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Dylan Howard leaves National Enquirer’s owner after slew of scandals
Dylan Howard, the National Enquirer editor who was caught in a hush-money scheme to silence women who claimed they had affairs with President Trump, has reportedly left the supermarket tabloid’s parent company, American Media Inc. Howard — an 11-year veteran at American Media who in 2014 was promoted to chief content officer, the top editorial...
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nypost.com
The Google doc that is keeping Yankees pitchers connected
The Yankees are stuck at home, like most of us. So, they’re working like many of us do. With players, coaches, training and medical staff spread all around the country, the team is keeping track of its pitchers’ indefinite offseason preparations via Google Docs. “Whatever you’re doing, whatever you threw that day or whatever you...
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nypost.com
R. Kelly Judge Says No To Prison Release Despite COVID-19 Fears
The judge rejected Kelly's request to be released citing that he is not at high risk, nor has he demonstrated that he is not a flight risk.
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newsweek.com
Long Lines, Masks And Plexiglas Barriers Greet Wisconsin Voters At Polls
After an 11th-hour scramble, Wisconsin forged ahead with its election, despite fears about the coronavirus outbreak and an ongoing stay-at-home order.
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npr.org
Walmart sued by family of worker who died of COVID-19
Lawsuit alleges retailer failed to warn others after employee showed disease symptoms before being sent home and dying.
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cbsnews.com
Couple married for over 50 years die of coronavirus holding hands
An elderly Mississippi couple died from the coronavirus just minutes apart while holding hands — after they contracted the deadly illness on a cruise ship, their pastor said. Jerry Austin Williamson and his wife, Frances Jewel Bond Williamson, both 72, died hand-in-hand on Wednesday just six minutes apart, North Long Beach Baptist Church Pastor Rick...
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nypost.com
Plasma infusions from coronavirus survivors may help ill recover: study
Doctors in China say they have preliminary but promising evidence that blood plasma taken from recovered coronavirus patients can be injected into those who are more seriously ill — and aid remarkably in their recovery. The pilot studies involved two small sets of severely ailing coronavirus patients in different hospitals, the Guardian reported. In one...
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nypost.com
Michelle Money says daughter Brielle, 15, ‘doing well’ on life support
She recently underwent brain surgery.
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nypost.com
Amazon is dropping prices on nearly all Echo products
If you've had your eye on any Amazon Echo, now's the time to buy. Amazon has dropped prices on nearly every Echo device. We're breaking down the discounts on this product lineup.
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edition.cnn.com
McConnell: Senate to boost small business loan program with possible action on Thursday
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced Tuesday that the Senate will push this week for additional funds for a small business loan program to keep workers on the payroll during the coronavirus pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
Finland to begin randomized coronavirus antibody testing
HELSINKI – Finland will start tracking the spread of the new coronavirus in its population with randomized antibody tests, its public health authority said on Tuesday. The main hospitals will mail invitation letters to randomly chosen citizens of all ages to be tested for the antibodies which patients suffering from COVID-19 develop, including those who...
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nypost.com
NBC affiliate apologizes for ‘misjudgment’ in tweet that appeared to mock Ralph Northam’s blackface scandal
NBC’s Washington, D.C. affiliate apologized on Monday for a “misjudgment” that appeared to poke fun at Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam for his infamous blackface scandal. 
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foxnews.com
Scientists believe they discovered the 'smoking gun' that changed Uranus forever
Uranus was hit by a mysterious space object shortly after the planet formed, causing it to tilt approximately 98 degrees, compared to the plane of the Solar System. Now, researchers believe they have discovered what impacted the ice giant.
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foxnews.com
More Than 20,000 Coronavirus Patients in the U.S. Have Recovered From Infection
The U.S. has reportedly seen more than double the coronavirus recoveries in South Korea, which previously recorded the highest number of cases outside China.
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newsweek.com
MLB says it discussed starting the season with all games in a central location
Major League Baseball stated Tuesday that holding games in one central area is one of several ideas discussed regarding how and when to start the season.
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latimes.com
New York’s battle with coronavirus continues, Boris Johnson remains in ICU: Tuesday’s coronavirus news
A worker delivers toilet paper and tissues to the Wyckoff Heights Medical Center on April 7, 2020 in Brooklyn, New York. | Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images Here’s what you need to to know today. In New York, officials were cautiously hopeful that the coronavirus outbreak there might be beginning to stabilize. For two days in a row, the death toll has stayed below 600. That changed Tuesday, however, with the death toll reaching a record-high 731. Still, there was a sliver of some good news, as hospitalizations may be stabilizing. Still, it is a reminder that the United States is braced for a challenging week. The number of confirmed cases in the country now exceeds 369,000 as of April 7, with a death toll around 11,000. Health care workers are on the frontlines of the crisis in the US, but so too are the grocery store and pharmacy workers who are the lifelines for people to buy food, medicine, and other vital goods. And now, they too are starting to succumb to Covid-19. According to the Washington Post, at least four workers in retail stores have died from the coronavirus across the country. The United Kingdom is on edge as the coronavirus crisis has reached the highest levels of government. Prime Minister Boris Johnson remains in an intensive care unit battling coronavirus symptoms, as the UK tries to bring its outbreak under control. Here’s what you need to know today. Another look at America’s epicenter White House officialshave said the country must prepare for a very difficult week. But there are some signs of hope that social distancing measures are helping to “flatten the curve” in places that have been at the center of the outbreak, like New York City and the surrounding areas. But the city isn’t out of the worst of it yet. For two days in a row, deaths in New York have stayed below 600. Then, on Tuesday, the number of deaths in the last 24 hours reached 731. Hospitalization rates in New York are also beginning to stabilize, and New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said Tuesday that he believed New York might be reaching a plateau in hospitalization rates. New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio also said Tuesday that the number of patients being placed on ventilators in recent days has improved. It’s really too soon to know for sure if this is a blip, or a real sign that infections are slowing. Either way, the message from officials is clear: Social distancing is working, and we can’t stop now. “We get reckless,” Cuomo said, “you will see these numbers go up again.” Grocery workers are dying from Covid-19 The majority of states have asked nonessential businesses to shutter, but places that sell groceries or other essential goods remain open. And those workers — the cashiers, the greeters, the stockers, the janitors, the managers — are another workforce on the frontlines of the crisis. According to the Washington Post, at least four such workers have died in recent days from the coronavirus: A Trader Joe’s worker in Scarsdale, N.Y., a greeter at a Giant store in Largo, Md., and two Walmart employees from the same Chicago-area store have died of covid-19, the disease the novel coronavirus causes, in recent days, the companies confirmed Monday. This may not even capture the scale of the crisis, as workers fall ill and companies rush to hire more workers to meet the spike in demand at grocery and other stores. While companies are now offering more protections to workers such as gloves and masks, employees are still putting themselves at risk. Congress is considering adding hazard pay to another coronavirus stimulus bill, which would supplement incomes for essential workers, including grocery store clerks, postal workers, and truck drivers. The UK’s Boris Johnson is in ICU British Prime Minister Boris Johnson remains in the intensive care unit due to his worsening coronavirus symptoms. He is receiving oxygen, but is not on a ventilator and does not have pneumonia, a spokesperson for the prime minister said Tuesday. Johnson, the spokesperson said, was “stable.” Dominic Raab, the UK’s foreign secretary, has been deputized to take over for Johnson where needed. Raab has been leading the daily coronavirus response meetings, but Johnson’s absence has raised concerns about the government’s management of the coronavirus emergency. Michael Gove, another cabinet official who’s helping to coordinate the UK’s coronavirus response, also went into self-isolation on Tuesday, just as a precaution because a family member had shown symptoms, but he is continuing to work as normal. The UK’s stay-at-home orders are also set to expire this coming Monday, and the government hasn’t made an official announcement yet on whether it will extend them. And some good news This story is a few days old, but whatever, good news is hard to find these days. In Brooklyn, a landlord, Mario Salerno, told his tenants not to worry about April rent. He told the New York Times that meant not collecting rent from some 80 apartments, maybe 200 or 300 tenants, but his main concern was the health and safety of his tenants. While most renters can’t rely on a generous landlord, and more needs to be done to keep people in their homes, it’s always nice calling out an act of kindness and decency during these troubled times.
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vox.com
Maria Bartiromo on market gains: 'Signs of optimism' as coronavirus outbreaks slow
Fox Business anchor Maria Bartiromo said on “America’s Newsroom” on Tuesday that U.S. equity markets are soaring for a second straight day because “we’ve got some signs of optimism.”
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foxnews.com
What It's Really Like to Work For The 'Tiger King's' Carole Baskin
Volunteers donated their time at Big Cat Rescue to help exotic cats survive and return back to the wild.
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newsweek.com
New York City Coronavirus Deaths Now Outnumber 9/11 Ground Zero Toll
New York state recorded 731 new coronavirus deaths Tuesday, its biggest one-day jump yet
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time.com
How coronavirus is impacting pollution across the globe
With mass lockdowns in place across the globe, the coronavirus pandemic is having a major impact on pollution, according to experts.
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foxnews.com
From money trees to hybrid flowers here are our favorite tips for Animal Crossing New Horizons
We're big fans of Animal Crossing New Horizons and our full review is just the tip of the iceberg. As is the nature with any game, the more you play the more you discover. That's no different with New Horizons.
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edition.cnn.com
Dorinda Medley says she wouldn’t want to quarantine with Tinsley Mortimer
"We just run our lives so differently, you know. We’re, we’re totally different women."
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nypost.com
Coronavirus exerts heavy toll on blacks in places like Chicago
The coronavirus is exerting a disproportionate toll on blacks in places like Chicago, according to new statistics.
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foxnews.com
New York suffers deadliest day in coronavirus crisis
New York has suffered its deadliest day in the novel coronavirus pandemic, with 731 fatalities in the last 24 hours, although Governor Andrew Cuomo said hospitalizations were reaching a plateau in a promising sign for the hardest-hit state.
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reuters.com
Firms backing anti-China suit suggest country is behind uptick in incoming cyberattacks
Berman Law Group, the class-action firm running the suit, and Lucas Compton, the lobbying firm partnered with Berman to run PR and government-relations related to the suit, said they are seeing upwards of 5,000 cyberattacks on their systems per day, and suggest the attacks may be coming from the Chinese government.
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foxnews.com
Pennsylvania's colorful 'Graffiti Highway' is being shut down for good
Pennsylvania's "Graffiti Highway," an abandoned stretch of road that's become an unofficial tourist attraction, is being covered with truckloads of dirt to discourage trespassers.
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edition.cnn.com
Governor Cuomo on the deadliest day yet from coronavirus in New York
At his daily briefing Tuesday, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said the state recorded 731 deaths from COVID-19 on Monday, April 6 - the largest daily toll yet. But he said hospitals and overflow medical facilities like the USNS Comfort are cooperating and keeping up with demands so far. Watch his remarks.
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cbsnews.com
New York coronavirus deaths on the rise again after temporarily staying flat, Cuomo says
The number of coronavirus deaths in New York has increased by 731 overnight in what has been the largest daily leap yet, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Tuesday. 
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foxnews.com
See the hilarious way this news station is reminding people what day it is
Fox 8 Cleveland anchor Todd Meany is reminding viewers working from home during the Covid-19 pandemic what day it is.
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edition.cnn.com
Dr. Oz catches Trump's attention as he pushes unproven drug to fight coronavirus
As President Donald Trump flips through the cable news channels, one doctor in particular has caught his eye: Dr. Mehmet Oz, the celebrity cardiac surgeon whose medical advice has been called into serious question in the past.
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edition.cnn.com
Dr. Martin Makary: Coronavirus – For everyone's sake, organize into second- and third-string medical teams
Here's how a detailed staff inventory can help meet the COVID-19 demand safely for patients and doctors alike.
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foxnews.com
Four famous stores that may not survive because of coronavirus
They were once the giants of American retail, strong enough to survive wars, the Great Depression, the Great Recession and the rise of online shopping. But Sears, JCPenney and others may not be able to survive the coronavirus crisis.
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edition.cnn.com
Actress Abbe Lane parts with Palm Desert retreat
In Palm Desert, singer-actress Abbe Lane and her husband, theatrical agent Perry Leff, have sold their golf course retreat for $2.91 million.
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latimes.com
New Coronavirus Unemployment Assistance Guidance May Leave Out Workers It Is Supposed to Help, Experts Say
One expert even called the rules "criminally narrow" and argued that they will "greatly undermine the effectiveness of the system."
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newsweek.com
New York state sets grim record with 731 coronavirus deaths in single day
A New York state-record 731 coronavirus deaths were reported Tuesday, running the total toll to 5,489 — a grim twist following a two-day dip that led officials to believe the disease may have hit its apex. “Behind every one of those numbers is an individual,” said Gov. Andrew Cuomo in his daily Albany press briefing....
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nypost.com
For delivery workers, the paychecks are bigger than ever. So are the risks
During the coronavirus pandemic, companies like Instacart, Uber Eats and DoorDash have seen a surge in demand. For delivery workers, that means more gigs, more money -- and a greater risk of exposure.
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edition.cnn.com
Trump removes independent watchdog for coronavirus funds, upending oversight panel
The move comes amid a broader push against inspectors general from Trump.
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politico.com
Chrissy Teigen showers with her dog and more star snaps
Chrissy Teigen sanitizes with her pup poolside, Luann De Lesseps practices her yoga and more...
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nypost.com
Projected CO2 Emissions Similar to Those Released by Volcanoes During Mass Extinction Event 200 Million Years Ago
Scientists say the environmental changes that took place in the end-Triassic extinction event could be similar to what is predicted for the near future.
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newsweek.com
L.A. author Kathryn Scanlan on whether we're still 'The Dominant Animal'
Kathryn Scanlan, taut new story collection, "The Dominant Animal," probes power relationships in uncertain times. She talks about L.A. and COVID-19.
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latimes.com
'At Home With Olaf': How to Watch the 'Frozen' Inspired Shorts For Your Stir-Crazy Kids
Josh Gad and Disney animator Hyrum Osmond are working together (from home) to bring new 'Frozen' shorts to YouTube.
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newsweek.com
Needed: Not just ventilators, but also the people who run them
As states scramble to secure ventilators during the coronavirus crisis, a potential shortage looms of respiratory therapists — the workers trained to operate them.
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latimes.com
Henry Rollins debuts long-form KCRW show, 'The Cool Quarantine'
The DJ, actor, writer and former frontman for Black Flag has released the first episode of "The Cool Quarantine," a new four-hour show on KCRW.
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latimes.com
NBA 2K Players Tournament Schedule: Quarterfinal Matchups, Where to Watch on TV and Online
Eight players remain in the competition, with Kevin Durant, Donovan Mitchell and DeMarcus Cousins among those already knocked out.
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newsweek.com
Coronavirus scams in India include person who tried to sell the world's largest statue for billions
A spike in criminal activity online has been reported in India amid a three-week lockdown to stop the spread of coronavirus, including someone who tried to sell the world's largest statue.
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foxnews.com
The evidence for using hydroxychloroquine to treat Covid-19 is flimsy
Hydroxychloroquine, an anti-malaria drug, is undergoing tests to see if it can treat the Covid-19 coronavirus. | John Phillips/Getty Images Why experts say we need clinical trials before using the drug to treat the coronavirus. In the rush to treat the hundreds of thousands of people sick with the Covid-19 coronavirus, many — including President Trump — have touted the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine. This has led to shortages of the drug across the country. But researchers know little about its effectiveness against the disease because rigorous scientific studies have not yet been conducted. “The data are really just, at best, suggestive,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told CBS’s Face the Nation on April 5. “There have been cases that show there may be an effect, and there are others to show there’s no effect. So I think, in terms of science, I don’t think we could definitively say it works.” However, as Covid-19 spreads throughout the country, the need for an effective treatment is mounting. And as hospitals struggle with a lack of equipment and personnel, health workers are running out of options for how to help the infected. That’s adding to the pressure to deploy a drug like hydroxychloroquine during the pandemic. Yet without robust clinical trials to verify its potential, the treatment could do more harm than the disease itself. How we could find out if hydroxychloroquine is a good treatment for Covid-19 Clinical trials are the main way researchers figure out whether a drug works — and whether taking it is worth potentially harmful side effects. Doctors in individual cases can repurpose a drug like hydroxychloroquine that’s been cleared to treat other illnesses, prescribing it for off-label use. But even drugs previously approved to treat one illness need clinical trials before they can be used as a widespread standard treatment for another condition. Repurposing drugs cleared for one purpose to use for another also has a tragic history of severe harm to patients. Researchers also don’t know whether hydroxychloroquine is actually good at fighting against Covid-19. Most patients infected with the disease recover with no treatment. So scientists need to distinguish whether the drug is actually helping patients recover faster, or if they are getting better on their own, making sure that what they’re seeing isn’t due to chance. The small sample studies and anecdotes around hydroxychloroquine that have emerged so far don’t cut it. The gold standard for figuring out cause and effect is a double-blind randomized controlled trial. Here, patients are sorted randomly between those receiving the treatment and those in the control group, or those receiving a placebo. To make a study “double-blind,” not only do the patients not know if they are receiving the active treatment, the people administering it also don’t know (thus controlling for unintentional bias). These trials, when large enough, can yield robust results and overcome biases that emerge in smaller samples, like having a certain age demographic overrepresented in the study group. There are now larger studies underway to resolve questions about the effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine, some recruiting thousands of patients. Such trials are especially important because of the scale of the Covid-19 pandemic. Millions of people are likely to contract the virus, and without widespread treatment, many of them will suffer and die. On the other hand, a treatment like hydroxychloroquine could do more damage than good if prescribed to patients without proper testing to see which circumstances make the most sense to use the drug. But randomized controlled trials are expensive, and frustratingly time-consuming in the context of a mounting pandemic. It’s not surprising then that people are scrounging for whatever information is already available. What we currently know about using hydroxychloroquine for Covid-19 The anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, sold under the brand name Plaquenil, is also prescribed as an anti-inflammatory drug for conditions like arthritis and lupus. It’s a derivative of another anti-malaria drug, chloroquine. Hydroxychloroquine is an appealing prospect because it’s already been tested in humans and is available in a low-cost generic form. Doctors in several countries, including the United States, France, China, and South Korea, have reported success in treating Covid-19 patients with hydroxychloroquine, sometimes paired with the antibiotic azithromycin. But these are anecdotes that don’t offer much insight into how effective the drug could be in a wider population. A laboratory study of hydroxychloroquine showed that it could prevent SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind Covid-19, from entering cells in a petri dish. While it shows a plausible mechanism for the drug, the effects on cells in a dish can be different than in living people. Human trials of hydroxychloroquine, by contrast, have so far yielded mixed results. A tiny study by researchers in France found that the drug could clear the infection in a few days. But the study sample included only 36 patients, and the trial wasn’t randomized, meaning the administrators were deliberately picking which patients received the treatment, potentially skewing the results. Other studies have been even less promising.A study in China found that hydroxychloroquine was no better than standard medical treatments without the drug. This study was also small, 30 patients, but the treatment was randomized. Another study in France among 11 patients found that hydroxychloroquine was ineffective at best, with one patient dying, two transferred to an intensive care unit, and one patient who experienced a dangerous heart problem and had the hydroxychloroquine treatment stopped early. In Sweden, some hospitals have stopped offering the drug after some patients reported seizures and blurred vision. The listed side effects of hydroxychloroquine are long and well-known. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reported problems like irreversible retinal damage, cardiac arrhythmias, muscle weakness, and a severe drop in blood sugar. There are psychiatric effects as well, including insomnia, nightmares, hallucinations, and suicidal ideation. The drug can also have harmful interactions with medicines used to treat diabetes, epilepsy, and heart problems. These side effects are a big reason why the World Health Organization no longer recommends hydroxychloroquine as the routine treatment for malaria. High blood pressure and diabetes, for example, already make the infected more likely to suffer severely from Covid-19. So a treatment like hydroxychloroquine could worsen those underlying conditions, or could result in a dangerous interaction with the medicines used to treat those conditions. Some health workers have been hoarding hydroxychloroquine as a means to ward off the illness. Several patients who need the drug for approved uses have reported trouble getting their prescriptions filled. But there’s no evidence that the drug works as a prophylactic for Covid-19. Some of the rules for drugs like hydroxychloroquine have now been relaxed to allow doctors to experiment with treatments for patients in dire need during the pandemic. The FDA has granted emergency use authorization of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine to fight Covid-19. But expanding the use of these drugs to sick but not critical patients still warrants further testing due to the potential side effects. More than 50 clinical trials for the drug are now planned or underway around the world. But while randomized controlled trials do help health workers figure out how to safely deploy drugs, they don’t guarantee the drug will work for everyone, nor will they eliminate risks completely.
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vox.com
James Carafano: Coronavirus detente? US, China stepping back from pandemic name-calling
China has every reason to ramp down the blame game.
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foxnews.com
Israeli security agency says it arrested alleged Iran spy
Israel’s domestic security agency says it has arrested an Israeli citizen alleged to have spied for Iran
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abcnews.go.com