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Iran reports 3,000 new cases of coronavirus in one day
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edition.cnn.com
'The Last Dance' Release Date: LeBron James, NBA Twitter Reacts to ESPN Moving Michael Jordan Documentary to April
The 10-part documentary series chronicles Jordan's final season with the Chicago Bulls, which ended with a sixth NBA title for him and the franchise.
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newsweek.com
US stocks are poised for a strong day: March 30, 2020
The stock market's roller coaster week continues as investors continue to worry about the coronavirus outbreak. Here are the latest updates on the Dow, S&P 500, companies and more.
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edition.cnn.com
'Fortnite' Update 12.30 Adds Kingsman Umbrella & Crash Pad - Patch Notes
"Fortnite" update 12.30 has been released, bringing the Crash Pad and Kingsman Umbrella to Battle Royale. Get the unofficial patch notes here.
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newsweek.com
'Deeply embarrassed' Jack Grealish apologizes for ignoring UK government lockdown advice
A leading English Premier League footballer says he is "deeply embarrassed" as he apologized for breaching UK government coronavirus lockdown guidance after telling fans to "stay home."
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edition.cnn.com
Why Pharrell is tone-deaf
Multimillionaire Pharrell Williams gets slammed for asking people to donate to hospitals. Drake’s all in his feelings about his family, and shares the first photos of his son. And Mark Wahlberg and Mario Lopez are bro-ing out at the gym while we’re quarantined with our Goya-can weights. Here’s a closer look at today’s stories: Pharrell...
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nypost.com
NBA bust Darko Milicic responds to Carmelo Anthony's comment on live stream: 'We are not kids, we are adults'
Former No. 2 overall NBA draft pick Darko Milicic essentially told Carmelo Anthony and Dwyane Wade to grow up on Saturday after the two of the stars from the 2003 class took jabs at the former Detroit Pistons forward.
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foxnews.com
The Average Woman Loses $407,760 Because of the Gender Wage Gap Over Her Lifetime
Equal Pay Day falls on March 31 this year. At the current rate of progress in the U.S., women won't catch up to men when it comes to how much they are paid until 2059. Here's a by-the-numbers look at the persistent gender wage gap.
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newsweek.com
15,000 LA high school students absent from online learning since coronavirus shut down schools
Some 15,000 Los Angeles high school students have not participated in any online learning since schools were forced to shut down in wake of coronavirus, new data shows.
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foxnews.com
Empire State Building shines flashing red to honor medical workers amid coronavirus
Each night through Thursday, the light will sync up to Jay-Z and Alicia Keys' "Empire State of Mind." The flashing light was met with mixed response.        
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usatoday.com
Coronavirus live updates: Amazon workers to strike; Illinois to make conference center a hospital; US deaths surge past 3,100
U.S. deaths surged past 3,100 as states across America pleaded for help Tuesday and took drastic action to try to stem the flood of coronavirus cases.        
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usatoday.com
Massie calls for Congress to hold virtual public hearings on coronavirus
Massie last week forced over 200 House members to return to Washington, D.C. to pass the coronavirus relief package after he announced he would try to block a voice vote on the measure.
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foxnews.com
World champion boxer suspended following domestic violence 'advice' video
British boxer Billy Joe Saunders has had his license suspended following a social media video in which he seemingly advocated domestic violence.
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edition.cnn.com
For Trump, Power Is for Self-Preservation Only
Seldom, if ever, has a president claimed so much power—and then turned around and done so little with it. Just a few months ago, when Donald Trump was being impeached in the House and tried in the Senate, he and his legal team insisted that presidential power is all but unlimited. Alan Dershowitz, one of Trump’s legal advisers, suggested that if the president believes that his staying in power is best for the country, he cannot be impeached for the actions he takes in hopes of being reelected. So complete is the president’s power, Trump’s legal team insisted at the time, that he can direct federal employees to defy a congressional subpoena—even after they stop working for the White House.These arguments grew out of what constitutional scholars call the unitary-executive theory, which has been cited to justify ever more expansive powers in the office of the presidency. But with his halting response to the coronavirus, Trump has turned the unitary-executive theory on its head.[Peter Wehner: The Trump presidency is over]This theory holds that the president has inherent, implicit authority under Article II of the Constitution that cannot be constrained by Congress—including exclusive power to control all subordinates. In the words of the law professor John Yoo, the author of the infamous Department of Justice memos rationalizing torture under the presidency of George W. Bush, presidents need unitary executive power “to defend the country in times of crisis and emergency.” Proponents of the theory also justify unfettered presidential power as fostering accountability. The public knows where the buck stops if it stops unflinchingly with the president, and it can vote accordingly in every fourth November.Under Trump, though, enhanced presidential powers under the unitary-executive theory have produced neither robust protections for the American people during the COVID-19 pandemic nor accountability for his actions since taking office. After weeks of stalling and misinformation, Trump has declined to use his far-reaching presidential powers to take all necessary steps to protect the public from widespread suffering and death in this unprecedented global health crisis. He has also been unequivocal that “I don’t take responsibility at all” for the federal government’s failures over coronavirus testing, affirming his personal impulse to shirk accountability—not accept it—in the face of criticism.What could Trump be doing with his unitary-executive power to help the nation in this time of crisis? For starters, he could have used the precious weeks of February to marshal widespread testing, which we now know would have saved countless lives, instead of falsely pretending that he had the problem under control. But even in this late moment, at least three things come immediately to mind: Mandate increased domestic production of necessary equipment, comprehensively manage the supply chain for medical equipment, and order everyone in the United States to stay home while the first wave of illness crashes over the U.S. medical system—offering it a fighting chance to stay alive and maybe even catch up with the rate of infection, illness, and death.Late last week, after weeks of intensifying pressure, Trump finally ordered General Motors to prioritize the production of ventilators, pursuant to his Korean War–era powers under the Defense Production Act. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported the first U.S. case of COVID-19 on January 21, more than nine weeks ago. Although better than nothing, the ventilator-production order might have come too late to save the lives that could have been saved if the ventilator count were higher to date.[Fred Milgrim: A New York doctor’s warning]The United States now has more confirmed infections than any other country on the planet, with no end in sight. Supply-chain intermediaries are capitalizing on the crisis, gouging prices and forcing states and hospitals to compete with one another for protective material and other lifesaving medical supplies. The federal stockpile of equipment is insufficient, with states and health-care professionals complaining that the Trump administration is not delivering promised supplies. Calls from Congress that Trump use the DPA to hasten the production and purchase of millions of N95 masks and other needed equipment for medical personnel and broadly implement a national, coordinated system of disseminating supplies have so far gone unheeded. Beyond approving the GM order, the most Trump has done on this front is to delegate DPA authority to Alex Azar, the secretary of health and human services—presumably for use at some point—and put Peter Navarro, an economic adviser who currently heads an obscure trade-policy office, in charge of government-business coordination.On January 31, Azar issued a statement that legally triggered the Public Health Service Act, a 1944 statute that affords the president broad power to mandate and enforce nationwide quarantines. Trump hasn’t used that power either, despite irrefutable evidence that minimizing physical contact is crucial to slowing the virus, as countries like China, Germany, and South Korea have shown by invoking such measures to “flatten” their curves. He threatened Saturday to impose a quarantine in the New York City area, but did not follow through.Even as Trump has largely declined to use his unitary-executive authority to combat COVID-19, he remains stout in his defense of perceived constitutional powers to ignore Congress and thus thwart his own accountability to the public. In a rare stroke of bipartisanship, Congress passed and Trump signed into law a much-needed $2 trillion relief bill for coronavirus aid. The statute provides $500 billion to the Treasury Department for loans and loan guarantees for states, municipalities, and eligible U.S. businesses. It also creates an Office of the Special Inspector General for Pandemic Recovery and a congressional oversight commission to review how federal agencies implement the program. The president has the power to appoint the special inspector general, who must file reports and coordinate efforts with Congress.In his statement accompanying his signing of the bill into law, Trump noted that the relief law authorizes the special inspector general to “request information from other government agencies” and requires that person “to report to Congress ‘without delay’ any refusal of such a request that ‘in the judgment of the Special Inspector General’ is unreasonable.” He also noted that the statute conditions federal agencies’ spending or reallocation of funds on consultation with or approval of Congress. In his signing statement, Trump announced that “my administration will continue the practice of treating provisions like these as advisory and nonbinding.”Although prior presidents have used signing statements in controversial ways—particularly during George W. Bush’s War on Terror—Trump’s contemptuous approach to any legislative or judicial oversight whatsoever should make even supporters of the unitary-executive theory shudder. Trump is calling himself a “wartime president” without acting as such. With billions of federal taxpayer dollars newly flooding into the administration for COVID-19 assistance, he is treating Congress as utterly impotent once lawmakers hand off massive powers to federal agencies—which, despite being placed within the president’s chain of command, were set up by Congress in the first place. A unitary executive cannot have it both ways—wielding entrenched and unaccountable power for the sake of self-preservation, but sloughing it off when it comes to protecting the nation from devastation.[Read: Red and blue America agree that now is the time to violate the Constitution]Throughout Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation and during the impeachment process, Trump’s legal team relied on notions of unlimited executive power to evade accountability. But now that the public needs a steady, powerful leader to steer us through this terrifying and deadly storm, Trump is telling state governors who are desperate for basic, lifesaving medical supplies that “you can get it yourself.”One could argue, of course, that philosophical consistency is a frequent casualty of major crises across the political spectrum. Many Democratic officials and left-leaning commentators have savaged Trump both for his failure to mount a unified national effort against the coronavirus and dictate terms to private companies and, just this past weekend, for dangling the very opposite suggestion of a federally imposed, tri-state quarantine to slow the national spread of the virus from the New York area.Yet the emergency powers that states have been begging Trump to deploy are not merely legal aspirations. Nor do they hinge on whether one accepts or rejects the unitary-executive theory. Congress has already specifically authorized presidents, in moments of national emergency, to take the kind of decisive steps that Trump has shown such reluctance to take now. Trump being Trump, he continues to exercise the powers of his office in self-interested ways, conditioning states’ access to federal help on obeisance to him personally. “It’s a two-way street” he told Fox News last Tuesday. “They have to treat us well, also. They can’t say, ‘Oh, gee, we should get this, we should get that.’” On Friday, he said he had instructed Vice President Mike Pence not to communicate with governors who have not been “appreciative” of the administration’s COVID-19 efforts. “Don’t call that woman in Michigan,” he said at a news conference regarding his directive to Pence. He was referring to Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer. That same Friday, she was dealing with an increase of 801 new cases in the state—the biggest one-day jump in the country so far. (The White House subsequently issued a disaster declaration for Michigan, making it eligible for more federal aid.)[Read: How the pandemic will end]As applied by Trump, therefore, the unitary-executive theory has produced the worst of both worlds: a would-be autocrat with absolute power who insists on complete obedience and retaliates if he doesn’t get it—while also blinking at the dire needs of the people he was elected to represent.During the House Judiciary Committee’s proceedings on impeachment, the Stanford Law School professor Pamela Karlan spoke these words: Imagine living in a part of Louisiana or Texas that’s prone to devastating hurricanes and flooding. What would you think if you lived there and your governor asked for a meeting with the president to discuss getting disaster aid that Congress has provided for? What would you think if that president said, “I would like you to do us a favor? I’ll meet with you, and send the disaster relief, once you brand my opponent a criminal.” Wouldn’t you know in your gut that such a president has abused his office? That he’d betrayed the national interest, and that he was trying to corrupt the electoral process? Heard today, these words are chilling.
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theatlantic.com
The kitchen ritual getting my family and me through the pandemic
Whether it's evoking early 20th century immigrants who baked bread and built lasting communities or giving her family a birthday cake and a reason to celebrate during Covid-19 social distancing, Vanessa Hua's sourdough starter -- a tiny bit of yeast -- is giving her constancy during a time of unfathomable chaos and fear, she writes.
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edition.cnn.com
Drink vodka to 'poison the virus': Dubious advice from political strongmen
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edition.cnn.com
Immigration lawyers sue feds over in-person virus hearings risks
They want in-person immigration hearings replaced with remote one until the pandemic ends and remote ways to communicate with immigrant clients.
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cbsnews.com
Kids in foster care? Coronavirus prompts courts to halt family visits, dealing harsh blow.
Dependency courts nationwide cancel hearings and suspend face-to-face family visits for foster kids over coronavirus concerns.      
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usatoday.com
Small businesses fear they won't survive the pandemic
Many small businesses, who employ almost half of the American workforce, are on the brink of losing it all. CNN's Kyung Lah reports.
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edition.cnn.com
Blue cities and their red states are dividing over coronavirus
The struggle to contain the coronavirus pandemic is opening a new front in the long-running conflict between blue cities and red states.
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edition.cnn.com
Post-Soviet president: Vodka and saunas can fight virus
Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko has shrugged off concerns about the novel coronavirus, telling his people that hockey, vodka and banya -- a traditional sauna -- are the best cures.
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edition.cnn.com
5 things to know for March 31: Coronavirus, health, economy, trans rights, Hungary
Here's what else you need to know to Get Up to Speed and Out the Door.
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edition.cnn.com
31 States Now Have Stay at Home Orders Amid the Coronavirus Outbreak
Other states, including Alabama and Georgia, have only issued the stay at home orders in major cities.
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newsweek.com
Man claiming to have coronavirus kisses police car window after arrest, cops say
Police in Michigan detained a 26-year-old man outside a Mount Morris grocery store after he allegedly claimed he had coronavirus and was pushing several shopping carts inside the store and later allegedly kissed the window of a patrol car following his arrest, a report said.
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foxnews.com
Should We Wear Masks in Public to Protect Against Coronavirus? Here's What Who, CDC and and Johns Hopkins Experts Advise
The World Health Organization advises against the general public wearing masks unless they are sick or caring for those infected.
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newsweek.com
How I became a ballerina: Misty Copeland
From humble beginnings, Misty Copeland became the African American female principal dancer for American Ballet Theatre in New York.       
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usatoday.com
Letters to the Editor: California got rid of surplus ventilators and mobile hospitals? Outrageous
The decision to pare down California's $200-million stockpile of emergency equipment to save $5 million annually needs to be investigated.
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latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: So now we're finally mad about how unwalkable much of L.A. is?
Now that people have only their streets as a recreation opportunity, they'll realize how much nature we've taken from L.A.'s neighborhoods.
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latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: He's from Indian Country. Now, he worries about COVID-19's impact on his community
A public health graduate school says the effect of COVID-19 on his small community near an Indian reservation will expose deep inequality.
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latimes.com
Op-Ed: If marijuana is essential during the coronavirus shutdown, why not books?
As are bread and milk, gas and aspirin, alcohol and marijuana, books should be available, with safety precautions in place, at the usual places we buy them in our neighborhoods.
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latimes.com
Editorial: Hey, sheriff and supervisors, knock off your squabbling. People are dying out here
The last thing L.A. County needs during a coronavirus pandemic is a turf battle between the sheriff and the Board of Supervisors.
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latimes.com
New rulings amid coronavirus could force Trump to release migrant children and parents
A federal judge in Los Angeles gives the government until April 6 to deliver a plan to handle 6,600 children held in shelters and family detention facilities.
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latimes.com
Medal of Honor recipient Gary Beikirch: Coronavirus spurring Americans to truly live for others
On behalf of my fellow Medal of Honor recipients, I want all Americans to know that you are in our thoughts and prayers during this serious situation that we are all facing together.
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foxnews.com
Editorial: Migrant children shouldn't be detained, but especially not during a pandemic
A federal judge was right to order the Trump administration to move faster to release detained migrant children from conditions that put them at risk for COVID-19.
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latimes.com
Letters to the Editor: People in China and South Korea wear masks in public. We should too
One of the simple steps we can all take to prevent the spread of the coronavirus is to wear masks in public.
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latimes.com
'What if I am a carrier?' As the coronavirus spreads in Florida, a priest struggles to reach his flock
The Rev. Michael Sahdev, a 28-year-old priest, is caught between the pull to shelter in place and his calling to tend to his congregation.
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latimes.com
My Home Is So Messy Even Marie Kondo Can’t Help. Now What?
To tidy up your home, focus on the family that lives there.
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slate.com
Help! My Boyfriend Deliberately Coughed in My Face.
“He began ridiculing me for wearing a face mask.”
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slate.com
Letters to the Editor: Can anything convince coronavirus skeptics that they're wrong?
If social distancing has the desired effect, coronavirus naysayers will insist we overreacted. Here's how to show they're wrong.
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latimes.com
Op-Ed: Black voters pragmatically support Biden to beat Trump — but we deserve Sanders' big agenda
Trump is forcing black folks to vote defensively. It's too bad: For once mainstream politics, in the form of Bernie Sanders, lets us vote our ideology.
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latimes.com
Fast Carbs Are Killing Us
I stood in the supermarket a couple of years ago examining the Nutrition Facts label on a box of breakfast cereal and realized that it did not tell me all I needed to know about what was inside. In 1992, when I was the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, I helped design the now-ubiquitous food label. I believe it has made an important contribution to public health. Given the limits of our knowledge when we introduced it in 1994, we could not have done it differently. But it is no longer enough.[Read: More than half of what Americans eat is ‘ultra-processed’]The first ingredient on the cereal box: whole wheat. But is that wheat truly a whole grain, largely in its natural state? The label is silent on that, but the answer is almost certainly no—the chemical structure of the wheat in most processed foods has been transformed into a “fast carb.” The extremely long chains of starch in a whole grain are pummeled, using industrial techniques, into much shorter chains. When we eat them, they flood our complex digestive system with glucose molecules that are swiftly absorbed by the body. They come to us essentially predigested.This is a big part of the reason that in the 25 years since the Nutrition Facts panel appeared, the average American has continued to gain weight. Obesity rates have doubled, and in 29 states a majority of people are expected to be obese by 2030; more than half of the children living today will be obese by the time they turn 35. As much as I would like to reassure people that they can be both healthy and obese, the truth is that carrying extra weight catches up to us as we age, throwing the body into metabolic chaos. The devastating consequences of diabetes and cardiovascular disease are likely to follow.The Nutrition Facts panel focuses our attention on calories, fat, sugar, and salt. It lists total carbohydrates, but does not distinguish between the fast and the slow carb varieties. Yet the processed starch of fast carbs represents a staggering percentage of the calories we consume. Think of hamburger rolls, pizza dough, and fries. The average American eats more than 1,000 calories of rapidly digestible starches and sugars every day, and gets 500 more from the fats and oils added to many of these products. Starch serves as the carrier for much of the fat, sugar, and salt that we ingest, and like sugar, it is converted into rapidly absorbable glucose.This article was adapted from Fast Carbs, Slow Carbs: The Simple Truth about Food, Weight, and Disease by David Kessler.All of this undermines what should have been an American success story. We became an agricultural powerhouse because of the nation’s abundance of fertile grasslands, ideal for growing grain, and the industrial infrastructure that refines that grain into starch. But the processed carbs that became our main food source have also proved to be a missing link between obesity and metabolic dysfunction. That story has largely gone untold. Despite all the research on nutrition and disease in recent years, the effects of inundating our bodies with a constant stream of rapidly absorbable glucose—a poison hiding in plain sight—has not been well examined.Modern processing techniques involve intense heat and mechanical forces that destroy the structure of food. In addition, food manufacturers add fat and salt to highly processed carbs to increase their palatability, making them much softer and easier to chew and swallow. We thus eat more and we eat it faster. Because the nutrients never reach the lower part of the gastrointestinal tract, hormones that should trigger signals of fullness don’t get stimulated. (By contrast, less-processed foods retain their tight structure so that enzymes don’t break them down completely; we can still digest the food, but may not absorb all of its calories.)Fast carbs elevate blood glucose, and with it, insulin levels. When this happens repeatedly, especially in people who are overweight, metabolic pathways can become dysfunctional: Insulin stops working effectively, leading to insulin resistance, and eventually, diabetes and other disorders. Our bodies become intolerant to fast carbs, and by continuing to eat them, we further accelerate metabolic dysfunction.[Read: The startling link between sugar and Alzheimer’s]The dangers of processed carbs are amplified in an environment of positive energy balance—that is, a world in which bodies take in more calories than they burn. Historically, humans had to work hard to find food and were lucky to get enough calories to match their energy expenditures. When we burned at least as much as we consumed, processed carbs didn’t present the same problems—especially when those carbs weren’t as highly processed, because we didn’t have industrial techniques to shatter the food matrix so completely. But today, when many of us struggle with weight and confront disorders like prediabetes or worse, processed carbs are a disaster. It is shocking, but perhaps no surprise, that only about 12.2 percent of Americans are cardio-metabolically healthy, their blood pressure, lipid levels, blood glucose, and weight falling within current guidelines, a repercussion of these changes.If the physiology of all of this seems complex, the solution is not. The first step is to reduce your consumption of fast carbs and add legumes, intact whole grains, and other slow carbs to your diet. The second step is to engage in moderate-intensity exercise to ensure proper insulin control.[Read: Why whole wheat is better than white]Finally, be cautious about what you substitute for fast carbs. Generally, people who follow a low-carb diet by substituting saturated fat increase their levels of LDL particles—a form of cholesterol that can build up in the arteries—by an average of 10 percent. Given that we know the number of LDL particles are associated with atherosclerotic cardiac disease, that’s the wrong approach: Our goal should be to bring everyone’s LDL level down. Unfortunately, clinical trials tell us more about how to lower these levels through drugs than through diet. On a population-wide scale, though, we know the majority of heart disease can be eliminated by reducing people’s LDL level.From a tangle of intricate science, then, a simple strategy emerges. Our best path to health comprises three basic steps: limit fast carbs, exercise with moderate intensity, and lower LDL levels. Following these recommendations will change our nation’s health as significantly as reducing tobacco use has done.
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theatlantic.com
Dear Care and Feeding: I Despise Toddlers. Does That Mean I Shouldn’t Have Kids?
Parenting advice on becoming parents, social distancing from family, and father-son bonding.
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slate.com
Today is Equal Pay Day for women and it's not a day to celebrate
March 31, 2020 is Equal Pay Day for many women, but it's not a day to celebrate.
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edition.cnn.com
Why the U.S. Is Running Out of Medical Supplies
Health care is a private industry in the U.S., and hospitals are businesses designed to maximize profit, not respond to a pandemic.
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nytimes.com
POLITICO Playbook: What they told us about the coronavirus
And the latest on a potential Phase Four bill.
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politico.com
The NBA could lose billions this season. Who will eat that loss?
Just as the NBA was approaching the critical stage of an exhilarating season this month, it abruptly suspended play when Rudy Gobert of the Utah Jazz tested positive for the coronavirus only minutes before a scheduled tipoff.
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edition.cnn.com
The NBA could lose billions this season. Who will eat that loss?
The NBA is one of the world's wealthiest sports leagues affected by the coronavirus, and the disease's economic impact on it could be fierce.
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edition.cnn.com
How to Create the Perfect Home Office: Ideas From Home Depot, IKEA, Office Depot and More
We share tips from experts on how to achieve the perfect professional space in your home, as well as advice on where to buy office essentials.
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newsweek.com