguments, Hinting Some May Be Decided Next Term
But other cases may have to be decided sooner, among them those involving subpoenas for Donald Trump's financial records, and cases involving the Electoral College.
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npr.org
Home of the Week: In Pasadena, a home for mom
The 1920s Pasadena home was hand-built by local builder Fritz Ruppel for his mother, Gertrude. Asking price: $1.495 million.
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latimes.com
Texas’s election law could disenfranchise millions during a pandemic
Voters wait in line to cast their ballots on March 3, 2020, in San Antonio, Texas. | Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images Texas’s absentee ballot law is utterly unfit for a state holding an election during a public health crisis. Texas has one of the most restrictive absentee ballot laws in the country. Even under ordinary circumstances, this means that many Texans will have a tougher time casting a ballot than voters in most other states. During a pandemic that could prevent millions of voters from venturing to the polls, however, Texas’s law could wind up disfranchising much of the state. The law only allows Texas voters to obtain an absentee ballot under a very limited list of circumstances. Voters may obtain an absentee ballot if they plan to be absent from their home county on Election Day, if they have a “sickness or physical condition” that prevents them from voting in person, if they are over the age of 65, or if they are jailed. It is far from clear that a healthy person who remains at home to avoid contracting coronavirus may obtain an absentee ballot. Texas Democratic Party v. Hughs, a lawsuit filed by the state Democratic Party, seeks to fix this law — or, at least, to interpret the law in a way that will ensure that healthy people can still vote. But the lawsuit potentially faces an uphill battle in a state court system dominated by conservative judges. All nine members of the state Supreme Court are Republicans, and Republican Attorney General Ken Paxton filed a motion seeking to intervene in the lawsuit — a sign that he intends to resist efforts to prevent this law from disenfranchising voters. The stakes in this case are astoundingly high. As Texas Democrats note in their complaint, voters are “now heavily discouraged” from even leaving their homes “by various government orders and are being discouraged in an enormous public education campaign.” Even if the pandemic were to end by July 14, when the state plans to hold several runoff elections, “certain populations will feel the need and/or be required to continue social distancing.” Millions of voters could potentially be forced to choose between losing their right to vote and risking contracting a deadly disease. Texas’s absentee ballot law is unusually strict There is no federal law mandating that states provide minimal access to absentee voting, though Sens. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) and Ron Wyden (D-OR) proposed legislation that would expand access to mail-in ballots during the coronavirus pandemic. As a result, states are largely free to decide how easy it should be to obtain an absentee ballot. Five states — Colorado, Oregon, Washington, Utah, and Hawaii — automatically mail ballots to voters in the weeks before the election. Most of the remaining states have a “no excuse” absentee ballot regime, meaning that a voter has to affirmatively request a mailed-in ballot, but any voter many do so. Texas is among the minority of states that require voters to give an excuse before they can cast a ballot. A little more than a dozen states require voters to justify their request for a ballot, according to the advocacy group Vote at Home. In Texas, the list of valid justifications is fairly short, and these exceptions are drafted fairly narrowly. At least some states that require voters to justify absentee ballot requests have medical exemptions that are broad enough to accommodate voters who are staying at home during a pandemic. West Virginia’s law, for example, allows “any voter who is confined to a specific location and prevented from voting in person” to obtain an absentee ballot if their confinement is due to “disability, illness, injury, or other medical reason.” In any event, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) handed down an executive order this week that, in his words, “requires all Texans to stay at home” except for when doing certain essential activities. His order mirrors similar requests by state and local officials throughout the country. And even without such an order, many Texans will understandably be unwilling to risk their health to go to the polls. Whether these Texans can get an absentee ballot could end up depending on how the courts interpret the phrase “physical condition.” The Texas Democratic Party lawsuit turns on the meaning of two words The Texas Democratic Party case turns on the meaning of two words that appear in a section of Texas law permitting people with disabilities to obtain absentee ballots: “a qualified voter is eligible for early voting by mail if the voter has a sickness or physical condition that prevents the voter from appearing at the polling place on election day without a likelihood of needing personal assistance or of injuring the voter’s health.” On the one hand, the law explicitly labels this provision as an accommodation for people who have a “disability.” The words “physical condition” also appear in conjunction with the word “sickness,” which implies that those words should be interpreted to refer to some sort of disabling condition that only a subset of Texans possess. Often, when a law uses a general term in the context of other, more specific terms, courts will assume that the general term should be given a narrow reading — one similar to the specific terms. On the other hand, the literal meaning of the words “physical condition” is much more expansive. As a team of civil rights lawyers argue in a motion suggesting that the state law should be read expansively, “everyone has a physical condition” that prevents them from appearing at their polling place during a pandemic — the physical condition of being susceptible to coronavirus. Either one of these interpretations of the Texas law is plausible, and a judge could reach either conclusion using methods of statutory interpretation that are widely accepted as legitimate. One judge might argue that the words “physical condition” should be read expansively, because that is the ordinary meaning of those words. Another might argue that they must be read in context with words like “sickness.” The problem facing the Texas Democratic Party is that, when a fair judge acting in good faith could legitimately read a law in two different ways, it is very easy for a partisan judge to choose the interpretation they prefer. And every one of the nine justices on the Texas Supreme Court is a Republican. Because older voters tend to prefer the GOP, the Texas Republican Party has a clear interest in preserving a legal regime that allows voters over 65 to obtain an absentee ballot but makes it much harder for younger voters to do so. That said, if Democrats lose this particular lawsuit, that does not necessarily mean that millions of Texans will lose their right to vote. It’s possible a federal court could rescue Texas voters in a separate lawsuit — one that most likely has not even been filed yet — holding that the unique burden the coronavirus pandemic imposes on voters renders Texas’s strict absentee ballot law unconstitutional. In Florida Democratic Party v. Scott (2016), for example, a federal court extended the state’s voter registration deadline after a hurricane hit the state just five days before that deadline. A similar logic could be applied to the coronavirus pandemic. A federal judge in Wisconsin recently made several tweaks to that state’s election procedures in order to prevent voters from being disenfranchised by coronavirus. But such an order could ultimately be appealed to the US Supreme Court. And the Court’s current majority isn’t especially friendly to voting rights. America’s election law simply wasn’t written with a pandemic in mind The overarching problem underlying cases like Texas Democratic Party is that America’s election law simply was not drafted in anticipation of a public health crisis that would force most of the country to remain in their homes. Until very recently, absentee ballots were not an especially partisan issue. The red state of Utah, after all, is extraordinarily friendly to voting by mail. Meanwhile, blue states like Massachusetts and Connecticut have absentee ballot laws that are arguably more restrictive than Texas’s. (Although the courts in those blue states are much more likely to be accommodating to voters facing disenfranchisement.) Now that a crisis has arisen, however, many partisans are likely to seek advantage where they can. Texas Republicans, for example, have a lot to gain from an election regime that makes it easy for voters over 65 to vote, while simultaneously disenfranchising huge swaths of young voters. In 2016, Donald Trump won older voters by 7 points, even though he lost the overall popular vote. Texas didn’t necessarily write its absentee ballot law with the goal of benefiting one party. But now that a pandemic is upon us, that law has profound partisan implications if it is not corrected. Similarly, there are a number of election law doctrines that were simply not designed for an age when judges are having to decide, often on very short notice, whether to enjoin state voting laws while an election is looming. Potentially the most troubling is a rule the Supreme Court announced in Purcell v. Gonzalez (2006). Purcell warned that judges should be reluctant to hand down decisions altering the rules a state uses to administer an election as that election draws close. “Court orders affecting elections,” the Court claimed, “can themselves result in voter confusion and consequent incentive to remain away from the polls. As an election draws closer, that risk will increase.” But the number of people infected by coronavirus grows exponentially. And voting rights lawyers won’t necessarily be able to see the problems created by this pandemic coming until they are already happening. Judges will face novel questions, and will need to make quick decisions about laws that historically have not been especially controversial. If they can’t adapt the law quickly, millions of Americans could be disenfranchised by election laws that simply were not designed with a pandemic in mind.
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vox.com
Andrew Cuomo supporters quietly angling him for 2020 vice president gig
Could Joe Biden benefit from a little Cuomentum? People close to Gov. Andrew Cuomo certainly think so and are engaging in a furious behind-the-scenes campaign to tout his leadership during the COVID-19 outbreak and appeal to Team Biden, insiders say. “Biden bundlers have told me that they are feeling pressure from Cuomo’s orbit to, at...
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nypost.com
China sends medical supplies to countries struggling with coronavirus
China has been carving out a new image on the world stage by sending supplies to countries struggling with the coronavirus. However, the country where the pandemic originated is also facing backlash from critics who claim they are under-reporting their number of cases. Ramy Inocencio reports on China’s handling of the global pandemic from Tokyo.
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cbsnews.com
Passenger gets entire plane to herself
Sheryl Prado got a special shout-out from flight attendants as the only person riding on a Washington to Boston flight.
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edition.cnn.com
'If I could only Lysol my husband, too': Sex in the age of coronavirus
The coronavirus pandemic has impacted every aspect of our lives. Any wonder then that it would impact our sex lives?       
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usatoday.com
'Corona' chorus unites voice around the world
More than 100 people from around the world virtually sing together in the Corona Community Chorus. It seeks to ease anxiety over the coronavirus outbreak through music. (April 4)       
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usatoday.com
You can finally learn how to play the piano with this class bundle
Have you ever wanted to learn how to play the piano? Well, now you finally can. To get started, check out The 2020 Complete Learn Piano For All Master Class Bundle, which includes 6 courses made up of 421 lessons aimed at teaching you how to play the piano and master music composition. With 27-hours...
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nypost.com
Learn how to code with this developer certification course
If you’ve always wanted to learn the ins and outs of becoming a software developer, now is the perfect time to explore it. And the 2020 Learn to Code Full Stack Certification Developer Certification Bundle will assist you in educating yourself on MySQL Server, HTML, C#, PHP, Python and all the other essential programming skills....
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nypost.com
"Lean On Me" singer Bill Withers dies at 81
Soul legend Bill Withers, known for songs like “Lean On Me” and “Ain’t No Sunshine,” has died at the age of 81. The three-time Grammy Award winner’s family said he died of heart complications. The singer’s hit “Lean on Me” has been a source of comfort for many, with choirs and medical workers recording their own renditions of the song amid the coronavirus pandemic.
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cbsnews.com
When coronavirus hit her city, this mayor didn't wait for Florida's governor to sound the alarm
Tampa Mayor Jane Castor is used to dealing with disasters like hurricanes that cripple her Florida city. But none have ever come close to the magnitude of destruction she is bracing for with the novel coronavirus pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
Grocery delivery start-up Boxed sees soaring demand amid pandemic
One start up company has risen to meet the mounting demand for grocery deliveries as the coronavirus pandemic forces millions of Americans to stay inside their homes. Boxed, described as Costco for millennials, offers many items that seemingly vanished overnight from store shelves through their app and website. The company has also become known for the generous benefits it provides full-time employees, from paid sick leave to financial support for college and weddings. Don Dahler takes a look at one of Boxed’s warehouses to see how they are handling the spike in business.
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cbsnews.com
Michelin-Starred Restaurant Shuttered by COVID-19 Reopens as 'Commissary Kitchen' to Cook Meals For New York's Neediest
The Eleven Madison Park restaurant is sending up to 2,000 meals a day to help frontline medical staff and vulnerable people.
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newsweek.com
More than ever, we need nature. It makes us and our children happier
A connection to nature may make children happier and more eco-conscious, a recent study shows. And we all need that now.
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edition.cnn.com
IRS's antiquated technology could delay delivery of $1,200 coronavirus stimulus checks, experts warn
Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says the IRS will start delivering $1,200 stimulus checks in two weeks. But outdated technology could cause delays.       
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usatoday.com
Florida mayor says Covid-19 is worse than hurricanes
CNN's Dana Bash interviews Tampa, Florida Mayor Jane Castor about how to be a leader during the Covid-19 pandemic and using social media to reach residents. Watch the latest videos on Covid-19
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edition.cnn.com
At least 22,000 Americans still stranded abroad over coronavirus crisis
Millions of Americans shelter at home amid the coronavirus pandemic, while others remain on foreign shores still hoping to return to the U.S. Cancelled flights, sudden travel restrictions and strict quarantines have all blocked many people from getting back. This week, the State Department warned that time may be running out. Kris Van Cleave speaks to some of the Americans looking for a way to return.
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cbsnews.com
Coronavirus updates: COVID-19 death toll in U.S. passes 7,100
The CDC is recommending Americans wear cloth face coverings in public to help slow the spread of the virus.
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cbsnews.com
This day in sports: Ex-Dodger Hideo Nomo throws a no-hitter in his debut with Red Sox
On April 4, 2001, former Dodger Hideo Nomo pitches a no-hitter in his Red Sox debut and joins select company in achieving the feat in both leagues.
1m
latimes.com
In rural Northern California, dread and denial greet coronavirus' slower creep
Coronavirus cases are slowly creeping into vast, rural Northern California. Only a handful of counties had no cases.
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latimes.com
'Long on fear, short of gear': Inside California hospitals as they wait for the surge
With emergency rooms and ICUs filling rapidly, those inside California's hospitals are tense, tired and determined to endure.
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latimes.com
Column: When it comes to coronavirus, she's L.A.'s version of Dr. Fauci
Dr. Barbara Ferrer announces coronavirus stats, warns us to keep our distance and dispenses compassion to a worried city
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latimes.com
Opinion: I just hugged my daughter for the first time in 18 days. Is this our new normal?
We know we have adapted to our alarming new coronavirus norms when even a hug from a daughter feels foreign.
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latimes.com
When social distancing is impossible. Living with 17 roommates during the coronavirus
How can someone socially distance when they're living with dozens of other people?
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latimes.com
Mitch McConnell: Master of the Senate 2.0
The majority leader's focus has been on not just the Senate but the judiciary and the nation's constitutional order.
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washingtonpost.com
John Murray: Hope during coronavirus crisis — in times of adversity, creativity and kindness can flourish
As a student of literature and history, I have been encouraged by the number of creative works, cures and calls to kindness that have surfaced during periods of trial.
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foxnews.com
You don't even need an oven to make the simplest homemade bread
This simple bread recipe for mantou, Chinese buns, steams the dough on the stovetop to make it extra tender and moist. The dough can be baked as well.
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latimes.com
A Funeral Director's Lessons For The Living
Because we can not hug or stand close, the coronavirus has changed how we mourn those we've lost. Funeral director Norman J. Williams of Unity Funeral Parlors offers his thoughts about the living.
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npr.org
Home has always been my happy place. Still, sheltering in place has changed things
TV writer and producer Valerie C. Woods muses on benefits of being at home — and how you can be OK with it during coronavirus era.
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latimes.com
This opera will be sung by more than 250 global performers for coronavirus relief
To raise money for musicians who have lost jobs in the pandemic, the April 7 stream of "Full Pink Moon: Opera Povera in Quarantine" includes "The Lunar Opera" by Pauline Oliveros.
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latimes.com
This 'Homeland' director isolates at home in her 'room of stories'
As Showtime's 'Homeland' races toward its finale, prolific director Lesli Linka Glatter isn't done telling her tales.
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latimes.com
Help! My Date Ghosted Me After He Found My Social Media Posts About My Dead Husband.
It’s ridiculous to feel threatened by someone who died—right?
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slate.com
Foot-dragging GOP governors are imperiling the whole country
In some states, magical pandemic thinking.
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washingtonpost.com
“We are on our own”: How the coronavirus pandemic is hurting child care workers
Miren Algorri, a licensed day-care provider in Chula Vista, California, normally takes care of up to 14 kids in her home. Now she has none. | Danielle Penn/CCPU Many providers could go out of business — permanently. Miren Algorri has been a licensed day care provider for 22 years — her 23rd anniversary is coming up this month. Ordinarily, Algorri and her assistant take care of up to 14 kids in her home in Chula Vista, California. The youngest right now is 16 months old. “We still rock him to sleep,” Algorri said. The oldest is 8, and she has been caring for him for six years. But on Tuesday, she told Vox, “I am sad to announce that today we have zero attendance.” Algorri was still technically open on Tuesday, and said she hopes to stay that way in case any families need her. It is her “duty and responsibility to these families so they can continue to make a living,” she told Vox. But as the coronavirus pandemic worsens, she’s not sure how long that will last. “We are running very low on cleaning, disinfectant, and sanitizing supplies,” she said. “When I don’t have those supplies, then I will have to stop providing services.” Danielle Penn/CCPU “We’re overworked, we’re underpaid, and we don’t even exist,” says Algorri, who has been a child care provider for 22 years. Algorri still has income — all of the families her day care serves receive subsidies from the state of California, and those have not been cut off. But she sees other day care providers who rely on private payment losing all of their income. Meanwhile, six of the parents whose kids she cares for are restaurant servers who were laid off after California ordered bars and restaurants closed to help slow the spread of the coronavirus. Algorri has been trying to help her fellow providers and the families she serves by sharing resources to get through the crisis, whether it’s the number of a food or diaper bank or the news that Taco Bell is offering free tacos. “I know it’s not healthy,” she said, “but on those empty bellies, whatever they can get.” Her story is mirrored across the nation, as child care providers face layoffs and loss of income as well as concerns about how or whether to stay open as coronavirus spreads around the country. Though states have closed K-12 schools in recent weeks, many have allowed — or even encouraged — day cares to remain open. That leaves some day care providers to decide for themselves whether to shut down and lose their livelihoods, or stay open and risk exposing themselves and their families to Covid-19. In other cases, the decision is made for them as families pull their kids out and stop paying — according to one report, child care providers around the country lost more than 70 percent of attendance in a single week as the pandemic worsened. The crisis is hitting child care providers especially hard because they already earn disproportionately low incomes — an average of just $10.82 an hour — and many lack health insurance and paid sick leave. Day cares are typically small businesses without a lot of cash on hand, and a long-term closure could force them out of business. According to a survey by the National Women’s Law Center, 30 percent of child care providers would have to shut down permanently if forced to close for two weeks or more. But for some families, especially those of health care workers and other essential employees, their services are more important than ever. Child care workers say the pandemic is highlighting something they’ve been trying to impress upon the public for years: that although their services keep the economy going, their low pay and lack of labor protections leave them incredibly vulnerable in a crisis. As Algorri put it, “We’re overworked, we’re underpaid, and we don’t even exist.” Child care workers are at risk both medically and financially All 50 states have closed K-12 schools in response to the pandemic, with an increasing number now saying the closures will extend through the end of the academic year. But America’s early child care system is less centralized than its schools, ranging from larger day care centers to smaller in-home day cares that may have one (or zero) employees in addition to the owner. While some are supported, at least in part, by public subsidies, many rely entirely on fees paid by parents. And many states that have closed schools haven’t extended the same order to day cares: In New York and California, for example, some day care centers remained open as of this week, although many, like Algorri’s, had little or no attendance. For many providers, the decision about whether to keep coming to work during this time is a difficult one. “I know providers who are 65 years old, so they’re part of the vulnerable population,” said Algorri, a member of the union Child Care Providers United. She’s also heard from providers who have been forced to close because they live with older family members and don’t want to risk exposing them to the virus. Others say they want to stay open to help parents who need to work right now. Marisol Hoffmann, who operates two day care centers in New York’s Dutchess County, says parents who use her centers include a single mom who is a state trooper and a dad who is a police officer. “They need to work,” she says. Courtesy of Marisol Hoffmann Marisol Hoffmann, who runs two day care centers in New York, normally cares for 25 children. Now that number is only four to six. But of the roughly 25 children who usually come to her centers, only about four to six are currently attending. For the parents of the others, she’s handling payment on a case-by-case basis. “Although some parents are paying, we’ve got some parents who can’t, who have been laid off,” she said. That means the business has taken a financial hit. And one of her biggest concerns is how to keep paying her eight employees. Elsewhere in the country, day cares are laying off staff. Leslie Spina, owner of Kinder Academy in Philadelphia, laid off her 100 employees on March 20, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. She said she wanted to make the call sooner rather than later so that her employees could begin collecting unemployment. “My biggest fear is that I can’t go back to work soon,” one of her employees, Yashira Morant, told the Inquirer. “If I have no income coming in, what happens to us?” Other day care employees say they’ve stayed home from work due to fears of coronavirus, but have done so without pay. Jessica, a Connecticut child care worker, told Time magazine that she was told to report to work last month or risk not being paid. But because of the hands-on nature of child care work, she didn’t feel comfortable going in. For example, “When I’m feeding the child, I’m touching all the things in their lunchboxes,” she said. While laid-off workers can get extra unemployment benefits from the recently passed stimulus bill, people who aren’t going to work because of concerns about coronavirus are not eligible. And child care workers often have little safety net to fall back on. Many are low-income: Between 2014 and 2016, 53 percent were on at least one public assistance program, according to a 2018 report. They are also more likely than other workers to lack health insurance and paid sick leave. Many — 75 percent in Los Angeles County, for example — are immigrants, and many speak English as a second language, which could make it more difficult to apply for unemployment, especially if the stimulus package creates new or complex methods for doing so. Operating a daycare is an “entrepreneur opportunity for people who are first coming to this country,” Kim Kruckel, executive director of the Child Care Law Center, told Vox. “Traditional relief packages are just going to be really hard for people to access,” she said. As Algorri put it, “I know we’re all in this together, but at the same time, as providers, we are on our own.” Workers say the pandemic highlights the need for basic protections Even as many parents keep their children out of day care during this time, child care remains incredibly necessary around the country, especially for health care workers and others on the front lines of fighting the pandemic. Many areas, including New York City, have set up emergency child care centers for the children of essential workers. But even in the midst of great need, providers say they are still often going unrecognized by American society. But “the nurses, and the techs, and the doctors could not go to work” if it wasn’t for child care providers who are “open and willing to work through this pandemic,” Algorri said. Danielle Penn/CCPU Nurses and doctors couldn’t go to work right now if it wasn’t for child care providers, said Miren Algorri, pictured here in December 2019. And experts say that without support, child care centers will close permanently, leading to joblessness and a long-term shortage of this crucial service. “Child care will not be there for us when we’re all ready to go back to work if we don’t include them specifically, in a targeted, effective way, in the relief packages,” Kruckel said. The most recent stimulus legislation included $3.5 billion in funding for child care, but Kruckel says the need could be closer to $50 billion to support providers who aren’t getting parent fees right now, as well as to provide cleaning supplies, mental health support, and other resources to providers who are staying open to care for children of essential workers. Many say the crisis only highlights the needs of a workforce that has long been largely ignored. In addition to some acknowledgment of their work, Algorri says child care workers around the country need better working conditions, including a living wage and health insurance, not just now but also for the future. “We want to be healthy,” she said. “If we’re healthy, we can serve you, we can serve the community.”
1m
vox.com
He spent 24 years in prison. He came out to a new kind of confinement.
Derrick Redd says his time behind bars prepared him for the pandemic.
1m
washingtonpost.com
In a bleak year, the natural world stirs hope
Once we emerge from the pandemic, we must learn to take better care of our planet.
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washingtonpost.com
Spain to extend coronavirus state of emergency until April 26: El Pais
Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez will extend the state of emergency in the country with Europe's highest number of infections from the coronavirus by another two weeks until April 26, El Pais newspaper reported on Saturday.
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reuters.com
Keir Starmer elected leader of Britain's Labour Party amid coronavirus crisis
Keir Starmer was elected leader of Britain's main opposition Labour Party on Saturday by a decisive margin, after a contest thrown into turmoil by the coronavirus outbreak.
1m
foxnews.com
Federal small business loan site reveals users' personal data
President Trump touted the federal government’s Paycheck Protection Program on Friday, claiming the initiative designed to help small businesses has already processes over $3 billion worth of loans. Jim Axelrod reports on a disturbing technical glitch that some business owners have reported when attempting to apply for the program.
1m
cbsnews.com
Unemployed workers battle busy signals and long waits to file for benefits
Eight hours and 48 minutes.
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edition.cnn.com
France Knife Attack Leaves Multiple People Dead, At Least 4 Wounded
The attack happened in the town of Romans-sur-Isère on Saturday morning, Mayor Marie-Hélène Thoraval confirmed.
1m
newsweek.com
Spain behind U.S. in total number of coronavirus cases
Spain now has the second-highest number of confirmed coronavirus cases behind the U.S., while China held a nationwide day of mourning as it gradually brings the disease under control. The United Nations said it will make a decision later in the month as to whether it will postpone September’s General Assembly meeting in New York. Roxana Saberi breaks down the virus’ global impact from the U.K., where the death toll has jumped to over 3,300.
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cbsnews.com
Expert reacts to mounting jobless claims amid coronavirus pandemic
Over 9 million Americans applied for unemployment in the last two weeks, a grim record that reflects the coronavirus pandemic’s toll on the U.S. economy. CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger joins “CBS This Morning: Saturday” to break down the virus’ impact on the economy and what the current numbers could mean for American workers’ futures.
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cbsnews.com
Why should you wear a mask in public? Dr. Agus explains
Just this week, the CDC unveiled a new recommendation urging the American public to wear masks when outside their homes, and the FDA approved a new blood test to detect the coronavirus. As the coronavirus pandemic continues to grow, so does the knowledge of the experts attempting to fight the disease. Dr. David Agus joins “CBS This Morning: Saturday” to discuss the latest coronavirus news reported this week.
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cbsnews.com
NJ nurse fights coronavirus with food donations: 'Everybody is smiling underneath their masks'
Atlantic Health nurse practitioner Chuck Warwick saw the outpouring of food donations to hospitals overrun by the coronavirus pandemic and wanted to help.  
7 m
foxnews.com
'The Walking Dead' Season 10 Episode 15 Spoilers: What Happens in the Finale?
"The Walking Dead" Season 10 episode 15 spoilers have arrived. Find out what Beta plans to do with his massive horde in the finale.
8 m
newsweek.com
Trump says he will not wear mask despite CDC recommendation
President Trump unveiled a new CDC recommendation on Friday that strongly urges Americans to wear some sort of cloth or fabric face mask when in public. President Trump said he will not be following that guideline, although he came down on manufacturer 3M for not manufacturing enough protective masks for the U.S. Nikole Killion reports on the White House pandemic response from Washington, D.C.
cbsnews.com