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Netflix buys streaming rights for ‘Seinfeld’

“Seinfeld” is coming to Netflix. Streaming giant Netflix has inked a deal for the rights to the hit sitcom starring Jerry Seinfeld, paying “far more” than half a billion dollars, according to a report Monday. While terms of the transaction were not disclosed, Netflix is said to have paid more than the $500 million NBCUniversal...
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WNBA Players’ New Contract Is a Good Step—but It’s Not Enough
These victories might taste sweeter had the league not been dragged here by a crisis.
8 m
slate.com
How Trump's impeachment trial may look similar to Clinton's, and how it will not
As President Trump's impeachment trial gets underway, both sides look to how the Senate handled the proceeding during President Clinton's trial.
latimes.com
New Lady Gaga song ‘Stupid Love’ leaks, her fanbase rejoices
“Stupid Love” has leaked to the masses, and Lady Gaga fans can’t stop talking about it.
nypost.com
Police in Lesotho want to question Prime Minister Thabane in ex-wife's killing
Police in Lesotho want to question Prime Minister Thomas Thabane as part of an investigation into the killing of Thabane's former wife.
edition.cnn.com
How to Hack Your Way to a Better Flight in Basic Economy
Is it possible to get the cheapest fare and enjoy your flight in basic economy? We talked to some experts to find out.
newsweek.com
New subway cars let riders — and smells, and creeps — move freely
Get ready to smell other straphangers from several subway cars away. The MTA on Tuesday released a sneak peek of its upcoming “open gangway” trains, in which all the cars are linked via one long passage. Images of the under-construction cars show a seamless corridor with wall handles between the cars — instead of the...
nypost.com
Blake Shelton, Gwen Stefani drop 'Nobody But You' music video days before Grammys duet
Blake Shelton and Gwen Stefani have dropped their "Nobody But You" music video. On Sunday, they have their first performance together at the Grammys.       
usatoday.com
Cowboys' Stephen Jones says Dak Prescott's contract is team's 'No. 1 priority'
Now that the Cowboys' season is complete and Mike McCarthy has been hired as coach, Dak Prescott's deal is Stephen Jones' top concern.       
usatoday.com
NYPD lieutenant disciplined for alleged on-the-job bathroom sex romp
An NYPD lieutenant was stripped of her gun and badge for allegedly having sex on the job inside a department bathroom in Downtown Manhattan on Saturday night, law enforcement sources said. Lt. Brandi Sanchez, 39, also appeared drunk and was in a state of undress when she was caught inside a bathroom stall with an...
nypost.com
U.S. Senate rejects Democratic bid for documents in Trump impeachment trial
The Republican-controlled U.S. Senate rejected a Democratic bid on Tuesday to force the White House to produce documents and evidence in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial, an early sign the trial could proceed along lines favorable to Trump.
reuters.com
Buttigieg's 'please clap' moment? Dem urges Iowa audience to get excited after awkward silence
Former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg had a moment on the campaign trail that's sparking comparisons to the 2016 election after an awkward silence during an event in Iowa.
foxnews.com
Cuomo budget would steer more money to needy schools, charters
Gov. Andrew Cuomo proposed a modest 3 percent increase in state education spending Tuesday that would steer more dollars to poorer public districts and to charter schools. That translates into New York City getting a $321 million bump in aid under the plan. Generally, Cuomo proposed an overhaul of the state school funding formula to...
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‘Star Trek: Picard’: Which ‘Next Generation’ characters are back, which are new
"Star Trek: Picard" is a partial family reunion for the cast and characters of "Star Trek: The Next Generation."
nypost.com
Sanders responds to Clinton claim no one likes him: 'On a good day, my wife likes me'
Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., pushed back Tuesday on former Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton's claim that "nobody" likes him.
foxnews.com
Brooklyn man registers beer as emotional support animal
It’s brews you can use. Brooklyn resident Floyd Hayes, 47, registered a pint of beer as an emotional support animal with the USA Service Dog Registration in December, according to Ale Street News. Brooklyn Paper reports that Hayes aims to use the certification to carry his beverage of choice — like, say, a seasonal IPA...
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Search on for driver who hit Virginia sheriff’s office cars
A Virginia sheriff’s office is looking for a driver who they say rammed two of its vehicles during an attempted traffic stop last weekend
washingtonpost.com
Convicted child molester beaten to death with cane in California prison
An inmate at a California prison beat a convicted child molester to death with a walking cane, authorities said. Jonathan Watson, 41, allegedly battered the perv, David Bobb, 48, and another prisoner Thursday around 2:30 p.m. at the California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison in Corcoran. Both Bobb and the other prisoner suffered...
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Per Se sommelier: I quit when ‘things became uncomfortable’
The former beverage manager from Per Se opens a ham-bar that extols the virtues of American pork.
nypost.com
¿Lumpia Shanghai? Piense en rollitos de primavera con un toque picante
Esta receta filipina para preparar Lumpia Shangai es del chef Charles Olalia de Ma'am Sir en Silver Lake y combina un clásico relleno de cerdo, camarones y verduras con una salsa picante a base de vinagre de coco.
latimes.com
Houston Texans defensive star J.J. Watt to host 'Saturday Night Live' on Feb. 1
Houston Texans defensive end J.J. Watt will host "Saturday Night Live" on Feb. 1, the night before the Super Bowl.      
usatoday.com
The Best Pregnancy Pillows of 2020
We tested 8 of the most popular pregnancy pillows to find the one that's most comfortable for your growing bump.       
usatoday.com
McConnell wants trial wrapped in 10 days, sources say
edition.cnn.com
What happened in the impeachment trial so far
edition.cnn.com
The Angle: Minority Rule Has Ensnared American Politics
And there’s no easy way out.
slate.com
Streets closed in downtown D.C. for report of suspicious package
At around 5:20 p.m., police said Pennsylvania Avenue was closed between 7th and 11th streets, and 9th and 10th streets were closed at D Street.
washingtonpost.com
UN Security Council must recognize Iran as the real Mideast aggressor, Kelly Craft says
Kelly Craft, the United States ambassador to the United Nations, called out the Security Council in a speech Tuesday, saying the world body continued to criticize Israel but failed to work toward keeping Iran in check.
foxnews.com
Supreme Court saves Republicans from themselves
The health-care system will not be destroyed before the election.
washingtonpost.com
Migrants clash with Mexican troops at the Guatemala border
Tensions flared on Mexico's southern border Monday as troops tried to intercept a large group of migrants who'd crossed into the country.
edition.cnn.com
Marc Benioff picks a new fight with Silicon Valley — over trees
Marc Benioff is a regular at Davos. | ERIC PIERMONT/AFP via Getty Images One of tech’s most divisive CEOs thinks his peers need to help plant 1 trillion trees. Marc Benioff is betting on the power of trees. Benioff, the garrulous billionaire founder of Salesforce, loves to needle other tech leaders for being insufficiently civic-minded. On Tuesday, he took his routine to Davos, Switzerland, and the World Economic Forum. That’s where he announced that he and his wife would provide the financial backing for a new platform, 1t.org, that will support an ongoing global initiative to plant, restore, or conserve 1 trillion trees over the next decade. The Trillion Trees Initiative is a novel strategy to limit the impact of greenhouse gas emissions, and it’s one that some activists are already criticizing as insufficient for the scale of the problem that is climate change, a threat that Davos is meant to address this year. In fact, some worry that the Benioffs’ support of reforestation — which, somewhat surprisingly, Donald Trump also endorsed in a speech at Davos — offers an easy out for a business community that is eager to reap the PR value of climate action without actually modifying their own emissions. “Planting trees is good, of course, but it is nowhere near enough of what is needed, and it cannot replace real mitigation and rewilding nature,” said environmental activist Greta Thunberg from Davos following the announcement. A Benioff representative declined to answer how much exactly the Benioffs would be spending on the new measure. But Benioff — with a net worth of about $7 billion — is reprising his chief role as an instigator in Silicon Valley, where his antics, like rebuking Facebook as akin to “cigarettes” and saying that tech billionaires “hoard” their money, have made him a divisive figure in both C-suites and in billionaire philanthropy. “If you are attending this conference, you need to commit to planting 1 trillion trees,” Benioff said, which was just one of a half-dozen exhortations at the end of a mini-speech he gave on a panel on Tuesday. “This is a time of action, not words. We are at that point of urgency with our planet.” Benioff’s funding for 1t.org comes from his own pockets, but his company, Salesforce, will be responsible for about 100 million of those trillion trees. Benioff has recently been displaying his zeal for planting the world out of the climate crisis, quizzing interviewers, for instance, about whether they know how many trees exist today versus in the past (Answer: 3 million and 6 million, respectively.) A tree-planting initiative of this scale is unprecedented and hard to accomplish, but some experts think it could be one of the most intriguing ways to help save the planet. As my colleague Umair Irfan explained last year, referencing an article in the journal Science: Letting saplings regrow on land where forests have been cleared would increase global forested area by one-third and remove 205 billion metric tons of carbon from the atmosphere. That’s two-thirds of the roughly 300 billion metric tons of carbon humans have put up there since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. “The point is that [reforestation is] so much more vastly powerful than anyone ever expected,” said Thomas Crowther, a professor of environmental systems science at ETH Zurich and a co-author of the paper. “By far, it’s the top climate change solution in terms of carbon storage potential.” Some climate scientists who were not involved with the study disagree with its calculations and are warning against its “silver bullet” message. Still, supporting natural systems that can soak up carbon is widely accepted as a major component of any climate change mitigation strategy — in addition to deploying clean energy, switching to electric vehicles, and curbing consumption overall. Some like Thunberg still see this as a distraction from the real, more important work of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by moving away from reliance on fossil fuels. In fact, even as Trump was telling the elite at Davos that the US would sign onto the trillion-trees program, he was also encouraging Davos not to listen to the “prophets of doom and their predictions of the apocalypse” when it comes to climate change. The initiative does put Benioff into some rare agreement with the Trump administration, which Benioff has cultivated despite being one of the Democratic Party’s biggest fundraisers in recent years. The business titan and the “jovial” president were reportedly seen engaged in “animated conversations” at the ski chalet town in Switzerland.
vox.com
Toyota recalls 2.9 million cars to fix airbag defect
Toyota issued a massive recall on Tuesday to fix an airbag sensor defect that affects 2.9 million U.S. vehicles covering nearly a decade of assembly.       
usatoday.com
Magic Johnson, Wynton Marsalis, Adam Silver among luminaries who memorialize David Stern
The Jazz at Lincoln Center Quartet played as attendees took their seats at Radio City Music Hall to remember former NBA commissioner who died Jan. 1.       
usatoday.com
After months of protest, Lebanon forms new government
After months of escalating protests, Lebanon has named a new prime minister and cabinet.
edition.cnn.com
Harvey Weinstein's legal team claims it has 'dozens of loving emails' from accusers
Harvey Weinstein's lawyers want to use intimate emails from his accusers to try to convince jurors in his rape trial that any contact was consensual, the defense said Tuesday as an appeals court rejected an 11th-hour request to move the trial out of town.
foxnews.com
Sanders on Clinton comment: On a good day, my wife likes me
Democratic Presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders responds to a comment from Hillary Clinton in which she said, "nobody likes him, nobody wants to work with him."
edition.cnn.com
GOP Rep. Susan Collins says she's 'likely' to support witnesses
CNN's Dana Bash reports.
edition.cnn.com
Ousted Female Chief Files Discrimination Complaint Against The Grammys
Deborah Dugan was supposed to right the Grammy ship after her predecessor told women to "step up" in the music business. On Tuesday, the short-tenured executive filed a complaint with the EEOC.
npr.org
Subway robberies jumped in 2019, for second straight year
Robberies surged on New York’s subway system in 2019 — for the second straight year, police said Tuesday. Despite overall crime on the rails trending down, robberies on the subways increased from 486 in 2018 to 546 last year — a 12.3 percent jump, Chief Vincent Coogan of the NYPD’s 2nd Transit District told MTA...
nypost.com
Senate splits down party lines to table Schumer's amendment on WH documents
The Lead panel discusses.
edition.cnn.com
Ozzy Osbourne padece Parkinson (VIDEO)
El rockero Ozzy Osbourne anunció que padece la enfermedad de Parkinson, un trastorno del sistema nervioso que afecta el movimiento.
latimes.com
Papyrus closing stores nationwide in the next four to six weeks
Schurman Retail Group is closing all 254 Papyrus stores, Dominique Schurman, CEO of Papyrus' parent company Schurman Retail Group, confirmed.      
usatoday.com
Senate rejects amendment to impeachment trial seeking witnesses, documents
The Senate voted along party lines Tuesday to table an amendment proposed by Democrats seeking to subpoena additional documents and witnesses in President Trump’s impeachment trial — killing the effort at least for now. The amendment, introduced by Sen. Chuck Schumer, would have compelled the Senate to subpoena former national security adviser John Bolton and...
nypost.com
The Hunger Games is getting a prequel that centers on the villain: a young President Snow
Donald Sutherland portrayed President Snow in the original Hunger Games movies. | Grant Lamos IV/FilmMagic Will The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes be a descent into the mind of a fascist tyrant? Grab your bows, Hunger Games fans, because we’re going back to Panem — to learn more about how its deeply dystopian social system all began, with a new prequel, The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes, centered on the series villain. We learned in 2019 that author Suzanne Collins had penned a prequel to her eerily realistic YA series about a girl forced to join a macabre battle royale in a bleak future version of the US. The Hunger Games and its two sequels attracted legions of fans when the series launched in 2008. The three books led to a blockbuster film franchise and inspired real-life protesters throughout the 2010s who referenced the series while fighting their own fights against dystopian states around the world. Entertainment Weekly has debuted a preview of the new book, which is scheduled for a May 19 release date. The plot seems to be centered around the antagonist of the original series, Coriolanus Snow. In The Hunger Games, Snow is the authoritarian “president” of Panem who works to quash the social uprising led by the book’s heroine, Katniss Everdeen. The books hint that Snow (played by Donald Sutherland in the films and depicted in EW as a young man who’s rocking the pretty bad boy/Evil Aryan look, à la Draco Malfoy) became Panem’s ruler in classic Shakespearean fashion — by murdering his opponents until there was no one strong enough left to oppose him. If that backstory sounds like something you’d like to hear all about, you’re in luck. Meet your new hero, Hunger Games fans. Read @EW’s exclusive first excerpt. https://t.co/qVY7LoOOjH— The Hunger Games (@TheHungerGames) January 21, 2020 In the excerpt on EW’s website, we see Draco — er, future President Snow — musing about his prospects as a mentor for the first Hunger Games, which took place several decades before the events of the first novel. The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes takes us back to when Snow is still a senior in college, and he’s horrified when, out of all the gifted students who’ve been chosen to mentor the contestants, he’s paired with a girl from District 12. As a refresher to anyone who needs it: Panem is a starkly divided future version of the US, with many of its districts reduced to abject poverty following an apocalyptic event (strongly hinted to be the result of climate change) that centered power in a wealthy city now known as the Capitol. District 12 is the poorest of all the nation’s remaining districts. Ostensibly a form of cultural entertainment, the “hunger games” essentially gamify the ongoing poverty throughout the nation by selecting “tributes” from each district to participate in a brutal, nationally televised battle to the death. The contestant who wins has to kill or outlast all of the other contestants, whereupon they’ll be rewarded with a lifetime of wealth and survivor’s guilt. Eventually, the heroine of The Hunger Games, Katniss, becomes a contestant, one who manages to destroy the system and become an unwitting leader for a massive societal rebellion. The prequel, however, seems to focus on the games while they’re still in their infancy, honing in on the moment Snow himself gets involved in shaping their course. Collins’s decision to make the story about Snow has already proven hugely unpopular with fans, who see the move as an unnecessarily humanizing look at a fascist dictator not unlike President Donald Trump. As you might have noticed, “Nazis are people too” hasn’t been the most popular post-Trump take, and this new prequel is no exception. i couldn’t be more disappointed by the next HUNGER GAMES being about fucking President Snow and trying to paint him as a “misunderstood hero” are you kidding me. the very last thing i’m interested in is humanizing a fascist dictator because he has a ~tragic past~. — Aiden Thomas (50k) (@aidenschmaiden) January 21, 2020 Of all the characters in The Hunger Games, Suzanne Collins decided to humanize President Snow. Like we need another story about some tortured white boy. I hate it here. pic.twitter.com/iAxnMrBlJz— merline (@merlinereads) January 21, 2020 This reaction is understandable, given widespread cultural backlash against films like Joker for their focus on celebrating and deepening audience empathy with a white male character who’s previously been established as the villain of a franchise. Then again, this is the Hunger Games, which has always been cannily prescient about its connections to real-life authoritarianism and dystopian society. The chances are strong that Collins’s decision to pair Snow with the Hunger Games contestant from the poorest district — the prequel excerpt doesn’t tell us who that is, only that she’s a “District 12 girl” — is a quick way to explore the power dynamics behind the Capitol’s drastically unequal social structure. We can already get a glimpse of that in the brief excerpt: It’s clear the younger Snow moves within a system of secret power-brokers with social influence. It’s possible the story won’t be about humanizing him as much as it will be giving the reader a look inside how this kind of system dehumanizes its victims. Granted, the book will be from Snow’s point of view, and I can understand why inside the mind of the leader of a fascist society might not be the most comfortable, or comforting, place to be. But The Hunger Games has never been about comfort — and that part definitely hasn’t changed.
vox.com
Trump impeachment trial live updates: Senate rejects Democrats' call for witnesses
The Senate impeachment trial of President Trump resumed Tuesday with a fight over the fairness of proposed rules to govern the proceeding.
abcnews.go.com
Gov. Gavin Newsom opposes UC tuition increase as 'unwarranted' and 'bad for students'
Gov. Gavin Newsom opposes any tuition hike for University of California students this fall, calling it 'unwarranted' and 'bad for students.'
latimes.com
'The Turning' brings horror tale to big screen
Mackenzie Davis, Finn Wolfhard, and Brooklynn Prince star in a horror flick based on the Henry James novella.
edition.cnn.com
Netflix adds 8.8 million new subscribers, 'The Witcher' tracks as most-viewed new series
Netflix added 8.76 million new subscribers, more than expected. Growth came despite the arrival of new streaming competitors Disney+ and Apple TV+.      
usatoday.com
British-Australian woman jailed in Tehran says she rejected Iran's offer to become a spy
A British-Australian academic jailed in Iran said she refused an offer from Tehran to become a spy in exchange for her release, according to media reports.
foxnews.com
Police swarm Antonio Brown’s mansion amid battery, burglary accusations
Antonio Brown may be in trouble again. Police on Tuesday surrounded Brown’s mansion in Hollywood, Fla., to investigate the former NFL star for possible battery and burglary, multiple outlets reported Tuesday. The latest police presence involving the 31-year-old Brown stems from an alleged altercation with a driver from a moving company, TMZ reported, and the...
nypost.com