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Oregon State Representative Called to Resign for Letting Far-Right Group Enter State Capitol

Republican Representative Mike Nearman hasn't apologized for letting far-right protesters, some of whom were armed, enter the state capitol building during a special session.
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Read full article on: newsweek.com
Firefighter's sign language Pledge was homage to her late father
Georgia fire captain Andrea Hall delivered the Pledge of Allegiance on Inauguration Day — in spoken word and in American Sign Language.
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cbsnews.com
83 Percent of Americans Support Wearing Masks, But Only Half Wear Them: Poll
Only 51 percent of those polled said they wear a facial covering in public, according to USC's Dornsife Center for Economic and Social Research.
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newsweek.com
Reports: Detroit Lions and quarterback Matt Stafford agree to part ways
According to multiple reports, the Detroit Lions and quarterback Matt Stafford are parting ways. The Lions are set for a rebuild under a new regime.        
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usatoday.com
Dr. John LaPook on the state of COVID-19 vaccine distribution
Despite more than 40 million doses of coronavirus vaccines made available in the U.S., only 20 million have been administered thus far. CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook answers some common questions regarding the state of vaccine distribution.
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cbsnews.com
This might be Aaron Rodgers’ last chance
No, not desperation. More like: urgency. That is how this next challenge awaiting Aaron Rodgers must be viewed. This might not be the last opportunity to get to his second Super Bowl. But it could be. Rodgers is 37 years old, and his 16th year in the NFL — his 13th as the Packers’ starting...
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nypost.com
Donald Trump Gives First Public Remarks Since Leaving Office as Impeachment Trial Delayed
"We'll do something, but not just yet," the former president said about his future plans.
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newsweek.com
Working from home while kids learn remote drives mom near ‘breakdown’: lawsuit
Juggling remote learning and working from home nearly gave one Queens mom a “breakdown.” When the coronavirus swept through the city, Nimyah Jones-LaCroix and her computer engineer husband chose to have their two children attend class online, to minimize any danger to her elderly parents, with whom the family shared a home. “This will only...
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nypost.com
Brazil President Jair Bolsonaro could face Hague court over Amazon rainforest destruction
Brazil’s indigenous leaders and human rights groups are calling on an international court to prosecute the country’s president for crimes against humanity for removing environmental safeguards in the Amazon rainforest. William Bourdon, a Paris-based attorney, submitted a request for a preliminary investigation of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro to the International Criminal Court in The Hague...
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nypost.com
Heat fans to attend games thanks to COVID-19-detecting dogs
If we needed another reason to love Man’s Best Friend, here’s another: Dogs are the reason the Heat will be allowing fans to attend games. The team will be having crowds of up to 1,500 season-ticket holders at home games starting on Jan. 28 and COVID-19-detecting dogs will be the reason why. The canines will...
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nypost.com
Biden administration vows to improve coronavirus response
Through additional financial relief plans, faster vaccine distributions, and clear public messaging, the Biden administration is pledging to tackle the coronavirus pandemic. Skyler Henry has more on the Biden administration's efforts.
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cbsnews.com
"CBS Weekend News" headlines for Saturday, January 23, 2021
Here's a look at the top stories making headlines on the "CBS Weekend News with Adriana Diaz."
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cbsnews.com
U.S. faces vaccine crisis over supply problems
Frustrations are mounting nationwide as vaccination sites close or cancel appointments as the vaccine supply runs dry. Danya Bacchus has more.
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cbsnews.com
Vaccine doses are scarce across America as U.K. strain emerges
Vaccination sites have canceled appointments as frustration mounts over supply problems.
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cbsnews.com
Trump made 30,573 false or misleading claims as president. Nearly half came in his final year.
The Washington Post Fact Checker’s database of Trump claims, originally launched as a project to track his first 100 days, offers a window into his obsessions.
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washingtonpost.com
Democrats urge President Joe Biden to commute sentences of death row inmates
A group of Democratic members of Congress is urging President Joe Biden to commute the sentences of dozens of federal death row inmates. The 35 legislators, led by members of “The Squad,” which includes Bronx/Queens Rep. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez, called on Biden Friday to take “swift, decisive action” to commute the death sentences of 49...
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nypost.com
33 missing children found in anti-human trafficking operation in Southern California
Thirty-three missing children were recovered this month in an anti-human trafficking operation led by FBI's Los Angeles field office, the bureau said in a statement Friday.
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edition.cnn.com
How Ghislaine Maxwell was nabbed by the FBI via her cellphone
Ghislaine Maxwell spotted the agents, heard them shout “FBI” and ran to another room inside her secluded New Hampshire compound, slamming the door behind her. On a desk was a cellphone wrapped in tinfoil, a clue that prosecutors claim shows just how far the accused sex trafficker went to avoid being traced. But the cellphone...
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nypost.com
A term of untruths
Scroll a visual timeline of all the false or misleading claims Donald Trump made during his time in office.
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washingtonpost.com
Biden’s DOJ seeks to extend his trans-rights order beyond sports
President Joe Biden’s lack of a confirmed attorney general isn’t stopping his Department of Justice from tearing up the previous administration’s directives — or pushing the limits of his executive orders. A lawyer named to temporarily head the department’s civil rights division issued a memo Friday undoing a last-minute Trump Administration attempt to restrict the...
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nypost.com
Doug Jensen, man who charged cop during Capitol riot, ordered held, sent to DC for trial
A judge halted the release of right-wing conspiracy theorist Douglas Jensen, electing to send him to Washington, D.C., to face charges related to the Capitol riot. Jensen, 41, of Des Moines, Iowa, appeared in several videos of the invasion wearing a QAnon T-shirt and chasing hero cop Eugene Goodman through hallways and up a flight...
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nypost.com
Photos | Larry King, legendary talk show host
Larry King, one of the most famous talk show hosts and opinion shapers in the world, died Saturday in Los Angeles after being hospitalized with COVID-19.
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latimes.com
New Jersey man charged with assaulting cop during Capitol riot is a Secret Service agent's brother
A New Jersey gym owner and former ultimate fighter who got attention for defying the COVID lockdown was arrested for his role in the Capitol riot on Friday after several people identified him to the FBI, according to court papers.
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foxnews.com
DOE diversity chief in charge of ‘implicit bias’ training leaves after 25 years
The Department of Education staffer who led “implicit bias” training for school faculty has left the job. Paul Forbes, executive director of Educational Equity, Anti-Bias and Diversity, tweeted last week that he was leaving the DOE after 25 years serving city schools. Chancellor Richard Carranza, who promoted Forbes to the post in November 2018, did not...
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nypost.com
Posh Alexander stays hot to lift St. John’s over Utah Valley
A number of factors can be connected to St. John’s recent uptick in play. The defense has improved. The schedule has eased up. At the top of the list, though, is the play of point guard Posh Alexander. The freshman from Brooklyn continued his recent surge on Saturday, leading the Johnnies past Utah Valley, 96-78,...
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nypost.com
Trump jumps into a divisive battle over the Republican Party — with a threat to start a ‘MAGA Party’
The former president, in his first political activity since leaving office, endorses an ally for Arizona party chair who backed his false claims of election fraud.
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washingtonpost.com
Send us your questions for President Biden's Covid-19 team
What questions do you have for President Biden's Covid-19 team? Ask them here and they may be answered in a CNN Town Hall this Wednesday at 8pm ET.
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edition.cnn.com
Nancy Grace mourns friend Larry King, ‘there’s never been anybody like him’
Fox Nation host Nancy Grace mourned the passing of her mentor and friend Larry King in an interview with Fox News Saturday, remembering him by saying, "there’s never been anybody like him and there will never be anybody like him from now on."
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foxnews.com
Trevor Bauer’s dark social media episode should disqualify him from Mets
As he fell on his sword this past week, performing a public mea culpa for the Jared Porter disaster, Sandy Alderson offered this: “Suffice it to say, had we known about it in advance before Jared was hired, it would have been a disqualification.” “It” was of course the disgusting revelation, reported by ESPN, that...
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nypost.com
Sen. Rand Paul says Chief Justice Roberts won’t take Trump impeach trial
As Democrats plunge ahead with a post-term impeachment trial of President Donald Trump, a key question remains: Will Chief Justice Roberts take the case? Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky says he won’t — making the exercise “a fake, partisan impeachment,” the lawmaker told Fox News’ Sean Hannity Friday. Paul claimed Roberts has “privately said...
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nypost.com
'Nonstarter': Joe Biden's $1.9 Trillion Stimulus Plan Opposed by Senate Republicans
"There's some things in there that aren't going to happen," said Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri.
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newsweek.com
Pitbull fatally struck by subway train after running away from owner
A wayward pitbull allegedly ran from its owner — and was struck and killed by a southbound Number 6 subway train at the Central Park North-110th Street station Saturday morning, officials said. Power was turned off on the track for three hours while cops brought the injured dog to safety. The drama unfolded at 10...
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nypost.com
Stormy weather pattern setting up across the U.S.
A stormy jet stream is slamming into the West next week, setting up storm patterns across the U.S. CBS News meteorologist and climate specialist Jeff Berardelli joins "CBS This Morning: Saturday" to discuss what to expect next week.
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cbsnews.com
Thousands of Russians were arrested in protests supporting Putin critic Alexei Navalny
Police work to apprehend protesters during a Moscow demonstration in support of jailed Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny. | Oleg Nikishin/Getty Images Navalny was recently arrested upon his arrival in Russia from Germany. Massive protests took place across Russia on Saturday in support of Alexei Navalny, a Russian opposition leader and vocal critic of President Vladimir Putin. Navalny was arrested last Sunday after returning to Moscow from Germany, where he was treated for a poisoning allegedly linked to the Kremlin five months earlier. According to Reuters, about 40,000 people took part in the Moscow demonstrations, although police called that number incorrect, estimating the crowd at 4,000. Several thousands more participated in cities across the country, from Yakutsk in the northeast to St. Petersburg in the west, and about 3,000 demonstrators have been arrested in all. People are now spreading around the city center, being pushed off Pushkinskaya, the main site of the rally. pic.twitter.com/I3dgZ4f4wV— Ivan Nechepurenko (@INechepurenko) January 23, 2021 Protesters were met by a strong police presence — and government officials had urged citizens to stay home, arguing that the rallies did not have proper authorization. “Respected citizens, the current event is illegal,” police reportedly announced during the demonstration in Moscow. “We are doing everything to ensure your safety.” Few protesters heeded these warnings, and the number of those arrested in protests in Moscow, St. Petersburg, and about 70 other towns and cities swelled to at least 3,000, according to reports from the human rights monitoring group OVD-Info. That includes about 1,100 people in Moscow alone, as of 11:30 pm Moscow time on Saturday. Navalny’s wife, Yulia Navalnaya, was among those arrested at this weekend’s protests. Heads of his party’s regional offices have also been detained in advance of the protests, as well as members of Navalny’s team, including his press secretary, Kira Yarmysh. Navalny’s arrest — and the detentions of his team — have galvanized a tremendous mass movement. The size of the Moscow protests is reminiscent of the summer of 2019, when at least 60,000 people demonstrated in that city to demand fair elections. (Navalny was arrested in advance of that movement, too.) While many of the protesters were Navalny’s supporters, others said they came out more because they want to see a sweeping end to Putin’s authoritarian rule. “I was never a big supporter of Navalny, and yet I understand perfectly well that this is a very serious situation,” Vitaliy Blazhevich — who, at 57, was one of the demonstration’s more senior participants — told the New York Times. “Unless we keep coming out [to protest], the problem in this country will never go away,” Natalya Krainova, a former teacher, told the Guardian. “And that problem is Putin.” Regardless of their motivation, in many places, protesters were met with swift and aggressive police force. Video out of Moscow, for example, shows police dressed in riot gear beating protesters with batons. Dozens of protesters in that city were arrested outside of the Matrosskaya Tishina detention center, where Navalny is being held. At least 1,090 have been arrested at protests around Russia against @navalny's jailing pic.twitter.com/sRp2BtOl3v— Alec Luhn (@ASLuhn) January 23, 2021 As night fell, police unleashed smoke grenades on downtown Moscow, and protesters responded with snowballs, according to reporter Alec Luhn. "Fascists!" Snowballs vs batons in Moscow pic.twitter.com/RNp4AOg3eM— Alec Luhn (@ASLuhn) January 23, 2021 The demonstrations were also striking for their enormous geographic diversity. On Twitter, the Atlantic reporter Anne Applebaum collected scenes of large protests — composed largely of young people, many waving Russian flags — in the cities of Irkutsk, Novosirbirsk, Vladivostok, Tomsk, and Yakutsk. Irkutsk has come out for Navalny. One of many such scenes across Russia today https://t.co/3OHzHJnDqf— Anne Applebaum (@anneapplebaum) January 23, 2021 Yakutsk is in the east of Siberia, while Vladivostok abuts the Sea of Japan. In a Siberian winter, these protesters were also braving brutally cold temperatures, with temperatures approaching -60°F in some places. As clashes continues in Moscow, more ludicrous footage of the small pro-Navalny protest in Yakutsk earlier, where it was -48 pic.twitter.com/Ne4TvYl51g— Shaun Walker (@shaunwalker7) January 23, 2021 That the protests were so widespread, and that they involved Russians of all ages, is indicative of Navalny’s appeal and ability to mobilize supporters — especially young people — according to the Washington Post. In recent years, Putin has moved to crack down more aggressively on dissent, with new laws making it more difficult to organize protests. Russians who demonstrated Saturday face jail as well as other consequences. Artyom, a college student who protested, told the Guardian he and his classmates had been threatened with serious academic consequences, which he said many believed meant expulsion, if they participated. Putin seems likely to remain in power, despite the public opposition seen Saturday. A recent change to the Russian constitution would allow Putin to hold power for an additional 15 years. Navalny is the leader of Russia’s opposition movement In August, Navalny fell ill at a Siberian airport before boarding a flight to Moscow. His team, concerned he wasn’t receiving proper care in Russia, partnered with a humanitarian group that transported him to Germany for treatment. There, doctors traced the cause of his illness, which was found to be novichok, a deadly nerve agent that the Russian government has been known to use. As Vox’s Alex Ward has written, Navalny always pledged he would return to Russia, even as he continued his criticism of Putin from Germany — including directly accusing the Kremlin of trying to kill him in YouTube videos viewed over 40 million times. When Navalny arrived at the Berlin airport on January 17 for his return trip home, he said that he was not afraid, even though Russian officials had threatened to arrest him upon his return. Hundreds of supporters violated anti-protest laws to greet his plane at Moscow’s Vnukovo airport. Instead, the plane was diverted to the Sheremetyevo airport, whereupon Navalny was arrested at passport control. The official charge he faces is failure to appear at a parole hearing, tied to a 2014 embezzlement case. Navalny has claimed those charges are politically motivated. Nevertheless, if the charges stick, he could face years in prison. His newest arrest follows years of attempts by the Kremlin to stifle his opposition, and to dissuade Navalny from coming home, including by placing him on its federal wanted list, and claiming he avoided inspectors while abroad, as Ward has written: This kind of thing isn’t new for Navalny. As mentioned, he’s been arrested before — and even poisoned before — so it’s possible he’ll eventually be released and go back to leading Russia’s anti-Putin movement. Sometimes the Kremlin just wants to remind Navalny who’s in charge, and slow down his work, in a manner that attempts to maintain the illusion of Russian democracy. But it’s also possible Putin has had it, especially as he seeks to stay in power for life. Removing his top political nemesis would surely make such a ploy easier, though it may invite condemnation from other nations, including the United States newly led by President-elect Joe Biden. Navalny has received support from US officials. Hours after Navalny’s detainment, incoming National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan tweeted a statement condemning the Putin critic’s detainment. “Mr. Navalny should be immediately released, and the perpetrators of the outrageous attack on his life must be held accountable,” he wrote. And Rebecca Ross, a spokesperson for the US Embassy in Moscow, tweeted on Saturday that “The U.S. supports the right of all people to peaceful protest, freedom of expression. Steps being taken by Russian authorities are suppressing those rights.” We're watching reports of protests in 38 Russian cities, arrests of 350+ peaceful protesters and journalists. The U.S. supports the right of all people to peaceful protest, freedom of expression. Steps being taken by Russian authorities are suppressing those rights.— Rebecca Ross (@USEmbRuPress) January 23, 2021 It is unclear how effective a US response will be, however. Relations between Washington and Moscow — already cool — have deteriorated further since a hack of American federal agencies was linked to Russia in late 2020. Moreover, operations have shuttered at the last two remaining US consulates — one in Vladivostok and one in Yekaterinburg — leaving the US embassy in Moscow as the only US outpost in the entire country.
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vox.com
Florida sheriff’s office tweets weird warning about murder and speeding
Florida's Duval County has an odd way of telling drivers not to speed.
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nypost.com
NYC mayoral contender Andrew Yang hawked bidets on podcast
He’s wet behind the rear. New York City mayoral hopeful Andrew Yang offered his services up as a bidet salesman for an advertisement on his podcast, “Yang Speaks.” “It makes you more environmentally friendly. It will make you more sophisticated. It will make you more European,” the Democrat contender said on behalf of bidet maker...
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nypost.com
Retired FDNY firefighter arrested for role in Capitol riot
A retired New York City firefighter wanted for his role in the Capitol riot was arrested after he texted a picture and video of himself at the insurrection to his girlfriend’s brother, who is a special agent with the U.S. Diplomatic Security Service. Thomas Fee, 53, of Freeport, Long Island, claimed to be “at the...
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nypost.com
Marlon Brando shares a song and kiss with Larry King (1994)
Legendary actor Marlon Brando sat down for a rare interview with Larry King at his California home in October 1994.
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edition.cnn.com
Biden and Boris Johnson talk alliance, climate, Covid
Johnson congratulated Biden for his inauguration and praised Biden's decision to reenter the Paris climate agreement.
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politico.com
Biden Cabinet nominee hired convicted domestic abuser who punched woman for refusing sex
Boston Mayor Martin Walsh, the nominee to be President Joe Biden's Labor Secretary, briefly hired former Massachusetts state representative Carlos Henriquez to be a special assistant in 2018, despite Henriquez's conviction years earlier for assaulting a woman who refused to have sex with him. 
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foxnews.com
Historic All Saints Church in Harlem to be sold
Historic All Saints Church — called the “St. Patrick’s of Harlem” — is about to be sold, The Post has learned. The Catholic Archdiocese of New York shuttered the church in 2015 and the landmark building, along with its adjacent school and parish house, which occupy an entire block, have stood empty since. A spokesman...
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nypost.com
Chargers' Austin Ekeler to help build new gym for high school
Through his foundation, Chargers running back Austin Ekeler is helping to build a new gym at Santa Barbara High School.
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latimes.com
Knicks seeking ‘dog’ mentality after disappointment
The Knicks acknowledged their opponents Friday night were the ones scrambling for loose balls, blocking shots and playing like the hungrier team in desperate need of a win. The Kings had dropped their previous four games and played like it, while the Knicks compounded a poor shooting night with a lack of intensity for much...
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nypost.com
Accused Capitol rioter called for AOC’s assassination, court docs show
A Texas man accused of taking part in the Capitol riot allegedly called for the assassination of Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Garret Miller of Richardson, Texas, was arrested Wednesday after spending the weeks since the riot chatting away online about his actions, including statements threatening the Capitol Police officer who shot one of the rioters, according...
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nypost.com
Cold war nuke bunker in UK goes on sale for $50K
Worried the COVID-19 vaccine might turn people into zombies? Afraid of a new Cold War? Or do you just simply want a simple place to call your own that no one else can get to? Then you’re in luck! A cozy bunker, built in 1961 (and abandoned since 1991) under a field in St. Agnes,...
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nypost.com
Balsa Koprivica helps Florida State blow out Clemson for fourth consecutive victory
Balsa Koprivica helps Florida State blow out Clemson for the Seminoles' fourth consecutive victory        
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usatoday.com
Deshaun Watson's top trade destinations revealed as these teams sit on top: report
Deshaun Watson reportedly has teams in mind when it comes to where he would potentially like to be traded to and two AFC East organizations are on the top of that list.
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foxnews.com
Pay-to-play: Rolling Stone wants content from ‘thought leaders’ — who pay $2K
If you’ve always wanted to join the storied list of writers like Hunter S. Thompson, Lester Bangs and Cameron Crowe who have called Rolling Stone home, you’re in luck — but it’s going to cost you. The famed magazine has sent emails to proposed members of a new “culture council” it created, alerting them that...
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nypost.com
Woman catches date scrolling through Bumble via reflection in his glasses
If you’re gonna scout for women on dating sites while you’re on another date, leave your reflective glasses at home. One dude didn’t and now is being shamed — online — for being such a cad. Instead of paying attention to his companion, 23-year-old TikTok user @ppidhebwklwosjwpqlqmbdb, the shlubby guy opted to fiddle with his phone,...
4 h
nypost.com