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Dr. Anthony Fauci says it’s likely coronavirus will become ‘seasonal’
Dr. Anthony Fauci, an infectious disease expert on the White House coronavirus task force, said Sunday it is likely that the virus will become a seasonal illness. “Unless we get this globally under control there is a very good chance that it’ll assume a seasonal nature,” Fauci told CBS’s “Face The Nation.” Fauci said that...
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nypost.com
Top Fed official says universal coronavirus testing needed to reopen U.S. economy
James Bullard, the CEO and president of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, disputes the notion that the job market is in freefall, saying Americans are staying at home to invest in national health.
1m
cbsnews.com
4/5: Strassman, Palmer, Fauci
This week on "Face the Nation," with the month of March behind us, Americans prepare for what's likely to be a catastrophic April.
1m
cbsnews.com
Marinated ramen eggs are simple to make and sheer joy to eat
You may never want to make plain boiled eggs again.
1m
washingtonpost.com
Rep. Devin Nunes on Trump considering second task force to reopen economy
House Intelligence Committee ranking member Devin Nunes, R-Calif., reacted on Sunday to President Trump’s statement the day before saying he is considering creating a second coronavirus task force focused on reopening America’s economy.
1m
foxnews.com
Soccer star Kyle Walker caught in prostitute sex party amid coronavirus lockdown
There’s paying a pair of prostitutes to come over for a sex party and being photographed in your underwear handing out the cash. Then there’s hosting that late-night rendezvous amid a coronavirus lockdown, in flagrant violation of social distancing guidelines. And then there’s doing that mere hours after going on social media to remind your...
1m
nypost.com
Louis C.K. acknowledges 2017 #MeToo scandal in first stand-up comedy special since allegations
Louis C.K. addressed his #MeToo accusations in his first stand-up special released since his career imploded in 2017 over sexual misconduct claims.       
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usatoday.com
2 coronavirus deaths tallied overnight in New York City, death toll over 2,200
The Big Apple tallied two coronavirus fatalities overnight Saturday into Sunday, according to city statistics — a relative respite as the overall death toll rose to 2,256. The number of diagnoses in the five boroughs still rose to 63,767 in the 9:45 a.m. report, a jump of 2,917 from the previous audit released 5 p.m....
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nypost.com
US military recruitment struggles as coronavirus closes enlistment stations
Military recruitment in the U.S. is struggling in the face of the coronavirus threat, recruiters are finding.
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foxnews.com
NJ cops break up Pink Floyd cover band’s coronavirus concert
Cops broke up a Pink Floyd cover band’s concert — with 30 middle-aged partiers defying lockdown orders — on the front lawn of a New Jersey home over the weekend, authorities said. Rumson Police said they received a complaint Saturday night about an impromptu concert, which was being broadcast on Facebook Live outside of a...
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nypost.com
Irish prime minister joins coronavirus pandemic effort, assuming medical role again
Ireland's Prime Minister to take a more hands-on approach to fighting the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
'Tiger King' star John Finlay reveals who he wants to play him in adaptation of life story
John Finlay, who appeared in "Tiger KIng: Murder, Mayhem and Madness" on Netflix, has some ideas as to what actors should play him in an adaptation of his life.
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foxnews.com
Spain records smallest rate of increase in coronavirus infections since start of crisis
Spain on Sunday morning saw both the smallest increase in death toll from the coronavirus in nine days, and the smallest increase in number of infections since the outbreak first began, officials said.
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foxnews.com
UK: 53 Illegal Boat Migrants Brought Ashore Despite Pandemic
Dozens of illegal migrants reached Britain's shores over the weekend after being brought to Dover by the Border Force after being intercepted in the English Channel, despite coronavirus outbreaks at migrant camps in France.
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breitbart.com
Zoom founder responds to safety and privacy concerns
Zoom founder and CEO Eric Yuan responds to concerns about the privacy and security of its video conferencing app after federal officials are now warning of "Zoombombing."
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edition.cnn.com
U.S. braces for 'hardest, saddest' week as coronavirus deaths surpass 9,300
The United States enters one of the most critical weeks so far in the coronavirus crisis with the death toll exploding in New York, Michigan and Louisiana and some governors calling for a national stay-at-home order.
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reuters.com
Coronavirus stay-at-home order in Pennsylvania questioned after woman gets $200 ticket for taking drive
A woman in Pennsylvania became the first person to be cited last week for violating the state's stay-at-home order meant to slow the spread of coronavirus, spurring questions from at least one state lawmaker on if the ticket went too far.
1m
foxnews.com
Former Clinton adviser predicts Democratic primary ‘write-in movement’ for Cuomo
Dick Morris, a former adviser to President Bill Clinton, says he doesn’t believe Democrtic frontrunner Joe Biden has a lock on the 2020 nomination — because Gov. Andrew Cuomo could be the recipient of a “write-in movement.” “Biden thinks he has the nomination sewn up, but I’m not so sure. Cuomo has been doing very...
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nypost.com
What should Americans do as coronavirus upends the nation's economy
CBS News' Business Analyst Jill Schlesinger explains why the U.S. economy will not look the same after COVID-19.
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cbsnews.com
"A backlog of funerals" in coronavirus' epicenter
"A lot of the COVID cases are more or less direct burials or direct cremation. But we do our best to serve the families," said one funeral director.
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cbsnews.com
Fauci says coronavirus deaths will keep rising even as new U.S. cases stabilize
Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says the U.S. is "struggling" to get the spread of coronavirus under control.
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cbsnews.com
Anxiety specialist on coping with coronavirus stress: "It's OK to not be OK"
Dr. Luana Marques discusses best practices for average Americans and health care workers in dealing with stresses of coronavirus and quarantine.
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cbsnews.com
Clyburn says House committee on coronavirus stimulus spending will not look at past: 'The crisis is with us'
When it comes to the new House committee tasked with overseeing the federal response to the coronavirus pandemic, House Majority Whip James Clyburn, D-S.C., said he is looking to the future not the past.
1m
foxnews.com
Gottlieb says "very aggressive surveillance" needed to track future coronavirus spread
The former FDA commissioner says "mitigation is clearly working" but surveillance measures will be needed to contain future outbreaks.
1m
cbsnews.com
Report: Fired Commander of Aircraft Carrier Captain Crozier Tested Positive for Coronavirus
The ex-commander of the USS Theodore Roosevelt Navy Capt. Brett Crozier tested positive for coronavirus before he was removed from command.
1m
breitbart.com
Surgeon General: “This Is Going to Be the Hardest and the Saddest Week of Most Americans’ Lives”
It marks a stark change in tone for Jerome Adams, who a few weeks ago suggested Americans should be more concerned about the flu than the coronavirus.
1m
slate.com
Cuomo skeptical that sports could resume by August amid coronavirus crisis
President Trump’s prediction that the sports world’s coronavirus time-out could be over by August may be a false start, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sunday. “I would love to see sports back, [to] help with cabin fever,” said Cuomo in his now-daily Albany press briefing. “But this is not about hopes and dreams and aspirations and...
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nypost.com
Yonkers Raceway may have been source of NJ coronavirus outbreak
Yonkers Raceway may have been Ground Zero for the spread of the deadly coronavirus in New Jersey. COVID-19 cases linked to the Westchester County, NY, harness-racing track led to a cluster of infections in the Garden State, where a veteran fixture at the track became the first New Jersey death from the global pandemic, nj.com...
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nypost.com
Navy Captain Brett Crozier Tests Positive for Coronavirus Days After Being Removed Over Leaked Letter: NYT Report
Crozier, who was removed from command of the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt this past week, tested positive for coronavirus, according to two Naval Academy classmates who are close with Crozier and his family.
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newsweek.com
Queen Mary ocean liner may be used as hospital ship as coronavirus cases surge
The Queen Mary ocean liner may be brought out of retirement after over half a century to help California fight the coronavirus outbreak as America's latest floating hospital ship.  
1m
foxnews.com
New York Times: Ex-Navy commander who sounded alarm over coronavirus outbreak tests positive for virus
The Navy captain removed from command of the USS Theodore Roosevelt last week after warning that action was needed to save the lives of his crew from a coronavirus outbreak has tested positive for the virus, according to The New York Times on Sunday.
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edition.cnn.com
Fauci warns coronavirus could become 'seasonal' illness if not controlled soon
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned that if the coronavirus outbreak does not get “globally under control,” it is likely to become a recurring problem.
1m
foxnews.com
Governors give mixed response to Trump's handling of coronavirus crisis, but all say pandemic will get worse
Governors in some of the states hardest hit by the coronavirus pandemic have had mixed reactions to President Trump’s response to the public health crisis, but they all agree on one thing: they need more help.
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foxnews.com
Full transcript of "Face the Nation" on April 5, 2020
On this "Face the Nation" broadcast, we sat down with Dr. Anthony Fauci and Dr. Scott Gottlieb.
1m
cbsnews.com
Margot Robbie stocks up at the store and more weekend star snaps
Margot Robbie grabs groceries, Jessica Chastain goes on a coffee run, and more...
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nypost.com
Surgeon general: This week will be 'Pearl Harbor moment'
The US surgeon general said this week is going to be the "hardest and the saddest" for "most Americans' lives," describing the upcoming grim period of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States as a "Pearl Harbor moment" and a "9/11 moment."
1m
edition.cnn.com
Katy Perry and Orlando Bloom reveal the gender of their baby
Katy Perry and Orlando Bloom have given fans a new detail about their baby.
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foxnews.com
Rwanda Finds Genocide Grave That Could Contain 30,000 Bodies
In the genocide, 800,000 ethnic Tutsi and Hutus who tried to protect them were killed
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time.com
Clyburn: House coronavirus panel 'will be forward-looking,' not review Trump's early response
Some lawmakers want to examine early mistakes by the Trump administration.
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politico.com
Shroud of Turin will go on virtual display for Easter
The Shroud of Turin, worshiped by some Christians as the burial cloth of Jesus, will go on virtual display for Easter, church officials said. The shroud, stored in a climate-controlled vault at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist in Turin, Italy, will be displayed via livestream on Saturday, the day before Easter Sunday, Turin...
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nypost.com
Rick Pitino makes bet with son on Brock Lesnar-Drew McIntyre WrestleMania 36 match
The Pitinos will be keen observers of WrestleMania 36. Rick Pitino, the new Iona men’s basketball coach, challenged his son Richard, the coach at Minnesota, to a bet on the Brock Lesnar vs. Drew McIntyre WWE title match, which will headline night two of WrestleMania 36 on Sunday. The stakes? Who hosts next season’s clash...
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nypost.com
Chicago pizzeria tests out using oven to make needed medical supplies amidst coronavirus outbreak
Pizza ovens aren't just for pizza anymore.
2 m
foxnews.com
A California county takes unusual step to slow coronavirus spread; state braces for jump in cases
Riverside County orders residents to cover their faces when leaving home, marking a dramatic escalation by officials to slow the coronavirus spread.
3 m
latimes.com
As world struggles to contain coronavirus, China is over the worst
CBS News senior foreign correspondent Elizabeth Palmer has more on COVID-19's impact on the global community.
5 m
cbsnews.com
She was lonely from social distancing. Then inspiration struck
One Arizona woman found a creative way to get around isolation during the coronavirus epidemic. CNN affiliates KPHO and KTVK report.
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edition.cnn.com
A timeline of Trump promises and predictions on coronavirus -- and how they stack up against the facts
It's been almost a month since the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus a pandemic. In that time, the virus has swept across the US, which has gone from having just a few outbreaks to now leading the world in infections.
7 m
edition.cnn.com
Hospitals Reject Trump's Claim They Are 'Really Thrilled' With Supplies
As hospitals warn of shortages, President Trump claims without offering evidence that he's hearing from administrators who are pleased with the current levels of supplies.
8 m
npr.org
Read these 12 moving essays about life during coronavirus
A woman wearing a face mask in Miami. | Chandan Khanna / AFP via Getty Images Artists, novelists, critics, and essayists are writing the first draft of history, The world is grappling with an invisible, deadly enemy, trying to understand how to live with the threat posed by a virus. For some writers, the only way forward is to put pen to paper, trying to conceptualize and document what it feels like to continue living as countries are under lockdown and regular life seems to have ground to a halt. So as the coronavirus pandemic has stretched around the world, it’s sparked a crop of diary entries and essays that describe how life has changed. Novelists, critics, artists, and journalists have put words to the feelings that many are experiencing. The result is a first draft of how we’ll someday remember this time, filled with uncertainty and pain and fear as well as small moments of hope and humanity. At the New York Review of Books, Ali Bhutto writes that in Karachi, Pakistan, the government-imposed curfew due to the virus is “eerily reminiscent of past military clampdowns”: Beneath the quiet calm lies a sense that society has been unhinged and that the usual rules no longer apply. Small groups of pedestrians look on from the shadows, like an audience watching a spectacle slowly unfolding. People pause on street corners and in the shade of trees, under the watchful gaze of the paramilitary forces and the police. His essay concludes with the sobering note that “in the minds of many, Covid-19 is just another life-threatening hazard in a city that stumbles from one crisis to another.” Writing from Chattanooga, novelist Jamie Quatro documents the mixed ways her neighbors have been responding to the threat, and the frustration of conflicting direction, or no direction at all, from local, state, and federal leaders: Whiplash, trying to keep up with who’s ordering what. We’re already experiencing enough chaos without this back-and-forth. Why didn’t the federal government issue a nationwide shelter-in-place at the get-go, the way other countries did? What happens when one state’s shelter-in-place ends, while others continue? Do states still under quarantine close their borders? We are still one nation, not fifty individual countries. Right? Award-winning photojournalist Alessio Mamo, quarantined with his partner Marta in Sicily after she tested positive for the virus, accompanies his photographs in the Guardian of their confinement with a reflection on being confined: The doctors asked me to take a second test, but again I tested negative. Perhaps I’m immune? The days dragged on in my apartment, in black and white, like my photos. Sometimes we tried to smile, imagining that I was asymptomatic, because I was the virus. Our smiles seemed to bring good news. My mother left hospital, but I won’t be able to see her for weeks. Marta started breathing well again, and so did I. I would have liked to photograph my country in the midst of this emergency, the battles that the doctors wage on the frontline, the hospitals pushed to their limits, Italy on its knees fighting an invisible enemy. That enemy, a day in March, knocked on my door instead. In the New York Times Magazine, deputy editor Jessica Lustig writes with devastating clarity about her family’s life in Brooklyn while her husband battled the virus, weeks before most people began taking the threat seriously: At the door of the clinic, we stand looking out at two older women chatting outside the doorway, oblivious. Do I wave them away? Call out that they should get far away, go home, wash their hands, stay inside? Instead we just stand there, awkwardly, until they move on. Only then do we step outside to begin the long three-block walk home. I point out the early magnolia, the forsythia. T says he is cold. The untrimmed hairs on his neck, under his beard, are white. The few people walking past us on the sidewalk don’t know that we are visitors from the future. A vision, a premonition, a walking visitation. This will be them: Either T, in the mask, or — if they’re lucky — me, tending to him. Essayist Leslie Jamison writes in the New York Review of Books about being shut away alone in her New York City apartment with her 2-year-old daughter since she became sick: The virus. Its sinewy, intimate name. What does it feel like in my body today? Shivering under blankets. A hot itch behind the eyes. Three sweatshirts in the middle of the day. My daughter trying to pull another blanket over my body with her tiny arms. An ache in the muscles that somehow makes it hard to lie still. This loss of taste has become a kind of sensory quarantine. It’s as if the quarantine keeps inching closer and closer to my insides. First I lost the touch of other bodies; then I lost the air; now I’ve lost the taste of bananas. Nothing about any of these losses is particularly unique. I’ve made a schedule so I won’t go insane with the toddler. Five days ago, I wrote Walk/Adventure! on it, next to a cut-out illustration of a tiger—as if we’d see tigers on our walks. It was good to keep possibility alive. At Literary Hub, novelist Heidi Pitlor writes about the elastic nature of time during her family’s quarantine in Massachusetts: During a shutdown, the things that mark our days—commuting to work, sending our kids to school, having a drink with friends—vanish and time takes on a flat, seamless quality. Without some self-imposed structure, it’s easy to feel a little untethered. A friend recently posted on Facebook: “For those who have lost track, today is Blursday the fortyteenth of Maprilay.” ... Giving shape to time is especially important now, when the future is so shapeless. We do not know whether the virus will continue to rage for weeks or months or, lord help us, on and off for years. We do not know when we will feel safe again. And so many of us, minus those who are gifted at compartmentalization or denial, remain largely captive to fear. We may stay this way if we do not create at least the illusion of movement in our lives, our long days spent with ourselves or partners or families. Novelist Lauren Groff writes at the New York Review of Books about trying to escape the prison of her fears while sequestered at home in Gainesville, Florida: Some people have imaginations sparked only by what they can see; I blame this blinkered empiricism for the parks overwhelmed with people, the bars, until a few nights ago, thickly thronged. My imagination is the opposite. I fear everything invisible to me. From the enclosure of my house, I am afraid of the suffering that isn’t present before me, the people running out of money and food or drowning in the fluid in their lungs, the deaths of health-care workers now growing ill while performing their duties. I fear the federal government, which the right wing has so—intentionally—weakened that not only is it insufficient to help its people, it is actively standing in help’s way. I fear we won’t sufficiently punish the right. I fear leaving the house and spreading the disease. I fear what this time of fear is doing to my children, their imaginations, and their souls. At ArtForum, Berlin-based critic and writer Kristian Vistrup Madsen reflects on martinis, melancholia, and Finnish artist Jaakko Pallasvuo’s 2018 graphic novel Retreat, in which three young people exile themselves in the woods: In melancholia, the shape of what is ending, and its temporality, is sprawling and incomprehensible. The ambivalence makes it hard to bear. The world of Retreat is rendered in lush pink and purple watercolors, which dissolve into wild and messy abstractions. In apocalypse, the divisions established in genesis bleed back out. My own Corona-retreat is similarly soft, color-field like, each day a blurred succession of quarantinis, YouTube–yoga, and televized press conferences. As restrictions mount, so does abstraction. For now, I’m still rooting for love to save the world. At the Paris Review, Mark Levin writes about reading Virginia Woolf’s novel The Waves during quarantine: A retreat, a quarantine, a sickness—they simultaneously distort and clarify, curtail and expand. It is an ideal state in which to read literature with a reputation for difficulty and inaccessibility, those hermetic books shorn of the handholds of conventional plot or characterization or description. A novel like Virginia Woolf’s The Waves is perfect for the state of interiority induced by quarantine—a story of three men and three women, meeting after the death of a mutual friend, told entirely in the overlapping internal monologues of the six, interspersed only with sections of pure, achingly beautiful descriptions of the natural world, a day’s procession and recession of light and waves. The novel is, in my mind’s eye, a perfectly spherical object. It is translucent and shimmering and infinitely fragile, prone to shatter at the slightest disturbance. It is not a book that can be read in snatches on the subway—it demands total absorption. Though it revels in a stark emotional nakedness, the book remains aloof, remote in its own deep self-absorption. In an essay for the Financial Times, novelist Arundhati Roy writes with anger about Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s anemic response to the threat, but also offers a glimmer of hope for the future: Historically, pandemics have forced humans to break with the past and imagine their world anew. This one is no different. It is a portal, a gateway between one world and the next. We can choose to walk through it, dragging the carcasses of our prejudice and hatred, our avarice, our data banks and dead ideas, our dead rivers and smoky skies behind us. Or we can walk through lightly, with little luggage, ready to imagine another world. And ready to fight for it. From Boston, Nora Caplan-Bricker writes in The Point about the strange contraction of space under quarantine, in which a friend in Beirut is as close as the one around the corner in the same city: It’s a nice illusion—nice to feel like we’re in it together, even if my real world has shrunk to one person, my husband, who sits with his laptop in the other room. It’s nice in the same way as reading those essays that reframe social distancing as solidarity. “We must begin to see the negative space as clearly as the positive, to know what we don’t do is also brilliant and full of love,” the poet Anne Boyer wrote on March 10th, the day that Massachusetts declared a state of emergency. If you squint, you could almost make sense of this quarantine as an effort to flatten, along with the curve, the distinctions we make between our bonds with others. Right now, I care for my neighbor in the same way I demonstrate love for my mother: in all instances, I stay away. And in moments this month, I have loved strangers with an intensity that is new to me. On March 14th, the Saturday night after the end of life as we knew it, I went out with my dog and found the street silent: no lines for restaurants, no children on bicycles, no couples strolling with little cups of ice cream. It had taken the combined will of thousands of people to deliver such a sudden and complete emptiness. I felt so grateful, and so bereft. And on his own website, musician and artist David Byrne writes about rediscovering the value of working for collective good, saying that “what is happening now is an opportunity to learn how to change our behavior”: In emergencies, citizens can suddenly cooperate and collaborate. Change can happen. We’re going to need to work together as the effects of climate change ramp up. In order for capitalism to survive in any form, we will have to be a little more socialist. Here is an opportunity for us to see things differently — to see that we really are all connected — and adjust our behavior accordingly. Are we willing to do this? Is this moment an opportunity to see how truly interdependent we all are? To live in a world that is different and better than the one we live in now? We might be too far down the road to test every asymptomatic person, but a change in our mindsets, in how we view our neighbors, could lay the groundwork for the collective action we’ll need to deal with other global crises. The time to see how connected we all are is now. The portrait these writers paint of a world under quarantine is multifaceted. Our worlds have contracted to the confines of our homes, and yet in some ways we’re more connected than ever to one another. We feel fear and boredom, anger and gratitude, frustration and strange peace. Uncertainty drives us to find metaphors and images that will let us wrap our minds around what is happening. Yet there’s no single “what” that is happening. Everyone is contending with the pandemic and its effects from different places and in different ways. Reading others’ experiences — even the most frightening ones — can help alleviate the loneliness and dread, a little, and remind us that what we’re going through is both unique and shared by all.
9 m
vox.com