Generally
General
1208
unread news
unread news
The Far Right Is Looking for Miracles and Scapegoats to Bail Us Out of the Coronavirus Crisis
Dr. Fauci is given a security detail in response to increased threats.
1m
slate.com
Memo to NYC paramedics shows grim reality of coronavirus crisis
Over 1,000 American residents died of the coronavirus on Wednesday, bringing the U.S. death toll to over 5,100. In New York City, paramedics have been told to not transport patients in cardiac arrest to the hospital, reflecting the grim reality of how overwhelmed the epicenter of the virus outbreak is. David Begnaud reports from outside a field hospital in Central Park to show the toll the disease is taking on the city.
1m
cbsnews.com
Which NFL Teams Have the Best Odds of Signing the Top Remaining Free Agents?
Cam Newton, Jadeveon Clowney, and Jameis Winston are still looking for a team almost a month since free agency started.
1m
newsweek.com
Man Jailed for Six Months After Stealing Masks and Hand Sanitizer From Ambulance
Mark Manley, 35, admitted to stealing equipment from a stationary ambulance and assaulting a security guard, police said.
1m
newsweek.com
New England Patriots’ jet will bring over a million N95 masks from China to US
The New England Patriots' team plane went to China to pick up more than a million N95 medical masks -- with at least 300,000 coming to New York's coronavirus-stricken hospitals
1m
nypost.com
The Cybersecurity 202: States plan to expand mobile voting amid coronavirus pandemic, despite security concerns
States weigh increasing access to voting during a crisis with cybersecurity risks.
1m
washingtonpost.com
In a pandemic, to baby or not to baby?
It seems like the rule about not making big decisions while hormonal and pregnant probably applies during the emotionally charged and mentally fraught time of coronavirus, writes SE Cupp. But she's been thinking...
1m
edition.cnn.com
Women Dominate Booker International Prize Shortlist
Yoko Ogawa of Japan, Marieke Lucas Rijneveld of the Netherlands and Fernanda Melchor of Mexico are among the authors in the running for the prestigious translated literature award.
1m
nytimes.com
How Two Artists Combined Thousands of NYC Listings Into an Ad for One Massive, $43.9 Billion Apartment
Hardwood floors, plenty of closet space, and 55,588 bathrooms.
1m
slate.com
Day 22 without sports
The NHL playoff picture should have crystallized this weekend. Here are some of the questions we wish we had answered before the sports shutdown.        
1m
usatoday.com
Chesapeake Bay Bridge work finished a year ahead of schedule
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan says key repairs on the Chesapeake Bay Bridge have been completed more than a year ahead of schedule, thanks in part to light traffic amid the coronavirus pandemic
1m
washingtonpost.com
Khabib Nurmagomedov out of UFC 249, suggests he was pressured into unsafe choice
The UFC's lightweight champion says he will remain in quarantine in Russia, leaving the event, for which company president Dana White has yet to announce a site, in further turmoil.
1m
washingtonpost.com
Woman's Eye Bulging from Socket Was Caused by a Baby Tapeworm-filled Cyst
The 31-year-old had suffered from blurred vision for almost a month before she visited the E.R.
1m
newsweek.com
Eye Opener: U.S. medical supply stockpile at critical low
President Trump said the national stockpile of emergency medical supplies is nearly depleted. Also, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis ordered all of his residents to stay at home in an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus, a move that critics say should have happened earlier. All that and all that matters in today's Eye Opener. Your world in 90 seconds.
1m
cbsnews.com
Just because you’re working from home doesn’t mean your boss isn’t watching you
Your boss may be looking over your virtual shoulder right now. | Zac Freeland/Vox Software that monitors remote employees is seeing a sales boom. It’s a scenario that perhaps millions of employees across the US have experienced: Because of the coronavirus pandemic, your office closes up shop and your boss sends you home with a company laptop and the hope that you can get the same amount of work done remotely that you did when you were in the office. But some bosses don’t have to hope. They’ve installed tracking software on those computers to supervise their employees at home as well as — if not better than — they do in the office. Meanwhile, you may have no idea that your employer is virtually looking over your shoulder. Employee monitoring software comes in many forms. It could be something as simple as Slack giving your boss access to your private messages or as complex as dedicated programs that monitor how many minutes you spend using Slack (also Facebook, YouTube, and, of course, your actual job). Some programs allow the employee to self-report time spent on various tasks and others can record it for them. Some take screenshots of an employee’s monitor at random intervals, while others record every single key they press. Some employee monitoring features are so subtle you might not know they’re there. Videoconferencing software Zoom, for example, allows hosts using its paid service to turn on something called “attention tracking.” This feature lets them see if meeting attendees navigate away from the app for longer than 30 seconds during a meeting — a good indication that they’re looking at something else. It can’t see what they are looking at instead, and it can only be activated when the host is in screensharing mode. Zoom told Recode the feature is really meant for training purposes, when it’s important to know that people are actively watching a presentation. Because attention tracking can be turned on without attendees’ knowledge (and because many people didn’t know the option existed until it was widely publicized with a headline that may have made the feature seem more invasive that it is), many Zoom users felt like they were being spied on. Zoom’s mounting privacy issues haven’t helped matters. Employee tracking software has been around for years, but with so many more people working from home and many workplaces concerned that they won’t be as productive in their living rooms as they were in the office, some employers are turning to activity monitoring programs for the first time — as are their employees, whether they like it or not. Companies can pick and choose which monitoring features they want to enable. Some employers use these programs to prevent or detect theft — a valid and understandable concern, especially in certain industries. But others see them as a way to make sure employees are staying on task and not wasting time on Facebook, apparently not trusting their workers to do so unsupervised. For workers, it can feel like an invasion of privacy that breeds resentment. “My manager knows every single damn thing I do” Jane (who requested that neither she nor her employer be named for fear of retribution) is a contractor for a translation agency based in Australia. Her employer tracks remote workers using a program called TeamViewer, which mirrors everything from an employee’s laptop onto their desktop computer, which is still in the office. Jane’s manager is in the office, too, so he can see, in real time, everything his employees are doing by looking at their desktop monitors. “My manager knows every single damn thing I do,” Jane told Recode. “I barely get to stand up and stretch, as opposed to when I am physically in the office. I feel like I have to constantly be in front of the computer and work because if not, either the TeamViewer logs me out for being idle, or my manager randomly sends a check-in email that I must reply to promptly.” Jane’s office had this system in place for remote workers well before the pandemic, but the countless new members of the remote workforce might be encountering them for the first time, according to several activity monitoring software makers. ActivTrak, Time Doctor, Teramind, and Hubstaff all told Recode that they’ve seen significantly more interest in their product from new and returning customers during the coronavirus work-from-home boom. Time Doctor, which co-founder Liam Martin told Recode he likes to think of as a “Fitbit for work,” has had a “significant uptick” in business, with more leads in a week than the entire last quarter. Teramind reported a triple-digit percentage increase in new leads since the pandemic began. HubStaff said unique visits are up 72 percent in the last three weeks compared to the previous period, and it has added hundreds of trial customers and subscribers, along with adding hundreds of licenses for existing subscribers. ActivTrak has seen a threefold increase in sales requests and license increases from existing customers ranging from 50 to 800 in March, as companies scale up their remote workforce from some employees to all of them. “We’re hosting informational webinars, detailed product tutorials, and posting tons of educational content around the clock in response to an overwhelming increase in demand from companies,” Rita Selvaggi, CEO of ActivTrak, told Recode. The people behind these applications realize that workers may not be thrilled about being required to use tracking software, so they encourage employers to use them thoughtfully and transparently. “Time tracking is always something that people don’t like to do, but we’ve focused our feature set on what makes the individual employee more productive while still giving the employer the piece of mind as to what is being done inside of the company,” Martin said. “Our software focuses on active time tracking rather than something that runs subversively in the background, and all data we collect is given specifically to the employee to improve their productivity.” Teramind’s vice president of research and development, Isaac Kohen, says it’s important for employers to consider their employees’ privacy along with what they hope to get out of monitoring them. “If you ignore employees’ right to privacy, you will risk legal ramifications, not to mention cultural rifts, loss of trust, and many other issues that will outweigh any security benefits you can achieve,” Kohen told Recode. “It can cause employees to feel spied on or untrusted, two things that can erode a flourishing company culture. But it doesn’t have to be this way.” Giving employees control is best for everyone When the pandemic hit, “John’s” employer (John did not want to be named nor reveal his workplace for fear of retribution) was reluctant to let its employees work from home. It eventually did so under one condition: They had to log their hours in a time-tracking program. “They said you have to use it, and were pretty forceful about it,” John told Recode. After a week of accounting for every minute of his workday, John sees positives and negatives. A software developer, his job often involves switching between several different tasks in a short period of time. Logging his activities on such a granular scale can be a pain and take up time he could spend doing his actual job. John also doesn’t think the time logs give proper context for job-adjacent activities that are necessary to accomplish a task. “You’ve got to call it this person and talk to them and get ideas, or you need to browse the internet for a while to research a topic,” John said. “On paper, it looks like maybe you’re wasting time. But it’s critical to getting the job done well.” John also understands why management would want there to be some accountability for workers that it suddenly can’t directly oversee. He likes that his job had enough trust in him and his co-workers to let them manually log their activities — rather than installing a program that does so automatically. “If it wasn’t self-reported, I think I would feel weirder about it,” he said. “Especially since a lot of us use personal devices for our work. I’d be like, ‘I’m not gonna install your nanny cam.’” Mac Quartarone, an industrial/organizational psychologist, said employees’ response to monitoring programs often depends on the organizational trust their company has built up with them. “If you have a lot of trust, then you probably expect that the organization is just trying to do the right thing,” Quartarone told Recode. “If you don’t have a lot of trust, then you’re going to assume that they’re trying to fire you or trying to find people that they need to fire.” In the case of this pandemic, where employees are essentially forced to work from home, introducing tracking software to make sure they’re getting that work done might seem like a punishment for something they had no control over in the first place. Quartarone also warns that the long-term ramifications of using tracking software during this crisis “could be damaging the sense of organizational justice and trust among your employees. And that will live on.” Quartarone recommends that employers give workers as much autonomy as possible and be transparent about what they’re tracking and why — as John’s employer did. “If done right, it could really be a positive thing for employees that could outweigh the downside,” Quartarone said. “But I think if it’s done wrong, then the downside will vastly overshadow any positives.” In the end, while Jane resents being monitored so closely by her boss, she also acknowledges that she gets more work done because of it. “My employers realize I can be given more work now that they can monitor my screen directly,” she said. For some employers, that’s the only thing that matters. Open Sourced is made possible by Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists.
1m
vox.com
Anti-malaria drug helps speed up recovery of coronavirus patients: study
The antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine has shown promise in treating the coronavirus – helping to speed up the recovery of a small number of patients suffering a mild form of the illness, according to a report. In a study published online this week, Chinese researchers found that patients who were administered the drug saw their cough,...
1m
nypost.com
'Trolls World Tour' Streaming Release Date: When You Can Watch the Sequel Online
"Trolls World Tour" will be available to stream online in April after the release date of the sequel was changed a number of times in response to coronavirus.
1m
newsweek.com
New England Patriots send plane to China, get 1.2 million N95 masks for Massachusetts: reports
The New England Patriots appeared to answer the calls for help as Massachusetts became the latest state to struggle with supply shortages amid the coronavirus pandemic, which has gripped the U.S.
1m
foxnews.com
Wife of coronavirus victim: They wouldn't let me say goodbye
In an emotional interview, Nicole and Skye Buchanan remember their husband and father, 39-year-old Conrad Buchanan, who passed away from coronavirus.
1m
edition.cnn.com
For years, brands have been pushing an at-home lifestyle. No one expected it to happen like this.
The homebody economy has been on the rise for years. Now, massive numbers of people are at home. | Getty Images The homebody economy has consumers right where it wanted them. But what happens next? Over the past few years, brands have wanted nothing more than for us to stay at home and buy stuff. The “homebody economy,” as Kaitlyn Tiffany named it in 2018, encompasses everything from mattress companies to CBD seltzers. What these companies all have in common is a promise to burnt-out workers that they can avoid the anxieties of daily life by filling their homes with soft clothes, soft lighting, soft bedding, and the right plants. Now more than two-thirds of Americans are under government orders to stay at home. Homebody brands finally have consumers — especially those with the privilege of working remotely during a pandemic — right where they’ve always wanted them. It’s seemingly fortuitous. But championing staying in as a lifestyle choice takes on an uncanny timbre during the age of coronavirus, when it’s not a choice at all. These millennial-friendly, often direct-to-consumer brands espouse a viewpoint in which the world outside is a scary place, one where hustle culture and social obligations demand that young people keep up an impossible pace. “Just 500 more minutes” reads a bus stop ad for Parachute, yet another luxury linen brand whose ads remind workers they’re not in bed. This hygge ethos — which has been embraced even by brands that have nothing to do with being inside — was developed when burnout was one of the biggest threats to millennials’ well-being. The idea seems almost quaint now, when most white-collar workers are fortunate enough to spend their entire days at home, where they’ll worry about whether they’ll contract Covid-19, or their loved ones will, and if they do, if they’ll be able to access tests or, god forbid, a ventilator. Then there’s loss of work and the crumbling economy. View this post on Instagram We asked and you answered! Since many of you are staying at/working from home, for the rest of this week we will be discounting our Loungewear collection by 25%. We wish you comfort during this time. @dashing_darlin A post shared by Brooklinen (@brooklinen) on Mar 19, 2020 at 3:00pm PDT How will brands that have spent recent years convincing consumers to stay home respond to this strange and endless moment where we’re all forced to be home? Now that consumers finally have the indoor lives they were told to dream of, do they actually feel the comfort they were promised? Or will quarantine cause the end of the homebody economy, and the brands that peddled it? It was only a few days after the coronavirus pandemic ushered white-collar Americans into a work-from-home existence when the cozy promotions started. The bedding company Brooklinen offered a 25 percent discount on its loungewear. The sustainable basics brand Everlane ran a “bundles of comfort” sale on leggings, sweats and fleece. Other retailers attempted to calm our anxieties. Cuup, a lingerie startup, sent a “Stay-At-Home Advice” email that offered shoppers a curated list of book recommendations, breathing tips, and cooking inspiration from influencers pictured wearing their bras. The furniture and decor company West Elm created Zoom backgrounds of beautiful interiors so remote workers could “start dialing in from your dream home.” The athleisure company Lou & Grey crafted a “suuuuper laid back” Spotify playlist designed to ease Covid-19-related stress spirals. These weren’t the only brands to reach out and run sales, but their cozycore messaging did give them a leg up. Even adventure-oriented retailers decided to pivot to homebody messaging. Outdoor outfitter Backcountry had a sock sale. Rugged outdoorsman brand Huckberry threw a Work From Home Sale offering discounts on items to help shoppers complete their “WFH Mullet” (“business up top, sweats on the bottom”). Ben O’Meara, Huckberry’s executive director of marketing, told me the unlikely pivot to cozy was born from the company employees’ new reality of working from home for the foreseeable future: “We wanted to make sure we acknowledged that we’re going through this as well.” Shockingly, it wasn’t the only retailer to suggest mullet-inspired outfits — Rent the Runway promoted a “party on top, sweatpants on bottom” approach to videoconferencing fashion. Within a week, email inboxes flooded with promotions ranging from the subtle — suggesting you stock up on cozy clothes — to the more overt: referencing “social distancing” and videoconferencing struggles. Few included the actual words “coronavirus” or “Covid-19” in their outreach, but they didn’t need to. Pandemic headlines loop through consumers’ minds constantly, as if a news chyron had been implanted directly into their brains. “We wanted to make sure we acknowledged that we’re going through this as well” The WFH sales speak to a privileged class during a crisis that has laid bare just how stratified our country is. While some American workers are afforded the luxury of having a salary and health care to help them through coronavirus, many are not. And the precarity of the US economic situation gets clearer with every headline: Employees being refused paid sick leave, recovering Covid-19 patients leaving the hospital burdened with massive medical bills, hospitals begging for donations of protective equipment for their workers — these are the horror stories that circulate the internet daily. The concern for those on the front lines means some consumers who are working from the comfort of their couch don’t feel justified in splurging. “I have been doing a lot of online ‘window shopping,’ but anytime I feel the urge to add to my cart, my guilty conscience reminds me of the warehouse worker that could potentially have to leave isolation in order to fill my order,” one shopper told me. Another echoed this sentiment: “I don’t want to stress out the package delivery system even more with unnecessary purchases. If I order something dumb, that’s just added work for them.” Then there’s the feeling that the disaster could easily happen to us. Renée Richardson Gosline, a senior lecturer and research scientist at MIT’s Sloan School of Management, says the prominent messaging consumers are receiving right now is one of scarcity. Many people are currently unable to access what they need, whether that’s basic household cleaning items, pantry staples, or coronavirus tests. Beyond the scarcity of the moment looms the scarcity to come — a recession or depression. Just a few weeks after the economic downturn first hit hospitality and travel, mass layoffs are now reaching industries like tech, media, and retail. The sense of scarcity that characterizes the current moment is a stark contrast to what came before it. Coronavirus descended upon the US when the economy was booming. Gosline believes that at the height of the stock market, before the virus hit, an “eat the rich” backlash to consumerism was already surfacing. Then the pandemic laid bare just how rich the rich were when celebrities began receiving immediate access to largely unavailable coronavirus tests and posting out-of-touch sentiments (see: Gwyneth Paltrow telling us to write the next Great American Novel in quarantine, or the chaotic and tone-deaf “Imagine” video). “I don’t want to stress out the package delivery system even more with unnecessary purchases” “You’re seeing a lot of backlash against individual celebrities in a culture that is very celebrity-oriented,” Gosline says. “Brands that are selling hedonistic products, like fashion or beauty, need to be particularly careful about further signaling this social stratification.” In the face of this uncertainty, and perhaps as a reaction to the consumerism that characterized the past decade, many consumers are choosing to hoard their cash and hunker down. Or, in the words of one consumer I spoke to, “I’m saving my money for the next Great Depression we’ll be having.” Relatedly, hobbies that offer a comforting sense of self-sufficiency, like baking or gardening, are now booming — yeast and flour have been flying off the shelves. One consumer told me she was investing in a Le Creuset Dutch oven so she could finally fulfill her sourdough dreams. Even if the economy’s going to hell, at least she’ll have her starter. Consumers who are deciding to shop might opt to use their splurges to support local small businesses that have a tangible place in their community, and are more impacted by closures. New luxury items from flashy DTC companies headquartered in Silicon Valley don’t feel as gratifying. For many DTC companies, however, things were already rocky before the coronavirus hit: Early in March, Maya Kosoff reported at the Markup that brands like Outdoor Voices, Casper, and Harry’s were imploding, unable to become close to profitable or meet investors’ expectations. Once coronavirus hit retail, news of layoffs and furloughs, along with aggressive sales promotions, came quickly. On March 27, Everlane, a modern basics retailer that built its brand on the tagline “Radical Transparency,” laid off nearly all members of its 65-person remote “customer experience” team. Those laid off say that they were targeted for forming and joining the Everlane Union, which was seeking recognition from the company. Everlane’s founder responded by saying the layoffs were a result of the coronavirus crisis and that the company is not profitable. A few days later, Everlane announced an unprecedented sale of 25% off site-wide. (“We’ve never done it before. But there are a lot of firsts right now” the email read.) Still, shoppers might be hesitant to purchase from a brand that isn’t taking care of its own employees amid a pandemic. View this post on Instagram To everyone working tirelessly to keep us safe: thank you. To everyone at home, keep doing what you’re doing. You can refer to our unofficial list of things to do from bed as needed: call a friend, write a thank you note, recommend someone on LinkedIn, follow @shedd_aquarium, touch your toes, meditate, knit a scarf, think about cleaning your bedroom, drink water, adopt an animal, power nap. A post shared by Casper (@casper) on Mar 24, 2020 at 9:05am PDT These aggressive promotions also risk making consumers feel like they’re being cornered while emotionally vulnerable and spending more time at home and online. “Decision-making under greater scarcity and greater uncertainty can make people less rational and more short-term focused,” Gosline says. “It’s a risky move [for brands] to say in this moment, ‘I know you’re at home, so why don’t you shop?’ These tone-deaf type of messages could really prove to lead to some backlash.” The line between checking in on and trying to be of service to consumers versus profiteering during a moment of panic can be a fine one, and today’s empowered consumers are savvy enough to tell the difference. One consumer I spoke with noted “the widespread and aggressive promotional strategy of retailers who had to close their brick-and-mortar shops.” Still, she admitted she’s interested. “I’m incredibly tempted to buy new cozy loungewear that I’ve always wanted but never was able to justify before.” Panic and uncertainty can also lead to impulsive decision-making. Another consumer I spoke to mentioned buying a new dress on sale one day and buyer’s remorse kicking in the next, as the economy began tanking: “Shit hit the fan, and I started regretting the decision to spend money on nonessential items.” In a stroke of luck, the dress had sold out and her order was canceled. For retailers attempting to navigate and respond to an increasingly dire news cycle, it takes a lot of diligence. O’Meara told me that to not make a misstep during this moment, he reads every single comment on Huckberry’s Instagram and every single email from subscribers. “I’m incredibly tempted to buy new cozy loungewear that I’ve always wanted but never was able to justify before” “We have a meeting every morning to recap the day before, the message that went out, and the customer feedback,” he says. Ultimately, staying home is the most service many white-collar workers can offer to the cultural moment. It doesn’t feel as engaged as protesting, though homebody brands will try to make consumers feel like heroes for not getting out of their pajamas all day — heroes who deserve to add a little something to their online carts for doing their part. This is nothing new: Makeup brands turned buying red lipstick into an act of service during World War II. Ads encouraged women to give the men fighting overseas something to dream about by wearing shades like Patriot Red, “in defense of glamour.” The deluge of quarantine homebody sales is likely to continue. For some, they provide a useful distraction, or hope for life beyond coronavirus: a bathing suit as passport to a future where Americans can go to the beach this summer. For others, like the woman I spoke to who is using the opportunity to test out a new expensive retinol, it’s helping them find the silver lining in their new homebound life. “If I peel massively, no one will know, and I could have nice baby skin on the other side of quarantine.” The other side of quarantine — it’s hard to imagine what it will be like. But one thing I know: Once the world does make it to the other side, no brand will be able to convince me that staying in is the new going out. Sign up for The Goods’ newsletter. Twice a week, we’ll send you the best Goods stories exploring what we buy, why we buy it, and why it matters.
1m
vox.com
Anthony Fauci to get a security detail after facing threats, reports say
The 79-year-old doctor has been one of the most high-profile members of President Donald Trump's response to the coronavirus.       
1m
usatoday.com
24 hours inside the lives upended by coronavirus in the nation’s capital
In a city defined by power, a virus has seized control
1m
washingtonpost.com
Andrew Yang Says Asian Americans Are 'Stepping Up' to Fight Coronavirus Amid Racist Attacks
The entrepreneur said he felt "self-conscious" of being an Asian American on a recent shopping trip for groceries.
1m
newsweek.com
Former Knicks star Marbury bringing 10M masks to New York
Former New York Knicks star Stephon Marbury is working with a company in China to sell 10 million masks to his hometown at cost instead of a profit. He tells Anderson Cooper why it was important for him to do so.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Pedestrian struck and killed in hit-and-run in Fairfax County
The crash happened along Lee Highway in Centreville.
1m
washingtonpost.com
Coronavirus-infected New York nurse finds hospital transformed as a patient
When the coronavirus struck Sylvia LeRoy, she turned to the hospital she knew best - Brooklyn's Brookdale University Hospital Medical Center - where she has worked for seven years as a labor and delivery nurse and planned to give birth herself in just two months.
1m
reuters.com
NFL power rankings: Tom Brady's signing, free agency moves spark big changes
After several marquee players moved to new teams in free agency, the NFL landscape has undergone a big shift. Who's moving up and who's moving down?       
1m
usatoday.com
Working out from home but want to run a marathon? Here's how one man did just that.
A distance runner from England built his own garden marathon course and live streamed his 26.2-mile race. He took 1,064 laps around his yard.       
1m
usatoday.com
Police and fire departments warn supplies for first responders running dangerously low
When a resident at an elder care facility near Madison, Wisconsin, refused to isolate Monday night after a coronavirus diagnosis, local law enforcement responded to the call for help. On the scene, a Dane County sheriff's deputy helped subdue the person and transport them to a local hospital. She was spat on in the process.
1m
edition.cnn.com
NFL power rankings: Free agency, coronavirus impacting league landscape
March was an eventful month in the NFL, with free agency changing quite a few teams while the coronavirus pandemic altered offseason programs.       
1m
usatoday.com
Filing for unemployment benefits? Read this first
Unemployment benefits are becoming a financial lifeline for millions of Americans after their employers shut their doors to help stem the spread of the coronavirus.
1m
edition.cnn.com
James Otteson: Coronavirus crisis creates opportunity — and reveals this about ourselves and others
Crises disrupt lives. They bring hardship and even tragedy. But they can also clarify what is truly important.
1m
foxnews.com
In times of crisis, the National Guard is deployed. Here's what troops are doing amid the coronavirus pandemic.
As the coronavirus pandemic continues, states have the option of deploying the National Guard. Here's what they are doing.        
1m
usatoday.com
How to figure out if your student loan qualifies for coronavirus relief
Among the provisions of the coronavirus stimulus package is payment relief until after Sept. 30. But it doesn't apply to all types of student loans.
1m
latimes.com
Beach closures, dog walks gone wild: Adjusting to coronavirus life
Feedback: From coronavirus quarantine, readers express their longing for closed beaches and appreciation for stories about new dog-walking routines, Elton John's socially distant telethon, independent radio and more.
1m
latimes.com
Michael Jordan’s greatest moments, according to the Post Sports staff
The first shot, the last shot and everything in between.
1m
washingtonpost.com
Combat Rewind, April 2: Top highlights include a sickening Jens Pulver soccer kick
Check out the best highlights from this day in history with MMA Junkie's "Combat Rewind."       Related StoriesMichelle Waterson still wants to fight Carla Esparza, hopes UFC events return soonWatching Joe Rogan and the UFC commentary teams go crazy over knockouts never gets oldKevin Holland likes secluded UFC 249 scenario: 'That's fight club, right? You don't really talk about it' 
1m
usatoday.com
I saw 9/11 in New York. This is worse.
New York is ground zero — again. Why does one city have to suffer so much?
1m
washingtonpost.com
Sanders was losing to Biden anyway. But he lost more in areas with coronavirus cases.
The virus could have cost Sanders as much as 7 points in some places.
1m
washingtonpost.com
What we can learn about this covid-19 time from a non-speaking autistic teen
Ben Breaux spends time on social forums for nonspeaking autistics. "You know how being a member of a group like this helps?" he asked. "We listen to what each other has to say, acknowledging fears and anxieties."
1m
washingtonpost.com
Work, teach, repeat: How working parents are coping under coronavirus
With schools across California closed, millions of parents have become de facto teachers and principals. "It's bonkers," says one mom.
1m
latimes.com
France's coronavirus lockdown offers a preview of restrictions we may see in America
France is roughly two weeks ahead of the U.S. in the fight against the virus. What's happening there could happen to us next.       
1m
usatoday.com
Half of Americans say coronavirus outbreak will get worse over next month
Seventy-seven percent say doctors and nurses don't have the supplies they'll need.
1m
cbsnews.com
Ian Bremmer: World Health Organization 'carrying a lot of water' for China during coronavirus pandemic
Political scientist Ian Bremmer joined the "Fox News Rundown" podcast Thursday to discuss China’s lack of transparency during the coronavirus pandemic and the role of the World Health Organization.
1m
foxnews.com
Ten Tips From ‘Mars’ for Quarantined Earthlings
Quarantine is a lousy way to spend your time—as we’re all learning in the era of Covid-19. I learned it in an even more dramatic way, spending a full year in lockdown with five other people—on Mars. Technically speaking, it wasn’t Mars of course; it was the HI-RISE simulated Mars base on the flank of…
1m
time.com
Coronavirus live updates: US braces for 'horrific' weeks as deaths top 5,000; Dr. Fauci gets security
More than 1,000 people died of coronavirus Wednesday, pushing the death toll over 5,000 and likely signaling the beginning of a "very painful" period.        
1m
usatoday.com
Coronavirus cases approach 10,000 as California braces for worsening conditions
Coronavirus cases approach 10,000 as California braces for worsening conditions
1m
latimes.com
Ex-Obama adviser Plouffe predicts 'historic' turnout for Trump, says Biden now at a disadvantage
The coronavirus pandemic and struggling economy will not deter President Trump's supporters from turning out in November, which makes the incumbent "very dangerous" to Joe Biden, former Obama adviser David Plouffe told the "Fox News Rundown" podcast Thursday.
1m
foxnews.com