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U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson Leaves The ICU Amid Treatment For COVID-19
"He is in extremely good spirits," his office said. Johnson's emergence from intensive care is good news for the leader, who remains in the hospital after testing positive for the coronavirus.
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npr.org
This business owner received one of the first SBA loans
Amy Wright, co-founder of Bitty and Beau's Coffee, has some advice: "Share your story with any bank that will listen."
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cbsnews.com
Florida teacher goes out of her way to help struggling student during coronavirus lockdown
A first-grade teacher in Florida went above and beyond last week to cheer up one of her students who appeared to be having a hard time with the coronavirus lockdown.
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foxnews.com
Cuomo: NY coronavirus hospital admissions at lowest level since shutdown
The number of newly hospitalized coronavirus patients has dipped to its lowest level since New York state was all but shut down last month — but residents can’t “relax” yet, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Thursday. “We had 200 net increases in hospitalizations which is, as we see, the lowest number we’ve had since this nightmare...
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nypost.com
Angelina Jolie urges outreach to vulnerable children amid coronavirus pandemic
Angelina Jolie penned an essay noting that even though children may not be at risk for coronavirus, they are at risk for domestic violence.        
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usatoday.com
Heartless crook swipes $150 from 75-year-old man in Manhattan
A heartless crook knocked a 75-year-old man to the ground and swiped $150 from him inside a Manhattan bank, cops said Thursday. The septuagenarian was withdrawing cash inside a Citibank on Park Avenue South and 25th Street at 9:45 a.m. on Saturday, when the thief came up behind him, brandished an unknown object and demanded...
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nypost.com
Colton Haynes’ sister loses battle with cancer
"I just feel absolutely gutted that our family can’t be together to hold one another …"
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nypost.com
A coronavirus patient makes videos for her daughters. She hopes they won't need them
Mireya Pérez González, 32, was not expecting her COVID-19 diagnosis. Now she's preparing for the worst by making videos for her young girls.
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latimes.com
Nick Saban does email now thanks to coronavirus
Nick Saban is almost entirely consumed by football. In November 2016, the Alabama coach claimed Election Day passed without his knowledge. Still, Saban’s bubble is even smaller than we imagined. With nowhere to go during the COVID-19 pandemic, the 68-year-old, six-time national champion finally began using an email account for the first time. “I’ve come...
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nypost.com
Coronavirus lockdowns shouldn’t end until there’s a vaccine, study says
Countries should be cautious about completely ending coronavirus lockdowns for their citizens until there is a vaccine against the deadly bug, according to a new study based on China’s experience. China’s strict public health interventions brought the first wave of COVID-19 in the country to an end — but authorities need to be proactive to...
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nypost.com
GOP senator calls for WHO chief to testify over coronavirus failings
Sen Todd Young on Thursday called for the head of the World Health Organization to testify to Congress over the agency’s handling of the coronavirus crisis -- the latest move by Republicans to put pressure on the embattled U.N. body.
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foxnews.com
Alarm bells sound over historic deficit spending, as coronavirus bills could near $5T
The U.S. government is poised to spend an unprecedented sum of money on its response to the coronavirus crisis, with a potential final price tag of nearly $5 trillion if lawmakers get the full extent of what they're seeking in as many as five separate bills.  
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foxnews.com
Pete Hegseth rips WHO chief as a 'globalist spewing Chinese propaganda'
"Fox & Friends Weekend" co-host Pete Hegseth blasted World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus Thursday as a "globalist propagandist."
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foxnews.com
General says coronavirus may affect more Navy ships
WASHINGTON — Pentagon leaders anticipate that the coronavirus may strike more Navy ships at sea after an outbreak aboard an aircraft carrier in the Pacific infected more than 400 sailors, a top general said Thursday. Gen. John Hyten, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said one member of the crew of the USS...
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nypost.com
Gupta's moving goodbye to child who changed his mind on CBD
Charlotte Figi, a child with a catastrophic type of epilepsy who went on to inspire a CBD movement, has passed away at age 13. CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta reflects on her life.
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edition.cnn.com
Ryan Strome’s likely Rangers contract outcome after Artemi Panarin success
Part 19 in a series analyzing the Rangers. This is where you must begin with a Ryan Strome overview: He was acquired from Edmonton on Nov. 16, 2018 in a one-for-one trade for Ryan Spooner. It was a bait-and-switch deal, that’s what it pretty much turned out to be, when general manager Jeff Gorton was...
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nypost.com
'You can't relax': Vigilance urged as New York sees signs of coronavirus flattening
Americans must persevere with social distancing now that their efforts are showing signs of slowing the spread of coronavirus, U.S. medical and state officials said on Thursday, as New York hospitalizations ebbed while the state's death toll spiked again.
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reuters.com
Socialite stranded in hotel by coronavirus crisis laments lack of amenities
She's eating Subway sandwiches.
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nypost.com
Keith Dinwiddie, Fidelis Okereke named co-City players of the year in basketball
All-City boys' basketball team topped by Keith Dinwiddie of Fairfax and Fidelis Okereke of King-Drew; Jane Nwaba of Palisades is girls' MVP
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latimes.com
Managing the outbreak: Hundreds of infected, quarantined in prisons and jails challenging officials
Officials have moved past trying to limit an outbreak and are now trying to manage hundreds of sick and isolated inmates, plus an exposed workforce.        
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usatoday.com
Trump enters the 2020 general with key demographics moving away from him
Since the 2016 election, Trump's support has faded.
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washingtonpost.com
Ask a book critic: What should I read when I can’t get any work done?
Amanda Northrop / Vox Vox recommends books for your very specific moods. Welcome to the latest installment of Vox’s Ask a Book Critic, in which I, Vox book critic Constance Grady, provide book recommendations to suit your very specific mood: either how you’re feeling right now, or how you’d like to be feeling instead. Personally, I am currently in the mood to read something quiet and restful by someone completely in control of their prose, so I just finished up with Robin McKinley’s Chalice. I grew up on McKinley, who came up in the ’70s as one of the first fantasy writers to let girls have adventures, and her exquisitely balanced sentences influenced my ear for prose more than probably any other writer. Chalice came out in 2009, so it’s a late book for McKinley, and like many of her most recent works it’s quiet and reserved to the point of chilliness. It takes place in a fantasy realm that was ruled by a bad king for seven years, and now a new leadership team, inexperienced and denied the education that was their due, is trying to find a way to heal the shattered country. Also there’s a lot about honey. It’s exactly what I want to read. It’s probably not exactly what you want to read, though, which is why this column exists. So let me help you find something that will take you where you want to go. The recommendation requests below, submitted to me via email and on Twitter, have been edited for length and clarity. I’m looking for a book about dysfunctional families. Quarantine has forced me to live with my own. This question I have seen a fair amount of! I have two go-tos. The Family Fang by Kevin Wilson is a warm and funny satire about two adults forced to move back in with their performance artist parents. It will make you think, “Hey, at least my parents never forced me to narc on them to the mall security guard while they stole jelly beans from a candy store as a commentary on capitalism on my sixth birthday.” (Unless that did happen to you, in which case I am very sorry.) I’m also a big advocate, in general, for well-written children’s literature in times of stress, and children’s literature is very good in particular on the subject of being trapped in your terrible gross house with your terrible gross family who will not stop annoying you, ugh. Lately I’ve been thinking about Nancy Bond’s A String in the Harp, about an American family doing a semester abroad in a little town in Wales. The house is tiny and weird and the family can’t figure out how to heat it or cook good food in it, and they’re all mad at each other and grieving a recent death, so they’re prickly and constantlygetting on each other’s nerves. But over time they adapt, adjust, and work together tobuild a deeply cozy home for themselves. (There is also magic, but oddly that is maybe the weakest part of this book? I always skip it in rereads and focus on the sections where the teenage daughter learns to bake bread and the family goes out for fish and chips.) Looking for nonfiction. I want to feel smarter, but not have to concentrate too hard. Something that will teach me about a world I’m not familiar with. Try Susan Orlean’s The Library Book, about the LA Public Library fire of 1986. It’s so tense and gripping that it reads like a novel, and it explores the past and future of America’s libraries in really smart and thoughtful ways. Just ended an 11-year relationship right before sheltering in place. Feeling sick of romance and love, and seeking a bit of non-romantic faith that things will be okay. Now might be a good time for Nancy Mitford! She wrote very clear-eyed and unromantic but hopeful fiction during some very dark times. Pigeon Pie might be the book of hers to begin with. It was written during the ramp-up to World War II, and it’s about a British aristocrat who gets bored volunteering at the Red Cross and decides to become a beautiful female spy. I want to escape my living room by reading a book that transports me to a new place and takes me on an adventure through jungles or deserts or frozen tundra. If you want something intense and a little challenging, the move would be Black Leopard Red Wolf by Marlon James. It’s literary fantasy set in a world inspired by African folklore, and the landscape is incredibly rich and immersive and will absolutely take you away. This book is deliberately designed to resist easy reading, though, and the reception has been polarizing. (I found it a little bit of a slog, although I know others adored it. And even skeptics like me can’t deny the setting is amazing!) So I’ll also throw out as an option East of the Sun by Julia Gregson. It’s about three young British women traveling to India in 1928, and it’s extremely charming and fun. I’m constantly finding myself procrastinating. Could you recommend a self-help book about time management? So for general organizing stuff, I like Julie Morgenstern, who wrote Time Management from the Inside Out: She’s good at creating strategies to help you adapt the way you think about an issue rather than imposing rules on you from above. But I also think that during a global catastrophe like the one we are in right now, it is very normal and reasonable to find yourself having trouble doing work! As Neil Webb put it in a widely shared tweet, we are not working from home right now. We are in our homes during a crisis and trying to do work. If you find it difficult to be productive right now, don’t beat yourself up about it. It’s enough just to get through the day. Jenny Odell explores some ideas related to this issue very beautifully in her book How To Do Nothing. If you’d like me to recommend something to you, email me at constance.grady@vox.com with the subject line “Ask a Book Critic.” The more specific your mood, the better!
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vox.com
The Relief of Uncertainty, Muses One New Yorker
In these pestilent days of being a New York City denizen, one travel writer muses on what we can learn from the uncertainty of reality.
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newsweek.com
CNN's 'straight news' anchors using coronavirus to 'flaunt their utter disdain' for Trump, critics say
CNN's most prominent anchors and reporters have ratcheted up their attacks against President Trump during the coronavirus outbreak as the liberal network continues to blur the lines between straight news and opinion journalism. 
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foxnews.com
Joe Torre: My fear for many children during the Covid-19 pandemic
Joe Torre, thinking back to the presence of domestic violence in his home growing up, writes that he often found solace at school or playing outside, but with the Covid-19 pandemic, many students -- including those that his organization, Joe Torre Safe at Home Foundation, serves -- are forced to stay home in violent situations.
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edition.cnn.com
Oil slumps on disappointment with OPEC supply deal
Oil prices slumped on Thursday, giving back an earlier 10% surge as investors reacted negatively to the emerging supply-cut agreement between members of OPEC and its allies in response to the global fuel demand collapse due to the coronavirus pandemic.
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reuters.com
Bryan Cranston, Aaron Paul team up in fight against coronavirus
"Stay home and stay well. Good spirits will get us through."
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nypost.com
Take 40% off your entire Puma purchase
Puma is bringing people together at its Friends and Family Sale, where your entire purchase is 40% off when you use promo code PUMAFAM at checkout.
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edition.cnn.com
Woman asked Alexa for help before dying of coronavirus
"Alexa, help me. ... I am in pain. I have to find a way to relieve it," LouAnn Dagen said in recordings found by her sister,
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cbsnews.com
Kristaps Porzingis: ‘Little details’ changed everything in Mavericks adjustment
Kristaps Porzingis still remains hopeful that the NBA can resume this summer, but the former Knicks star fully understands why he might not get the chance to appear in postseason play for the first time. Porzingis’ current team, the Dallas Mavericks, were in the No. 7 playoff position in the Western Conference — 10 games...
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nypost.com
Kentucky church asks Louisville mayor to reverse ban on drive-in Easter service
The mayor of Louisville, Kentucky is not allowing churches to hold drive-in services on Easter Sunday, an innovative move other congregations have used amid the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
AT&T taps Gillespie to head Washington office
Brownstein Hyatt signs 17 clients for coronavirus-related work — Restaurants ask Congress for more help
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politico.com
NYC to get 50,000 coronavirus test kits from charitable Indiana city
The Big Apple is getting 50,000 coronavirus tests donated by an Indiana city that has way more than it needs, its mayor announced Thursday. The city of Carmel is home to a new lab, Apex Medical, that can churn out 12,000 kits per day — and expects to have enough material to make as many...
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nypost.com
Boris Johnson leaves intensive care
Downing Street said the prime minister was in "extremely good spirits."
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politico.com
Trump’s wild claims of voter fraud blow back on campaign aide
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politico.com
Improvisation And Retraining May Be Key To Saving Patients In New York's ICUs
Pulmonologists in New York hospitals are now supervising doctors from other specialties as they try to keep ICUs staffed, and are deploying equipment in new ways. But COVID-19 is a demoralizing foe.
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npr.org
Airlines and TSA report 96% drop in air travel
The number of people traveling by plane has dropped by about 96% amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to multiple metrics.
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edition.cnn.com
People are luring Instacart shoppers with big tips -- then changing them to zero
In late March, Instacart worker Annaliisa Arambula accepted a grocery order that came with a big tip: $55. The store was just down the street, everything the customer wanted was available, and the order seemed to go off without a hitch.
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edition.cnn.com
Heart-pounding house fire rescue of 8-year-old boy left for dead
When police arrived at this blazing house fire in South Hedlund, Australia, they learned one child, named Liam, was still inside. Watch the newly released bodycam footage of the March 27 rescue as cops search for the 8-year-old boy. He was found “unresponsive” on the floor of the fiery suburban house and taken by the...
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nypost.com
6 Easter recipes for a scaled-down, but still festive holiday feast
Whether with many or few, with eggs or without, Easter is a moment of culinary joy.
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washingtonpost.com
Having weird dreams in quarantine? You’re not alone.
Getty Images/Tetra images RF Why so many people seem to be having vivid dreams right now, explained by an expert. The blog I Dream of Covid is a surrealist collection of dreams submitted by readers around the world in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic that, apparently, has had far-reaching effects into our collective subconscious. One San Francisco resident dreamed about walking around the city in Crocs and stepping on a needle contaminated with the coronavirus. Another person from Georgia recalled a dream where a doctor sprinkled salt on their thigh, tasted it with her fingers, and told them, “You are positive for Covid-19.” As people around the world hunker down in quarantine or otherwise adjust to the disease, many have anecdotally reported having weirder, more vivid dreams than usual — some related to the coronavirus, some about mundane life in the pre-pandemic world, and some just plain strange and inexplicable. Some people have said they’re more restless, thereby getting less sleep than usual. (For those struggling to have a good night’s rest or grappling with nightmares, the National Sleep Foundation recommends sticking to a consistent sleep schedule, or taking a short 30-minute nap.) Meanwhile, others have reported sleeping more, and consistent deep sleepers (like myself) rarely recall the dreams they have. been having the most vivid complex dreams every single night of quarantine— Hannah (@hannahg11) April 5, 2020 For sleep researchers, it’s a ripe time to collect dream content for analysis. Some theorize that this onset of vivid imagery is a result of changing sleep schedules: Most people have vivid dreams during the REM (rapid eye movement) phase of sleep, and they tend to have longer and deeper REM cycles as the night progresses. If a person wakes up in the middle of a REM cycle, they’re more likely to remember their dream content and the details involved. Others attribute this vividness to the emotional and physical chaos many of us are experiencing. In previous research, scientists have determined that the limbic system — parts of the brain involved in behavioral and emotional responses — are activated during dreams that are highly bizarre or emotional. I spoke with Dylan Selterman, a social psychologist who runs the Dreams, Relationships, Emotions, Attraction, and Morality (DREAM) Lab at the University of Maryland, on how something like the Covid-19 outbreak could be affecting our sleep and our dreams. How does stress about, say, a global pandemic affect our dreams? There is not a grand unified theory of dreams among researchers, but there are several different theories with some validity to them. You’ve probably heard of the continuity theory of dreams, which hypothesizes that people dream about the stuff they’re thinking about and doing while they’re awake. If we feel some degree of stress about the pandemic, or about work or family, then it’s normal for those types of themes to appear in our dream content. Some researchers believe that dreams have a functional purpose to prepare us for difficult or challenging situations when we awake. Normally, what happens during a stress dream is that your mind appears to be working a problem out. There are also researchers who believe the inverse of that; for example, if you’re experiencing difficulties in your current life and dream about them, that can predict your future mental health. Those are some possible explanations as to why some people might have stressful dreams. We’re trying to work through this situation emotionally, trying to prepare for the future. It’s not surprising to me to hear that some people are having dreams related to the pandemic. Both my wife and I have had dreams that involve social distancing, where we try to maintain physical distance from people around us, because that’s what we’re doing when we’re awake. Is there any truth to the feeling that lots of people are having similar types of dreams all at once? The biggest variables that influence dream vividness have to do with your regular sleep habits. If it’s a very traumatic personal event, in clinical research, there’s evidence of people experiencing nightmares. It could be that people are changing their sleep schedules, and if they get more sleep, they’re likely to have more vivid dreams. Another possibility is that people are thinking more about their dreams. Studies show that when you focus on your dreams more while you’re awake, you tend to remember them better. This has been shown in diary studies, for example. If a person starts a dream diary for even just a few days, they start to recall more imagery from their dreams. If you want to get more into dream philosophy rather than scientific research, you can look into Carl Jung’s idea of the collective unconscious. I haven’t read any literature on similar content in dreams after a traumatic event, like a terrorist attack, that caused millions of people to dream about that specifically. (In the aftermath of the 9/11 terror attacks, scientists from the Tufts University School of Medicine analyzed dreams of 44 participants. The post-attack dreams had more intense images, which is “very consistent with findings in people who have experienced trauma of various kinds,” the head researcher said, but there was no dream content involving airplanes or tall towers.) Is there any way a person can manifest better, less-scary dreams? There’s some research in clinical psychology — and I’m not a clinical psychologist — that people who suffer from chronic nightmares or PTSD can benefit from lucid dreaming therapy. I can only speak anecdotally from this, and I used to lucid dream a lot more frequently when I was younger. This can be a way for people to overcome negativity and experience more fulfillment in their dreams by controlling the content they encounter. Stephen LaBerge is the premier researcher on lucid dreaming, and if you’re interested, he has published several books on the topic and how to induce these dreams. During our talk, Selterman cited several other researchers who’ve made significant contributions to dream theory, including Rosalind Cartwright, author of The Twenty-four Hour Mind,who has studied how dreaming regulates our mental health and emotions, and Robert Stickgold of the Harvard Medical School’s Division of Sleep, whose research delves into how memory is consolidated during sleep. In several years, it’s possible that sleep researchers — those currently collecting anecdotal dream content — could come to some conclusions about our quarantine dreams. The crowdsourced I Dream of Covid blog has the potential to be a fascinating trove of dreams for future understanding, much like The Third Reich of Dreams, a record of 75 dreams compiled by Charlotte Beradt under the Nazi regime. Her book is organized by recurring symbols, and while it is not a study or psychoanalytic text, it “reinforces the premise that links between waking life and dreams are indisputable,” according to the New Yorker. In the meantime, if you’re an avid dreamer, it could be helpful to start a dream journal, regardless of whether you believe your dreams hold intrinsic meaning or not. Selterman added: “The way that dreams are understood by people can be filtered through their own beliefs as to what those dreams mean.” Support Vox’s explanatory journalism Every day at Vox, we aim to answer your most important questions and provide you, and our audience around the world, with information that has the power to save lives. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. Vox’s work is reaching more people than ever, but our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources — particularly during a pandemic and an economic downturn. Your financial contribution will not constitute a donation, but it will enable our staff to continue to offer free articles, videos, and podcasts at the quality and volume that this moment requires. Please consider making a contribution to Vox today.
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vox.com
Macron meets with controversial chloroquine doctor touted by Trump
Didier Raoult defends a controversial treatment for the coronavirus.
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politico.com
Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon’s podcast looks at married life in quarantine
If you haven’t seen their story in the Oscar-nominated autobiographical dramedy “The Big Sick” (and what better time than now to seek it out on Amazon?), writer Emily V. Gordon and comedian Kumail Nanjiani are a couple who got married following the most extreme of adverse circumstances. During their early dating days, she became seriously...
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nypost.com
Joe Exotic Juror Says 'Tiger King' Star Faked Tears During His Murder-For-Hire Trial
"He wasn't the same guy. He was much quieter."
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newsweek.com
Scientist asks for breast milk to study coronavirus treatment
Could the cure for coronavirus be abreast? Medical researcher Rebecca Powell, Ph.D., is asking mothers of newborns to donate breast milk to her study, with hopes of analyzing its healing powers. The human milk immunologist made the strange request on social media recently, asking specifically for samples in the NYC area. “Are you a healthy,...
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nypost.com
The UK PM 'is in extremely good spirits' after being moved to a regular hospital ward, Downing Street said
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edition.cnn.com
A Heavy Lift For The Fitness World As Home Workouts Replace The Gym
Swimmers, runners, weight-lifters are getting creative with home exercises. Out-of-work fitness instructors are doing tricky math: whether to offer their hard-earned skills on the Internet for free.
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npr.org
Trump team ramps up scrutiny of funds to WHO
The State Department and others have been told to get extra approvals before sending funds to the World Health Organization.
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politico.com