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Police say they’ve arrest man who threatened House speaker

Police in Virginia say they’ve arrested a man who threatened House Speaker Eileen Filler-Corn
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Navy scrambles to aid aircraft carrier as more than 100 sailors test positive for coronavirus
Most of the crew is still aboard the ship, where tight spaces make social distancing impossible.
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politico.com
Mexican president: My rivals will take over country if I self-quarantine
Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador says he won’t self-quarantine during the coronavirus pandemic because his political enemies would take over the country if he did, according to news reports. “Do you know what the conservatives want? For me to isolate myself,” the leftist president said, Mexico News Daily reported Monday. “There would be no...
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nypost.com
Plácido Domingo says he's at home and feels 'fine' after coronavirus battle
Plácido Domingo, who tested positive for the coronavirus March 22 and was reportedly hospitalized days ago, is home and feeling "fine," he said in a statement.
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latimes.com
Aircraft carrier captain begs Navy to contain on-board coronavirus outbreak
The captain of a US nuclear aircraft carrier where more than 100 sailors have tested positive for coronavirus issued a rare SOS to Navy brass — asking to quarantine his entire crew to contain the spread of the disease, according to a report. Navy Capt. Brett Crozier of the USS Theodore Roosevelt — which is...
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nypost.com
Ray-Ban takes 30% off eyewear and more for flash sale
Your search for trendy eyewear will be over after you shop Ray-Ban’s latest flash sale. The popular eyewear brand is taking 30% off all eyewear and accessories. The sale features a variety of styles so you won’t have a problem finding the perfect frame. You can rock these classic Clubmaster sunnies or make a statement with...
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nypost.com
Stocks on track for worst quarter since 2008
The Dow has shed 22% of its value since the year started and COVID-19 shut down broad swaths of the economy.
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cbsnews.com
Super pink moon: NASA's top tips for April skywatchers
Skywatchers are in for a treat in April when the super pink moon, the biggest supermoon of 2020, lights up the night sky.
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foxnews.com
When a TV Adaptation Does What the Book Could Not
At first glance, the novel Little Fires Everywhere seems to be a suburban whodunit. In the opening chapter, a house in the progressive neighborhood of Shaker Heights, Ohio, has burned down after someone set a series of fires inside its bedrooms—and no one knows why. But then the tale rewinds to the previous summer, and from there it becomes a study of two women—Elena Richardson, a wealthy mother of four, and Mia Warren, a nomadic single mom, who become inextricably linked. Their relationships stir up a dangerous obsession among both families, revealing the story to be less a crime thriller and more a clever, moving examination of motherhood, female ambition, and sexual politics.Set in 1997, Little Fires is an audacious novel, hence the 48 weeks it spent on the New York Times’ hardcover fiction bestseller list. It’s not just the story of two women who don’t get along. The author Celeste Ng posits that their conflict stems from the fact that they are not meant to connect, because they are constrained by their circumstances. Elena, who’s rich and intelligent and mannerly, understands success to mean a nuclear family. To her, Mia’s lifestyle as an artist and a photographer seems exotic. The privileged Elena will always see Mia as inferior, even if she refuses to admit it.Ng had originally intended to make their differences even clearer. Elena’s white, but Ng never defined Mia’s ethnicity. “Initially I had wanted to write [Mia and her daughter, Pearl] as people of color,” the author, who’s Asian-American, told me in February. “I thought of them as people of color, because I knew I wanted to talk about race and class, and those things are so intertwined in our country and in our culture… But I didn’t feel like I was the right person to try to bring a black woman’s experience to the page.”The small-screen adaptation, which currently airs a new episode on Hulu every Wednesday, doesn’t just take the story from the page to the screen, but goes where Ng felt she couldn’t go on her own. The show focuses on race as one of the crucial contrasts between Elena (Reese Witherspoon) and Mia (Kerry Washington). Though the book works without that detail, it presents a missed opportunity to make the relationship between the families even knottier. Shaker Heights residents take pride in the fact that their community was one of the first suburbs to racially integrate, for instance. If Ng had made Mia a woman of color, she could have delved further into that attitude through Elena. Plus, the dynamics between their families offer plenty of chances to incorporate race: The Richardsons often ogle the Warrens and pride themselves on knowing them; one of the children considers Pearl his “claim” because he befriended her first. Elena is troubled by Mia and what she calls the “dark discomfort” Mia inspires in her. And Mia cares deeply about ownership—of her art, of Pearl, and of her identity. In retrospect, it’s clear Ng was tiptoeing toward defining Mia’s race. Out of a feeling of authorial responsibility, she chose not to.But a TV series doesn't have such a choice. And while adaptations are never carbon copies of their source material, Little Fires Everywhere hasn’t just made a change for cosmetic reasons. The concept of caging others and being caged by others—based on one’s background, values, and lifestyle—serves as a pivotal theme to Ng’s novel. Throughout the first half of the season, defining the Warrens as black complicates that theme.The show is a study of two contrasting women, Elena (Reese Witherspoon) and Mia (Kerry Washington), who are constrained by their circumstances. (Erin Simkin / Hulu)Take the subplot between Elena’s daughter, Lexie (Jade Pettyjohn), and Mia’s daughter, Pearl (Lexi Underwood), for example. In the book and the show, Pearl is dazzled by the older Lexie; she’s enamored with her confidence, her clothes, and her social standing as the queen bee of Shaker Heights High School. On the page, Lexie takes advantage of Pearl’s naivete and admiration: When Pearl, hoping to impress Lexie, offers to help her write her college application essay, Lexie accepts—and has her write the entire piece. On the screen, Lexie does the same, but in a slightly different way. Instead of Pearl writing it, Lexie takes a story Pearl told her—about being denied entry into an honors class at Shaker because her guidance counselor assumed she, a black student who moved often, hadn’t taken enough math classes—and tells it as her own for her essay. (The prompt required her to write about a hardship she’d experienced, and Lexie had struggled to come up with anything that seemed serious enough.) Lexie tells herself it’s okay, but she also feels guilty about plagiarizing her friend’s experience. She takes Pearl shopping, and tries to clear the air without explaining what she did. “I mean, whether you’re black or a girl or, like, both, when something happens to one of us, it’s like it happens to all of us, you know?” she asks.In a scene like this, the series captures the relationship’s dynamics as illustrated in the novel and furthers them: Lexie already perceives herself to be more powerful than Pearl, because of her age and social standing at school, but how would their races play into that? If being “colorblind”—a popular belief in the ’90s—means seeing “beyond” race, why does Lexie feel the need to confirm that Pearl agrees that being marginalized for being black is the same as being marginalized for being a girl? The book and the series may be set decades ago, but these questions make the series feel timely, reflecting the ways in which perhaps little has changed.In making the pivotal change to Mia and Pearl’s race, however, the writers of Little Fires Everywhere needed to ensure that they told the characters’ stories authentically. The showrunner Liz Tigelaar, as a white woman, pondered the issue—one that’s been at the center of several recent controversies over art and authentic authorship—early on. “It’s like, why are you the person to adapt this novel?’” she said. “I think that’s a fair question.”To answer it, Tigelaar began by searching for her “points of connectivity” with the source material. (For instance, she drew from her experience as an adoptee to understand the novel’s subplot about an adopted child whose mother wants to regain custody.) From there, she sought writers who could personally connect with characters’ perspectives, ones who understood the experience of black women, of single mothers, of adoptive parents, of suburban Ohioans, and so on—in her words, “the whole gamut.” “I knew things were going to change [as a result of Mia and Pearl being black], and I had my own ideas of how they would change,” she said, “but it really wasn’t until all our voices came together with everyone’s point of view that we were able to really go in and start to reexamine every moment.” Eventually, the writers room grew to seven people, a larger-than-average size for a limited series such as this, which usually brings on board three to four writers. “We collaborated with the studio and found the money,” Beatrice Springborn, Hulu’s VP of content development, told me over the phone, “because we felt like it was the right thing to do for this project.”There may be a lot riding on the series’ success, but there’s even more pressure on the writers to do the story justice. After all, it’s not as if Little Fires Everywhere, the book, ignored the topic of race. Ng tackles the subject deftly in the subplot about a Chinese baby adopted by a white family, whose mother tries to take her back. In that arc, the characters debate the child’s future and the notion of whether she would have a “better life” with an adoptive family who doesn’t understand her culture, or with a single mother who does.That conflict has begun to play out in the series as well. But while the book refuses to take a side, the show escalates the drama: In the third episode, Bebe Chow (Lu Huang), the baby’s biological mother, stormed into the adoptive family’s home, desperate to see her child. The fourth episode then followed Elena’s efforts to stop Bebe from pursuing custody by offering her $10,000—money that Bebe rejects, insulted by Elena’s attempt to buy her out. Elena, the show suggests, is in the wrong. Tigelaar, an adoptee herself, told me the series isn’t trying to demonize adoption, but to illustrate one of many debates the shows’ writers themselves had when interpreting Ng’s novel: whether Elena sided with the adoptive parents simply because they’re friends, or because they’re white and therefore more fit to raise a child in her eyes.In both the book and the show, Elena sees Mia as inferior, even if she refuses to admit it. The show, though, complicates their relationship further by defining Mia as black. (Erin Simkin / Hulu)Those debates were the point. Tigelaar wanted to establish a “common language” in the room about the book’s social commentary, so she assigned homework—including the sociologist Robin DiAngelo’s book White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism—and asked the team to share research and reading material. She encouraged her writers to wrangle with every plot point. “Every choice, every line of dialogue, every debate in the room, when I watch the episodes, feel so scrutinized because everyone kicked the tires,” Tigelaar said. “The room was a really transformative experience. I came out of it a very different person.”Such discussions led to some of the most challenging scenes in the series so far, scenes that add nuance to the story and code characters’ relationships in a new way. When Elena tells Pearl that she’s “welcome” at the Richardsons’ home anytime, for example, the offer takes on a more complicated subtext: Elena clearly considers her way of life “normal” compared to Pearl’s own and appears to expect Pearl to thank her for being comfortable with having her around. (The book characterizes Elena’s actions as merely those of a woman happy to have her children’s friends over.) Mia’s discomfort with Pearl’s interest in the Richardsons becomes richer in light of their racial differences. When Mia sees the ways Lexie has influenced Pearl’s wardrobe and mannerisms, she’s not just worried her daughter has gotten too close to another family, but that her daughter is abandoning her racial identity in favor of adopting another. The book delves into the influence a mother can have on her child’s values; the show builds on that, adding the conversation around how a dominant culture can do the same and smother another.With eight episodes, the series has more room to explore the characters’ life stories than the book does. Ng spends a chapter uncovering Mia’s past, but sprinkles details of Elena’s throughout the narrative. The series, on the other hand, devotes an upcoming episode to both women’s lives before they became mothers, and even uses some cold opens to examine flashbacks of supporting characters. The show also invents new character arcs for the ensemble: Izzy (Megan Stott), for example, is no longer the Richardson family outcast merely because she’s rebellious. She’s exploring her sexuality and attraction to her female former best friend—a conflict that deepens the rift between her and the conservative Elena. These additions demonstrate the writers’ intense interest in the novel’s social commentary and in using Ng’s story as a means to have timely conversations about race and gender.The show is clearly trying to cover the bases Ng couldn’t get to herself, and it’s admirable to see an adaptation try to improve upon its source material and write toward a savvy audience mindful of social and racial issues. Yet in some ways, it can seem like the show is firing in too many directions at once. Supporting characters get more screen time, but often contribute little to the series’ message. Elena’s relationship with her husband, Bill (Joshua Jackson), for example, is used to illustrate the power dynamics of a marriage, but the arc distracts. He’s useful as further evidence of her controlling behavior—she even regulates when they’re allowed to have sex—but the series’ attempt to develop Bill muddles the audience’s understanding of Elena. In their scenes, she’s portrayed as an absolute villain rather than a complicated woman whose actions are rooted in her belief that she has the best intentions. In that sense, Ng’s laser focus in plotting her novel made it clear what she cared most about: the complicated nature of being a mother.Tigelaar, though, certainly hopes her assembled team of writers with intersecting, diverse experiences can do justice to the characters’ journeys. “I feel a lot of peace with this because of the voices involved, that I think anything anybody might question or write is something that we endlessly talked about in the room,” she told me. “We did not take a step without three people being like, ‘Wait a minute, hold on, let me think of it this way, or this way.’”And Ng, for her part, has no qualms with the series’ writers’ ambitions. She’s grateful Little Fires Everywhere grew beyond her book, with a team who could take it where she could not. (“My job as a fiction writer is usually me alone in my house, in my home office, possibly wearing sweatpants with my laptop,” she quipped.) Besides, she sees the room as an example of why it’s important to question the authenticity of certain stories and interrogate whether a writer is the right fit for the assignment. “It’s such a complicated thing to try and suss out ... It’s not just a writer by writer conversation or a ‘is this writer allowed to write about this,’” she continued. “It’s really sort of, ‘Can this writer do justice to it? … You are allowed to write what you want, but it is on you to try to do it right.”
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theatlantic.com
New York, 'Still In Search Of The Apex,' Sees Another Spike In Coronavirus Cases
The state has reported more than 75,000 confirmed cases, but Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the peak is still to come. On Tuesday he expressed frustration that FEMA was hindering, not helping, its efforts.
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npr.org
What's Leaving Netflix in April 2020? It's Last Call for All of These Titles
You better watch all seven 'Police Academy' films while you still can.
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newsweek.com
13 must-haves from Maisonette, the online children's shop fashion people love
Our favorite pieces for spring from Maisonette       
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usatoday.com
More hard proof that erectile dysfunction leads to early death, study finds
For men, problems in the sack might just be the canary in the coal mine. A growing body of evidence indicates erectile dysfunction may also be a harbinger of premature death. More than 30 million Americans suffer from ED, defined by the inability to conjure and hold an erection long enough to perform in bed....
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nypost.com
Coronavirus lockdown in India spurs probe after migrant workers sprayed with 'chemical solution'
Authorities in India are investigating after a group of migrant workers was seen being sprayed with a chemical solution upon their arrival to a village, following a nationwide lockdown put in place to stop the spread of coronavirus.
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foxnews.com
Governors contradict Trump on lack of coronavirus tests
In audio obtained by The New York Times, President Donald Trump told governors during a conference call that he had not "heard about testing in weeks," suggesting that a lack of kits to screen people for the coronavirus was no longer a problem.
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edition.cnn.com
Coronavirus hits the economy where it hurts: Consumer confidence
Steep dents in consumer optimism are to be expected with such severe and widespread economic pain.
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politico.com
De Blasio says US Open coronavirus hospital will be at ‘full capacity’ next week
The city’s latest planned makeshift hospital — at the Queens stadium that houses the US Tennis Open — will quickly be at “full capacity” when it starts taking coronavirus patients next week, Mayor Bill de Blasio predicted Tuesday. Hizzoner spoke at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, which will offer the city’s struggling hospitals...
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nypost.com
Chris Godwin is letting Tom Brady have jersey No. 12 for free
Tom Brady has linked his brand to his jersey number, No. 12. Tampa Bay Buccaneers receiver Chris Godwin is letting his new quarterback have the number for free.
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latimes.com
Feds uncover opioids, meth, cocaine in tunnel beneath US-Mexico border
U.S. border authorities have seized a trove of drugs hidden in a sophisticated cross-border tunnel beneath the California-Mexico border, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced Tuesday.
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foxnews.com
Italy has lowest daily coronavirus infections in 2 weeks — but risks losing control in south with fear of riots, looting
Italy on Tuesday saw the lowest daily increase in confirmed coronavirus cases in two weeks, but risks losing control of its poorer southern region amid rioting and looting during times of greater economic hardship prompted by a nationwide lockdown that has shut down all non-essential business.
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foxnews.com
Fox News Channel ratings for first quarter of 2020 are the highest in network history
The first quarter of 2020 was jam-packed with news, from the impeachment trial of President Trump to the growing coronavirus pandemic, and Americans relied on Fox News for the latest news and information. 
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foxnews.com
Hiking during the coronavirus pandemic? Here's how to stay safe on the trails.
Trail experts and associations offer some tips to keep hikers get exercise and fresh air while still keeping safe during the coronavirus pandemic.       
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usatoday.com
Brooklyn hospital resumes use of forklift to move bodies amid coronavirus
A Brooklyn hospital on Tuesday resumed its use of a forklift to move the dead bodies of coronavirus victims, just hours after the shocking practice was exposed on the front page of The Post. The red forklift was pressed back into service shortly before 11 a.m., and by 1:30 p.m. had shuttled more than 15...
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nypost.com
Looking to brighter days, Natural History Museum wins county funding for a makeover
L.A. County releases $15 million toward Natural History Museum plans for a new entrance, theater and cafe. Another $15 million is approved for later.
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latimes.com
Teddy bear hunt helping kids have fun amid coronavirus lockdown
Inspired by the book “We’re Going on a Bear Hunt” by British author Michael Rosen, the stuffed toys have been cropping up in windows, including in the US, providing kids a safe activity.
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nypost.com
Jets NFL Mock Draft: Jerry Jeudy is first of few offensive weapons they’ll add
With free agency basically over, the Jets are now preparing for the NFL Draft, which begins on April 23. They are unable to meet with draft prospects due to the coronavirus pandemic, but are conducting video interviews with players and finalizing their draft board. Each week up until the Draft, we will conduct a seven-round...
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nypost.com
Opinion: Boris Johnson learns no one is immune to Covid-19
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has spent a lifetime convinced he is immune from the rules lesser mortals must abide by. The trouble is, no one told Covid-19.
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edition.cnn.com
Tomie dePaola, beloved children's author and illustrator of 'Strega Nona,' dies at 85
DePaola wrote or illustrated more than 270 children's books, sold nearly 25 million copies and had his books translated into more than 20 languages.
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latimes.com
Coronavirus outbreak at Massachusetts veterans' home kills at least 6, additional tests pending
Eleven veterans at the facility have died this month, five of whom tested positive for coronavirus, with an additional five test results pending.
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foxnews.com
At White House, MyPillow CEO tells Americans to read Bible
"I encourage you to use this time at home to get back in the Word, read our Bibles and spend time with our families," he said.
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cbsnews.com
Zoom’s sudden spike in popularity is revealing its privacy (and porn) problems
Zoom lets you stay in touch while social distancing, but it has issues. | PA Images via Getty Images Zoom’s best month could also be its worst. Zoom, the videoconferencing app that’s dominating our coronavirus-created work, school, and social lives, is more popular than ever. With this popularity has come a wave of scrutiny, and Zoom’s new users have been joined by a lawsuit, a letter from a state attorney general, and accusations of shady privacy practices. On Monday, Zoom found itself the recipient of not just a letter from New York Attorney General Letitia James but also a class action lawsuit, both over privacy issues that have been brewing since even before the coronavirus existed but which gained momentum once seemingly everyone began using it. How lax security brought us “Zoombombing” Zoom was released in 2013 and steadily climbed the videoconferencing app ranks, becoming one of the most popular business apps out there for the last several years. When the pandemic hit, forcing millions of workers and students to work remotely and friends and family members to interact virtually, many of them turned to Zoom. It is currently the most popular Apple and Android app in the world, and its stock price has more than doubled since late January — an especially impressive rise considering the stock market crash that also occurred during this time. Leading up to the pandemic, Zoom suffered from several security issues, including a well-publicized vulnerability that could force Mac users that have (or ever had) Zoom installed on their device to join Zoom meetings with their cameras automatically activated. In January, cybersecurity firm Check Point found a way that a hacker could easily generate active meeting ID numbers, which they could then use to join meetings if the meetings weren’t password protected. Zoom instituted a number of changes to help fix the issue, but Check Point’s recommendation that meetings must be password protected was not. So now we have “Zoombombing,” where public Zoom meetings are joined by a troll who broadcasts things like porn and Nazi imagery to the rest of the room. Public Zoom events that have been targeted must shut down to stop the broadcast. There are ways to mitigate this, such as password protecting meetings or limiting the screensharing setting to the meeting host. But the fact that it is so easy for anyone to join and then disrupt a public Zoom meeting at all indicates that Zoom’s developers didn’t anticipate the ways those meetings could be disrupted in the first place — something that anyone who has used the internet before really should have foreseen. James, the New York Attorney General, sent Zoom a letter on Monday saying her office was “concerned” that Zoom’s security practices weren’t enough to handle its sudden boom in users, and it wanted to know what, if any, measures the company was taking to improve them. The New York Attorney General’s office also wanted to know what data the app collects about its users and why, and how it was following legal requirements to get consent from minor users. Why Zoom’s privacy problems probably won’t ruin your day Some of Zoom’s other recent sources of controversy, namely those related to privacy concerns, may have been blown out of proportion. When its “attention tracking” feature was highlighted, many thought it allowed Zoom meeting hosts to secretly monitor their participants’ activities. The truth is less sensational: attention tracking can be turned on by the meeting host without participants’ knowledge. This can certainly feel like a privacy invasion. But Zoom told Recode that the feature is only enabled when the host is in screensharing mode, and it only tells the host which participants haven’t had its app in focus for 30 seconds or more. In other words, a meeting host can’t monitor everything the participants are doing on their computers — just when they stop looking at Zoom for a while. Another recent dustup followed a Vice report last week that Zoom’s iOS app sends data back to Facebook through a software development kit, or SDK. (SDKs are packages of tools that developers use to build apps, and it’s very common for apps to have third-party SDKs that transmit information back to those third parties.) Facebook’s SDKs are some of the most popular in the world, mobile app intelligence service Apptopia told Recode, with at least a million apps using its most popular social SDK and at least half a million apps using its login SDK. The login SDK enables users to log in to Zoom through their Facebook accounts, and in Zoom’s case, it also sent basic device information back to Facebook, including the device’s model, app version, and cellphone service carrier. It’s hard to know what Facebook was doing with this data. Cybersecurity company Bitdefender did find it unusual that the SDK sent this data back to Facebook even if the user didn’t log in through Facebook (or have a Facebook account at all). It did not tell Facebook which meetings the user joined or what was said in them. Zoom claimed it didn’t realize this information was being sent to Facebook and removed the SDK after Vice’s report. A class action lawsuit was filed several days later accusing Zoom of collecting and disclosing information about its users without properly notifying them. The trouble doesn’t end there. On Tuesday, the Intercept reported that Zoom inaccurately claims that meetings can be “end-to-end encrypted.” In true end-to-end encrypted services like WhatsApp and Signal, the message content is encrypted even from the service provider. Zoom’s video chats can be seen by Zoom, although according to the Intercept, text chats in those meetings are truly end-to-end encrypted. What’s Zoom’s problem? With its vaguely worded privacy policies and misleading marketing materials, Zoom’s real overarching issue seems to be a lack of transparency. Combine that with an apparent lack of forethought about how video meetings with insufficient privacy protections — both on the back and the front end — could be exploited by hackers or trolls. This entire scenario becomes especially problematic considering the growing number of students that Zoom eagerly recruits for the platform. It all seems like a bad publicity time bomb that went off as soon as Zoom became an essential piece of pandemic software and people started really looking more closely at how the service worked. It remains to be seen just how damaging these reports will be. Some schools are already backing off using Zoom. Public schools in Fairfax County, Virginia, for example, announced on Monday night that they “can no longer use Zoom” for video calls. Then again, the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, currently quarantined after contracting coronavirus, hosted a cabinet meeting over a (password protected) Zoom call today. Perhaps Zoom is just too popular and necessary to fail now. Or maybe its problems are just beginning. Open Sourced is made possible by Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists.
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vox.com
Demand for food stamps surges in California as virus takes economic toll
The economic toll of the COVID-19 pandemic has spurred a record surge in the number of people applying to CalFresh, the state's food stamp program.
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latimes.com
Everything We Know about Betsy DeVos' Microgrants For Students and Teachers Hit by Coronavirus Crisis
"We know this crisis is putting added burden on families and the microgrants are meant to help overcome that challenge," an Education Department spokesperson told Newsweek.
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newsweek.com
Cops probe grocery store burglaries in the Bronx, Queens
The crooks are not self isolating. Cops are probing break-ins at food stores in the Bronx and Queens and a Bronx liquor store, police sources said. Two identified men cut a hole in the roof of Vitelio’s Marketplace in Forest Hills at 2 a.m. Monday, and made off with $10,000 from cash registers and employee...
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nypost.com
Sociologist who trekked nearly every NYC block dies from coronavirus
A distinguished sociologist who visited nearly every street in New York City's five boroughs—on foot—has died from the coronavirus.
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foxnews.com
From bartering to begging for relief, struggling Americans confront April rent
New York hair stylist Vanessa Karim has not worked since March 21, when the state closed all salons to slow the spread of the coronavirus. She only has enough cash on hand to cover half of her $1,400 April rent.
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reuters.com
Airbnb apologizes to hosts for coronavirus cancellation policies, will pay out $250 million
Nothing says "I'm sorry" like $250 million.
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foxnews.com
McConnell says Trump impeachment trial 'diverted the attention' of the government as coronavirus entered US
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., argued Tuesday the federal government was distracted by the Democratic-led impeachment trial of President Trump when the coronavirus outbreak began.
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus' frightening profile: Who is more likely to die from COVID-19?
As coronavirus tears through the world, public health professionals and medical experts are endeavoring to solve the many mysteries surrounding who the novel disease is striking the hardest, and put together something of a profile to determine who is more likely to get infected, who is more likely to require intensive care, and who is more likely to succumb to the officially termed COVID-19.
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foxnews.com
New York City launches coronavirus portal to assist infected residents
New York City has created an online engagement portal for any resident who is infected with coronavirus or experiencing symptoms.
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abcnews.go.com
Houseparty fights hacking charges; how to delete app
Houseparty, the app owned by Epic Games of Fortnite fame, said on Twitter that hacking rumors are part of a "smear campaign," and is fighting back      
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usatoday.com
Coronavirus may make weather forecasts less accurate as flights canceled across the world
The coronavirus pandemic that's caused a freefall of air travel and spurred airlines to ground aircraft may end up making weather forecasts less accurate. 
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foxnews.com
750,000 volunteers to help U.K. health service manage COVID-19
Three times more people than expected applied to the massive new volunteer program, which will help ensure the most vulnerable get the help they need.
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cbsnews.com
Squabbling over 4th coronavirus bailout bill begins, but passage is likely weeks away
The House is working behind the scenes on another coronavirus relief package. Senate Republicans say it is too soon.
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latimes.com
Here's how to help with coronavirus relief by dining with Bill Walton
Lunch with Bill Walton is one item in CollectibleXchange's charity auction to benefit World Health Organization's COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund.
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latimes.com
WHO expert warns countries easing coronavirus restrictions to keep guard up
A health expert at the World Health Organization said on Tuesday that countries that have relaxed earlier coronavirus bans due to low transmission rates should keep their guard up due to the threat of the virus surging back. Takeshi Kasai, the regional director for the Western Pacific at the WHO, told Reuters that the new...
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nypost.com
Italy Observes Moment Of Silence For COVID-19 Victims, As Case Numbers Plateau
As the country moves into its fourth week of lockdown, the head of Italy's national institutes of health announced that the country "has reached a plateau" in its infection rate.
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npr.org
'The Last Song' turns 10: A look back at the film
Now 10 years old, "The Last Song" is known for its guilty pleasure-style romance that all Nicholas Sparks adaptations embrace, but with a teenage twist.
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foxnews.com
'Tiger King' Don Lewis' cold case revisited, Florida sheriff seeks new tips from public
"Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness" has quickly become the biggest diversion from the coronavirus pandemic. Now, a Florida sheriff is revisiting one of the series' lingering mysteries: What happened to Carole Baskins' husband?
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foxnews.com