Generally
General
1144

Σύσκεψη στο υπουργείο Υγείας για τον κορωνοϊό -Προβληματισμός για τα κρούσματα στην Ιταλία

Σε εξέλιξη βρίσκεται σύσκεψη στο υπουργείο Υγείας με αφορμή τα κρούσματα κορωνοϊού στην Ιταλία.
Load more
Read full article on: iefimerida.gr
unread news
unread news
Some auto insurers refunding premiums to drivers stuck at home
An "unprecedented" decline in driving because of the coronavirus recession is reducing accident claims.
1m
cbsnews.com
Acting U.S. Navy Secretary Thomas Modly Resigns After USS Roosevelt Leaked Audio Revealed Him Berating Captain Brett Crozier
Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly submitted his resignation Tuesday, just one day after leaked audio overheard him calling ousted U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt commander, Captain Brett Crozier, "stupid" in an address to the ship's crew.
1m
newsweek.com
Need a laugh? 50 funny bits to watch while quarantined
When you feel sad and trapped inside, you need not go far for a giggle. Here are 50 things that should get you laughing from home.        
1m
usatoday.com
Wait, Should My Kid Be Wearing a Mask Too?
Kids are germ vectors even in the best of times. Should they be wearing masks now?
1m
slate.com
Many small businesses are being shut out of a new loan program by major banks
A normally busy Main Street is deserted as the small businesses that line the business district remain closed after the governor instituted a shelter-in-place order in an attempt to curtail the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) on March 24, 2020 in Rockton, Illinois. | Scott Olson/Getty Images After the launch of the Paycheck Protection Program, some businesses are just trying to find a lender that will consider their application. The Paycheck Protection Program, a new effort intended to help small businesses combat the economic fallout from the coronavirus, is working through technical snafus, confusion about available lenders, and questions about the costs its loans will cover — all of which have made the application process more challenging. Since it launched on Friday, the program — which includes $349 billion in funding for forgivable loans to small businesses and nonprofits — has seen a deluge of interest: According to White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow, 178,000 loan applications were being processed as of Tuesday morning. And that figure doesn’t include the small businesses that are still searching for lenders to accept their applications after many larger banks, including Bank of America and Chase, limited their pool to existing customers. Agency officials are working to increase access to the program and offer more clarity about the application criteria, according to Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL), the chair of the Senate Small Business Committee. “When you launch something this unprecedented and far-reaching just seven days after it becomes law there will inevitably be problems,” Rubio said in a statement this weekend. “The good news is that every problem we saw ... can be fixed.” Access is perhaps one of the largest issues to come up: Although some businesses were able to apply swiftly on Friday, others were initially turned away by institutions like Bank of America because they didn’t have an existing credit line or loan with the bank. (Bank of America has since updated its policy to allow checking account holders to apply in the wake of significant public pushback, but new clients are still barred from applying.) Just another small business owner screwed by @BankofAmerica 13 years of doing business with BOA ends today. Denied application bc of no line of credit with them. All the 30 other banks I've contacted are serving their customers first. Shame on you. #BoA #bankofamerica #PPP pic.twitter.com/I1WSqN1G6q— K.C. Bugg, Psy.D. (@Drkcbugg) April 3, 2020 As Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA) called out in a tweet, Bank of America was far from the only institution that offered customers a surprising message when they attempted to apply on Friday — with both Citi and Capital One indicating that their applications weren’t even open yet. Yesterday @stevenmnuchin1 stood at the White House podium and assured American small business owners that the Paycheck Protection Program "will be up and running tomorrow."Here's what small business owners are looking at right now when they try to get PPP loans from banks: pic.twitter.com/8SOKCA8y4Z— Rep. Don Beyer (@RepDonBeyer) April 3, 2020 In addition to access to the program, a larger question that’s emerged about PPP is whether Congress has allocated sufficient money to meet the immense need that small businesses and nonprofits have. There are 30 million small businesses in the US, and the funds that were dedicated to PPP in the recent stimulus package don’t seem like they’re nearly enough. As Kudlow’s statements on Tuesday indicated, fewer than 200,000 loans have been processed so far. “Funding of $349 billion is frankly inadequate for the magnitude of need in the American small business community and is likely to run out quickly,” the Independent Community Bankers of America recently wrote in a letter to the Treasury Department. Lawmakers, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, have said they plan to push for more funds as soon as this week. Good news on #PPP. @senatemajldr is working with @SenSchumer & hopes to approve additional funding by voice vote during the Senate’s pro forma session this week on Thursday 9 April.We will need at least another $200-$250 billion for #PPPloan— Marco Rubio (@marcorubio) April 7, 2020 Officials are working on broadening access to these loans Soon, the Treasury Department is expected to make moves aimed at broadening access to PPP loans as well. Specifically, it’s set to roll out more applications to online lenders, including PayPal, to participate in the program, according to Rubio. Other banks and lenders could get approved in the coming weeks as well. This effort is intended to ensure that more institutions are able to respond to the flood of inquiries — and that more people have institutions where they can apply. According to Bank of America, it’s already received applications from more than 177,000 small businesses in the past few days. “The pure volume of applications that are being submitted to lenders is incredible,” says Don Stevens, a small-business expert at the financial advisory firm CohnReznick. “As you bring on potentially new online lenders, they are going to add resources to the system that help process this information and get the applicants’ information to the SBA for final approval.” For context, the SBA typically processes about 800,000 loan applications a year, according to Forbes — so the number of businesses that are applying for support now is of a scale that’s far different than what the agency and banks are used to. The approval of new lenders will be an important step to open up this program to more people, especially as several of the large banks curb the types of applications they’re willing to consider. Bank of America has limited the businesses that could apply to the program to those with existing checking and credit accounts. Wells Fargo has already stopped accepting any applications because it’s hit the threshold of funds it would be able to lend via the program. Others like Chase, TD Bank, and Capital One, are limiting the applications they’re accepting to customers who’ve opened some type of account at that bank before. This approach means that many small businesses could be shut out of the process by large, national lenders. “If banks only serve their customers, then the very businesses that may need access to the PPP program most will be left out in the cold, no question,” Enhanced Capital Group CEO Michael Korengold told the Wall Street Journal. Minority-owned business are less likely to have existing accounts at these banks and could experience more obstacles in obtaining these loans as a result, the WSJ notes. To identify which banks are taking applications, businesses can check out a tool on the SBA website as well as the agency’s list of active 7(a) lenders — though neither of these services currently indicates which banks are open to new clients. Experts also advise businesses to contact their local Small Business Development Center, Women’s Business Center, or SCORE, which all include experts who will provide free guidance via phone. Stevens notes that regional community banks would potentially be more open to new clients, and urges businesses to contact some of these institutions as potential options. Not all banks are able to participate in this program at this time, however — the SBA’s tool indicates exactly who has been approved. An example of a regional bank that’s taking new clients is the Bank of Southern California. Fundera, an online loan broker, has a list of banks and their requirements on its website as well. Questions remain about several other aspects of the program, including the timing of the approval process for both PPP and the Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL), another loan program that includes a $10,000 forgivable grant. Thus far, Stevens notes that his clients haven’t been able to receive a status update on where their EIDL grant applications stand beyond an acknowledgment that they’ve been submitted and received. The timing of the PPP loans is tied more directly to banks’ ability to approve them. Lawmakers say they intend to approve more money for small businesses Beyond some of the operational problems that have emerged, there’s a larger issue looming over the PPP program: There’s a major concern about whether the money that was allocated in the recent coronavirus stimulus package is enough to tide businesses over for the duration of the outbreak. Increasingly, lawmakers are acknowledging that it’s not. “Based on demand, it is clear that Congress will need to appropriate additional money for this program,” said Rubio in a statement. In an estimate he posted on Twitter, Rubio suggested that PPP would run out of funding by June 6. Eighth issue is money. Based on the demand we saw on Day One it is clear we will need more money for #PPP by late May.Our rough estimate is that if 2/3 of the lenders that will participate in #PPPloans aren’t up & running yet,the $349 billion will run out around 6 June. 12/13— Marco Rubio (@marcorubio) April 4, 2020 As Vox’s Ella Nilsen has reported, both House and Senate leaders are now in support of a fourth stimulus package that could closely resemble the one lawmakers approved two weeks ago. Among the elements it may include are more money for direct payments as well as more funding for small businesses in order to help organizations cope with the massive, ongoing fallout from the coronavirus response. Lawmakers could also move as quickly as this week to approve more money for small businesses, specifically. Given that President Trump has also acknowledged the need to provide more funding for small businesses, some congressional effort seems likely to succeed, with the only question being how much the next package allocates for those in need of PPP relief funds. I will immediately ask Congress for more money to support small businesses under the #PPPloan if the allocated money runs out. So far, way ahead of schedule. @BankofAmerica & community banks are rocking! @SBAgov @USTreasury— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 4, 2020
1m
vox.com
Researchers look for ways to divert patients from ventilators as shortage looms
Several groups of researchers are testing different methods to divert critically ill COVID-19 patients from needing ventilators in the first place.
1m
latimes.com
Acting Navy secretary forced out after bungled firing of USS Theodore Roosevelt's captain
Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly is out after a profanity-laced speech about Capt. Brett Crozier, who was fired for pleading for help for his crew.       
1m
usatoday.com
U.S. House Speaker wants Navy leader's removal, despite apology
U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi called on Tuesday for the removal of Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly, despite Modly's apology for ridiculing the commander of a coronavirus-stricken aircraft carrier.
1m
reuters.com
Trump to unveil social media hashtag to highlight Americans helping one another amid coronavirus
Trump will use the #AmericaWorksTogether hashtag to promote companies hiring employees and donating supplies amid the coronavirus pandemic.       
1m
usatoday.com
The Body Shop takes 30% off skincare products and more self-care essentials
If you’re looking to improve your self-care routine, The Body Shop is here to help with its flash sale on self-care items. For a limited time, you can get 30% off products like moisturizers, face masks, shower gels, and more. You can relax with a fragrant bath bomb, treat yourself with a face mask, and...
1m
nypost.com
Tips for looking your best on work video conference calls
Step into my home office. Appearing put-together during a video conference is an entirely different skill from making an impression at the water cooler. The current reliance on remote technology in the coronavirus pandemic has intensely blurred the line between work and life, turning homes into offices. Remember: Your co-workers can’t see past what you...
1m
nypost.com
How wild, domesticated and zoo animals are managing COVID-19
Does one infected tiger in New York mean animal owners—and lovers—should be worried about their own furry friends?
1m
newsweek.com
Uber helps nonprofit deliver free meals to Holocaust survivors
One quarantined Holocaust survivor told a volunteer, "the Holocaust was, of course, the worst experience in her life, but this is worse in a different way," Met Council CEO David Greenfield told CBS News.
1m
cbsnews.com
Schumer calls for up to $25,000 in ‘heroes’ pay for coronavirus workers
The Senate's minority leader declared the emerging proposal the “highest priority” from Democrats as congressional leaders and President Trump call for more aid for Americans.
1m
nypost.com
Jaguars DE Yannick Ngakoue doubles down on trade demand amid franchise tag standoff
Yannick Ngakoue still doesn't see himself as part of the Jacksonville Jaguars' future amid a standoff with the organization.        
1m
usatoday.com
Coronavirus response delayed despite health officials' private alarm
Coronavirus alarms were raised early in February. An email thread called "Red Dawn Breaking" exposed flaws in the plans.       
1m
usatoday.com
Drone video may show inmates burying coffins on NYC’s infamous Hart Island
Disturbing new drone video shows a crew of city inmates in protective gear burying coffins in a mass grave on Hart Island — where the city says it may bury the mounting dead from the COVID-19 pandemic. The newly released footage, shot Thursday, shows more than a half-dozen white-clad prisoners lower wooden coffins into the...
1m
nypost.com
Trump’s promotion of unproven drugs is cause for alarm, but not because he’s making money off it
President Donald Trump speaks at a coronavirus press conference, events at which he touts hydroxychloroquine as a Covid-19 treatment. | Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images Trump indirectly owns a minute stake in a company that makes hydroxychloroquine. But that doesn’t seem to be why he’s been promoting it. President Donald Trump’s aggressive support for the unproven idea of using the lupus and malaria drug hydroxychloroquine to treat coronavirus has puzzled public health experts, journalists, and others for weeks. A Monday New York Times report appeared to offer one possible new explanation: financial interest — his own, and that of those close to him. Per the Times: If hydroxychloroquine becomes an accepted treatment, several pharmaceutical companies stand to profit, including shareholders and senior executives with connections to the president. Mr. Trump himself has a small personal financial interest in Sanofi, the French drugmaker that makes Plaquenil, the brand-name version of hydroxychloroquine. However, Trump’s Sanofi stake is indirect and rather small — he owns shares through a fund that includes a diverse array of stocks. As Vox’s Emily Stewart noted, a government official repeatedly promoting a product made by a company they have a minute stake in would be a very inefficient way to be corrupt: So the issue on the Trump/Sanofi thing is that if I were planning to make money off talking up a stock, I'd ... invest directly in the stock, not a small portion through a mutual fund. Like if I'm talking up Apple and am invested in an S&P index, I'm doing it wrong.— Emily Stewart (@EmilyStewartM) April 7, 2020 The immediate interest in Trump’s financial connections to the pharmaceutical companies is another indicator of how the president’s decision not sell off his assets or put them into a blind trust opens him up to allegations of impropriety. But it was also a sign of how puzzled some experts are by the president continuing to tout the drug in nearly every public appearance, particularly given that it can have some dangerous side effects. Overall, Trump’s top medical experts have taken a more measured tone, as director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and White House coronavirus task force member Dr. Anthony Fauci did in speaking with CBS’s Face the Nation Sunday. “The data are really, just, at best, suggestive,” Fauci said on the program. “There have been cases that show there may be an effect and there are others to show there’s no effect. So, I think in terms of science, I don’t think we could definitively say it works.” Trump appears to have been convinced of the drug’s effectiveness by its advocates in his inner circle, including trade adviser Peter Navarro and his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, as well as by a French study that indicated the drug is effective against the virus — but that, as Vox’s Umair Irfan has explained, came with a number of caveats the president may have missed, and that has been retracted. And this — combined with the fact that the president, unlike Fauci, has no scientific training — had led a number of observers to believe Trump genuinely thinks hydroxychloroquine is promising and should be further investigated. This view was encapsulated in the Times’s reporting Monday by a medical director at Brooklyn Hospital Center, Dr. Joshua Rosenberg. “I certainly understand why the president is pushing it,” Rosenberg told the Times. “He has to project hope. And when you are in a situation without hope, things go very badly. So I’m not faulting him for pushing it even if there isn’t a lot of science behind it, because it is, at this point, the best, most available option for use.” But the report of Trumpworld’s connections to the pharmaceutical industry caused many to believe something more sinister was afoot — namely, that Trump hoped to use the coronavirus pandemic to enrich himself and his allies. Trump has been accused of many crimes — but doesn’t seem to be doing anything wrong this time Trump has on numerous occasions been accused of, put under investigation for, and refused to rule out using his position to financially benefit himself. And he was, of course, impeached about four months ago on charges of using his office for his political benefit. It’s this history that has online observers, political strategists, and journalists highlighting the president’s financial ties to Sanofi, which makes hydroxychloroquine. But while there are a number of outstanding questions about Trump’s financial stakes and how his current role influences them, it isn’t clear there is great cause for concern with respect to his pharmaceutical holdings. For one, the president doesn’t directly own Sanofi stock. His 2019 financial disclosures suggest he holds it in three family trusts through an investment in the mutual fund company Dodge & Cox’s international stock fund. According to Dodge & Cox, that fund includes shares of a number of drug companies — including AstraZeneca, Novartis, Bayer, GlaxoSmithKline, and Sanofi. But it also includes shares of companies in other industries, from online retail to banking to electronics. And of the drug companies it does include, only some, like Novartis and Sanofi, are major manufacturers of hydroxychloroquine. This would suggest that the president — and anyone else who bought this particular Dodge & Cox product — may not profit very much from increased hydroxychloroquine sales, and that any benefits drug companies in the portfolio see may not be enough to offset the loses of other included companies. Trump’s financial disclosures don’t show exactly how much each trust has invested in the fund, but they do say it is $15,000 or less. Financial Times reporter Kadhim Shubber wrote this means the president’s stake in Sanofi is likely worth about $450. It also is not clear how much the stakes in those other pharmaceutical companies will benefit the president. In late March, Novartis donated 30 million doses of hydroxychloroquine to the US federal government, and Bayer donated an additional 1 million doses of its hydroxychloroquine drug. Other pharmaceutical companies, including Mylan and Teva, have pledged to donate millions of doses as well. This does not mean these companies will make zero sales — particularly given continuing demand among lupus and malaria patients, as well as at hospitals and other medical facilities for Covid-19 care — but that they may not be making money hand over fist thanks to the coronavirus. And as Ami Fadia of SVB Leerink, a health care investment company, told Barron’s, any additional hydroxychloroquine sales aren’t likely to greatly impact drug companies’ bottom lines because, even if they are able to quickly ramp up production, it is a relatively cheap drug in its generic form. Fadia said it can cost as little as 32 cents per pill. Assuming increased demand over the short term, Fadia said, Mylan could expect to make $15 million in hydroxychloroquine sales. This sounds like a lot, but not when you bear in mind Mylan’s 2019 revenues were $3.19 billion. Given demand, Mylan Sanofi and other companies could raise prices in order to increase profits. This would likely cause public uproar and be met with pushback from lawmakers. It is true that a number of drug companies have shown themselves able to disregard that sort of criticism in the past, as with drugs to treat diabetes, for instance — but thus far, there has been little sign there will be hydroxychloroquine-related opportunistic pricing. And the Trump allies with investments in the drug companies that would seem to be helped by Trump’s advocacy for the drug — which include Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, investor Ken Fisher, and Amneal Pharmaceuticals co-founder Chirag Patel — also do not seem to be the beneficiaries of any underhanded behavior. Ross, like Trump, is connected indirectly, through a fund he used to run; Fisher has long been a Sanofi investor through his asset management company; and while Patel’s company does plan to produce hydroxychloroquine, Amneal has said it plans to donate pills as well — and, should the treatment actually prove effective, it may seem wise to empower those able to make it. Again, there are many reasons some are suspicious of Trump policies and how they affect his pocketbook. He tried to steer millions of dollars of business to his Florida resort by planning to hold a G7 meeting there. He has faced questions over Air Force and White House spending at his resorts worldwide. He was ordered to pay a $2 million fine by New York for “improperly using charitable assets to intervene in the 2016 presidential primaries and further his own political interests.” This has made many of his critics sensitive to what could appear to be improprieties on his part. It is important those sensitivities do not lead to false alarms, but past behavior means there is an important line for interested parties to walk when assessing Trump’s behavior.
1m
vox.com
Trump removes inspector general poised to oversee coronavirus stimulus funds
President Trump on Tuesday removed the Pentagon inspector general tasked with monitoring the coronavirus economic relief plan.
1m
foxnews.com
New York region governors plan coordinated economic restart
1m
politico.com
Social Distance: You're Doing Great
Over the weekend, the surgeon general warned the public that, due to the rising death toll from the coronavirus pandemic, this week would be “the hardest and saddest week of most Americans' lives,” comparing it to Pearl Harbor and 9/11. And President Donald Trump himself, who has often sought to downplay the danger of the virus, said on Saturday that there will be “a lot of death.” With the COVID-19 deaths continuing to creep up, lots of Americans will be grieving in the weeks and months ahead.On this episode of the podcast Social Distance, Katherine Wells and James Hamblin call Lori Gottlieb, author of The Atlantic's weekly “Dear Therapist” column, to answer listeners' questions about supporting loved ones, dealing with depression, and grieving during the pandemic.What follows is an edited and condensed transcript of their conversation.Listen to the episode here:Subscribe to Social Distance on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or another podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they’re published.Katherine Wells: Lori, we wanted to first just give you our condolences. I know you wrote a column to yourself recently.Lori Gottlieb: Yeah. In the midst of the coronavirus, my father died, and he did not die of the virus. He had complications from congestive heart failure. We knew that he was going to die in the coming weeks or months, but when somebody dies in the middle of what's going on in the world right now, it's a very, very different experience. It's a very surreal experience, layered on top of an already surreal experience.I'm Jewish, and we sit shiva, which means for seven days, normally, people would be coming in and out of the house constantly, grieving with you, sitting with you, bringing you food, comforting you, telling stories, sharing memories. It's a really meaningful part of the grieving process.And we couldn't have that, of course. You come back from burying your father and nobody is there. People FaceTime; people call. But it's not the same as physical presence.One of the things that I noticed is that if somebody died of something unrelated to COVID-19, it's almost like, because everything is surreal for everybody right now, you don't feel as alone. You feel like, Wow, my world has been shaken up and there's no normalcy to my life. But there's no normalcy anywhere. There's a collective grief. Everybody's grief is unique to them. But I also feel like there's also a collective grief that we're all sharing.Wells: That was actually something I wanted to ask you—if it's appropriate to call that feeling grief. What does grief really mean?Gottlieb: Grief is the pain of loss. And it doesn't have to be a death. It's any kind of loss that causes you pain. People are minimizing certain losses because they feel like they aren't valid. You're missing your college graduation, for example. That's a loss, and you grieve that. But it's not the loss of a life, for example, or the loss of a job. As I always say: there's no hierarchy of pain. There's no hierarchy of grief. Grief is grief and loss is loss.Wells: Why don't we ask you a couple of questions on behalf of our listeners? We've gotten many that we thought you were best suited to answer.Hamblin: We have a listener question here, a very thoughtful one."Hi. I graduated college last May, and I landed an amazing job that I loved with great people and health care and a living wage. Unfortunately, I was laid off due to COVID. I've fallen into an extremely deep depression from this economic downturn and quarantine. And I don't know what to do about it. And I'm trying to stay mindful. But I guess I'm wondering if there are any ways to stay productive. Does it matter if I'm being productive? Should I just chill out? I just feel so completely lost and directionless and can't cope with this. It's not even a real question. I'm just in deep distress." Gottlieb: It is a real question. I think what she's asking is how to deal with her depression. One thing she's trying to do is to try to be productive, because she doesn't have the job now, and she doesn't quite know what to do with herself.But being productive is not going to help her manage the underlying loss. We're going back to grief. This was a huge loss. A lot of our sense of self is tied up in what we're doing every day. The usual “Here's what I do. Here's who I am.” And so, all of a sudden, she’s got this big blank every day when she wakes up. What is she going to do?What I would say to her is that I think she needs to reach out to a therapist. Because I think that this can really spiral downwards. Being more productive can help somewhat, but I also feel like she needs to talk to somebody about this loss.Wells: I do wonder about that question about productivity. I imagine a lot of people who have lost their jobs, even those who maybe wouldn't say they were feeling depressed, would be at loose ends for how to deal with this open time.Gottlieb: So let’s say that you aren’t in that deep despair, but you are feeling lost. I think it’s really important to have some sort of routine and not the routine that you had before. I think a lot of people are trying to replicate that routine, and then they feel like a failure, because you can’t really replicate it.So I would say, make a sort of coronavirus routine for yourself. Every night, it's really helpful to sit down before you go to bed, and say, “Here's what tomorrow is going to look like.”And I don't mean over-program yourself. A lot of people are over-programing themselves, because they're so afraid of having any length of empty time. Getting dressed and showering are really important. Making your bed is really important. And eat your meals at regular times. Plan one or two things that you want to accomplish the next day. And that's it. One or two things.Wells: A listener wrote in concerned about her sister. Her sister lives alone and is prone to depression. She usually deals with it by getting out and doing things but can no longer do that.Gottlieb: If she could take the sister into her own home, then they are an isolated unit, and they don't go anywhere. I think we really need to look out for people who are alone during this time. I know a lot of people have taken in people who were living alone, so that they don't have to be alone during this time. And I think that's a fantastic idea.Wells: And then the last question for you, Lori. This is from Ashley."Hi. This morning, my cousin in his early thirties passed away from COVID-19. In addition to the normal grief of something like this, there is an added devastation that we can't hold a funeral for him in the foreseeable future. It's extremely painful to think he was alone when he died. And we now can't come together as a family to mourn him. As the number of COVID-related deaths continues to rise, I'm realizing this is a grim reality that more and more families are going to have to deal with. This is obviously quite macabre, but I'm wondering if you guys can discuss this aspect of the pandemic and how people are dealing with it."Gottlieb: So earlier we were talking about what happens when somebody dies and it's not COVID-related. What so many people are experiencing right now are the COVID-related deaths. I think people feel like they don't have a way to honor that person.But on top of that, there's this feeling that they weren't there for them. You know, they couldn't be there in person. So there are a lot of people who feel like I wasn't there. I wasn't there at the most important moment when I needed to be there.There is an added loss, on top of the loss of not having the person there anymore, of not getting to have some kind of goodbye, and knowing that that's an opportunity we will never get back. So what do you do with all of that?I think that part of it has to do with forgiveness. I think sometimes the instinct is to blame oneself: What if I could have done it this way? Or what if I could have come to the door or the window? Or what if I could have had them put me on FaceTime in the ICU? Whatever it is.Everybody did their best. And I want people to remember that this is unprecedented. Everybody was doing the absolute best they could do. And so just forgiveness and a little bit of self-compassion that you did the best you could. I think that focusing on what didn’t happen is simply a way not to focus on the pain of not having the person there. So I would advise people to sit with your grief, not about the guilt and what you did and didn't do and about how things worked out or didn't work out. I think it's more about integrating the loss into your life as opposed to kind of getting through it.And I would just say the last piece of this is what I wrote for parents in Monday's column, but I think it applies to everybody: You're doing great. We're all doing great under these circumstances. And we’re so concerned about What should I be doing? Should I be doing more? Should I be doing something better? Just the fact that you are waking up and you are listening to this podcast and, trying to eat your meals on time, and maybe putting on some clothes. You're doing great.
1m
theatlantic.com
Egg prices crack records thanks to coronavirus panic shopping
Egg prices have cracked fresh records as the coronavirus crisis sent shoppers scrambling for yolks. The wholesale price for a dozen “Midwest large” eggs tripled over the course of last month to an all-time high of $3.09 on March 27, according to Urner Barry, which tracks daily food prices. The spike came as coronavirus panic...
1m
nypost.com
Virginia pilot, 16, transports medical supplies to small hospitals that need them most
A 16-year-old Maryland high school student disappointed that his lacrosse season was canceled amid the coronavirus pandemic is on a mission to help small rural hospitals that desperately need supplies, and he is using his flying experience to do so.
1m
foxnews.com
New Jersey’s governor extends state’s health emergency
The governor of New Jersey announced Tuesday that he’s issuing an executive order extending the state’s public health emergency by an additional 30 days amid the coronavirus pandemic. Gov. Phil Murphy initially declared the public health emergency last month on Mar. 9 as a result of the COVID-19 crisis. “Extending this order ensures we will...
1m
nypost.com
Acting US Navy secretary submits resignation after calling ousted aircraft carrier captain 'stupid'
Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly has submitted his resignation a day after leaked audio revealed he called the ousted commander of the USS Theodore Roosevelt "stupid" in an address to the ship's crew, according to a US official and a former senior military official.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Earl G. Graves Sr., founder of Black Enterprise, dies
Earl G Graves, Sr., founder of Black Enterprise -- the media company focused on black entrepreneurship and black businesses -- died Monday at the age of 85.
1m
edition.cnn.com
PGA golfer Jeff Sluman gets same price he paid for Florida town home
PGA Tour golfer Jeff Sluman has sold his waterfront home in Florida for $3.65 million, the same price he paid for it in 2017.
1m
latimes.com
Pennsylvania nursing home presumes all staff and residents have COVID-19
A nursing home in in Beaver County, Pennsylvania is operating under the presumption that all of its 800 residents and staff members have COVID-19. The Brighton Rehab and Wellness Center said they'll all be treated as such. CBSN Pittsburgh's Chris Hoffman reports.
1m
cbsnews.com
Grocery store customer tackled for coughing, spitting on produce amid coronavirus outbreak, could face charges
Coughing on food could land you in serious trouble.
1m
foxnews.com
Michigan nurse demonstrates coronavirus spread using gloves in viral video
A former emergency room nurse in Michigan took to Facebook with a warning to all those who are wearing disposable gloves during the coronavirus epidemic: You are still at risk for an infection. 
1m
foxnews.com
NORTHCOM commander vows military will look after health workers 'like they've taken care of us'
Air Force Gen. Terrence O'Shaughnessy, the commander of U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM) and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), vowed Tuesday that the U.S. military is ready to protect and serve health care professionals fighting the coronavirus pandemic.
1m
foxnews.com
A pandemic primary in Wisconsin offers glimpse into voting rights fight ahead
As voters arrived at the polls in Wisconsin on Tuesday in the midst of a pandemic, the images of snaking lines, mask-clad citizens and apprehensive poll workers reinforced by National Guard troops provided an early glimpse into the fight over voting rights that could surround November's critical general election.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Covid-19 is disproportionately taking black lives
People wait in line to get tested for Covid-19 at Roseland Community Hospital, in Chicago, Illinois, on April 3. | E. Jason Wambsgans/Chicago Tribune via Getty Images Hundreds of years of racism has delivered poor health and economic outcomes for black people, making them more vulnerable in the pandemic. US Surgeon General Jerome Adams gave America a dire warning on Monday: The country was about to enter its worst week yet of the coronavirus pandemic, “our Pearl Harbor moment, our 9/11 moment.” While Adams cautioned that the calamities wouldn’t be localized but would be “happening all over the country,” it’s becoming increasingly clear that based on new data, Covid-19 will have a starker impact on one group in particular: black people. Over the past few days, several states and cities across the country have begun releasing Covid-19 outcomes by race. The preliminary numbers reveal that black people are facing higher risks when it comes to the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. As of Tuesday, black people made up 33 percent of cases in Michigan and 40 percent of deaths, despite being just 14 percent of the state’s population. In Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, where blacks represent 26 percent of the population, they made up almost half of the county’s 945 cases and 81 percent of its 27 deaths, according to a ProPublica report. In Illinois, black people made up 42 percent of fatalities but make up only 14.6 percent of the state’s population. In Chicago, the data is even graver: Black people represented 68 percent of the city’s fatalities and more than 50 percent of cases but only make up 30 percent of the city’s total population. Claire Bangser/AFP via Getty Images Authorities in New Orleans set up a temporary field hospital at the convention center to start accepting thousands of coronavirus patients. In the South, the numbers are also grim. In Louisiana, black people accounted for more than 70 percent of deaths in a state population that is about 33 percent black. About 33 percent of the state’s 512 deaths as of Tuesday morning have occurred in Orleans Parish, where black people make up more than 60 percent of the population and where 29 percent of people live in poverty, according to 2018 census data. Louisiana’s first teen death — also one of the first teen deaths in the nation — was that of 17-year-old New Orleans resident Jaquan Anderson, an aspiring NFL player, according to local reports. But while some states have released data broken down by race, others have not, including New York, deemed the country’s epicenter of coronavirus cases. Nationally, there aren’t stats either. Health professionals and elected officials, like Congress members Elizabeth Warren and Ayanna Pressley, have called on institutions like the country’s Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to track Covid-19 testing and outcomes by race. The national Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, bolstered by 400 doctors from across the country, also demanded on Monday that the federal administration and local governments address racial disparities in Covid-19 treatment and testing, starting with the release of comprehensive information that includes race and ethnicity. Still, the emergence of just a smidgen of the Covid-19 data on race already tells a grim story that shouldn’t shock anyone who knows a little about the systemic oppression of black people in America. Hundreds of years of slavery, racism, and discrimination have compounded to deliver poor health and economic outcomes for blacks — heart disease, diabetes, and poverty, for starters — that are only being magnified under the unforgiving lens of the coronavirus pandemic. And negligible efforts to redress black communities are being agitated like a bee’s nest prodded with a stick. This has left some health care professionals and academics wondering if the coronavirus pandemic will ultimately become a black pandemic. Once wealthy and middle-class white people overcome the early throes of the virus, will America still care when it’s only ravaging black communities? Can racial demographic information in testing eventually become a tool to further marginalize the most vulnerable? “Nowhere else would we say let’s skip a major variable or factor in analyzing a national or worldwide epidemic,” Brookings Institution fellow Andre M. Perry tells Vox. “The reticence to report racial data is a reflection of how black and brown people are marginalized.” How health disparities make black Americans more vulnerable to coronavirus Well before the novel coronavirus arrived at America’s shores, black people across the country, regardless of socioeconomic status, have lived with chronic illnesses — long-term health conditions like diabetes and hypertension — at high rates. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Minority Health, the death rate for black people is generally higher than that of whites for “heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma, influenza and pneumonia, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, and homicide.” When combined with Covid-19 in the body, people already suffering from chronic illnesses or from comorbidity suffer the worst health outcomes. The underlying conditions increase a patient’s chance of hospitalization and even death. Some health professionals also stress that we pay attention to black people with less prevalent chronic conditions, like lupus and Crohn’s disease, or those with renal failure who can’t stay home because they must go outside for treatments like dialysis, as they may be more vulnerable to coronavirus, too. In Detroit, where black people make up 80 percent of the city’s population, chronic illnesses have already created a lethal storm. Detroit represents 7 percent of Michigan’s population but 26 percent of the state’s infections and 25 percent of its deaths. “It’s almost like structural racism has made black people sick” “What we are seeing is that because of the way [Covid-19] attacks the body, in terms of what it does in the lungs and how it interacts with the part of the body that controls the blood system, people with hypertension are more susceptible to the illness itself,” Philip Levy, a professor of emergency medicine and assistant vice president at Wayne State University where he focuses on health disparities in Detroit, tells Vox. When the virus first began to manifest in the city, Levy helped set up infrastructure to test health care workers and first responders. He has seen a lot of comorbidities in the firefighters and police officers he’s tested, and those who test positive for Covid-19 are especially vulnerable. “We have to get them out of the workforce,” he says. Levy points out that it’s not just elderly people who are falling prey to comorbidity. “There’s a high degree of hypertension among younger individuals here, where they have elevated blood pressure on a higher basis,” he says. “Young people think they are invincible, but they might have hypertension at 30 and succumb to this infection.” This is also backed up by data released in Louisiana on Monday. In the state, the leading underlying medical conditions in patients who tested positive for coronavirus are hypertension (66.4 percent), diabetes (43.52 percent), chronic kidney disease (25.1 percent), and obesity (24.7 percent). “Louisiana is already being hit hard by [Covid-19] since there are a lot of comorbidities associated with negative outcomes for the virus,” Paula Seal, an associate professor at Louisiana State University School of Medicine’s infectious diseases division in New Orleans, tells Vox. On the clinical side, Seal works in the HIV outpatient clinic at the University Medical Center and does inpatient counsel for general infectious diseases patients. Seal has been present since her facility, one of New Orleans’ key safety net hospitals, began seeing Covid-19 patients in the second week of March. The fact that New Orleans sees new HIV diagnoses often means that patients at the clinic already walk in with the hurdles of health inequity and racial disparity, Seal says. “HIV itself accelerates aging and presents a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease and kidney disease, and we are now seeing increased weight gain,” she says. “Many of these things identify as risk factors for [Covid-19 too].” Seal points out that a reason why racial disparities in health care are more pronounced in the South is the fact that a number of governors, including former Louisiana governor Bobby Jindal, rejected Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. “It wasn’t until Jon Bel Edwards came in that Medicaid expansion was accepted. That helped a lot,” Seal says. The 2016 expansion, which covers 10 percent of people in the state, has been proven to decrease annual mortality in Louisiana, cut uninsurance rates in half, and expand access to care. Louisiana is the only state in the Deep South to embrace the legislation. Still, Seal suggests that a lack of access to primary care for generations may have added to the Covid-19 risk factors the black community was already facing. The reason for compounded health problems among black Americans: racism “It’s almost like structural racism has made black people sick,” Uché Blackstock, an emergency medicine physician in Brooklyn and the founder and CEO of Advancing Health Equity, an organization that fights health care inequity, tells Vox. Blackstock, who works in a gentrifying neighborhood in central Brooklyn, says she is used to seeing a mix of people at her clinic, but with Covid-19, it’s lately “been all black people” — essential workers who don’t have the luxury of leveraging wealth to escape to homes on Long Island, upstate New York, Connecticut, or Rhode Island. Environmental racism, including practices like toxic dumping, has worked in tandem with other kinds of oppression (racial restrictive housing covenants and anti-busing measures, to name two) to produce stress and contribute to high rates of chronic illness. According to Blackstock, the pandemic is exposing a deep-rooted system of the haves and have-nots. It’s also displaying how black and brown people have a more tenuous existence in New York City since they lack job security, sick leave, and health insurance. They must ride public transportation to get to work on the front lines, many of them driving the buses themselves or cleaning the hospitals where they are directly at risk. Giles Clarke/Getty Images New York City nurses and health workers held a demonstration demanding safer working conditions on April 6. Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images A bus driver for the Detroit, Michigan, city bus line DDOT on March 24. In Michigan, black people made up 33 percent of cases and 40 percent of deaths, despite being just 14 percent of the population. And those are the ones who still have jobs: The latest US unemployment figures show that black people were disproportionately impacted by job losses in March. The unemployment rate was highest for blacks at 6.7 percent and lowest for whites at 4 percent. Nationally, the unemployment rate was 4.4 percent as nearly 10 million Americans filed for unemployment compensation at the end of the month. To fight the spread of the coronavirus, public health experts say that social distancing is one of the most effective measures people can take. But being able to socially or physically distance is a privilege. Black families often live in multigenerational homes, with the very young and the very old together under one roof. In 2016, 26 percent of black people lived in multigenerational homes, while 16 percent of whites did, according to Pew Research. Perry says residential segregation is making black people sick, and it started with housing discrimination and redlining, the unethical practice of refusing or limiting loans and services to people based on race, income, or neighborhood. “Redlining determined that certain black areas weren’t worthy of housing, ensuring that black people didn’t have the ability to pass down wealth to their children. It determined where black people could live, what kind of jobs they had, and the colleges and elementary schools they would attend,” Perry says. And over time, low-income black people became concentrated in the same areas, with vulnerabilities stacking atop one another. Black people’s movement has been restricted, making them more vulnerable to economic shocks. “When you’re poor, you use other people to make ends meet,” Perry says. “You share cars, you share energy, you live together. You’re not afforded the luxury of not being connected.” This dependency feeds the cycle of poverty. Without any intervention, families remain trapped, vulnerable to factors like low food access or low-quality education in segregated neighborhoods that beget their susceptibility to infectious disease. In 2018, the poverty rate for black Americans was 22 percent, according to a 2018 analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation. By comparison, it was 9 percent for white Americans. Abandoned populations are the most vulnerable in the pandemic Black people are also often overrepresented in abandoned populations like the homeless and incarcerated. Because these groups are an afterthought in American society, they’re especially vulnerable. Covid-19 will easily compromise them, public health officials warn, which is why advocates are calling for specific protection measures now. In Detroit, where the homeless population is majority black,Levy is working with the city to test members of the homeless for Covid-19, an effort that could save thousands of lives. “There are 2,100 chronically homeless people in Detroit, and we must make sure they don’t get duly afflicted with coronavirus as a virtue of residing in shelters together,” Levy says. The city is reopening temporary shelters and setting up 500 more beds across the facilities that will allow for social distancing. Paul Sancya/AP Rabbi Yosef Chesed carries water for distribution at the Brightmoor Connection Food Pantry in Detroit, Michigan, on March 23. Black people are also disproportionately represented in the country’s prison system;police targeting leads black people to be incarcerated at more than five times the rate of whites. Add the conditions of confinement — lack of access to basic necessities like clean water, soap, and ventilation — to already existing health conditions, and it’s no surprise that incarcerated people are more susceptible to sickness. In New York City’s Department of Corrections facilities, 286 inmates have tested positive for Covid-19, andon Sunday, New York City’s first inmate died at Rikers Island prison, according to BuzzFeed News. He was awaiting a hearing on a parole violation. According to Brendan Saloner, a health policy researcher at Johns Hopkins, the result of a widespread outbreak in jails and prisons has catastrophic consequences. “The nature of outbreaks in prison is that once they set off, it’s hard to contain,” he tells Vox. “The pandemic is only magnifying structural inequality, and we won’t ever understand the true magnitude of what’s happening if we don’t include incarcerated populations.” Some states, like California and even New York, have begun releasing people incarcerated for nonviolent crimes to reduce spread in the pandemic. However, advocates say more could be done, such as releasing those who are more vulnerable to the virus, including people who committed violent crimes but are no longer a threat because they are sick and old. Ultimately, advocates say, bold reforms at both the state and federal levels need to be taken, and taken quickly, if correctional facilities want to slow the escalating number of cases not only among the incarcerated but among those who work in prisons and jails, too. What comes next will probably further disenfranchise the black community With a lack of data comes a solid lack of certainty. Many health and civic leaders agree that a disaggregation of race and other demographic information would help health care professionals better treat patients as the country ventures through what is said to be its worst week yet in the pandemic. “We are in unprecedented times right now so we need the data released immediately,” says Blackstock. “We know it will confirm what we are predicting. We need the information to determine exactly how to respond to the demands of surges of sick people.” There’s worry that we will get the details when it’s far too late. Or worse, even when we get the information we need, it might serve as a ticket for the rest of the country to move on. In Memphis, Tennessee, community activist and pastor Earle Fisher is certain that the city will be ground zero for understanding how poverty leads to outsized health disparity, particularly in the face of a pandemic. But Memphis and Shelby County leadership have not displayed an interest in releasing detailed information on Covid-19 testing or in ramping up testing for residents at large, according to Fisher. “We’re leaving out a vulnerable community and subjecting them to even more deaths,” he says. Chris Sweda/Chicago Tribune via Getty Images Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker speaks to construction workers tasked to set up a 500-bed temporary hospital in Chicago on April 3. Past pandemics like the 1918 influenza outbreak and subsequent H1N1 seasons show that black people have a higher risk of dying when they contract widespread disease. In 1918, for example, even though blacks had lower morbidity and mortality overall, they still had higher fatality rates. And though black people had lower rates of influenza, whites still advanced racist theories about blacks being infectious disease threats. Then there is HIV, which has also disproportionately affected black Americans in recent years, a statistic that is rarely talked about. Fisher recited an age-old saying in the black community: “If white America has a cold, black America has the flu. If white America has Covid-19, what do we have?” The question stumps other leaders, too. Blackstock and Perry see some validity in asking, if white America recovers and moves on, will the country care about a pandemic that continues to terrorize black communities? Will the president or the CDC continue to hold press conferences once white people are mostly in the clear? “Black people have been suffering from a number of epidemics and no one batted an eye,” Perry says. “The status of the country has always been measured by the status of white people.” While Blackstock said it’s still too early to make any definitive predictions, she says “those who do care have to be as vocal as possible — we have families and generations of people who call these communities home.” The burden is once again on black people to demand information and related actions that will save their lives.
1m
vox.com
Target's Shipt grocery delivery workers push for more coronavirus protections and pay
Some Shipt delivery workers aren't taking jobs Tuesday, protesting what they call inadequate safety measures and pay for risks amid coronavirus spread.
1m
latimes.com
U.S. to become net petroleum importer again amid oil meltdown
The new forecast from the Energy Department's independent statistical arm comes as oil prices hover in mid-$20s per barrel.
1m
politico.com
Boris Johnson in intensive care as coronavirus symptoms worsen
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson is in the intensive care unit of a London hospital after his coronavirus symptoms worsen. CBS News senior foreign correspondent Elizabeth Palmer joined CBSN from London with the latest on his condition.
1m
cbsnews.com
‘Cats’ visual effects artist says rumored ‘butthole cut’ exists
“There was nobody that said, ‘We want buttholes.' It was one of those things that just happened and slipped through.”
1m
nypost.com
Prince William sends tweet wishing Boris Johnson a 'speedy recovery' as PM battles coronavirus
Prince William sent a rare, personal tweet from his verified social media account on Tuesday.
1m
foxnews.com
Wisconsin voters brave long lines amid coronavirus crisis
Tuesday’s elections also come after 24 hours of disarray because of conflicting state orders and court rulings.
1m
politico.com
House Republicans demand answers after Kennedy Center lays off employees despite taking stimulus money
Republicans on the House Oversight Committee are demanding that the management of the Kennedy Center explain themselves after announcing the furlough of employees -- after a controversial $25 million provision in the CARES Act coronavirus stimulus was meant to keep this from happening.
1m
foxnews.com
German woman, 101, violates coronavirus lockdown by escaping senior home, police say
A 101-year-old German woman on Tuesday escaped her senior home in violation of a nationwide lockdown to see her visit her daughter on her birthday, authorities said.
1m
foxnews.com
Coronavirus lockdown sex is the best we’ve ever had
In the age before quarantine, Denise and her husband of 14 years were in the grips of a serious dry spell. “We hadn’t had sex for almost two years,” the 36-year-old Charlottesville, Virginia, resident tells The Post. “We had just fallen into a rut … and our marriage was on the rocks.” With their three...
1m
nypost.com
Five Barnes & Noble workers were diagnosed with coronavirus in New Jersey
At least five Barnes & Noble employees at a distribution center in Monroe, New Jersey, have been diagnosed with coronavirus.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Hopes of coronavirus slowdown lift Wall Street
Wall Street rose on Tuesday on tentative early signs that coronavirus outbreaks in some of the biggest U.S. hot spots may be plateauing, with New York's governor saying social distancing measures to curb the spread of the virus were working.
1m
reuters.com
Online grocery deliverers struggle to satisfy coronavirus demand
A pandemic forcing everyone to stay home could be the perfect moment for online grocery services. In practice, they’ve been struggling to keep up with a surge in orders, highlighting their limited ability to respond to an unprecedented onslaught of demand. After panic-buying left store shelves stripped of staples like pasta, canned goods and toilet...
1m
nypost.com
Why official rushed to McDonald's with $3.4M for medical supplies
Illinois state comptroller Susana Mendoza described her state's race to get medical supplies during the coronavirus pandemic, comparing it to the "wild-wild west."
1m
edition.cnn.com
Inside glimpse at Cowboys’ NFL Draft process could be subtle Dak Prescott hint
At least some members of the Dallas Cowboys are practicing social distancing. The coronavirus pandemic has forced millions of Americans adjust to remote working using teleconferencing software like FaceTime, Google Hangouts, Zoom, Skype, etc. and NFL teams are no exception. A video was posted to the Cowboys’ official Instagram account this weekend showing owner Jerry...
1m
nypost.com
Aid Groups Say They've Never Faced A Challenge Like The Novel Coronavirus
Humanitarian organizations are used to dealing with droughts, conflict and natural disaster. But the pandemic adds unprecedented layers of difficulty to their work.
1m
npr.org