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Don't worry: John Krasinski will still host a few 'Some Good News' shows
After selling "Some Good News" to CBS, John Krasinski told fellow "Office" alum Rainn Wilson that he'll still be involved in the show, sometimes even as host.
5 m
latimes.com
Doctors use GPS, dinghies to screen Greek islands for virus
SIKINOS, Greece — Using dinghies, GPS and a portable refrigerator, doctors deployed by Greece’s national public health agency have launched a coronavirus testing drive on the country’s Aegean Sea islands ahead of the summer vacation season. Ferry service for visitors to the islands resumed Monday, and Greece plans to start welcoming international travelers again on...
8 m
nypost.com
Rush Limbaugh says cancer treatment ‘kicking my ass,’ may take him off air
Rush Limbaugh says his latest round of cancer treatment is “kicking” his “ass” — and that it will likely take him off the airwaves soon. “There have been many cycles, but this is the third wave, and this current wave, I have to tell you, is kicking my ass,” the 69-year-old syndicated conservative radio host...
nypost.com
As the U.S. death toll hovers at 100,000, theme parks and casinos prepare to reopen
Las Vegas casinos and Florida theme parks are set to begin opening next month as states balance health concerns with lost tourism revenue.
latimes.com
Washington, D.C. to Loosen Lockdown Restrictions This Week Despite White House Warning Capital Remains Most Worrisome Area
"Moving into Phase One means that more people can get infected," Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser warned while announcing the city's plans to reopen.
newsweek.com
'I hope your son gets coronavirus': Troy Deeney reveals abuse received
Watford captain Troy Deeney has revealed he is abused both in public and online for expressing concerns about the Premier League's attempts to restart the season.
edition.cnn.com
Flying amid coronavirus was one of the best experiences of my life
Instead of the miserable toxic wasteland that I envisioned, I was greeted by a very different reality.
nypost.com
US certifies Hong Kong has lost its autonomy to China, endangering its special status
Hong Kong has lost its autonomy from the Chinese government, the Trump administration said in a historic report to Congress Wednesday.
abcnews.go.com
When is it safe to see friends again as the coronavirus pandemic rolls on?
As lonely, stir-crazy Americans wait for a coronavirus vaccine to materialize in the distant future, some might be wondering if it’s safe to hang out with friends or rope extra family members into their quarantine bunker. The answer, experts say, will depend on where they live, the precautions they take, and the level of risk...
nypost.com
Graves of veterans vandalized with torn American flags, police say
The graves of veterans at Union Cemetary in Quakertown, Pennsylvania, were desecrated over Memorial Day weekend, police said.
edition.cnn.com
US ends waivers for Iran's civil nuclear programs in latest maximum pressure campaign move
The United States announced the end of waivers that allowed countries to cooperate with Iran on civil nuclear projects under the 2015 nuclear deal.
edition.cnn.com
Catholic Minnesota diocese to pay $22.5M to sexual assault victims
The Roman Catholic diocese of Saint Cloud in Minnesota announced in a statement Tuesday they will pay $22.5 million to 70 victims of clergy sexual assault and file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.
foxnews.com
Most small businesses remain optimistic on reopening after coronavirus: poll
The majority of small businesses in the U.S. are optimistic about reopening amid the coronavirus pandemic, a new study says. Nearly three-quarters of businesses (74 percent) expect to return to business as usual within six months of coronavirus restrictions being lifted, the Connected Commerce Council (3C) said Wednesday. “This report shows that in the face...
nypost.com
You have the secret to easy crispy waffles in your pantry
Fast and easy, this pantry-staple waffle recipe includes an ingredient you already own to guarantee crispness: oil.
latimes.com
Orange County reports 5 new deaths as coronavirus hospitalizations hit new high
Here are the latest coronavirus numbers by community in Orange County.
latimes.com
Ice Cube reacts to death of George Floyd: ‘How long ... before we strike back?'
Ice Cube is speaking out against police after a viral video on Monday showed a white police officer pinning his knee against a black man's neck as he struggled to breathe in Minnesota. 
foxnews.com
Ford’s cop cars can now kill coronavirus with extreme heat
Ford is ready to bring the heat to the coronavirus fight. The automaker has developed a software update for some of its Explorer-based Police Interceptor Utility patrol vehicles that allows them to use the climate control system to raise the cabin temperature to 133 degrees for 15 minutes to help kill any coronavirus inside. Research...
nypost.com
Iran, Venezuela Praise Fuel Shipments Despite U.S. 'Aggression' on Their Trade Deal
Officials from Tehran and Caracas hailed solidarity between the two nations as Iranian tankers defied U.S.-imposed restrictions to carry fuel to Venezuela.
newsweek.com
Coronavirus government response: Good news eludes Trump after launch scrubbed
President Donald Trump traveled to the battleground state of Florida Wednesday, his fourth major trip this month, as the U.S. approaches 100,000 deaths.
abcnews.go.com
New York Daily News Editorial Board Highlights Trump's War Against Twitter in Seven Tweets
After Trump tweeted his displeasure with the social media platform, the newspaper said he "flails about like a fish, threatening to shut the place down."
newsweek.com
Trump administration taps failed ambassador nominee who spread fringe conspiracies for diplomatic post
President Donald Trump's failed nominee to be ambassador to Barbados, who previously spread fringe conspiracy theories and unfounded attacks about Trump's political opponents, has now been tapped for the role of "principal officer" at the US Consulate General in Bermuda, a job that does not require Senate confirmation.
edition.cnn.com
House Republicans Sue to Try to Block Pandemic Proxy Voting
The historical analysis is OK, but the math is ridiculous.
slate.com
Three killed at business meeting in France
Three people were killed and one injured in western France on Wednesday after a man open fired during a business meeting, national police told CNN.
edition.cnn.com
George Floyd Did Not Have a Pulse When Medics Placed Him in Ambulance, Minneapolis Fire Department Report Shows
The report describes Floyd's condition as "unresponsive" when medical personnel arrived and unchanging as they worked to revive him on the way to Hennepin County Medical Center.
newsweek.com
SpaceX and NASA's historic launch postponed due to bad weather
• Opinion: Why we're rocketing people into space during a pandemic
edition.cnn.com
Just hours after NYC crackdown, Borough Park businesses are packed again
The crackdown didn’t even last a day! Just hours after City Hall sent in the Sheriff’s Office, at least four Borough Park stores exposed by The Post for operating in violation of emergency coronavirus orders were back open — and, again, packed with maskless customers. “Maybe it’s illegal to open it, but you have to...
nypost.com
MGM Resorts to reopen Bellagio, New York-New York, MGM Grand in Las Vegas
MGM Resorts plans to reopen Bellagio, New York-New York, MGM Grand and The Signature on June 4. Bellagio's famed fountains will be turned on.       
usatoday.com
The reality of LJ Figueroa’s separation from St. John’s
From the moment news broke that LJ Figueroa had entered the transfer portal, there were two immediate reactions dripping with hot takes. 1. St. John’s is doomed. 2. It won’t miss him. Neither is accurate. St. John’s will clearly miss Figueroa, the 6-foot-6 wing who led them in scoring a year ago and is unlikely...
nypost.com
Dear Care and Feeding: My Crazy Neighbor Is Asking Sixth Graders to Drive and Run Errands
Parenting advice on underage driving, wiping issues, and traumatic separations.
slate.com
Photos capture the stark contrast in police response to George Floyd protests vs. anti-lockdown protests
A community-wide protest in Minneapolis, Minnesota, was held May 26 after the death of George Floyd. | Richard Tsong-Taatarii/Star Tribune via Getty Images In Minneapolis, police responded to a protest about police violence with more violence. In Minneapolis on Tuesday, thousands of people gathered to condemn the police violence against George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who died Monday after an officer knelt on his neck for more than seven minutes. The protest, which included chants of “It could have been me,” was met at times with tear gas and rubber bullets. It’s a response that was incredibly harsh — and one that marks a stark contrast with how law enforcement has reacted to lockdown protests, several of which have included armed white men. Tuesday’s protest was prompted by officers’ violence toward Floyd, actions that were captured on camera by bystanders who urged the police to stop hurting him.Floyd was arrested in connection with a forgery report on Monday; shortly after, officers pinned him to the ground, with one putting his knee on his neck to keep him down. In a video that circulated widely on social media, Floyd can be heard repeatedly saying, “I can’t breathe! I can’t breathe!” a statement reminiscent of the last words of Eric Garner, who died in New York in 2014 after a police officer put him in a chokehold. Following his transport to a medical center, Floyd died later in the day. Floyd’s death has spurred massive outcry over the police’s excessive use of force during his arrest and the long pattern of police violence that’s resulted in the killing of black men. In Minnesota alone, there have been multiple incidents in recent years that have raised national attention, including the shooting of Philando Castile, who was killed by a police officer during a traffic stop in 2016. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images Protesters filled the streets of Minneapolis on May 26, 2020. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images A woman protests outside the Cup Foods in Minneapolis. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images Hundreds of protesters march down Hiawatha Avenue. Unlike many officer-involved shootings, though, there have been some swift repercussions to Floyd’s death: The four police officers who were involved in the incident were fired, and the FBI has now opened an investigation. “Being black in America should not be a death sentence,” Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said in a statement. Floyd’s family is now calling for the officers to be charged with murder, a sentiment that’s been echoed by advocates around the country. Yet despite the steps taken toward justice, the treatment of protesters during a Tuesday march in Minneapolis underscored how police continue to use violence against people of color. Although the march was predominantly peaceful, at one point a group of protesters began to throw rocks and vandalize police cars, according to CBS Minnesota. When protesters approached the location of the precinct where the officers who hurt Floyd supposedly worked, some broke a window of the police station, while others tagged the outside of a car with graffiti. Around that time, police began firing tear gas at the crowd and using flash grenades, CNN reports. Andy Maddix, a Star-Tribune journalist who was on the scene, also noted that he was shot by a rubber bullet. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images Protesters demonstrate outside the Third Police Precinct. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images Police in tactical gear attempt to disperse crowds outside the Third Precinct. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images Police fire tear gas at protesters. “It’s real ugly. The police have to understand that this is the climate they have created, this is the climate they created,” a protester told CBS Minnesota. The escalation from police is an example of how open law enforcement can be to using violence against a crowd composed heavily of people of color. “This is where police have to become better at deescalating,” Rashad Robinson, the president of advocacy group Color of Change, told Vox. “It illustrates very clearly the ways controlling, harming, and mistreating black people are an acceptable course for police in America.” Richard Tsong-Taatarii/Star Tribune via Getty Images Police walk toward protesters near the Minneapolis Third Police Precinct. Images from these protests — including protesters dousing their faces with milk in order to temper the sting of the tear gas — underscore not only the intensity of the response, but a major contrast with the lack of force that’s been used in anti-lockdown protests at state capitols around the country, when the protesters were armed white men. As Vox’s Katelyn Burns reported, white men equipped with assault weapons were among those who protested Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s lockdown restrictions in Michigan in late April, prompting some lawmakers to wear bulletproof vests to work. In St. Paul, too, an overwhelmingly white crowd pushed to “liberate Minnesota” earlier this month, with some showcasing firearms. “Unarmed people, many of whom are people of color, protest police brutality and are met with police brutality — flash grenades, tear gas, and rubber bullets,” says Georgetown Law professor Paul Butler, the author of Chokehold: Policing Black Men. “But when armed, mainly white protesters storm the Michigan state capitol, the police just let them be.” There’s a major difference in how unarmed black protesters were treated in Minneapolis, compared to armed white protesters The protests that took place in Minneapolis over Floyd’s death and those that have occurred in state capitols have many differences — including, in some cases, their size. Still, the contrast in how police reacted to protesters at these respective gatherings was evident, and several journalists and activists have called out the disparity on social media. the stark — and sickening— differences in police response to the George Floyd protests vs. armed anti-lockdown protests // via @therecount pic.twitter.com/HqcwD8nPZy— j.d. durkin (@jiveDurkey) May 27, 2020 A tale of two protests shows America’s ugly race problem:Michigan - white protestors WITH GUNS yell and threaten armed insurrection AGAINST fellow citizens’ safety, nothing doneMinneapolis- diverse, yet mainly black people protesting FOR fellow citizens’ safety, tear gassed pic.twitter.com/ieDvJOFSDn— (@exavierpope) May 27, 2020 “There are different sets of rules, there are different sets of consequences,” says Robinson, regarding the way law enforcement reacted in these different scenarios. He recalls police using tactics like tear gas and rubber bullets against protesters in Ferguson, Missouri, when they pushed back on the police killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown in 2014. Meanwhile, armed protesters in Michigan were met simply with pointed stares from the officers on the scene during a lockdown protest that itself drew attention to the racial disparities exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic. “Armed men with guns have been showing up in capitols across the country, in essence, demanding that things open back up,” Robinson notes. “What’s been opening back up are places where black and brown people work.” Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images Armed protesters demonstrate in an “American Patriot Rally,” organized by Michigan United for Liberty on the steps of the state capitol in Lansing on April 30. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images Hundreds of people including lawmakers take part in a “Reopen Pennsylvania” demonstration in Harrisburg on April 20. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images Protesters try to enter the Michigan House of Representative chamber in Lansing on April 30. As advocates note, this is not to say that there should have been more force used in the protests at the state capitols, or in any protests, but to highlight the uneven response — and note that police shouldn’t be disproportionately using violence when these protests involve people of color. Ultimately, both Robinson and Brown say that Floyd’s death — and the treatment of the protesters who were trying to raise awareness about it — draws attention to the lack of accountability of police in many cities. Robinson notes that more policies focused on transparency and taking responsibility, coupled with a fundamental rethinking of why the criminal justice system is so central to American life, need to be implemented in order to advance long-term change. “We put everything in our police departments instead of investing in communities to make them home. Literally, we put our knee on people’s necks instead of lifting them up,” he said. Support Vox’s explanatory journalism Every day at Vox, we aim to answer your most important questions and provide you, and our audience around the world, with information that has the power to save lives. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. Vox’s work is reaching more people than ever, but our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources — particularly during a pandemic and an economic downturn. Your financial contribution will not constitute a donation, but it will enable our staff to continue to offer free articles, videos, and podcasts at the quality and volume that this moment requires. Please consider making a contribution to Vox today.
vox.com
George Floyd's death another wound for Minneapolis' black community: 'Why can't I just be black in the state of Minnesota?'
George Floyd's death was not the first involving Minneapolis police, deepening mistrust between law enforcement and the black community.       
usatoday.com
Why Pay to Run a Race at Home?
Vacation Races has pivoted to Staycation Races. Somehow, it’s working.
slate.com
U.S. coronavirus deaths top 100,000 as country reopens
U.S. deaths from the novel coronavirus topped 100,000 on Wednesday even as the daily average death toll declines, businesses reopen and Americans emerge from lockdowns across the country.
reuters.com
Bloomberg exec: Federal government has failed us
Christiane speaks with Bloomberg L.P. executive Kevin Sheekey about the federal response to coronavirus and how Michael Bloomberg hopes to help Biden get elected.
edition.cnn.com
Factbox: Where states stand as U.S. reaches 100,000 deaths
Less than four months after a 57-year-old California woman died and was later found to be the country's first COVID-19 fatality, the coronavirus U.S. death toll topped 100,000 people on Wednesday, according to a Reuters tally.
reuters.com
‘Star Wars’ lead John Boyega goes off on racist fans
"I said what I said. And if you don't f--king like it, go suck a d--k."
nypost.com
Meteorologist explains why historic launch was scrubbed
CNN meteorologist Tom Sater explains why the historic SpaceX/NASA launch was scrubbed.
edition.cnn.com
Venezuelan asylum-seekers warn that lockdown-era America is a taste of socialism
Two Venezuelan asylum-seekers are warning that the recent shutdowns in response to the coronavirus pandemic are giving Americans a taste of the socialist ideology that drove their homeland down the road to economic and social ruin -- and are urging Americans to avoid going down that path in the future, even if public health imperatives dictate strict measures now.
foxnews.com
Medicare chief Verma blasts Cuomo for trying to deflect blame onto White House for NY nursing home deaths
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Administrator Seema Verma fired back at New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo Wednesday after he claimed last week to be following "what the Republican administration said to do" when he ordered nursing homes to admit coronavirus patients who had been discharged from hospitals.
foxnews.com
Andrew Yang says US should ‘seriously look at 4-day workweeks’
Former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang says the United States should “seriously look at 4-day workweeks.” 
foxnews.com
Henrik Lundqvist deserves chance to reclaim Rangers throne for NHL playoffs
I don’t know whether Henrik Lundqvist can reclaim the No. 1 job in nets from Igor Shesterkin when (and if) the Rangers reconvene at some point late next month or in early July. But I do know that David Quinn and the coaching staff would be making a mistake if they enter camp with minds...
nypost.com
UPDATE 6-Weather delays SpaceX's first astronaut launch from Florida
SpaceX, billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk's private rocket company, was forced by foul weather to scrub a planned launch on Wednesday of two Americans into orbit from Florida, a mission that would mark the first spaceflight of NASA astronauts from U.S. soil in nine years.
reuters.com
Only 'remote' chance of recertifying Hong Kong autonomy in future, Pompeo says
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told the U.S. Congress on Wednesday that China "has shed any pretense" that the people of Hong Kong enjoy the autonomy required by law, in a report certifying his determination that the territory no long warrants special treatment.
reuters.com
SE Cupp: Trump is melting down on his favorite platform
CNN's SE Cupp discusses President Donald Trump's response to Twitter highlighting two of his tweets that falsely claimed mail-in ballots would lead to widespread voter fraud.
edition.cnn.com
NASA monitors stormy weather as SpaceX prepares for launch
Dark clouds roll in over the SpaceX launch site in Cape Canaveral        
usatoday.com
LeBron James shares powerful image after George Floyd's death
"Do you understand NOW!!??!!?? Or is it still blurred to you??" James said in an Instagram post.
cbsnews.com
Stand-up comedians are performing at socially distanced drive-in movie theaters
The comics stood in the bed of a pickup and delivered their lines to a lot of some 45 cars.
nypost.com
Human activity threatens 50 billion years of evolutionary history, study reveals
Our human footprint--and the changes it has wrought--is threatening some of the most unique species on Earth, a new study reveals.
foxnews.com