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Scientists successfully reversed stroke damage in rodent tests
Over the years, doctors and healthcare professionals have learned a lot about what increases the risk of a person having a stroke. Things like high blood pressure, smoking and heart disease can all play a major role in whether or not a person will suffer a stroke during their lifetime, but treatment after a person...
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nypost.com
Pink details her ‘terrifying’ experience with coronavirus
"At one point I was crying, praying ... I thought they told us our kids were going to be ok."
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nypost.com
Snake party busted for not social distancing
“It looks like more than a party of 10,” a park manager joked after stumbling upon more than a dozen snakes huddled together in North Sioux City, South Dakota. The self-proclaimed nature lover, Jody Hartnett, couldn’t help but notice the garter snakes, which are mostly harmless, weren’t “social distancing,” as the rest of the world...
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nypost.com
How to Make a DIY Face Mask for Coronavirus
Amid a shortage of medical-grade face masks, such as surgical masks (loose-fitting, disposable masks that block large droplets but don’t filter small particles) and N95 respirators (tight-fitting face coverings that filter out small particles), the U.S. federal government recently changed its recommendations, suggesting now that all residents wear homemade facial coverings when they have to…
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time.com
Self-Isolating 97-Year-Old Veteran Plays Harmonica to Wife Through Glass Door
Lou serenaded his wife Jackie while they were separated because of social distancing. They have been married for 38 years and reside at the Soldiers' and Sailors' Home in Erie.
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newsweek.com
Nevada man stole hundreds of masks from VA facility: feds
An ex-Marine from Nevada is accused of stealing about 200 surgical masks from a Veteran Administration hospital, federal prosecutors said. Peter Lucas, 35, appeared in court Wednesday after allegedly ripping off at least four boxes containing 50 masks apiece from the Ioannis A. Lougaris VA Medical Center in Reno over a five-day span late last...
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nypost.com
Axelrod: Sanders must make 'active case' for Biden
Christiane speaks with David Axelrod, former Senior Adviser to President Obama, about Bernie Sanders dropping out of the race for the Democratic nomination.
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edition.cnn.com
U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Health 'Continues to Improve' After Third Night in Intensive Care
Johnson, who tested positive for COVID-19, is "in good spirits" after spending a third night in intensive care at a London hospital.
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newsweek.com
From symptom trackers to games, these apps will help you get through the pandemic
James Bareham for Recode/Vox How to stay informed and entertained during the Covid-19 crisis. So the coronavirus pandemic has you sitting around your house with very little to do and few places you’re allowed to go. It’s not the best setup, but it doesn’t have to be the worst, either. As a wise woman once said, you can spend this time “looking at apps.” That Kim Kardashian tweet was later deleted, but the point stands: Apps can be your friend during this pandemic. There are Covid-specific apps that allow you to help scientists and researchers stay up to date on the latest coronavirus news, and to check your symptoms and recommend if you should be tested for the virus or not. Some apps that have been around longer than the pandemic can also improve your mind and body. So here’s a guide to help you get started looking at apps. Coronavirus information Several apps have sprung up to keep the public informed about the pandemic. Apple recently debuted its coronavirus information clearinghouse, which it developed in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the White House coronavirus task force. The app is a pretty simple screening tool, allowing you to enter your symptoms and then recommending if you should seek medical care based on them. It also has guides for things like social distancing. Apple also worked with Stanford University to build an app just for first responders in California’s Santa Clara and San Mateo counties, which has information and a symptom checker, the goal being that the user will get tested at Stanford Health Care. Google has an educational website about the virus, though it’s not quite what President Trump advertised a few weeks back. There is no accompanying app as of yet, but Google’s wide reach into seemingly every facet of our lives means its website has everything from basic information about the virus to YouTube video guides for exercising and cooking in your home. The CDC and the World Health Organization have apps, too. They’re not coronavirus-specific (although the WHO is currently working on one), but they do, obviously, have information about the virus and the latest guidelines. The CDC’s app also gives you its latest stats on cases in the country. What’s more useful is the Healthynked Covid-19 tracker, which has coronavirus newsfeed and uses WHO data to map out cases (you can also report your own case to be included on the map). There’s also a chat feature for “real-time chat,” which might come in handy if you’re especially lonely. And don’t forget to check out your insurance company or care provider’s mobile apps — many have added coronavirus information and symptom checker sections. Symptom trackers Several companies and researchers are hoping that crowdsourcing will help them gain insights about the virus, how it spreads, whether preventive measures such as social distancing are effective, and how it affects different demographics. These apps typically ask users to check in every day to report how they feel and if they have any symptoms. Be sure to read each app’s privacy policies before you download or use them, especially since some of them ask for a good amount of personal data. The most popular of these is COVID Symptom Tracker, which initially launched in the United Kingdom and recently came to the United States. It’s currently one of the top medical apps in Apple’s App Store and boasts more than 500,000 installs on Google Play. The How We Feel Project is similar but less popular. Other health organizations have symptom tracker websites, such as Boston Children’s Hospital’s COVID Near You and regional efforts like Stop COVID NYC from Mount Sinai and the University of Alabama Birmingham’s HelpBeatCOVID19. There’s also the Kinsa smart thermometer’s app, which wasn’t designed to track coronavirus cases but has become a predictor of where the virus might break out next — according to Kinsa, anyway — based on the atypically high number of fevers that suddenly appear. You don’t need to own a Kinsa thermometer to use the app, which also gives general health advice and recommendations for when you should see a doctor. Telehealth solutions If you can’t see a doctor in person, there are a variety of telemedicine apps available. The Department of Health and Human Services has temporarily relaxed HIPAA laws to allow apps such as FaceTime and Skype to be used for virtual doctor appointments. That said, you’re best off using a dedicated, HIPAA-compliant app like Amwell, Teledoc, or Doctor on Demand. Your doctor’s office or health insurance provider may have its own telehealth apps (speaking of health insurance, make sure yours covers telehealth services before you use them). Still have questions? Check out our guide to teleheath as well as this Vox guide to finding a virtual therapist. Physical and mental health It’s easy to feel down and anxious when you’re stuck inside during a pandemic. We’ve already covered some of the mental health apps and digital tools, from chatbots to crisis lines to apps that say they will connect you with a licensed therapist who offers virtual sessions. None of these tools are meant to be a substitute for in-person therapy sessions, but finding one of those right now is next to impossible depending on where you live. Meditation is a great stress reliever, too. There are a ton of meditation apps out there, including Calm and Headspace, which recently introduced a dedicated section just for New Yorkers (though it’s probably fine to use no matter where you live). Many of these also offer sounds and songs to help lull you to sleep. You can also try dedicated sleep sound apps like Relax Melodies and Slumber. White noise apps are great to either drown out your loud neighbors who are always home now or help you snooze (or both). While you may not be able to go to your real gym, a place that’s a big source of anxiety relief for many, there are apps that will mimic the experience while you try to sweat it out in your living room. Vox has a good roundup of those here. Yoga apps like Glo, Daily Yoga, and Yoga Studio bridge the gap between mindfulness and working out. If you’re allowed to get outside to exercise, apps like Fitbit (which is temporarily offering some of its premium features for free) are a good way to remind you to take a walk and keep track of your steps, so you can play catch-up at the end of the day if you haven’t met your daily goal. And there are running apps from Map My Run to Zombies, Run! that will help you get moving. Finally, there is no better stress relief than fun. For some people, having fun is not an option right now. But if it is for you, there are the very timely and popular Pandemic: The Board Game, Dominion, and group chats and activities (you might want to read this before you use Zoom). So there you have it: apps for you to not only look at but also use and hopefully benefit from. You may be largely restricted to your home’s four walls, but that small device in the palm of your hand can make your world seem a little bigger. Open Sourced is made possible by Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists. Support Vox’s explanatory journalism Every day at Vox, we aim to answer your most important questions and provide you, and our audience around the world, with information that has the power to save lives. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. Vox’s work is reaching more people than ever, but our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources — particularly during a pandemic and an economic downturn. Your financial contribution will not constitute a donation, but it will enable our staff to continue to offer free articles, videos, and podcasts at the quality and volume that this moment requires. Please consider making a contribution to Vox today.
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vox.com
Senate Democrats block $250 billion for coronavirus small business loans
Senate Democrats on Thursday blocked legislation to add $250 billion to a small-business loan program designed to prevent layoffs during the coronavirus outbreak. The move means that Congress won’t pass an expansion of the Paycheck Protection Program, which is running out of money, until next week at the earliest. The Senate adjourned until Monday after...
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nypost.com
Facebook group "RVs for MDs" lets health care workers self-quarantine safely
A North Texas woman got a helping hand when she turned to the internet in a desperate bid to help her husband, an ER doctor, find somewhere to rest without the risk of exposing his family to the coronavirus. She turned her experience into a movement called "RVs for MDs," a Facebook group which connects people in the medical profession needing to quarantine with nearby volunteers who are willing to lend their campers to them. Mireya Villarreal speaks to group founder Emily Phillips and several people who benefited from her initiative for our series A More Perfect Union.
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cbsnews.com
'Fortnite' Shadow & Ghost Ollie Locations Week 8 Challenge Guide
'Fortnite' Skey's Adventure Challenges want skilled players to find Shadow or Ghost Ollie once all the main challenges are done. In this guide, we'll tell you where to find them.
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newsweek.com
Gwyneth Paltrow celebrates son’s 14th birthday with ‘socially distanced’ parade
The teen's pals pulled up to his home with decorated cars and a bag full of candy.
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nypost.com
France is building a 'Stop Covid' app, but privacy concerns could derail it
A number of different apps from countries and companies around the world have been created in an effort to stop the coronavirus pandemic, including ones from big tech companies such as Apple. Now, France is throwing its hat into the ring. 
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foxnews.com
Tyler Perry pays grocery bills for elderly shoppers
"You hear about these things, but you never expect for it to happen to you," one shopper said.
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cbsnews.com
Who Will Benefit From Federal Reserve's $2.3 Trillion Main Street Loans Program?
"Our country's highest priority must be to address this public health crisis, providing care for the ill and limiting the further spread of the virus," Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said in a statement.
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newsweek.com
Review: 'The Mindfulness Movement' offers an important message if you can only tune out the noise
'The Mindfulness Movement,' executive produced by Deepak Chopra and Jewel, details the ways mindfulness can combat anxiety, distraction and depression.
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latimes.com
TSA screens fewer than 100K travelers for 2 days in a row, hits 'record low' as coronavirus outbreak continues
The Transportation Security Administration screened fewer than 100,000 travelers two days in a row this week.
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foxnews.com
Children Seem to Be Less Vulnerable to the Coronavirus. Here’s How the Pandemic May Still Put Them at Risk
Of the many ways that the pandemic is making us rethink our humanity, none is more important, or urgent, than the overall protection of children. They may not be as susceptible to the virus as other groups, but they are especially vulnerable to so many of the secondary impacts of the pandemic on society. The…
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time.com
The Final Fantasy VII Remake Shouldn’t Exist — But I’m So Glad it Does
Remaking 'Final Fantasy VII' is like remaking 'Casablanca,' but developer Square Enix pulled it off
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time.com
Woman takes third job at assisted living facility to spend time with quarantined mother
Janie Kasse already had full-time and part-time jobs, but after her mother's assisted living facility closed its doors to visitors amid the Covid-19 pandemic, she knew she needed a third job.
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edition.cnn.com
All the Countries That Are Flattening The Coronavirus Curve
While the novel coronavirus continues to spread across the globe, a number of different countries have begun to flatten the curve.
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newsweek.com
24 Hours: The Fight for New York
Before the pandemic swept in, New York City lived up to its own hype. Then the coronavirus all but shut it down. Now the hush, is broken mostly by the wail of ambulances. Over 24 hours, New Yorkers of all stripes join the battle for their city. (April 9)       
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usatoday.com
17 NYC patients on ventilators transferred from hospital in Queens
Seventeen ventilated patients have been transferred from Jamaica Hospital Medical Center in Queens – including 10 to the Navy ship USNS Comfort – as a “preventative measure” amid a high demand for oxygen, officials said Thursday. In addition to the group sent to the ship, five patients were sent to a hospital in Albany and...
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nypost.com
Coronavirus can infect cats, study finds
Heads up, cat lovers: Your feline friend may be susceptible to the novel coronavirus after all. 
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foxnews.com
Connecticut Teen Arrested for Allegedly 'Zoom Bombing' Virtual High School Lessons and Using 'Obscene Language and Gestures'
The boy, who is not being named due to his age, is facing multiple criminal charges after being accused of repeatedly hijacking virtual classroom sessions and using "obscene language and gestures."
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newsweek.com
Review: Five new movies to watch at home (or not), ranked from must-see to skip it
New movies to watch at home include 'Sea Fever,' 'Stray Dolls,' 'We Summon the Darkness,' 'The Lost Husband' and 'Close Encounters of the Fifth Kind.'
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latimes.com
Lockdowns mean millions of women can’t reach birth control
JOHANNESBURG — The callers were in tears. One by one, women in homes across rural Zimbabwe had a pleading question: When would family planning services return? Lockdowns imposed to curb the coronavirus’ spread have put millions of women in Africa, Asia and elsewhere out of reach of birth control and other sexual and reproductive health...
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nypost.com
From their coronavirus quarantine, Michael Imperioli and Steve Schirripa talk 'Sopranos' with you
Coronavirus has them quarantined on opposite coasts, but "The Sopranos" stars Michael Imperioli (a.k.a. Christopher Moltisanti) and Steve Schirripa (Bobby "Baccalà" Baccalieri) launched a new podcast. Oh, the stories they tell.
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latimes.com
How Trump vs. Biden Match Up in Key Swing States of Pennsylvania, Michigan, Florida and More, According to the Polls
Trump narrowly beat Hillary Clinton in several battleground states that Obama had won in 2008 and 2012. Democrats aim to win back these states in 2020.
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newsweek.com
Coronavirus spurs police to deploy 'talking' drones in Florida, New Jersey to enforce social distancing
Police departments in Florida and New Jersey have recently deployed drones with pre-recorded warnings that will be deployed if crowds not following COVID-19 guidelines are discovered. 
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foxnews.com
Violent crime drops in District amid the coronavirus, stay-at-home order
While robberies have dropped, assaults and thefts are up.
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washingtonpost.com
Score unlimited access to 1,500+ yoga and fitness classes for only $29
If you are one of these people who are interested in staying active while physical distancing, then you probably already know that there are a plethora of options on the web, from full-body routines on Youtube to Barre classes via Zoom. If you want to become both physically stronger as well as feel calm and...
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nypost.com
Spain could be seeing start of coronavirus decline, mulls easing restrictions: PM
Spaniards might be seeing the beginning of the decline of the coronavirus pandemic after new reported infections and deaths have gone down after a two-day uptick.
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foxnews.com
Ithaca hospital buses dozens of employees to NYC to fight coronavirus
Big-hearted hospital workers from a small city in central New York are headed to the Big Apple on a 200-plus-mile road trip to help out at a hotspot in the coronavirus pandemic, officials said. Cayuga Health in Ithaca sent doctors, nurses and other staff members aboard two buses provided by the nearby Cornell University on...
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nypost.com
Dr. Fauci Says U.S. Coronavirus Deaths Could Be Far Less Than Predicted, But Cautions Against Loosening Social Distancing Restrictions
Dr. Anthony Fauci shared his thoughts on an adjusted projection model for U.S. coronavirus deaths during a Thursday interview with NBC.
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newsweek.com
Anthony Gordon: 5 things to know about the 2020 NFL Draft prospect
Anthony Gordon is a quarterback who is looking to make the jump from college to the pros.
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foxnews.com
Business owner: Zoom is helping us retain clients
Zoom is helping Americans adapt to life under lockdown, but the video conference platform's soaring popularity comes with security concerns. CNN's Clare Sebastian reports.
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edition.cnn.com
Ring Alarm gets sleeker in its 2nd Gen, keeps connectivity and DIY security simplicity
Just a day after the Ring Video Doorbell 3 and Video Doorbell 3 Plus started shipping to customers, the company is launching the second generation of Ring Alarm, the brand's customizable security offering.
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edition.cnn.com
Sanders ducks question on Biden endorsement in first interview after suspending campaign
The populist firebrand from Vermont isn’t ready yet to formally endorse Joe Biden for president.
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foxnews.com
Not Him, Them
Bernie Sanders will never be president. He won’t be Joe Biden’s pick for vice president. He’s not joining the Cabinet. He’s run his last race—he’ll be 82 when his current Senate term is up in 2024, and people close to him feel sure that will be it for him.Who will be on the ballot in 2024, trying to continue the movement he sparked? Who will take Sanders’s place in progressives’ hearts and on their T-shirts? Who could connect as viscerally, as widely, with such a force of personality? Look at the people who supported Sanders’s campaign. Could anyone else in American politics have been embraced by Evo Morales and Jack Nicholson; Jesse Jackson and the 37-year-old mayor of Jackson, Mississippi; hipster progressives and blue-collar workers; Ben & Jerry and Cardi B?Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the New York congresswoman and political sensation, gets named the most. Other members of “the squad”—Representatives Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib, and Ayanna Pressley—also come up, as do more establishment-adjacent figures like Pramila Jayapal and Mark Pocan, the co-chairs of the Congressional Progressive Caucus. RoseAnn DeMoro, the former nurses’ union head and one of Sanders’s longest-term and most loyal supporters, told me that she considers California Governor Gavin Newsom, a lifelong elected official, to be Sanders’s heir apparent: “They won’t be able to portray Gavin as an outsider in the way they try to do other progressives.” Other people have mentioned Stacey Abrams, the losing candidate in Georgia’s most recent gubernatorial race.Yesterday afternoon, once Sanders made his exit official, I texted Larry Cohen, Sanders’s friend and the president of the political group the senator founded, Our Revolution, to ask whom he saw as the next leader of the movement.“Too hard!” Cohen wrote back. He said he’s optimistic about grassroots groups mobilizing to advance Sanders’s agenda. But isn’t the lack of a clear successor a problem? His response: “Not yet.”[Read: What Sanders supporters are telling themselves now]This is an odd moment for Sanders-style progressivism. Without the coronavirus pandemic, the past month would have been politically humiliating for the senator. For all the boasting that he did in his exit speech about how many people agreed with him on the issues, he didn’t get the votes. His theory of the race, and of Democratic primary voters, was wrong. He managed to do worse in this campaign, which he came into as a front-runner with huge support and name recognition, than he did as a much lesser-known candidate in 2016. He spent significantly more money than Biden, who’s now the presumptive Democratic nominee. In fact, he spent more money losing the presidential nomination than anyone in history other than Michael Bloomberg.But you don’t have to be out of a job, or be trying to homeschool your kids, or be thanking minimum-wage workers in face masks for driving the trucks and stocking the grocery shelves while billionaires hole up at their beach compounds with maid service, to know that the world is going to be different now. It is already. Nationalized health care, a Green New Deal, and student-loan forgiveness used to be as hard to imagine happening as the stockpiling of toilet paper. Congress recently passed the biggest relief package in history, and it’s clearly going to do more, soon. Unemployment is headed toward Great Depression levels. Ideas that the supposedly smartest people in Washington, in both major parties, wrote off as too expensive or impractical are getting pulled into the mainstream. (“When we talk about essential people, we’re not talking about hedge-fund managers,” Sanders put it in an interview with the late-night host Stephen Colbert yesterday evening.)The crisis has prompted the broadest embrace of New Deal–style policies since the New Deal itself, Representative Chuy Garcia of Illinois, a Sanders supporter, told me: “The rest of society is being refocused on issues that working-class people have been talking about for a long time.”Garcia said he didn’t think that much of what was in the stimulus bill would have been possible without Sanders shifting popular opinion through his campaigns. That’s the kind of optimism Sanders’s allies are holding on to as they try to look ahead.“It is a movement moment, because basic things are in question,” Cohen said. “Can we wrestle with some things together? Even though we’re isolated socially, we’re all experiencing the same thing. To the extent that I have any optimism, it’s that people are hungry, they want to do something.”Maybe Sanders’s movement doesn’t need leaders. Some of his supporters maintain an idealistic sense of a movement that continues to create change from the bottom up, the way Sanders says he hopes will happen. Vermont Lieutenant Governor David Zuckerman evoked the example of Black Lives Matter, which has a dispersed leadership model. “What I think Bernie’s campaigns have done, and Bernie’s efforts beyond the campaigns have done, is helped create the network that is far stronger than being reliant on one figurehead,” Zuckerman told me.But Sanders was able to push his ideas into the mainstream and shepherd a new generation of progressives into office because his presidential campaign was so successful. Progressives aren’t going to lead America to a different future without a leader of their own. And that’s stressing them out. The potential successors whose names get tossed around generate doubts: that Ocasio-Cortez is too young and inexperienced to be president, that Newsom is too establishment for the movement at large, that Abrams is too centrist.Could Sanders’s movement unite without the unifying personality who almost won the Democratic nomination? Might the movement even do better without him?[Read: Progressives warn of a great deflation]“It’s going to be a hard lesson that folks need to sit in a room—or sit on Zoom, rather—and have these conversations: ‘What’s more important? My pride? Or the future of the movement?’” says Stacey Walker, a supervisor of Linn County, Iowa, and an avid Sanders supporter. Some of that, Walker says, will be on Sanders himself: “It’s his job then to help empower the existing leaders we have and to help find and recruit other leaders, but also to aid in that coalition-building.“Quitting, Sanders said in his exit speech, “was a very difficult and painful decision.” He left Nevada after the state’s mid-February caucus in the lead for the Democratic nomination, then watched victory evaporate. He spent the past six weeks not under the delusion that he could turn the race around, but instead thinking about the future of the movement that he’d seemed on the verge of bringing into the Oval Office. Every day the microphone he had got smaller, but every day that microphone remained bigger than it had been for almost his entire political life.“While the path may be slower now, we will change this nation and, with friends around the globe, change the entire world,” Sanders said, as he wrapped up his exit speech. In the world some Sanders supporters are imagining right now, he’s like Barry Goldwater—an ideological visionary who inspired a generation, even though his career ended back in the Senate.As it happens, another historical model I heard some progressives looking to hopefully was the man who beat Goldwater in 1964, Lyndon B. Johnson. No one would have thought of Johnson as a big lefty from his time in the Senate, or as vice president. He was a committed Democrat catapulted into the job he’d always wanted but had basically given up on getting, and then responded to the political pressures of the moment to become one of the most progressive presidents in American history. “Everything feels so short-term right now,” the Sunrise Movement’s Stephen O’Hanlon told me, “but a year and a half ago Democrats were saying climate change wasn’t a top priority.”Though Sanders and Biden finished yesterday expressing the same warmth to each other that was on display throughout the primary race, the now–presumptive nominee hasn’t given much indication that he’s headed leftward. And Sanders supporters are skeptical that Biden is actually committed to the few policy shifts he has made, given his sparse explanations for why he made them.But even if Biden gets elected and governs from the bring-back-the-status-quo middle, Sanders supporters believe they’re going to win in the end anyway. One day, they note, Biden and Sanders will be retired, and frustrated Millennials could be some of the most conservative Democratic voters, rather than some of the most liberal.“Progressives need to definitely reflect on the ways that we could have done a better job persuading voters that felt more confidence in a Biden administration and a Biden campaign than in the Sanders campaign,” says Waleed Shahid, a spokesman for the progressive group Justice Democrats—which stayed neutral in the primary until Elizabeth Warren dropped out, and then endorsed Sanders for his last gasp. But “the lessons of the Sanders campaign is that a 78-year-old white man from the whitest state in America won over a diverse coalition of much younger voters. These voters are very ideological. That constituency will continue to play a major role in Democratic Party politics in the future, and will lead it soon.”
1m
theatlantic.com
Senate Democrats Block GOP Effort To Boost Small-Business Aid
Democrats want to funnel the extra funding through community-based financial institutions, which they say help minority-, rural- and veteran-owned businesses across the country.
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npr.org
Zoombombing City Hall: The Struggle To Keep Public Meetings Going Virtually
Racist and pornographic attacks on video conferences are a problem for anyone holding online meetings, but especially for governments and organizations that must make their meetings public.
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npr.org
AEW star Britt Baker a bloody mess after busted nose
At least the dentist’s precious teeth are intact. Britt Baker, an AEW wrestling star who is also a real-life dentist, became a bloody mess during her pre-taped match with Hikaru Shida that aired on Wednesday’s episode of “AEW Dynamite.” Baker’s nose got busted up during the encounter, but she tried to make the most of...
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nypost.com
Chicago jail becomes top coronavirus hot spot, exceeding cases aboard USS Roosevelt
A major jail in Chicago is now considered the top hotspot for coronavirus cases in the nation, exceeding the number of infections recorded aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt, a containment zone in New Rochelle, N.Y., and a nursing home in Kirkland, Wash., according to a report published Wednesday.
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foxnews.com
Fauci Says U.S. Coronavirus Deaths May Be 'More Like 60,000'; Antibody Tests On Way
The predicted death toll has fallen, Dr. Anthony Fauci says, due to Americans' embrace of physical separation and other restrictions.
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npr.org
California's early response helped to flatten the curve
CNN's Dan Simon explains the early and ongoing efforts from California officials that experts say are helping to flatten the curve of the coronavirus outbreak.
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edition.cnn.com
New York on Course to Overtake Lombardy With Highest Coronavirus Death Toll in the World Within Days
Lombardy's death toll is projected to reach nearly 10,000 in about three days, while the death count in New York is on track to reach nearly 12,600 in less than three days.
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newsweek.com