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Saab Magalona gives birth to new baby

Singer and host Saab Magalona announced on Tuesday that she gave birth to her second son with husband Jim Bacarro.
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Op-Ed: My dad the sperm donor wanted to remain anonymous. That's almost not an option anymore
As the offspring of an anonymous donor, my desire to know my history should come before his desire to keep his identity secret. DNA testing and changing laws will soon make anonymous donations obsolete anyway.
latimes.com
Por coronavirus, sacarán a estadounidenses de ciudad china
Será un vuelo directo a San Francisco, pero avisan: Habrá capacidad limitada para transportar a los ciudadanos
latimes.com
Cris Cyborg reflects on historic fourth major championship won at Bellator 238: 'I feel blessed'
After making MMA history, Cris Cyborg took a little time to reflect on what she's achieved in the sport.        Related StoriesBellator 238 results: Cris Cyborg finishes Julia Budd, captures fourth promotional titleTwitter reacts to Cris Cyborg's title-winning TKO of Julia Budd at Bellator 238Bellator 238 results: Darrion Caldwell submits Adam Borics, advances in grand prix 
usatoday.com
Kenny Atkinson pushes right buttons in Nets’ lineup shuffle
DETROIT — With the Nets coming into Detroit on a five-game losing skid, Kenny Atkinson brought Spencer Dinwiddie off the bench for the first time in well over two months. And it worked like a charm in a slum-busting 121-111 overtime win over the Pistons on Saturday. Garrett Temple started next to Kyrie Irving, instead...
nypost.com
Why NFL once doubted Chiefs’ Patrick Mahomes
[nyp_brightcove playerid="ed38fae1-4db1-4308-8095-399a04010bc1" videoid="6126367990001" alignment="none" playlist_type="iris"][/nyp_brightcove]
nypost.com
Farewell Europe: the long road to Brexit
The Observer’s political editor has reported on Britain’s place in the EU for more than 30 years. Here he charts the key moments in a stormy relationship and the missed chances to save it from destructionLast week, with the end of the UK’s 47-year membership of the club of European nations just days away, I looked back at some newspaper cuttings from my time as a Brussels correspondent. A picture of worried-looking farmers eyeing up their cattle at a market in Banbury stared out alongside banner headlines. “British beef banned in Europe. Cattle prices fall. School meals hit. EU ‘rules’ broken.” Among the many crises in British relations with the EU down the years – from Margaret Thatcher’s bust-up over the European budget in the early 1980s to the UK’s exit from the ERM in 1992 – the beef war between London and Brussels ranks among the biggest.It was 29 March, 1996, and the European commission had just announced a worldwide ban on the export of British beef. The EU’s executive opted for decisive action after the Tory government admitted there could be a link between “mad cow” disease and the mutant strain of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease which could kill humans. I had been in Brussels less than three months. It was a huge story, and reading through articles I had written at the time, it felt like yesterday. But what was most striking, as my mind fixed again on events of 24 years ago, was how relevant that one prolonged and tortuous episode seemed today, in the context of Brexit. Continue reading...
Economie
Cyborg snags Bellator title in historic debut win over Budd
INGLEWOOD, Calif. — Cris “Cyborg” Justino won the Bellator featherweight championship Saturday night, becoming the first fighter to claim title belts in four major MMA organizations with a fourth-round stoppage of Julia Budd at Bellator 238. In her Bellator debut after seven bouts and three-plus years with the UFC, Justino (22-2) ended Budd’s eight-year winning...
nypost.com
The sorry tale of Saracens still leaves questions hanging in the air
The Premiership report may have been leaked but we are in the dark about the men in blackThere is nothing like a salary-cap crisis for holding the mirror up to each and every one of us. In a not-dissimilar effect to that of Brexit, our opinions on the matter, trenchant and polarised, reveal more about what we want to be true than what we know. Because what any of us knows is next to nothing. Related: Premiership Rugby are from Mars and Saracens are from Venus | Robert Kitson Continue reading...
Economie
'Physically assaulted by a teacher': 6-year-old boy's family demands answers
A 6-year-old child was allegedly grabbed by the neck and thrown to the floor by his own teacher in the middle of the day at school and now his family is demanding answers
abcnews.go.com
Making her Bellator debut, Cris Cyborg stops Julia Budd in the fourth round
The Brazilian fighter Cris Cyborg defeated featherweight champion Julia Budd by TKO at the Forum to add a fourth MMA title belt to her collection.
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latimes.com
The backlash against Meghan and Stormzy shows Britain is in denial about racism
Prince Harry and his wife Meghan began a new life in Canada last week, having stepped down as senior royals and left the UK. The couple's departure has forced a heated debate on a problem that many say the country is failing to face up to: racism.
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edition.cnn.com
Cultivar su propio apio es más fácil de lo que cree
¿Quién sabía que el apio, el último elemento que queda en cada plato de verduras, se convertiría en una estrella del bienestar?
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latimes.com
'Saturday Night Live': Kylo Ren checks back in with 'Undercover Boss'
Kylo Ren's second appearance on "Undercover Boss" went about as well as his first. But this time, he made four new friends and only killed one.      
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usatoday.com
Coco Gauff falls to fellow American Sofia Kenin at Australian Open
MELBOURNE, Australia — Coco Gauff’s latest history-making Grand Slam run at age 15 ended with a 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-0 loss in the Australian Open’s fourth round to Sofia Kenin on Sunday. Like Gauff, Kenin is a young — although, at 21, not quite as young — American and she reached her first major quarterfinal...
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nypost.com
Cyborg: Yo era una esclava en UFC, no era feliz allá
La brasileña Cris Cyborg señaló que UFC, en donde peleaba antes de Bellator, no le dio la importancia que ella se merecía
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latimes.com
Unfree Speech by Joshua Wong review – a call to arms for the Snapchat generation
The Hong Kong protests leader, a veteran activist at just 23, on his extraordinary decade – and what comes nextI don’t know if it counts as a demographic anomaly or a new world order, but our social media decade has seen the emergence of teenage political changemakers – the guerrilla wing of influencer culture. While Greta Thunberg may have become the most recognisable of these adolescent activists, the model was established by Joshua Wong, who at the age of 14 engineered a rare political climbdown by the Hong Kong government, and by 17 was on the cover of Time magazine as “the Face of Protest”.Wong, now 23, and having spent many months in prisons and detention centres, is the gnarled veteran leader of the “umbrella movement” against creeping Chinese authoritarianism. In a blurb to this book Thunberg describes him as “the future that has already come”. Wong’s story is not unlike Thunberg’s to the extent that a stubborn school-based protest that might have once been confined to the human-interest pages of the local newspaper quickly became first a national and then a global concern. Continue reading...
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Politica
10 of the UK’s best vineyard and distillery stays
Rooms with a brew: vineyards, breweries and distilleries where you can raise a glass and spend the night in a hotel or cottageIn the new wine heartlands of the South Downs, this 600-acre estate was started in 2010 and the first vintage of its Sussex sparkling wine arrived in 2018. With a tasting room and restaurant, staying here is a Napa Valley-style experience. There are also 10 en-suite rooms in the restored flint barns, including some with bunks, and prices are reasonable. A posh hostel vibe is at play here, with high thread counts and packed lunches, plus another – more casual – restaurant at the weekend, serving set meals. • Doubles from £100, rathfinnyestate.com Continue reading...
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Economie
The big picture: Mick Jagger, the world's least likely wallflower
Tony Curtis and Madonna leave the Rolling Stone in the corner in Dafydd Jones’s photograph, taken at Vanity Fair’s 1997 Oscars partyDafydd Jones got his break as a photographer by capturing the excesses of the “bright young things” at Oxford in the 1980s – a decadent cast that included Hugh Grant and Nigella Lawson and prime ministers Cameron and Johnson. As a result, he was hired by Tina Brown as Tatler’s society photographer, with an insider’s eye for the edge between observation and satire. When Brown moved to New York in 1984 to edit Vanity Fair, Jones moved too, in 1988.Nearly a decade later, in 1997, he was sent to photograph Vanity Fair’s annual Oscars bash by Brown’s successor as editor, Graydon Carter. He was struggling to find a good image until he noticed Mick Jagger sitting by himself looking bored, the world’s least likely wallflower. “Madonna crossed the room and sat down next to him,” Jones recalls. “She started talking and he became quite animated. Then Tony Curtis came along and sat down at the same table on the other side and started monopolising Madonna. Jagger was on his own again and looked miserable.” Continue reading...
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Economie
"48 Hours Live to Tell:" Murder on Prom Night
A survivor deals with the trauma after her stepbrother is convicted of killing her family in order to go to the prom. CBS News' Jim Axelrod reports.
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cbsnews.com
WRAPUP 3-Coronavirus deaths hit 56; China bans wildlife trade
More than 2,000 people have been infected with a new coronavirus, the vast majority in China where 56 people have died from it, and the United States said it will evacuate some of its citizens from the city at the centre of the outbreak.
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reuters.com
Sam Mendes wins DGA honor for '1917,' cementing its Oscar front-runner status
Sam Mendes DGA win for "1917" gives it another key prize in the Oscar race for best picture.
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latimes.com
'Saturday Night Live': The best impeachment trial jokes from 'Weekend Update'
"It was like a four-day-long PowerPoint," Michael Che said of the impeachment trial so far. "This is supposed to be Trump's punishment, not mine."      
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usatoday.com
Sunday with Bobbi Brown: ‘I head to bed long before I’m tired’
The makeup star on brunch and box setsWhat’s your morning routine? I wake up naturally at 6.30am and let the dog out. I drink two glasses of water – with lemon to clean up my liver, or salt if I’m dehydrated. I make a double espresso with a capful of organic half and half milk, so it’s 20 calories not 40. Then I get back into bed to read the papers.Do you exercise? On my Peloton in my bedroom for half an hour, or else I head out alone for a power walk. I feel guilty not taking the dog with me, but she sniffs more than she powers and is too slow up hills. If there’s time after, I’m straight into our backyard infrared sauna. Continue reading...
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Economie
China bans wildlife trade nationwide due to coronavirus outbreak
China banned wildlife trade nationwide in markets, supermarkets, restaurants, and e-commerce platforms due to the coronavirus outbreak, the country's market watchdog, agricultural ministry, and forestry bureau said in a joint statement.
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reuters.com
China's Shantou city will not ban cars, ships, people from entering, state media reports
China's coastal city of Shantou in Guangdong province, will not ban cars, ships and people from entering the city but will strengthen disease controls such as disinfection efforts, local state media STRTV reported, reversing an earlier government statement.
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reuters.com
'SNL' goes to hell with Jon Lovitz as Alan Dershowitz and Adam Driver as Jeffrey Epstein
With 2020 already seeing firestorms in Australia, conflicts in the Middle East, a presidential campaign and an impeachment trial, "Saturday Night Live" had a lot of material to work with for its first episode of the year. Where it started, however, may have been most apt: Hell itself.
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latimes.com
UFC on ESPN+ 24 bonuses: Herbert Burns scores $50,000 in promotional debut
Herbert Burns got his UFC career off to a good start at UFC Raleigh.        Related StoriesTwitter reacts to Curtis Blaydes' finish of former champ Junior Dos Santos at UFC on ESPN+ 24UFC on ESPN+ 24 draws announced 14,533 attendance for $1.3 million live gateConor McGregor wants Stephen A. Smith to apologize to Joe Rogan, Donald Cerrone 
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usatoday.com
Elliott: Kings' Anze Kopitar, Sharks' Tomas Hertl become buddies in NHL All-Star tournament
Usually rivals, the Kings' Anze Kopitar and Sharks' Tomas Hertl led the Pacific Division to the title in the three-on-three NHL All-Star tournament.
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latimes.com
US citizen trapped at epicenter of outbreak says she's angry and scared
A US citizen trapped at the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in China described her fear of living in a city that's cut off from the rest of the country by transport restrictions.
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edition.cnn.com
2 elefantes escapan del circo y pasean por la ciudad (Video)
Los habitantes contemplaron atónitos a los paquidermos
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latimes.com
AOC bashes ICE, Sanders bashes Trump during Iowa rally
U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez urged supporters of 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders on Saturday night to start "tipping people off" if they see federal immigration authorities taking action against illegal immigrants in their communities.
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foxnews.com
Mystery bulbs mean spring will be a bigger surprise
Green shoots, obsessive checking – and the longed-for hope of the first signs of the growing seasonI grew up in a magical land of meadow snowdrops, woodland bluebells and hedgerow primroses. There were riverside banks of wild garlic, which I loved for the flowers but was repelled by the smell – it was a sheltered English 60s childhood in very rural Devon.I guess I have been a bit sniffy about growing bulbs in pots ever since, though it has been many years since we had our own flower garden. Winter pots on the roof terrace were for green leaf, multiple shades and colours of hellebore. Continue reading...
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Economie
U.S. will not lift sanctions to negotiate with Iran: Trump
The United States will not lift sanctions on Iran in order to negotiate, U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted late on Saturday, seemingly in response to a Der Spiegel interview with Iran's foreign minister.
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reuters.com
LAFC scores a friendly victory over Uruguayan powerhouse Peñarol
Carlos Vela and Adrien Perez scored and goalie Kenneth Vermeer looked comfortable in his MLS debut as host LAFC beat Peñarol 2-0 in a preseason game.
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latimes.com
Corona Centennial rolls to victory over Windward
Huskies improve to 21-2 with win at Harbor College
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latimes.com
Coco Gauff loses to fellow American Sofia Kenin at Australian Open
Sofia Kenin defeated 15-year-old Coco Gauff 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-0 at the Australian Open to reach the quarterfinals of a major for the first time.
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latimes.com
U.S. to evacuate consulate staff, some citizens from Wuhan
The U.S. State Department said on Sunday it will evacuate personnel from its Wuhan consulate to the United States and will offer a limited number of seats to private U.S. citizens on a flight out of the epicenter of China's coronavirus outbreak.
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reuters.com
Mike Tyson treatment: Danny Garcia gets bitten in win
Danny Garcia packed a punch. Ivan Redkach apparently should have packed a snack. Garcia devoured Redkach to the tune of a 12-round unanimous decision in their welterweight fight at Barclays Center — but not before things took a bizarre turn. In a scene reminiscent of Mike Tyson chomping on Evander Holyfield’s ear during their 1997...
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nypost.com
Sofia Kenin ousts Coco Gauff in fourth round of Australian Open
Coco Gauff, 15, saw her Australian Open run end in the fourth round with a three-set defeat at the hands of fellow American Sofia Kenin.      
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usatoday.com
Shibden Mill Inn, near Halifax: ‘Brave enough to be more than just another food pub’ – restaurant review
There’s the fierce tang of ambition here, an early contender for snack of the year, and other acts of subversionShibden Mill Inn, Shibden Mill Fold, Halifax (01422 365 840). Nibbles £4–£6; starters £6–£12; mains £14–£23; desserts £7–£9. Wines from £19 a bottle. Extensive gin and whisky selectionThere are many kinds of brave. Rescuing families from advancing Australian bush fires is definitely brave, as is calling out predatory men in the movie business for sexual harassment. Me, on a beach, in a tight-fitting pair of Speedos might also be described as brave, though in that instance what the word really means is: “There are things that once seen, cannot be unseen.” Bravery is about context. The bravery described in a gravy-slicked restaurant column, is unlikely to stand up well against, say, that of a man who decides a narwhal tusk will do as a defensive weapon against a homicidal maniac. But that doesn’t stop it being its own kind of brave. Continue reading...
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Economie
California lightens up: three of its most drinkable wines
Two reds and a white that redeem one of the world’s most self-important wine regionsLo-Fi Gamay Noir, Santa Barbara County, 2018 (£25, Les Caves) It took me a long time to set aside my preconceptions and give Californian wine a fair chance. In my defence, California’s vintners (as they insisted on calling themselves while the rest of the world seemed happy with winegrower or producer) had been doing a good job of feeding my prejudice. Over the years, they’d given the world some of its least appetising yet inexplicably high-selling brands and some of its most ludicrously overpriced and pretentious ‘fine’ wines – the latter made in an overblown style that made them the vinous equivalent of a gas-guzzling SUV. But the past decade has seen another side of the state rise to prominence, a side well represented by the unforced, fluent, natural-tasting drinkability of Lo-Fi’s take on Beaujolais’ red gamay grape.Giornata Fiano, Paso Robles, 2018 (£19.89, All About Wine) As befitting a state that is larger than most European countries, California has started to get to grips with the diversity of its growing conditions, with a much greater range of grape varieties to match. At a recent tasting of more than 150 Californian wines put on by wine trade magazine the Wine Merchant in London, for example, there were still plenty of wines made from the traditional big gun regions (Napa, Sonoma) and varieties (cabernet sauvignon, chardonnay, zinfandel, pinot noir), but also convincing wines made from a range of southern European varieties, such as an Italian pair from Brian and Stephanie Terrizzi’s Giornata project in Paso Robles: the tangy-plummy red Barbera (£19.99, All About Wine) and the pristine, stony-peachy dry white Fiano. Continue reading...
2 h
Economie
The Fixers review: Trump, Cohen, Stormy Daniels and the porn star presidency
A guide to ‘the bottom-feeders, crooked lawyers and gossip mongers who created the 45th president’ demands to be readA Very Stable Genius review: at the court of King DonaldIn February 2019, Jeff Bezos accused David Pecker and the National Enquirer of extortion and blackmail after the tabloid published intimate pictures taken by the Amazon chief. Pecker and co denied being motivated by a desire to aid Donald Trump or receiving a major assist from Saudi Arabia. It was just about gossip. Related: 'Click I agree': the UN rapporteur says prince tried to intimidate Bezos with message Continue reading...
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Politica
Trump impeachment trial: the 10 things you need to know
The president won’t be convicted and removed because Republican senators are spineless. But voters are differentDon’t get bogged down in the minutiae of Donald Trump’s Senate impeachment trial – the procedural maneuvers aimed at getting witness testimony and new documents that Republicans want to prevent at all costs. Stay focused on the big picture. Related: Why the Joe Rogan endorsement is a good thing for Bernie Sanders Continue reading...
2 h
Politica
The Observer view: US bullying on tax and tech must be resisted | Observer editorial
In response to White House threats over Huawei and digital taxation, Boris Johnson must show Trump he’s no pushoverDonald Trump’s propensity for bullying people is well-known. The US president frequently resorts to threats, insults, heavyhanded pressure tactics and disproportionate retaliation to get his own way. Boris Johnson, a supposed Trump chum, now finds himself on the receiving end in respect of several bilateral disputes, actual or incipient. How Johnson deals with this unpleasant behaviour, and the extent of his willingness to defy Trump, is emerging as a key early test of his premiership.Britain is evidently not alone among America’s allies in having its friendship and fidelity taken for granted. Trump has acted in coarse and offensive ways to the leaders of France and Germany, threatening both with arbitrary trade and financial sanctions as punishment for not doing his bidding. He was gratuitously rude about Johnson’s predecessor, Theresa May. Continue reading...
2 h
Economie
World Bank urged to scrap $500m loan to Tanzania over schoolgirls' rights concerns
Campaigners say education funding would be ‘inappropriate if not irresponsible’ in light of ban on pregnant girls attending school An opposition MP and activists in Tanzania are urging the World Bank to withdraw a $500m (£381m) loan to the country, amid concerns over deteriorating human rights, particularly for women and girls.In a letter addressed to the bank’s board members, Zitto Kabwe said he feared the money would be used by the ruling party “to distort our electoral processes’” and ensure an easy victory in an election year. Continue reading...
2 h
Politica
Who Is an Indian?
India houses more democratic citizens than any other country in the world. But for weeks, it has been in the throes of an intense argument over who those citizens should be. The passage of a new citizenship law that treats non-Muslims from three neighboring countries differently from Muslim ones has sparked much outrage. Yet even though this law is new—and arguably the single largest blow to India’s secular character—debates over the country’s religious and ethnic diversity, over how its people should be defined and identified, have been part of India’s history for more than a century. Seventy years on from the implementation of its constitution, a central question continues to vex the country: Who is an Indian?The circumstances surrounding India’s birth—the partition of British India into two separate countries, India and Pakistan—are well known. The hurried withdrawal of the British Raj, the movement of millions across borders, and the ensuing displacement and violence have been unpacked and interrogated for decades. The philosophical context of the event is less appreciated, though. The division of British India marked a constitutional failure of gigantic proportions, underlining a breakdown over how to navigate identity and a failure to agree on the political form by which India’s millions should be represented.India’s diversity is unique—it has long had the world’s second-largest Muslim population—but the question it is dealing with, of what makes a citizen, poses a challenge for democracies around the world. With battles over immigration and citizenship, membership and belonging, acquiring intensity not only in India but also in the United States and Europe, it is worth asking whether, as India’s founders felt, the ultimate solution will be found not in some ideal pact among communities but rather in a system where one is treated as an individual. That is, an arrangement in which Indians would not be seen as simply members of a particular community, be it a religion or caste. This is hard to achieve, and requires constant political work. The equality promised would demand the intense suppression of one’s instincts and impulses, but holds the possibility of creating a self-sustaining politics.[Read: Indian democracy is fighting back]Imperial rulers consistently saw India as a collection of groups, and Indians as people without a past and without a future. The territory was not populated by individuals who could deliberate, form opinions, exercise judgments, and make choices, but by fixed and permanent identities. They were not free agents but rather members of a group—Hindu or Muslim, Brahmin or Dalit—people condemned to communities whose interests were predetermined. The task of political life was to manage tensions among these groups, to discover some kind of balance among distinct categories of people, rather than people themselves.This way of thinking cast a deep imprint on Indian political thought. In the years preceding the end of the British empire, few efforts were made to reimagine political representation in a way that focused on individual freedom. Historians have, for example, long debated the real intentions that drove Muhammad Ali Jinnah, the founder of Pakistan: Did Jinnah seek a separate nation-state, an independent homeland for Muslims, or did he instead seek more power within a single united country? For those who believe the latter claim, the birth of Pakistan is seen less as the product of a clear ideology and more as an unintended consequence of political negotiations that went astray.If one focuses not on territoriality but on representation, it becomes clear that regardless of whether Jinnah wanted one nation or two, he certainly saw Hindus and Muslims differently. He famously observed that whether one considered “culture and civilization” or “customs and calendar,” Muslims had a “distinctive outlook on life and of life.” For Jinnah, irrespective of how the matter of territory was to be settled, citizenship was to be mediated through one’s community. Hindus and Muslims were to be seen as Hindus and Muslims, rather than as individuals who happened to be Hindu or Muslim.The idea that Muslims were a distinct community was pervasive. From Syed Ahmed Khan, the preeminent South Asian Muslim intellectual of the 19th century, onward, Muslim leaders undertook a widespread effort to draw a line between one’s political commitments and one’s religious faith. Even for Abul Kalam Azad, an important voice for Hindu-Muslim unity and a senior leader in the Indian National Congress—the party of India’s first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru—the question of belonging was often framed in religious terms.Other political thinkers didn’t make much progress in framing national belonging as separate from religion either. Hindu nationalists such as Vinayak Damodar Savarkar and M. S. Golwalkar—heroes in India’s current political climate—spoke in universal terms, but their universalism was predicated on all true Indians being Hindu. Savarkar emphasized neither geography nor birth, but rather “common blood” underlying the cultural and social practices that tied Hindus together. Muslims, he felt, could never make India their homeland. Their gaze was “ever turned towards Mecca and Medina,” and they were “often found to cherish an extra-territorial allegiance.” For him, as for Golwalkar, national unity lay in underlining the similarities that Hindus shared and their differences with others.The Indian National Congress, the party behind India’s struggle for independence, saw citizenship very differently. Even though it rejected communalism, it did not quite put forth any positive idea of representation centered on the individual. At the time of the independence movement, Nehru distracted from the problem, seeing tensions among communities as reflections of underlying economic conflicts. In his mind, there was no real problem to address. For Mahatma Gandhi, the emphasis was on political practice, on the power of example. He sought unity and held a radical view of individual agency, but his answer was a noninstitutional one. It did not involve any theory of representation.The partition of British India changed all this. The event captured how a politics structured around competing identity claims was unsustainable. For decades, Indians had responded to the claims of different communities with proposals ranging from political quotas to separate electorates. But the division of territory revealed the instability of such solutions—the only answer to the competing claims was a new nation. It was, as Jinnah made clear, the conversion of a minority group into a majority. Partition displayed how any framework centered on identity would fail to satisfy everyone. The only solution could lie in moving to a new representative system, one centered on individuals who could participate as free agents and create and re-create majorities and minorities within the crucible of politics.[Read: How Hinduism became a political weapon in India]Today, as India celebrates the 70th anniversary of its constitution, the document’s liberal vision is under serious challenge. To be sure, the decline of constitutional principles has been steady, perhaps in motion ever since the death of Nehru, India’s prime minister for its first 17 years and the man who cemented the principles of liberal democracy. But the test at present is perhaps as serious as it has ever been. India has faced the dangers of an authoritarian state before, most notably during the 1970s, when then–Prime Minister Indira Gandhi declared a national emergency. Yet it has never seen such a direct attack on the idea of individual citizenship; it has never witnessed the legislative remaking of the nation along religious and community lines.In India’s current situation, the colonial model of citizenship has come back with a vengeance. The people have been viewed as having preset interests; they have been defined as permanent majorities and minorities. Their preferences are taken to be fixed matters that exist outside the domain of politics. And the nation faces the same challenge it did a century ago—it lacks a robust political alternative in which citizenship is imagined and defended on individual terms. Though the social unrest that has spread across India in recent weeks has been genuine and extensive, a new political vision has yet to emerge.For the makers of India’s constitution, who strove to create democracy in a country that had long been regarded as unfit for it, the promise of self-rule was that a person’s interests were not predetermined. Rather than being divined on the basis of one’s identity, they would instead be formulated and reformulated in politics. The democratic ideal enabled the idea of majorities and minorities to be ever changing, constantly subject to alignment and realignment. Such a vision could liberate individuals from prior associations and allegiances, and create new loyalties.The idea that one’s preferences were not imposed from either above or below was a modern one; it marked a departure from the ancient and medieval world where one’s choices were not exercised but assumed. As India’s republic turns 70, many of its citizens are wondering whether it can become modern again.
2 h
theatlantic.com
“Hillary” (the docu-series) lands on Sundance and 2020 primary like a hand grenade
PARK CITY, Utah — Hillary Clinton threw a hand-grenade at the 2020 Democratic presidential primary election Saturday with her new documentary, “Hillary.” The one-sided, four-part Hulu series about her life premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, and everything you’ve heard is true — Clinton comes off like Rambo when she talks about current Democratic candidate,...
2 h
nypost.com