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Trump at Daytona 500: ‘Gentlemen, start your engines!’

President Trump delivered the most famous words in motorsports while serving as grand marshal of NASCAR’s Daytona 500 on Sunday. “Gentlemen, start your engines!” the president roared at the Daytona International Speedway with First Lady Melania Trump standing at his side. “It’s truly an honor to be with all of you at the great American...
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Ancient Britons didn't eat hares or chickens -- they venerated them
New research has found that, rather than being seen as tasty morsels, chickens and brown hares were associated with gods and therefore off the menu when they first arrived in Britain.
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edition.cnn.com
Ex-NFL player now on the frontlines against coronavirus
Myron Rolle, a former safety for the Tennessee Titans who is now a neurosurgery resident at Massachusetts General Hospital, describes the similarities in battling his opponents on the field to the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.
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edition.cnn.com
Obama administration repeatedly sought to cut PPE stockpile, but Biden team points to GOP-led 'budget squeeze'
The Obama administration sought several cuts in funding for the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) of personal protective equipment (PPE) and other critical medical supplies -- although some of the reductions were relatively small, and most came after Republicans implemented a new law to restrict federal discretionary spending, records reviewed by Fox News show.
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foxnews.com
Nikki and Brie Bella on pregnancy amid coronavirus: 'This isn't what I imagined'
Nikki and Brie Bella are sharing their experience being pregnant at the same time amid the coronavirus pandemic.        
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usatoday.com
Less than half of jobs lost in coronavirus crisis will return, experts say
Less than half the US jobs lost to the coronavirus crisis will be recovered by the end of next year, a new survey shows. Economists expect non-farm payrolls to shed a monthly average of more than 4.5 million jobs from April through June as the pandemic keeps the economy largely frozen, according to the National...
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nypost.com
Why private repatriation is crucial to the future of Nigerian art
People often imagine art repatriation to be about big contentious items. But repatriation is first and foremost about returning items of significance to their home. In Nigeria private collector are quasi museums who can ensure art will stay here.
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edition.cnn.com
Angelina Jolie calls for protection of vulnerable children during coronavirus pandemic
Angelina Jolie is standing up for vulnerable children amid the coronavirus pandemic and is asking the greater population to do the same.
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foxnews.com
Eye Opener at 8: Survey says marijuana use at an all-time high amid pandemic
A look at what we've been covering on "CBS This Morning"
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cbsnews.com
Coronavirus already changing medical care in the U.S.
The coronavirus pandemic has dramatically sped up major changes in how the U.S. healthcare system works and how doctors get paid.
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latimes.com
We can't stop watching TV during the pandemic — and that's ok
The TV is on. Or the computer is on, or some other screen is on. But something is on because everything non-screen-based is on pause. Life is on pause.
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edition.cnn.com
Review: 'Final Fantasy VII Remake' summons back a timeless classic
Role-playing epic Final Fantasy VII Remake is an ambitious revisiting of one of the most beloved titles in video game history.       
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usatoday.com
'Do-or-die moment' to boost vote-by-mail for November election. But the politics is getting harder
Amid the coronavirus pandemic, there's been little action by states to adopt vote-by-mail and there's no national consensus on it. Trump is opposed.        
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usatoday.com
Avlon: How Trump has moved from denial to defecting blame
CNN's John Avlon explains how President Trump has gone from denying the seriousness of the coronavirus pandemic, to blaming others for the crisis.
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edition.cnn.com
I’ve read the plans to reopen the economy. They’re scary.
Medical personnel from Riverside University Health Systems administer a coronavirus test during drive-through testing. | Bob Riha Jr./Getty Images There is no plan to return to normal. Over the past few days, I’ve been reading the major plans for what comes after social distancing. You can read them, too. There’s one from the right-leaning American Enterprise Institute, the left-leaning Center for American Progress, Harvard University’s Safra Center for Ethics, and Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Romer. I thought, perhaps naively, that reading them would be a comfort — at least then I’d be able to imagine the path back to normal. But it wasn’t. In different ways, all of these plans say the same thing: Even if you can imagine the herculean political, social, and economic changes necessary to manage our way through this crisis effectively, there is no normal for the foreseeable future. Until there’s a vaccine, we either need economically ruinous levels of social distancing, a digital surveillance state of shocking size and scope, or a mass testing apparatus of even more shocking size and intrusiveness. The AEI, CAP, and Harvard plans aren’t identical, but they’re similar. All of them feature a period of national lockdown — in which extreme social distancing is deployed to “flatten the curve” and health and testing capacity is surged to “raise the line.” That’s phase one. Phase two triggers after a set period of time (45 days for CAP, three months for Harvard) or, in the AEI plan, after 14 days of falling cases and a series of health supply markers AEI. Christina Animashaun/Vox All of them then imagine a phase two, which relaxes — but does not end — social distancing while implementing testing and surveillance on a mass scale. This is where you must begin imagining the almost unimaginable. The CAP and Harvard plans both foresee a digital pandemic surveillance state in which virtually every American downloads an app to their phone that geotracks their movements, so if they come into contact with anyone who later is found to have Covid-19, they can be alerted, and a period of social quarantine can begin. Similarly, people would scan QR codes when boarding mass transit, or entering other high-risk public areas. And GPS tracking could be used to enforce quarantine on those who test positive with the disease, as is being done in Taiwan. To state the obvious: The technological and political obstacles are massive. While similar efforts have borne fruit in Singapore and South Korea, we are a very different country, with a much more mistrustful, individualistic culture. Already, polling shows that 70 percent of Republicans, and 46 percent of Democrats, strongly oppose using cellphone data to enforce quarantine orders. The CAP plan tries to answer these concerns, but in trying to imagine an answer, it shows the difficulty of the task. It’s worth quoting the CAP proposal at length: The entity that hosts the data must be a trusted, nonprofit organization—not private technology companies or the federal government. The app could be developed for a purely public health nonprofit entity such as the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO)—an organization that represents state health officials—which would host the data. Congress or foundations could provide funding to develop and operate the technology. States licensing the app could provide ongoing operational funding to ASTHO, provided states receive federal funding for this purpose. • Additional protections must include the following: • The amount of data needed and shared must be minimized • This system must be transparent • Data must be collected, secured, and stored within the United States • Data must be automatically deleted after every 45 days • The sharing of data with the federal government, except for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), must be prohibited • The sharing of data with state and local government agencies that are not public health agencies must be prohibited • The sharing of data with third parties and the sale of data must be prohibited • Any data shared publicly must be anonymized As a condition of receiving a COVID-19 test in the future, individuals may be required to download the app, which would include their test result. For others, the app would be voluntary, although the vast majority of people could be expected to download it to see if there are cases in their neighborhood or near their workplace. I’m not here to say that this, or anything else, is impossible. But it is light-years beyond the kind of political leadership and public-private coordination we’ve seen thus far. Who is going to spearhead the effort? President Donald Trump? House Speaker Nancy Pelosi? Bill Gates? Who is trusted enough, in this country in this moment, to shape this? And even if they could pass it, can we build it, and do so quickly? Force adherence to it, and quickly? Are we really going to deny tests to anyone who refuses to download the surveillance app? And what about communities with less digital savvy? The alternative to mass surveillance is mass testing. Romer’s proposal is to deploy testing on a scale no one else is contemplating — 22 million tests per day — so that the entire country is being tested every 14 days, and anyone who tests positive can be quickly quarantined. He shows, in a series of useful simulations, that even if the test has a high false-negative rate, the retesting is sufficient to keep the virus contained, and thus the country can return to normalcy rapidly. Of the various plans, this one seems likeliest to permit a true and rapid economic recovery. Sebastian Gollnow/Picture Alliance via Getty Images A doctor measures the temperature of a visitor in front of the entrance to the Katharinen Hospital in Germany. But it is hard to imagine a testing effort of this scale, either. So far, America is struggling to get into the millions of tests per week. This requires the US to do tens of millions per day. Most experts I’ve spoken to doubt that’s realistic anytime soon, though some believe it’s possible, eventually. So far, we’ve added testing capacity largely by repurposing existing labs and platforms. To add more, we need to build more labs, more machines, more tests. And there are already shortages of reagents, swabs, and health workers. But even if those constraints could be overcome, how are these 22 million daily tests going to be administered? By whom? How do we enforce compliance? If you refuse to get tested, are you fined? Jailed? Cut off from government benefits? Would the Supreme Court consider a proposal like this constitutional? The AEI proposal is the closest thing to a middle path between these plans. It’s more testing, but nothing approaching Romer’s hopes. It’s more contact tracing, but it doesn’t envision an IT-driven panopticon. But precisely for that reason, what it’s really describing is a yo-yo between extreme lockdown and lighter forms of social distanncing, continuing on until a vaccine is reached. This, too, requires some imagination. Will governors who’ve finally, at great effort, reopened parts of their economies really keep throwing them back into lockdown every time ICUs begin to fill? Will President Donald Trump have the stomach to push the country back into quarantine after he’s lifted social distancing guidelines? What if unemployment is 17 percent, and his approval rating is at 38 percent? And even if the political hurdles could be cleared, it’s obvious, reading the AEI proposal, that there’ll be no “V-shaped recovery” of the economy. Scott Gottlieb, the former FDA commissioner who helped craft the plan, says he thinks something like 80 percent of the economy will return — that may sound like a lot, but it’s an economic collapse of Great Depression proportions. I don’t want anyone to mistake this as an argument for surrendering to the disease. As unlikely as these futures may be, I think the do-nothing argument is even less plausible: It imagines that we simply let a highly lethal virus kill perhaps millions of Americans, hospitalize tens of millions more, and crush the health system, while the rest of us go about our daily economic and social business. That is, in my view, far less likely than the construction of a huge digital surveillance state. I care about my privacy, but not nearly so much as I care about my mother. My point isn’t to criticize these plans when I have nothing better to offer. Indeed, my point isn’t to criticize them at all. It’s simply to note that these aren’t plans for returning to anything even approaching normal. They either envision life under a surveillance and testing state of dystopian (but perhaps necessary!) proportions, or they envision a long period of economic and public health pain, as we wrestle the disease down only to see it roar back, as is currently happening in Singapore. What’s even scarier to consider is that the debate between these plans is far beyond the political debate we’re actually having. As of now, the White House has neither chosen nor begun executing on a plan of its own. That’s a terrible abdication of leadership, but reading through the various proposals, you can see why it’s happened. Imagine you’re the president of the United States in an election year. Which of these futures, with all its costs and risks and pain, would you want to try and sell to the American people? One final takeaway from all this: If there is literally anything more we can possibly do to accelerate the development of vaccines or therapeutics, we should do it. Support Vox’s explanatory journalism Every day at Vox, we aim to answer your most important questions and provide you, and our audience around the world, with information that has the power to save lives. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. Vox’s work is reaching more people than ever, but our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources — particularly during a pandemic and an economic downturn. Your financial contribution will not constitute a donation, but it will enable our staff to continue to offer free articles, videos, and podcasts at the quality and volume that this moment requires. Please consider making a contribution to Vox today.
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vox.com
Small business aid stuck in Senate limbo
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politico.com
Netflix releasing a new 'Tiger King' after-show hosted by Joel McHale
Netflix confirmed that it is releasing more “Tiger King,” the popular documentary series that’s been binge-watched by countless people self-isolating amid the coronavirus pandemic. 
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foxnews.com
Trump considers economic task force for pandemic recovery
More Americans are disapproving of President Trump's handling of the coronavirus crisis as it wears on. The president is mulling a new economic task force focused on getting the economy back up and running once the worst of the pandemic is over, while Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill disagree over how much more financial aid is needed to help Americans. Ben Tracy is at the White House where the coronavirus task force is working to pull the country through the worst of the crisis.
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cbsnews.com
New York City digs mass graves in potter's field for unclaimed coronavirus victims
While the rate of coronavirus hospitalizations may be falling in New York, New York City's morgues are so crowded that crews are digging mass graves on Hart Island, near the Bronx, for bodies that have been unclaimed for more than two weeks. David Begnaud reports on the city's ongoing crisis, and how the pandemic is now taking hold of the midwest.
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cbsnews.com
Hulu is not here for your 'Parasite' subtitle complaints
Hulu has time for anyone who is kvetching about "Parasite."
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edition.cnn.com
Tribune Publishing, parent company to Daily News, is cutting salaries
Tribune Publishing, the parent company of the Chicago Tribune, the New York Daily News, and the Baltimore Sun, late Thursday said it was asking employees across the company to take pay cuts ranging from 2 percent to 10 percent.
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nypost.com
Coronavirus outbreak: What is a 'car parade'?
The popularity of the festive fad has accelerated, as merrymakers shift gears to celebrate from a distance.
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foxnews.com
Booze is a window on the world
When you can't get out to explore, the spirits in your bar cart can transport you.
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edition.cnn.com
'He needs to let his experts speak': Haley offers Trump messaging advice amid pandemic
She praised the president's willingness to "over-communicate."
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politico.com
The 115-year-old Supreme Court opinion that could determine rights during a pandemic
When a US appeals court ruled this week that Texas could prevent physicians from performing abortions because of the Covid-19 pandemic, the judges leaned heavily on a 1905 Supreme Court decision against a Massachusetts man who had refused vaccination during a smallpox outbreak.
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edition.cnn.com
Florida felons' voting rights case is now a class action lawsuit
A legal challenge against a Florida law that requires former felons to pay back all legal financial obligations before they vote is now a class action lawsuit.
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edition.cnn.com
Malta, Accused of Disabling Migrant Boat, Flouts Port Closure by Rescuing Sinking Vessel Off Coast
The rescue comes a day after the government declared it could no longer guarantee the rescue or disembarkation of those seeking refuge and closed its harbors.
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newsweek.com
New Trump attack ad appears to suggest Washington state’s former Asian American governor is a Chinese official
An image of Gary Locke, a Chinese American, is included in a spot that portrays former vice president Joe Biden as too cozy with China.
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washingtonpost.com
From 'Ten Commandments' to 'Uncut Gems,' here are 12 great movies for Passover and Easter
"The Last Temptation of Christ," "The Gospel According to St. Matthew" and "Life of Brian" also make this critic's list of recommendations.
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latimes.com
Has Wall Street gone crazy?
Pelosi warns Trump against quick re-opening — Fed fires more giant bazookas
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politico.com
Column: Coronavirus has created opportunities for, shall we say, quirky cures
Televangelist Jim Bakker is being sued over his promotion of a coronavirus cure. Then there's Scalar Light, a Florida company that says it can "disassemble pathogens" at the quantum level.
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latimes.com
‘Insecure’ is back — finally. Here’s what you need to know for Season 4.
The short Season 3 recap of "Insecure"? Issa and crew finally confronted what a hot mess they all are.
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washingtonpost.com
Smaller, virtual or ham-less, our Easter meals will look different this year. Here’s how to keep it special.
We asked experts for advice.
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washingtonpost.com
Mary Vought: Fighting coronavirus — 'Right-to-try' law can help us beat COVID-19
Frequently lost in the debate surrounding hydroxychloroquine and chloroqune is the fundamental principle of giving hope to individuals with life-threatening diseases.
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foxnews.com
Column: California might behave as a 'nation-state.' But its power has limits
California has the ability to fight its own coronavirus war, but there are limits to the state's exceptionalism.
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latimes.com
Coronavirus delays put some Supreme Court cases in limbo. Trump may benefit
Supreme Court's delays caused by the coronavirus could work to President Trump's benefit.
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latimes.com
Now that we're all DIYing fabric face masks, this sewing maven has you covered
From her sunny home studio in Glendale, Mimi G is building an online sewing empire, one stitch at a time.
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latimes.com
Coronavirus hasn't slowed Iran's terrorism and proxy wars, analysts say
Coronavirus has ripped through Iran in recent months, prompting an outcry from the international community calling on the United States to lift heavy economic sanctions to help them fight the contagion. But according to many analysts, even with such a crippling pandemic, it has failed to curb its nefarious support of terrorist organizations and proxy wars.
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foxnews.com
Alabama receiver Jerry Jeudy appears to be top catch of NFL draft
In an NFL draft filled with great wide receivers, Alabama's Jerry Jeudy tops the list of pass catchers.
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latimes.com
Medical community battles pandemic despite mounting fear and deaths
The medical community is gravely concerned about the constant COVID-19 exposure they are facing, coupled with a lack of protective equipment that forces hospital workers to conserve and reuse gear. Many, like veteran trauma surgeon and father of three Dr. Ronald Verrier, are falling victim to the virus. David Begnaud speaks to health care workers to hear their stories from the front lines.
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cbsnews.com
Why Isn’t the White House Using the Nation’s Pandemic Experts?
The White House should be using a pandemic advisory board to get expert input on things like the use of hydroxychloroquine.
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slate.com
Editorial: NIMBYs stop a hotel from housing sick homeless people in Orange County
There's no place and precious little time for this kind of shameless obstructionism during a pandemic that is particularly ravaging older impoverished people already racked with medical problems — like the ones who would have been cared for at the Ayres Hotel.
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latimes.com
The Strokes, Hamilton Leithauser and More Release New Music: What You Should Listen to Today
There's a ton of new music that can keep you entertained while you're stuck in self-isolation.
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newsweek.com
A progressive congresswoman and a conservative senator want the federal government to pay workers’ salaries
Details of the proposals by Rep. Pramila Jayapal and Sen. Josh Hawley differ, but the general concept is the same.
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washingtonpost.com
Illuminating slave owners’ crucial role in the expulsion of Native Americans
Claudio Saunt reminds readers that Indian dispossession wasn’t inevitable.
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washingtonpost.com
If you could travel, ‘The Herd’ would be your ideal airplane novel
Andrea Bartz’s new book is perfect for fans of “Big Little Lies.”
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washingtonpost.com
The Cold War roots of Putin’s digital-age intelligence strategy
The Soviet Union’s fall shapes the Russian leader’s espionage aims, Gordon Corera writes.
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washingtonpost.com
What UFOs can tell us about life on Earth
Three books explore the meanings of alien encounters — real or otherwise.
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washingtonpost.com
What almost everyone gets wrong about the Midwest
In a region presumed to be homogenous, Phil Christman sees multiplicity.
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washingtonpost.com