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China sold nearly 4 billion masks to other countries over past month
China has sold nearly four billion masks to foreign countries in the past month and is ramping up production, even as some nations have questioned the quality of the medical supplies, according to a report. After a lull during the coronavirus outbreak, the Communist Party has called on factories to increase production as the number...
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nypost.com
Andrew Cuomo raises fine for not social distancing to $1,000
ALBANY — New Yorkers must maintain social-distancing discipline until the coronavirus is defeated, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday — or face a fine now doubled to $1,000. “Frankly, there has been a laxness on social-distancing, especially over this past weekend,” said Cuomo told reporters during his daily press briefing at the state Capitol. “That is...
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nypost.com
Bulls disaster somehow gets worse with ‘unhappy’ Lauri Markkanen
The Bulls’ ongoing dysfunction may soon cost them one of their few bright spots. Lauri Markkanen wants out of Chicago if the Bulls don’t pull themselves out of the mud, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. The third-year Finnish forward was “one unhappy camper” before the NBA suspended its season because of the coronavirus outbreak, the...
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nypost.com
Brooklyn woman burned outside home in possible acid attack
A Brooklyn woman suffered severe burns across her body when someone snuck up on her outside her home and splashed her with what appeared to be acid, cops said. The 39-year-old woman was taking the garbage out just before 11 p.m. Sunday in front of her Borough Park home when an unidentified man doused her...
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nypost.com
How FEMA Missed the Chance to Be Better Prepared for the Coronavirus Pandemic
FEMA was "fighting the last war"—worrying about Russia-—even as COVID-19 became a national emergency.
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newsweek.com
Coronavirus limits bring new religious freedom tension
NEW YORK — Despite state and local limits on public gatherings, some faith leaders have persisted in holding in-person services — a matter of religious freedom, they say, as the nation approached its fourth Sunday battling the coronavirus pandemic. The most high-profile clash over in-person worship – and crowd limits designed to stop the virus’...
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nypost.com
This Couple Made Fine Art For Their Gerbil, How's Your Quarantine Going?
The Louvre may be closed, but now you can see the "Mousa Lisa."
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newsweek.com
Boris Johnson ‘in good spirits’ after coronavirus hospitalization: UK official
UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson was resting comfortably in the hospital Monday, the day after he was admitted for stubborn coronavirus symptoms, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said Monday. “This was a precautionary step. The prime minister continues to have persistent symptoms. He had a comfortable night in hospital, and is in good spirits. He continues...
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nypost.com
Wartime Theme in Queen's Speech Came After Coronavirus Lockdown Triggered Memories of Evacuation, Royal Author Says
Queen Elizabeth II is shut away in Windsor during the pandemic for the first time since her "formative" World War II years, a royal author tells Newsweek.
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newsweek.com
21 new and classic books to keep you in touch with the natural world
Here are books on the natural world to read while avoiding the coronavirus, classics by John McPhee and Annie Dillard as well as the upcoming "Book of Eels."
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latimes.com
Supreme Court turns away dispute over D.C. transit authority's religious ad ban
The dispute dates back to 2017, when the Archdiocese of Washington sought to advertise its Christmas-themed campaign on the side of public buses operated by the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority.
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cbsnews.com
Trump says the federal coronavirus effort has been “incredible.” His own government disagrees.
An ambulance is disinfected outside Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City on April 4. | Spencer Platt/Getty Images A new HHS inspector general report details “severe shortages” facing hospitals dealing with the pandemic. A report released Monday by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) inspector general details the “severe shortages” of testing supplies and medical gear experienced by hospitals, and alludes to the disorganized nature of the federal response. The government report stands in contrast to the rhetoric coming from the government’s top elected official. President Donald Trump wants you to believe that officials who have criticized his administration’s coronavirus response are part of a plot to take him down, and despite a mountain of evidence to the contrary, he insists federal agencies have done “an unbelievable” an “incredible” job procuring supplies for states. Now, however, even his own government is acknowledging those talking points are at odds with the reality experienced by health care providers at hospitals that are struggling to contain the coronavirus outbreak while keeping workers safe. The report, which is based a random sample of administrators from 323 hospitals across the country conducted between March 23-27 — a period of time before the worst of the coronavirus pandemic hit the US — makes clear the notion hospitals don’t have enough masks for health care workers and ventilators for patients does not stem from some sort of conspiracy to take down Trump. It is coming directly from hospitals’ experience treating patients. But Trump still seems unwilling to do more. “We are meant to be the backup,” he reiterated on Sunday. “We are throwing all of our PPE best practices out the window” The IG report paints a picture of hospitals that don’t have all the resources they need and are struggling to get by with what they have. It indicates that even when federal help has been forthcoming, supplies sent from the federal stockpile have been insufficient or damaged. One administrator told HHS that “the supplies the hospital received ‘won’t even last a day.’” The following passage highlights these problems: Hospital administrators expressed uncertainty about availability of PPE from Federal and State sources. Some hospitals noted that at the time of our interview they had not received supplies from the Strategic National Stockpile, or that the supplies that they had received were not sufficient in quantity or quality. ... One health system reported that it received 1,000 masks from the Federal and State governments, but it had been expecting a larger resupply. Further, 500 of the masks were for children and therefore unusable for the health system’s adult staff. One hospital reported receiving a shipment of 2,300 N95 masks from a State strategic reserve, but the masks were not useable because the elastic bands had dry-rotted. Another hospital reported that the last two shipments it had received from a Federal agency contained PPE that expired in 2010. The shipment contained construction masks that looked different than traditional masks and did not contain a true N95 seal. To make do, the report details how hospitals are jerry-rigging ventilators from other equipment. “Our staff had figured out that we could transition some anesthesia machines using t-connectors and viral filters to turn them into ventilators. You jerry-rig the anesthesia machine by using a t-connector, you can support four patients off one of these,” one administrator said. Trump has repeatedly insisted that it’s up to the states to obtain their own ventilators and other supplies. State officials have pointed out that the problem with this approach is that resource-strapped states end up driving up prices by not only bidding against each other, but also in some cases having to compete with the federal government. The IG report indicates that hospitals are struggling with this same problem too. As one hospital administrator noted, “We are all competing for the same items and there are only so many people on the other end of the supply chain.” Another administrator reported being concerned about poor quality products despite high-prices and “…wonder[ing] if you get what you paid for.” “We are throwing all of our PPE best practices out the window,” the report quotes one administrator as saying. In addition to supply problems, the report notes that hospitals “reported instances of receiving conflicting guidance from different Federal, State, and local authorities.” “[The inconsistency] makes everyone nervous. It would have been better if there was coordination and consistency in guidance among the different levels of government.” one administrator said, with another adding: “It’s difficult when a doctor or nurse shows you legitimate information from legitimate sources and they’re contradictory.” Trump will try and blame everyone but himself Trump is famously sensitive to any and all criticism, and to the extent he notices the latest IG report, it’s unlikely he’ll respond well to it. The HHS report comes two days after Trump fired intelligence community Inspector General Michael Atkinson for not doing his political bidding with a whistleblower’s complaint about his dealings with Ukraine — one that resulted in his impeachment. And it comes just a day after the Associated Press broke news that the federal government waited until mid-March to try and replenish the national stockpile of medical gear. By that time, “hospitals in several states were treating thousands of infected patients without adequate equipment and were pleading for shipments from the Strategic National Stockpile,” the AP reported. An exchange from Sunday’s White House coronavirus task force briefing illustrates how Trump responds to criticisms of the sort the HHS inspector general is now making. When a reporter tried to ask him about the AP report, Trump cut him off and went on the attack. “Are you ready? ... the people that you’re looking at — FEMA, the military — what they’ve done is a miracle. What they’ve done for states is incredible, and you should be thanking them for what they’ve done and not always asking wise guy questions,” Trump said, before abruptly ending the briefing. "You should be thanking them for what they have done, not always asking wise guy questions" -- Trump ends the press briefing by berating an Associated Press reporter who dared to ask him about the government's slow response to coronavirus pic.twitter.com/EUq6SG42aN— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) April 6, 2020 Trump’s subtext was that states and hospitals should just be happy for any federal help they can get. But the new IG report reveals the myriad ways in which what they’re getting isn’t enough. The news moves fast. To stay updated, follow Aaron Rupar on Twitter, and read more of Vox’s policy and politics coverage.
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vox.com
Today in MMA History: Conor McGregor quickly takes out Marcus Brimage in stellar UFC debut
Before he went on to become simultaneous two-division champion, Conor McGregor's UFC career kicked off with an impressive first-round KO.        Related StoriesWalk-off knockouts and guillotine chokes: Relive Jessica Andrade's top UFC finishesDespite quick UFC rise, Ciryl Gane in no rush to the top: 'I just started my career in MMA'Aljamain Sterling explains where Henry Cejudo is going wrong en route to GOAT status 
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usatoday.com
DOT tells airlines to refund canceled flights, but don't count on cash just yet
The Department of Transportation has said it will give airlines a chance to comply with its refund requests "before taking further action."
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latimes.com
Chris Pratt spends Sunday Funday washing his classic VW Beetle
In these trying times, even celebrities have to do their own maintenance.
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nypost.com
Amazon faces another Staten Island warehouse strike as 25 have coronavirus
Amazon is facing its second labor strike at a Staten Island warehouse where workers fear more than two dozen people have come down with COVID-19.
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nypost.com
‘It Takes My Mind Off This Crazy World.’ A Quarantined World Is Here for Rex Chapman’s Twitter Feed
"It helps me stay out of my head a little bit," says Chapman of his feel-good Twitter account
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time.com
MSNBC's Mika Brzezinski wonders if Trump has a ‘financial tie’ to hydroxychloroquine
Mika Brzezinski accused President Trump of having a “financial tie” to hydroxychloroquine on Monday because he has suggested the drug could be an effective treatment for coronavirus. 
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foxnews.com
Lawmakers fight for a piece of coronavirus ‘9/11 commission’
Four proposals are circulating in the House to establish a commission that investigates the government's response.
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politico.com
IndyCar's latest schedule change: three races added, including one at IMS; Detroit canceled
The IndyCar schedule has undergone another massive change, but this time, the series has managed to add a race back onto the slate.        
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usatoday.com
Join Jennifer Senior to chat about Trump’s personality in a time of crisis
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nytimes.com
Need good news? Watch 'Hamilton' cast surprise Florida girl with reunion on John Krasinski show
The original 'Hamilton' cast performed for a 9-year-old girl who missed seeing the play after it was canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic.        
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usatoday.com
What we know about the tiger with Covid-19 — and how the disease affects other animals
A tiger at the Bronx Zoo, before the coronavirus pandemic began. | James Devaney/WireImage/Getty Images A tiger at the Bronx Zoo has tested positive for the coronavirus — joining a number of other animals around the world with Covid-19. A tiger at New York City’s Bronx Zoo has tested positive for the novel coronavirus, officials at the US Department of Agriculture said Sunday, raising new questions about how the virus that causes Covid-19 spreads in animals, and whether other animals are at risk of becoming infected with the virus. The Bronx Zoo’s tiger — a 4-year-old Malayan tiger named Nadia — is the first animal in the US and the first non-domesticated animal globally to have a confirmed Covid-19 case. At least two pets, a cat and a dog, were infected in Hong Kong; and a cat in Belgium is also believed to have had the virus. All of the pets were owned by people with confirmed Covid-19 cases. Zoo officials believe the cat — as well as her sister, two Amur tigers (also known as Siberian tigers), and three African lions that are all exhibiting similar symptoms — may have been infected by a caretaker who has the virus but is asymptomatic, given that the zoo has been closed to the public since March 16. “It’s the first time, to our knowledge, that a [wild] animal has gotten sick from Covid-19 from a person,” Paul Calle, chief veterinarian for the Bronx Zoo, said Sunday. Calle added that his team took samples from Nadia that were sent to scientists and veterinarians at Cornell University, the University of Illinois, and the USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratory. All samples tested positive. Animal testing for Covid-19 requires a specialized protocol that differs from the testing done in humans. For example, testing a tiger includes placing the big cat under anesthesia; the complexity of the procedure led zoo officials to decide only one cat should be tested. The new confirmed case is a reminder that although scientists have worked rapidly to understand the new coronavirus there is still much that isn’t known about how the virus can and cannot spread between species — and how it spreads among animals that aren’t human. Here’s what we know — and don’t — about Nadia, and how Covid-19 spreads in animals. What we know The Bronx Zoo announced a 4-year-old Malayan tiger, Nadia, tested positive for Covid-19 on Sunday Six other animals at the zoo — all large cats — are believed to have the coronavirus as well All seven animals have exhibited a dry cough and decreased appetites None of the animals exhibited other symptoms seen in humans, including fever or shortness of breath Other than the two symptoms, the zoo said Nadia and the other cats believed to be infected are “bright, alert, and interactive with their keepers” Neither of the dogs that tested positive in Hong Kong — a Pomeranian and a German Shepherd — exhibited any symptoms The infected cat in Belgium, like the zoo’s cats, did exhibit symptoms, including diarrhea, vomiting, and respiratory issues The Belgian cat’s case was confirmed using samples from its feces For her test, Nadia was sedated with general anesthesia; samples were taken from the back of her throat, nasal cavities, and trachea. Molecular testing confirmed she has Covid-19. The dogs and cat lived with owners with Covid-19 and are believed to have been infected by their owners Similarly, Nadia is believed to have been infected by a caretaker who was asymptomatic, or who cared for the cats before exhibiting symptoms Animals are thought to be able to infect humans with the coronavirus in some cases; as SARS expert Jonathan Epstein told Vox’s Brian Resnick, experts believe the coronavirus may have originated in an animal market in China and could have first appeared in bats A study from Chinese researchers at the Harbin Veterinary Research Institute in China — that has received some praise from scientists but that was done under conditions that did not approximate those of the real world, had a small sample size, and has not yet been peer reviewed — found there is community spread among cat populations The same study found the same is not true of dogs There have, however, been no confirmed cases of a pet or animal in captivity infecting a human Because of this, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) has recommended coronavirus testing be done on a limited basis in animals Nevertheless, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) requests those who deal with pets and other animals wash their hands after interacting with them and that pet owners and caretakers ensure their animals maintain proper hygiene What we don’t know Why one Amur tiger that lived with the Bronx Zoo’s other four infected tigers has not exhibited any symptoms — it is not clear whether this tiger is asymptomatic or does not have the coronavirus Why the Bronx Zoo’s other large cats have not exhibited symptoms Whether infected cats exhibit symptoms and dogs do not Whether cats really are more easily infected than dogs (as the Harbin study suggests) and if this is why a mixed-breed dog that lived with the German Shepherd tested negative for the virus Scientists like Linda Saif have noted other coronaviruses, like bovine CoV, can infect various species. But whether the coronavirus that causes Covid-19 can move from animal species to animal species (for instance, if it could move from a lion to an elephant) is not yet understood. It also is not yet clear whether transmission in animals must occur from humans — that is, whether the Bronx Zoo’s cats gave it to one another or if all exhibiting symptoms were infected by their caretaker Whether Covid-19 infections among animals make it more likely this coronavirus will become a seasonal one or whether animals might serve as carriers that could lead to a resurgence of the virus; this is something scientists are investigating Experts currently do not believe pets can transmit the virus to humans — but whether this is the case is currently poorly understood
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vox.com
Coronavirus social distancing around the world
Scenes of coronavirus social distancing around the world.
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latimes.com
'James Bond' star Honor Blackman, who played Pussy Galore, dead at 94
Honor Blackman, the actress best known as Pussy Galore in the 1964 James Bond film “Goldfinger” has died at age 94. 
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foxnews.com
Kaine blasts Navy leader's 'completely inappropriate' comments on fired captain
A transcript, as well as the audio of Thomas Modly's remarks to the crew of the USS Theodore Roosevelt, were leaked today.
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politico.com
Gabrielle Union shows off her natural hair with daughter Kaavia Wade
"Mama's got hair like yours!!"
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nypost.com
Pink says she ‘cried’ and ‘prayed’ during coronavirus ordeal with son, 3: ‘It got really, really scary’
Pink got candid about her horrific experience with the devastating coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
50 Migrants Force Way Over Morocco-Spain Border, Five Injured
Some 50 migrants on Monday forced their way into Spain's Melilla city over the fence that separates the European enclave in northern Africa.
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breitbart.com
CNN's Brooke Baldwin provides update after testing positive for coronavirus: 'I’m very healthy'
CNN host Brooke Baldwin provided an update to her fans after testing positive for coronavirus, saying she is “very healthy” and feels “like on of the lucky ones” while urging everyone to stay at home. 
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus pandemic causing massive increase in hungry families
The growing coronavirus pandemic has resulted in a significant rise in demand from the charitable food system in America, as the nation faces rising unemployment, school closures and rising poverty due to quarantine and stay-at-home orders. Feeding America is trying to make sure that nobody goes hungry during the crisis. Feeding America, the nation’s largest...
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nypost.com
Louisiana newborn dies after coronavirus-positive mom goes into preterm labor
The infant, who has not tested positive, was born at just under 22 weeks gestation after the child's mother was admitted to the hospital with COVID-19-related issues.
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foxnews.com
Andrew Cuomo: 'We Don't Need Any Additional Ventilators Right Now'
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he was comfortable with the number of ventilators in his state during a Monday press conference on the coronavirus pandemic.
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breitbart.com
WH Trade Adviser Navarro Defends His Disagreement With Dr. Fauci Over Hydroxychloroquine: 'History Will Judge Who's Right on This Debate'
"I'd bet on President Trump's intuition," Peter Navarro told Fox News, referring to the drug's efficacy as a treatment for COVID-19.
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newsweek.com
UK: 4,000 Prisoners to Be Released Early to Curb Coronavirus in Jails
The United Kingdom is set to release thousands of convicted criminals onto the streets in an attempt to slow the spread of the Chinese coronavirus in the prison system.
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breitbart.com
The Hollywood Reporter's editor Matthew Belloni departs
The Hollywood Reporter Editorial Director Matthew Belloni is leaving his role after about four years. Belloni had worked at the company for 14 years.
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latimes.com
Kendall Jenner lounges in her underwear and more star snaps
Kendall Jenner kicks back with video games and a face mask, Rod Stewart hits the beach and more...
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nypost.com
To aid coronavirus fight, The Times releases database of California cases
To follow the coronavirus' spread, The Times is conducting an independent survey of dozens of local health agencies across the state.
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latimes.com
How to gently remove your gel manicure and care for your nails at home
Here's celebrity manicurist Tom Bachik's advice for removing a gel manicure and more at home.
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latimes.com
Acting Navy Sec. blasts ousted USS Theodore Roosevelt's captain as 'naive' and 'stupid' in address to ship's crew
Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly slammed the now-ousted commander of the USS Theodore Roosevelt as "too naive or too stupid" to be a commanding officer during recent remarks made to the remaining sailors aboard the ship, multiple sources confirmed to Fox News.
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foxnews.com
California loans 500 ventilators to New York, other areas in immediate need amid coronavirus
Coronavirus: California to send 500 state-owned ventilators to the national stockpile for New York and other areas with immediate shortages.
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latimes.com
Tituss Burgess on ‘Dishmantled,’ his insane new Quibi cooking competition
Splats off to the chef!
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nypost.com
Virus Didn’t Have to Ground This Aviation Deal
Suppliers Hexcel and Woodward called it quits on their merger. That feels short-sighted.
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washingtonpost.com
Inside the scrapped coronavirus retreat for the wealthy
The oasis promised deep-pocketed members would find: “a community of makers, thinkers, and doers that can become your sanctuary.”
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nypost.com
Empty buildings across US now housing coronavirus patients, the homeless and first responders
Officials in counties – large and small, rural and urban - are turning to hotels, to house first responders, patients and homeless people.        
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usatoday.com
Wannabe action hero goes from skinny to stacked in quest for ‘world peace’
Davy Barnes pumps iron 12 hours a week to get swole like his hero Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. The wannabe action star first hit the gym nine years ago and has transformed from a scrawny 20-year-old into a bulging, 265-pound blond beast who boasts a 49-inch chest, 27-inch thighs and 20-inch biceps. Today, the Arizona...
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nypost.com
NFL 2010s All-Decade Team: Tom Brady, Aaron Rodgers headline star-studded group
Tom Brady can add another recognition to his expansive résumé, as the QB was one of eight unanimous selections to the NFL 2010s All-Decade Team.       
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usatoday.com
North Korea has denied covid-19 cases. Its actions tell a different story.
The coronavirus could be wreaking havoc on the world’s last Stalinist state.
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washingtonpost.com