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Pole de Hamilton en otro esperpento de Ferrari

Lewis Hamilton saldrá primero este domingo en el GP de Mónaco tras firmar la pole en la clasificación, la segunda que consigue el británico en las calles del Principado, en una nueva sesión de dominio de los Mercedes. Hamilton consiguió en su último intento en lo Q3 un crono de 1:10.166, 86 milésimas más rápido que su compañero Valtteri Bottas, que le acompañará en la primera fila. [Resultados del GP de Mónaco] Max Verstappen, que fue el más rápido en la Q2, incluso batiendo la mejor vuelta del circuito, terminó tercero, y estará acompañado en esa segunda fila por Sebastian Vettel. Fue otro día esperpéntico en Ferrari, que perdió a Charles Leclerc en la Q1 por un error de cálculo. El piloto monegasco, deseoso de hacer un buen papel en su casa, solo dio una vuelta buena en esa primera tanda de clasificación. Después volvió al garaje y ya no volvió a salir. En el muro pensaron que su tiempo sería suficiente para pasar de ronda, pero no fue así. Un enojado Leclerc se hartó de pedir explicaciones a sus ingenieros sin que nadie acertara a explicarle lo sucedido. Leclerc se queda fuera en Q1. #MONmovistarF1 pic.twitter.com/wXokjDozP3— F1 en Movistar+ (@movistar_F1) 25 de mayo de 2019 Carlos Sainz, por su parte, completó una buena clasificaciónj y saldrá noveno en la carrera tras entrar en la Q3, algo que no consiguió su compañero Lando Norris. En esa tanda definitiva el madrileño solo pudo mejorar el tiempo del Toro Rosso de Alexander Albon.
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Johnson must be put to the test in UK PM race: rival Gove
Boris Johnson, the front-runner to replace Theresa May as British prime minister but who has so far kept a low profile in the leadership race, needs to be put to the test, rival contender Michael Gove said on Monday.
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China says will continue to support Hong Kong Chief Executive Lam
China said on Monday it will continue to support Hong Kong's embattled leader, Carrie Lam, after two million protesters took to the streets with a demand for her to step down.
Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
Fierce hailstorm demolishes windshield
A powerful hailstorm pelted Europe with one fatality was reported in France. CNN's Natalie Allen reports.
CNN.com - RSS Channel
Kier Group to cut 1,200 jobs in cost-saving push – business live
Debt pile reductions planned to avoid fate of collapsed rival Carillion 8.26am BST Some interesting details on debt levels from the Kier statement, admitting that their business model was too reliant on taking on large debts to expand.In its statement to the stock market, Kier said:The strategic review concluded that, during this period, there was insufficient focus on cash generation and that the group today has debt levels that are too high. It also concluded that the group’s portfolio is too diverse and contains a number of businesses that are incompatible with the group’s new strategy and working capital objectives. 8.14am BST Kier brought in Andrew Davies as chief executive only two months ago, and he has taken little time before wielding the axe.Speaking to analysts and investors this morning, Davies said that Kier is a great company at its core, but that it needs self-help.Since becoming chief executive on 15 April, I have visited many of our key locations and spent time with all of our businesses, meeting the leadership teams and many of our dedicated people in the process. I have also met with many of our clients. Kier has a number of high-quality, market-leading businesses, in particular Regional Building, Infrastructure, Utilities and Highways. I believe that these businesses will deliver long-term, sustainable revenues and margins and are inherently cash generative.As previously announced, I have been leading a strategic review which has resulted in the actions being announced today. These actions are focused on resetting the operational structure of Kier, simplifying the portfolio, and emphasising cash generation in order to structurally reduce debt. By making these changes, we will reinforce the foundations from which our core activities can flourish in the future, to the benefit of all of our stakeholders.” Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
PSA: Set your Venmo transactions to private right now
A new research study has found that Venmo continues to make it easy for third-parties to scrape users’ public transaction history without their permission. Dan Salmon, a computer science student at Minnesota State University, has published a new data set of over seven million Venmo transactions on GitHub collected over a six month period. “I am releasing this dataset in order to bring attention to Venmo users that all of this data is publicly available for anyone to grab without even an API key,” Salmon wrote on the GitHub page, while warning users to change their privacy settings. The development… This story continues at The Next Web
The Next Web | International technology news, business & culture
Sudan’s former President Omar al-Bashir seen in public for first time since ouster
The deposed strongman has been held under arrest in the capital, Khartoum, since the military removed him from power in April amid mass protests against his 30-year rule.       
USATODAY - News Top Stories
Soccer club's mission to confront Holocaust's horrors
CNN.com
Analysis: Hong Kong remains a thorn in Beijing's side
Hong Kong has once again burnished its reputation as a thorn in the side of the Chinese Communist Party and its leader, President Xi Jinping, after protesters swarmed the city's streets for the third time in one week.
CNN.com - RSS Channel
Report urges travelers to get MMR vaccine due to European outbreak
According to data from the World Health Organization, 41,000 measles cases were reported from January to June 2018 across 53 European countries
CBS News - Breaking News, U.S., World, Business, Entertainment & Video
Pelosi flexes muscle over party in impeachment debate, but ‘dam’ could collapse
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has wielded her power to quash a faction of Democrats rallying for President Trump’s impeachment, but frustrated members within the party say the president is one misstep away from “that dam collapsing,” according to a Sunday report.
Politica
Republicans need to change their product. Californians aren’t buying it
Politics is like private enterprise. You either sell your product or perish. California voters have not been buying Republican merchandise. So Democrats have monopolized the market. It’s not the fault of consumers for not liking what the GOP has been peddling. Nor should the Democratic retailers...
Politica
Huawei CEO expects sales to drop to $100 billion in 2019, 2020
China's Huawei Technologies Co Ltd expects sales to drop to around $100 billion this year and the next, CEO Ren Zhengfei said on Monday, as its business comes under pressure due to U.S. sanctions.
REUTERS
India magician disappears in river after Houdini trick
Chanchal Lahiri, with his legs and hands shackled, was lowered into a river in India.
BBC News - Home
Freed Hong Kong Activist Joshua Wong Addresses Rally on the Day He Is Released From Prison
He is expected to resume his place at the forefront of the city's fight for political freedom
TIME - powered by FeedBurner
Gary Woodland wins U.S. Open at Pebble Beach
Gary Woodland outlasts Brooks Koepka to win his first major championship
Sport
Nvidia will support Arm hardware for high-performance computing
At the International Supercomputing Conference, Nvidia announced its intention to support Arm-based chips with its "full stack" of hardware and sofware.
VentureBeat | Tech News That Matters
Nigel Slater’s fuss-free summer recipes
When the sun’s out, keep lunch simple with dishes you can prepare in advance, from chicken and couscous to panna cottaA summer lunch should feel carefree and effortless. An assortment of dishes served cold or at room temperature, probably made earlier in the day. Perhaps the day before, brought to the table with very little fuss. (There is little worse than a cook arriving at the table hot and hassled.) I vote for one, and only one, dish that needs last-minute work. A plate of battered courgettes brought rustling from the kitchen or a dish of prawns tossed with butter, peas and dill. Even the dessert can be made first thing in the morning, or the previous night. Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
Streaming: Scorsese's freewheeling Dylan doc
Martin Scorsese is in playful mode with Rolling Thunder Revue, an intimate portrait of a 1970s Bob Dylan tourIn a year that has seen Steven Spielberg become the poster boy for anti-Netflix scepticism, his old peer Martin Scorsese is fully embracing the possibilities. In the autumn, his much-hyped, big-budget gangster film The Irishman will be released on the streaming service, but the 76-year-old has dipped a toe in the water with something a little smaller and funkier: another Bob Dylan documentary. I say “another”, but if you’re expecting a direct follow-up to Scorsese’s 2005 opus No Direction Home, or a concert film in the vein of 1978’s Dylan-featuring The Last Waltz, you’ll be surprised.Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story, which has been streaming on Netflix since Wednesday, is something more puckish and, well, freewheeling than any of Scorsese’s previous music docs – the word “story”, for starters, shouldn’t be disregarded: there’s a bit of fabrication here amid the facts. Ostensibly, it’s a portrait of Dylan’s famous seven-month Rolling Thunder Revue concert tour from 1975 to 1976, which saw him – alongside a rotating coterie of friends and collaborators – perform in a series of smaller venues in smaller US cities, fostering an intimacy between artist and audience that he felt was lost in rock stadiums. And much of the unhurried 140-minute film delivers on that promise, in a jangly, haphazardly structured fashion that effectively evokes the cheerfully ragged ambience of the concerts themselves. Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
'I refuse to regret waking up a day older': Ashton Applewhite's fight for age pride
The activist on her manifesto to empower older people, how to challenge age prejudice – and why she dyes her hair grey When Ashton Applewhite hit 55 years old, she dyed her hair. So what? That’s what women the world over do, you might think: dye grey hair to hide their age. But what Applewhite did was different: she dyed her hair grey. Not Kim Kardashian-platinum grey, but defiantly uncool, bog-standard grey.“I went to a matinee, so it was all old people,” she says, grinning widely as she absentmindedly tousles her hair, the brown roots showing. “When it finished, everyone left via an escalator. I looked down and there was not a grey head to be spotted. I suddenly thought: ‘This is one way we collude, en masse, in making ourselves invisible as older women – and that’s a real problem, because when people are invisible, so are the issues that affect them’.” Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
Oppo Reno 10x Zoom review: a OnePlus 7 Pro with a better camera
...and a worse screen As has often been the case in the past, Oppo’s latest flagship phone has a lot in common with another from OnePlus, since the companies share ownership and supply chain resources. In this case, the Oppo Reno 10x Zoom follows the release of the impressive OnePlus 7 Pro. But for the first time, Oppo’s phone might actually be better. Although the usual move has been for OnePlus to build a higher-spec phone around a mid-range Oppo chassis or screen design and strip down the software, that’s not what’s happened here. The Reno 10x Zoom is every bit as high-end and performant as the OnePlus 7 Pro, but with advantages and disadvantages of its own. For my money, I think I’d take the Oppo. At least if I lived outside the US. The Reno is roughly the same size and shape as the OnePlus 7 Pro, with a similar curved back and a front panel dominated by a huge 6.6-inch screen. The screen doesn’t slope on the sides, which is probably what accounts for the slightly smaller measurement. At 9.3mm thick, the Reno is half a millimeter thicker than the OnePlus Pro 7 and weighs slightly more at 210g. This doesn’t bother me, but I have gigantic hands. Even my iPhone XS Max felt small after a few days using the Reno. Let me be very clear that like the OnePlus 7 Pro, this is a Big Phone for Big Phone People. It’s also quite an attractive one, with a sleek frosted glass finish that’s broken by a strip for the Oppo logo and another for the cameras. There’s no camera bump at all, which is welcome given the thickness of the device; a small nubbin below the cameras prevents them from coming into contact with any flat surface you might place the phone on. There’s no headphone jack, either, but thankfully Oppo is using USB-C on the Reno — not a given for this company — and includes a pair of reasonably good in-ear buds. The only nit I have to pick about the Reno’s build quality is that the volume buttons feel a little loose, which is surprising from a company that tends to put an emphasis on tactile clickiness. As you’d expect from a Chinese flagship phone in 2019, the Reno is a near-as-dammit bezel-less device without a notch. The border around the screen is slightly thicker on the bottom edge than the other three, but it’s still only about the same thickness as an iPhone XR bezel. There’s an optical fingerprint sensor integrated into the display, which I’ve found to be very fast and reliable, and the earpiece is subtly integrated into the top edge of the phone. The Reno’s bezel-less design is completed by a 16-megapixel pop-up selfie camera that’s by far the weirdest one I’ve seen yet. Instead of raising the entire top of the phone itself, as on Oppo’s own Find X from last year, or the more common approach of integrating a small square-ish module into the phone’s top edge, the Reno’s selfie camera is housed inside a lopsided section that rises from the right-hand corner of the display like a shark fin. It’s startlingly asymmetrical, but the larger moving part means there’s also room for a separate LED flash alongside the camera. While Oppo has already demonstrated that it’s working on under-display cameras, at least the company is keeping things interesting until that technology arrives. And the headline feature of the Reno is another trick that Oppo has been showing off in prototype form for a while: the supposedly “10x” periscope zoom camera. Let’s get into that camera, because before I tell you that it’s awesome and fun to use, I also have to tell you that it really isn’t a 10x zoom lens. Here’s how it works: in the camera app, you can press a zoom button to go to 2x digital zoom, then 6x optical zoom, then 10x “hybrid zoom”, the latter of which is ostensibly an AI-enhanced advance on the 6x setting. That’s fair enough, but there isn’t really a 6x optical zoom lens either — if you start zooming in from 1x with a slide gesture you can clearly see the image switch to the zoom lens at 5x. The Reno at default, 6x, and 10x zoom settings You can go all the way to 60x with software-enhanced zooming if you really want, so Oppo’s fixation on the 10x setting for the literal name of the phone feels misleading — not to mention that this phone really has three prime lenses with software to fill in the gaps, rather than an actual zoom lens. But even a 5x telephoto lens is a pretty transformative thing to add to a phone, as we saw with the Huawei P30 Pro. Oppo’s version is at least as good, and has the advantage of not being imminently torpedoed from sale. In good light, the Reno turns in sharp, well-exposed 13-megapixel zoom shots that simply wouldn’t have been possible on previous smartphones. The feature isn’t really usable in low light, however. The 5x zoom lens is optically stabilized, which helps with shaky hands during the day, but can’t make up for the slow aperture of f/3 — your results will be pretty blurry at night. Huawei’s 5x zoom camera is even slower at f/3.4, however, with a lower resolution of 8 megapixels. The Reno also has an 8-megapixel f/2.2 ultrawide camera and uses Sony’s popular 48-megapixel IMX586 sensor with an f/1.7 lens for the primary camera, shooting pixel-binned 12-megapixel shots by default. Overall, I’m very happy with the cameras’ performance and Oppo’s image processing. I spent most of my time testing the phone during a sunny week in Taipei for Computex, and it never let me down. Its low-light performance is great, its dedicated night mode is effective in even lower light, and its daylight colors are well-balanced. Although it doesn’t perform the mind-bending HDR gymnastics of a Pixel, you’ll almost always get punchy and dynamic results that retain a ton of detail. By the end of the week, I was using my Sony RX100 Mark IV a lot less than I’d planned on. Clockwise from top left: regular low-light shooting, night mode, zoom, and ultrawide The Reno uses a Snapdragon 855 processor, and subjectively feels like the fastest Android phone I’ve ever used. A big part of that is down to Oppo’s new ColorOS 6 software, which sees the company move away from its heavier Android skin to produce something more in line with OnePlus’ OxygenOS. Animations are snappy, customizations are relatively mild, and there’s even a slide-up app drawer out of the box. Oppo also deserves credit for putting a legitimately good haptic feedback system in the Reno, which remains rare among Android manufacturers and even rarer among Chinese OEMs. ColorOS still does take a lot of inspiration from iOS, to be clear — its iPhone X-style multitasking system is very slick, while its bubbly notifications are less so. But overall, I don’t think anyone beyond hardcore Android purists would have major issues with this software. The big compromise is the screen I haven’t had any issues with battery life, either, which is just as well considering the sheer size of this phone. I definitely put the 4,065mAh battery through its paces while covering Computex, which involves a whole lot of web browsing, productivity software, and photography on the go, and I never once needed to get my USB-C battery pack out of my bag. I wouldn’t say the Reno is doing anything groundbreaking with battery life, but it’s a phone you can trust to get you through the day. It also supports Oppo’s VOOC 3.0 fast charging, which is the same system that OnePlus uses and works very well if you remember to bring the right power brick and cable. So, what’s the catch? Well, like OnePlus, Oppo still isn’t supporting wireless charging. That’ll be a big deal to anyone who’s dotted their house in charging mats, and less of a big deal to anyone who still plugs in their phone all the time. (I fall into the former camp.) The other big compromise is in the screen. Oppo isn’t using the OnePlus 7 Pro’s amazing 90Hz 1440p OLED display here, which in other words means it doesn’t match that phone’s most compelling selling point. The Reno’s panel is also 1080p, which isn’t something I would usually ding a phone for — Samsung sets its 1440p phones to render at 1080p by default for a reason. But the Reno’s huge display is just past the size where such a compromise is occasionally noticeable. It’s a great screen in terms of contrast and color rendition, but it isn’t class-leading overall. The Oppo Reno 10x Zoom costs £699 in the UK for a model with 8GB of RAM and 256GB of storage, which positions it directly against the equivalent OnePlus 7 Pro. These phones are clearly both peas from the same pod. I think they are equally good on their own merits. For most people, which one you prefer will come down to whether you would rather have an incredible screen or a game-changing camera. Me? I’d go with the camera. This phone is the result of something that Oppo has been promising for years, and the final product seriously delivers. The Reno 10x Zoom has very few flaws, hits all the right notes you’d expect from a flagship phone, and lands a few unique features of its own. I’ve tested a lot of Oppo devices in recent years, and I was truly surprised by how much I enjoyed using this phone. Last year’s Find X was where many people around the world started paying attention, but the Reno is easily the best phone Oppo has ever released, marking the point where it becomes a legitimate high-end brand that’s worthy of serious consideration. Photography by Sam Byford / The Verge Vox Media has affiliate partnerships. These do not influence editorial content, though Vox Media may earn commissions for products purchased via affiliate links. For more information, see our ethics policy.
The Verge
He was killed in Costco after attacking an off-duty cop, police say. His cousin says he was a 'gentle giant'
The cousin of a man shot and killed by an off-duty police officer in a California Costco has questions about what happened because the shooting victim was nonverbal and had an intellectual disability, according to a report by the Los Angeles Times.
CNN.com - RSS Channel
Johnson gets boost in race for UK PM's job as former rival backs him
Boris Johnson got a boost for his bid to replace British Prime Minister Theresa May when one of his former rivals backed his candidacy on Monday and said he was almost certain to win the contest.
Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
Matt Hancock backs Boris Johnson in Tory leadership race
Health secretary says frontrunner had promised he would govern as a ‘one-nation PM’Matt Hancock, who dropped out of the Conservative leadership race at the end of last week, has endorsed Boris Johnson, despite having campaigned on a modernising ticket and said he would not push for a no-deal Brexit.In an article for the Times announcing the decision, the health secretary said it was clear Johnson was likely to win, and it was time to “unite behind him” as soon as possible. Continue reading...
US news | The Guardian
UBS loses role in bond deal for Chinese firm on outcry over pig comment
UBS has lost a lead role on a U.S. dollar bond deal for state-backed China Railway Construction Corp, just days after a Chinese outcry over a senior UBS economist's use of "pig" in connection with Chinese food price inflation.
REUTERS
Hong Kong's Joshua Wong walks free, vows to join protest
Activist Joshua Wong, who has become the face of Hong Kong's push for full democracy, is released from prison and vows to join a mass protest movement demanding that the city's Beijing-backed leader, Carrie Lam, steps down. Rough cut (no reporter narration).
Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
Carrie Lam was supposed to unite Hong Kong. Instead she brought chaos
When career politician Carrie Lam became Hong Kong's Chief Executive in 2017 she promised to unite the city of seven million and "re-ignite hope for the next generation."
Politica
Liberty mounts latest court challenge to 'snooper's charter'
Rights group argues powers of MI5 and GCHQ to obtain and store data breach human rightsThe legality of the intelligence services’ bulk surveillance activities under which personal data is obtained from social media companies as well as through hacking and interception is being being challenged in court.Monday’s action by the civil rights organisation Liberty follows revelations last week that MI5 had lost control of its data storage operations and admitted there were “ungoverned spaces” on its computers where it did not know what it held. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
British PM May could meet Russia's Putin at G20: The Times
Prime Minister Theresa May is considering a face-to-face meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin at this month's G20 summit in Japan in an effort to begin a thaw in relations before a new British leader comes to power, The Times newspaper reported.
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Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
Brazil 'Do Not Weaken Without' Neymar, Says PSG Team-Mate Dani Alves
Brazil captain Dani Alves said the Selecao have not been weakened by Neymar's absence from the Copa America following their 3-0 win over Bolivia...
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bleacherreport.com
Airbus to launch A321XLR with nearly 200 orders at Paris Airshow-sources
Airbus will launch a long-range version of its A321neo passenger jet at Paris Airshow and will announce close to 200 orders over the week, sources familiar with the matter said.
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REUTERS
Germany's Far-Right Party Defeated In Closely Watched Mayoral Election
A candidate from beleaguered Chancellor Angela Merkel's Christian Democratic Union wins a convincing victory over the anti-immigrant Alternative for Germany (AfD) in the country's conservative east.
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News : NPR
Walmart Grocery challenges Amazon with new $98-a-year delivery option
The grocery delivery wars are hotting up. Walmart's latest effort is a $98-a-year subscription fee that offers free delivery on orders over $30. The service, called Delivery Unlimited, can be tried free for 15 days.
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Digital Trends | Technology News and Product Reviews
Asian shares wobble amid trade, geopolitical tensions; focus on Fed meeting
Asian shares wobbled near one-week lows on Monday as investors turned cautious ahead of a closely-watched Federal Reserve meeting, while political tensions in the Middle East and Hong Kong kept risk appetite in check.
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Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
Guatemala election headed for runoff, former first lady Torres leads
Guatemala's presidential election appeared to be headed for a runoff as partial results on Monday gave center-left candidate Sandra Torres an early lead but far short of the majority needed to avoid a second round against a conservative rival.
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Reuters: Top News - powered by FeedBurner
China Railway Construction says won't work with UBS on dollar-bond sale
China Railway Construction Corp (CRCC) has decided not to cooperate with UBS for a planned dollar-bond sale, a spokesman at the Chinese infrastructure giant told Reuters on Monday.
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REUTERS
Can you solve it? Are you in the smartest 1 per cent (of 13-year-olds)?
The test given to the UK’s maths prodigiesToday you are pitting yourselves against the best 13-year-old mathematicians in the UK.The questions below are taken from last week’s Junior Mathematical Olympiad, a competition aimed at children up to Year 8 (in England) who score in roughly the top half per cent of mathematical ability. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Exclusive: Banks face new challenges in Italian diamond scandal
(Please note strong language in paragraph 38.)
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REUTERS
Marathon swimmer who vanished on Hudson confirmed dead by his family
The marathon swimmer who disappeared during a 120-mile race on the Hudson River has been confirmed dead by his family, according to organizers. Dr. Charles Van Der Horst, 67, of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, had been competing in the “8 Bridges Race” on Friday when he vanished near the New Jersey side of the George...
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New York Post
7 reasons to visit Hoi An, one of Vietnam's most beautiful towns
Set on the banks of the Thu Bon River in central Vietnam, Hoi An is easily one of the most beautiful towns in Southeast Asia.
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Politica
'A minority within a minority': celebrating queer artists of colour
At a new exhbition, opening in pride month, the often overlooked work of LGBT black and Latinx artists is being spotlighted It’s pride month, which means gay culture is at the forefront all over the world. But beyond the rainbow flag emoji, there’s one art exhibition in San Francisco that digs beneath the surface to shine light on what the curator calls: “A minority within a minority.”Opening 29 June at the San Diego Art Institute, Forging Territories: Queer Afro and Latinx Contemporary Art showcases the works of 20 regional LGBTQ artists who have been overlooked in some way or another. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
David Lammy says England is failing those who don't go to university
Former universities minister warns that the lack of vocational alternatives is entrenching inequality England’s education system is failing young people who don’t go to university because there are too few quality routes for vocational education, says David Lammy, a Labour MP.“If you are academic, [England] is still one of the best countries in which to be born, particularly if you’re born into a middle-class family and your parents have some means,” said Lammy, MP for Tottenham. “But if you’re not academic I think there are quite a lot of countries we would choose above our own.” Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Dancer from the Dance by Andrew Holleran; Out of the Shadows by Walt Odets – review
A psychologist’s study of gay men and a cult 70s novel reveal the experiences of different generationsGiven the twerpish, if unsurprising, views of the recently elected MEP Ann Widdecombe, here are two books that could provide some much needed insight and education; one reissued classic and one new read, drawn from a lifetime of thinking about the lives of gay men.Dancer from the Dance, the 1978 novel by Andrew Holleran, a pen name of Eric Garber, is being revived by Vintage, with a new introduction from Alan Hollinghurst. It charts a life that Garber knew well, the club and cruising scene of 1970s New York, a space he’d immersed himself in while trying to become a writer. As often happens with literature, Garber had to leave to truly write about the place and inhabit its subject. He adopted a pseudonym and chronicled life he’d seen first-hand; the result is a cult gay classic. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Build it and they will bike: the second Bicycle Architecture Biennale – in pictures
15 projects from nine countries have been selected for the second Bicycle Architecture Biennale, which launches on Monday in Amsterdam Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Three to tango: the pregnant dancer duetting with her husband
A screen role as an expectant dancer prepared Bobbi Jene Smith for the real thing. She talks about doing the bump … with a bumpIt’s a case of life imitating art. In the new film Mari, Bobbi Jene Smith plays a dancer who discovers she’s pregnant just as she is choreographing her first big show. After the shoot, Smith became pregnant herself, and now must face some of the same challenges to her character.When I Skype the dancer in her New York apartment, she looks suitably glowing in the laptop’s wan light. “I don’t feel like I’m glowing!” she says. “I’m pretty tired. I can tell my body’s telling me: slow down.” Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Why sleeptrackers could lead to the rise of insomnia – and orthosomnia
In our chronically sleep-deprived society, many are using gadgets and apps to measure the quantity and quality of their shut-eye. But they could be causing more harm than goodFor more than nine months, Alex Whitecross’s routine on waking was to check the data about his sleep on his fitness tracker. And then he would feel quite anxious. “I started getting paranoid about how much sleep I was getting,” he says. Whitecross, a computer-aided-design technician from south Wales, says he bought his tracker in order to measure exercise, but became interested in the sleep-monitoring function. “I’m a lighter sleeper than my fiance so I thought it would help me, but it ended up having the opposite effect.”Sometimes he would check it in the night and feel panicked about how many hours he had until his alarm would go off. In the morning, “I would wake up and look at it, and it would say I’d had five hours and 44 minutes sleep, and spent an hour and 25 minutes awake at night. It made me feel more tired, knowing how little sleep I’d got.” He noticed, as time went on, “I was getting less and less sleep as I was wearing it”. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
The historical argument for impeaching Trump | Heather Cox Richardson
Since Nixon, Republicans have pushed the envelope under the guise of ‘patriotism’, and Democrats have tolerated it because of ‘civility’The question of impeaching Donald Trump is about replacing the toxic partisanship of today’s Republican party with America’s traditional rule of law. It has become a constitutional imperative. Related: What makes Beto run? This morning it's Pride and fighting prejudice Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
While the Sun Shines review – fresh-as-paint Rattigan revival
Orange Tree, RichmondSuperb performances power the ingeniously plotted story of a young earl’s marriage to the daughter of an impoverished dukeThe whirligig of time, as Shakespeare observed, brings in its revenges. Virtually banished in his later years by the Royal Court revolution, Terence Rattigan is now in constant revival and this 1943 farce comes up fresh as paint in Paul Miller’s strongly cast production.The plot revolves around a young earl’s impending marriage to the daughter of an impoverished Scottish duke. The problem is that, on the wedding eve, a muscular American bombardier and a passionate French lieutenant find themselves smitten by the future bride, which leads to a middle act full of buoyant confusion. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian
Top Gear would never have visited Brunei if it had already passed its homophobic stoning law | Andrew Flintoff
A segment of our new series was filmed in the sultanate. I was horrified when days later it passed this appalling lawBeing asked to present Top Gear was one of the best moments of my professional career, just behind captaining the England cricket team. I’ve always loved cars. I’ve always loved travelling the world. Top Gear lets me do both, with the added bonus of annoying Paddy McGuinness along the way.During filming for the new series we visited Ethiopia, a staggeringly beautiful country that surprised us at every turn. We’ve been to Iceland to compete in the most extreme off-road race series on the planet. And back in the spring we flew to Borneo to make a film with the Gurkhas, the British army’s elite infantry unit. Continue reading...
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US news | The Guardian