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Trump's Presidential Motorcade Leads Pace Lap For Daytona 500, Trump Was Grand Marshal

After Trump delivered the message for Daytona 500 drivers to "start your engines," he became the first sitting president to lead the pace lap, and he did it with a presidential motorcade.
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Girl gives to community through her business
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edition.cnn.com
No Tiger King drama at WI Big Cat Rescue
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edition.cnn.com
COVID-19 causes nervous times for expectant mothers
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edition.cnn.com
Expert gives advice on helping kids with learning
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edition.cnn.com
Joe Exotic under contract for new Investigation Discovery ‘Tiger King’ series
Exotic will be participating, though how exactly has yet to be revealed.
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nypost.com
Rams say they got their money's worth from departed star Todd Gurley
Coach Sean McVay and general manager Les Snead would not reveal the details behind why Todd Gurley was cut but said the running back earned his money.
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latimes.com
The Supreme Court’s disturbing order will effectively disenfranchise thousands of Wisconsin voters
President Donald Trump greets Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch as Supreme Justice Brett Kavanaugh looks on ahead of the State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives on February 04, 2020. | Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images American democracy is in deep trouble. The Supreme Court’s Republican majority, in a case that is literally entitled Republican National Committee v. Democratic National Committee, handed down a decision that will effectively disenfranchise tens of thousands of Wisconsin voters. It did so at the urging of the GOP. The case arises out of Wisconsin’s decision to hold its spring election during the coronavirus pandemic, even as nearly a dozen other states have chosen to postpone similar elections in order to protect the safety of voters. Democrats hoped to defend a lower court order that allowed absentee ballots to be counted so long as they arrived at the designated polling place by April 13, an extension granted by judge to account for the brewing coronavirus-sparked chaos on Election Day, April 7. Republicans successfully asked the Court to require these ballots to be postmarked by that original date. All five of the Court’s Republicans voted for the Republican Party’s position. All four of the Court’s Democrats voted for the Democratic Party’s position. The decision carries grave repercussions for the state of Wisconsin — and democracy more broadly. As Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg notes in her dissent, “the presidential primaries, a seat on the Wisconsin Supreme Court, three seats on the Wisconsin Court of Appeals, over 100 other judgeships, over 500 school board seats, and several thousand other positions” are at stake in the Wisconsin election, which will be held tomorrow. Of all these seats, the state supreme court race, between incumbent conservative Justice Daniel Kelly and challenger Judge Jill Karofsky, is the most hotly contested. The April 7 election is shaping up to be a trainwreck. Most poll workers have refused to work the election, out of fear of catching the coronavirus, which forced Gov. Tony Evers (D) to call up the National Guard in order to keep polls open. But even this measure appears woefully inadequate. In Milwaukee, election officials announced that the state only has enough election workers to open five poll locations — when the city would normally have 180 polling places. Meanwhile, the state has received a crush of absentee ballot requests — about 1.2 million, when it typically receives less than 250,000 in a spring election. That’s left state officials scrambling to send ballots to voters in time for Tuesday’s election. And on top of all of these complications, a state law required all ballots to be received by election officials by 8:00 pm on April 7, or else those ballots would not be counted. Tens of thousands of voters are not expected to even receive their ballots until after Election Day, effectively disenfranchising them through no fault of their own. In response to this brewing catastrophe, Judge William Conley, an Obama appointee to a federal court in Wisconsin, ordered the deadline for receiving ballots to be extended to 4 pm on April 13. In response to this order, the Republican Party asked the Supreme Court to modify Conley’s decision to require all ballots to be postmarked by April 7 or they will not be counted. The Supreme Court’s Republican majority granted the GOP this very specific request. Again, many voters are not expected to even receive their ballots until after this April 7 deadline. As Justice Ginsburg notes, “as of Sunday morning, 12,000 ballots reportedly had not yet been mailed out,” so the number of voters disenfranchised by the Court’s order in Republican is likely to be vast. The Court’s decision in Republican, moreover, is the culmination of a weeks-long effort by Republicans to thwart various efforts by Democrats to accommodate voters who might be disenfranchised by coronavirus. The majority relied upon one of the most destructive voting rights decisions of the modern era The majority opinion, which is unsigned, relies heavily on the Court’s previous decision in Purcell v. Gonzalez(2006). Purcell is by no means a famous decision. It received far fewer headlines that the Court’s decisions striking down much of the Voting Rights Act or permitting partisan gerrymandering. But it’s proved to be one of the greatest thorns in the side of voting rights advocates. And the Court’s decision in Republican cements Purcell’s status as one of the greatest obstacles facing a voting right litigator. Briefly, Purcell held that courts should be reluctant to hand down orders impacting a state’s election procedures as Election Day draws nigh. “Court orders affecting elections,” the Court warned in Purcell, “can themselves result in voter confusion and consequent incentive to remain away from the polls. As an election draws closer, that risk will increase.” As a vague guideline, there is some wisdom to that insight. Voters may, indeed, be quite confused if a wave of court orders are handed down close to an election. For example, if the Supreme Court of the United States were to declare, well after sunset on the eve of an election, that voters must mail their ballots by April 7 or be disenfranchised, such an order is likely to confuse some voters and lead to them being unable to vote. In any event, there are good reasons why Purcell’s warning about courts deciding voting rights cases too close to an election should not be read as an inexorable command. For one thing, the consequences of a new voting law may not become apparent until that law is actually operating close to an Election Day. Voting rights advocates may not learn that voters are struggling to obtain absentee ballots, for example, until an election is close and many voters are complaining that they haven’t received ballots. If courts cannot intervene under these circumstances, many impediments to the right to vote will go unaddressed. Similarly, as the Democratic Party unsuccessfully argued in its brief in the Republican case, court orders are not the only thing that can “result in voter confusion and consequent incentive to remain away from the polls.” In Republican, voter confusion and an incentive to remain away from the polls arose from “the COVID-19 pandemic and the ‘voter confusion and electoral chaos’ it is causing.” Until recently, the Democratic brief explained, “Wisconsin voters reasonably expected they would be able either to vote safely in person on election day or through a reliable, well-functioning absentee ballot system.” Those voters learned very close to the election that this reasonable expectation was wrong. And Judge Conley’s order was an attempt to alleviate the disruption caused by the pandemic. Nevertheless, Republican treats Purcell’s warning about last-minute election orders as something very close to mandatory. “By changing the election rules so close to the election date,” the Court’s Republican majority claims, “the District Court contravened this Court’s precedents and erred by ordering such relief.” “This Court,” the majority opinion added, “has repeatedly emphasized that lower federal courts should ordinarily not alter the election rules on the eve of an election.” This conversion of Purcell from guideline to something close to a mandatory decree is likely to have sweeping consequences for future elections. It means that, if voting rights advocates discover in the final days before an election that a new state law is disenfranchising African American voters — or god forbid, a pandemic keeps away most voters —federal courts most likely may not intervene. It means that many problems that are unlikely to be discovered until Election Day itself will go unaddressed. Republicans have fought tooth and nail to make it hard to vote in Tuesday’s election The Supreme Court’s decision in Republican is the capstone of a weeks-long effort by the Republican Party to make it difficult for voters to actually cast a ballot in Wisconsin. Last week, Gov. Evers called the state legislature into session and asked it to delay the election. But the Republican-controlled legislature ended that session just seconds after it was convened. After Evers acted on his own authority to delay the election, the state’s supreme court voted along partisan lines to rescind Evers’s order. Republicans also rejected Evers’s proposal to automatically mail ballots to every voter in the state. The background here is that Republicans hope to hold onto a seat on the state supreme court, which is up for grabs in Tuesday’s election. As law professor and election law expert Rick Hasen recently noted, “only 38% of voters who had requested an absentee ballot in heavily Democratic Milwaukee County had returned one, compared with over 56% of absentee voters in nearby Republican-leaning Waukesha County.” So there’s at least some evidence that, if additional voters are unable to return their ballots, Republicans will be over-represented in the ballots that are counted. It’s also worth noting that, if Wisconsin had free and fair elections to choose its state lawmakers, Evers would most likely have been able to work with a Democratic legislature to ensure that Tuesday’s election would be conducted fairly. In 2018, 54 percent of voters chose a Democratic candidate for the state Assembly. But Republicans have so completely gerrymandered the state that they prevailed in 63 of the state’s 99 Assembly races. There is far more at stake in Wisconsin, moreover, than one state supreme court seat. Wisconsin could very well be the pivotal swing state that decides the 2020 presidential election. The question of whether Donald Trump or Joe Biden occupies the White House next year could easily be determined by which man receives Wisconsin’s electoral votes. And the Court’s decision in Republican suggests that the Supreme Court will give the GOP broad leeway when it comes to how our elections should be conducted.
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vox.com
Police find body of Maeve Kennedy Townsend McKean, search continues for young son
Police have recovered the body of Maeve Kennedy Townsend McKean. The search continues for her the body of her young son.        
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usatoday.com
Jameis Winston helps launch toll-free coronavirus hotline
The hotline, launched in partnership with Dr. Scott Kelley, will help triage callers, answer questions, and identify further medical assistance.       
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usatoday.com
In California: 50,000 hospital beds, and a doctor who's been here before
The Golden State's preparing 50,000 extra beds for the expected surge in COVID-19 cases. And a doctor who fought Ebola in Liberia is now here battling the coronavirus. Plus, trying to get pregnant in the middle of a pandemic takes its toll.        
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usatoday.com
Prosecutors charge two in alleged bribes for World Cup broadcasting rights
Prosecutors charged two former 21st Century Fox executives with alleged bribes to gather confidential information during bidding for broadcast rights to the 2018 and 2022 World Cups.
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latimes.com
How new technology is transforming Vietnam's economy
After three decades of growth that lifted millions out of poverty, Vietnam's economy is undergoing another transformation -- thanks to technology. CNN speaks to Vietnam's business leaders to find out the latest developments.
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edition.cnn.com
How new technology is transforming Vietnam's economy
In 1975, Vietnam emerged from its 20-year-long war as one of the poorest nations in the world.
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edition.cnn.com
Where to buy toilet paper, hand soap, and other household goods online 
As people stock up on toilet paper, hand soap, and other essentials during the COVID-19 pandemic, shoppers have faced a shortage of these goods both online and in-stores. But despite the scarcity of certain household goods, several sites still have many of these items available online. It may take some tedious searching to uncover which...
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nypost.com
Answering Your Coronavirus Questions: Masks, Ventilators And Making Choices
On this broadcast of The National Conversation, we look at efforts in the U.S. to stop the coronavirus and answer questions about masks, ventilators and some of the difficult choices we're all facing.
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npr.org
Seniors in Texas had a special guest for their virtual bingo game -- Matthew McConaughey
Bingo night got a little more interesting for residents of a senior living facility in Texas.
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edition.cnn.com
A pandemic is the wrong time to shut down NYC’s top source of electricity
The devastation being wrought by the coronavirus has underscored two undeniable facts. First: We were woefully unprepared for a black-swan event like this pandemic. Second: Modern society — our medical system, in particular — is completely dependent on the electric grid. What if New York’s electric grid were to be hit by another black swan...
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nypost.com
Trump: Capt. Crozier Shouldn't Have Sent Letter, I'll 'Look Into' His Firing
Trump said he would get involved with the Navy's firing of Capt. Brett Crozier, the former commander of the USS Theodore Roosevelt.
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breitbart.com
LA Rams hope to run ball by committee without Todd Gurley
The Los Angeles Rams' unceremonious release of Todd Gurley left an enormous hole in the middle of their offense.
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foxnews.com
Venezuelans who once fled their homes are returning amid the coronavirus pandemic
Venezuelans who once fled their homes for neighboring Colombia are now returning to their country.
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edition.cnn.com
For jobless Americans, Obamacare is still a potential lifeline
But there's scant effort to spread the word — or streamline the signup.
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politico.com
Religious gatherings around the globe inflame the virus
Around the world, some religious gatherings continue to take place, despite widespread knowledge that large groups of people facilitate in spreading the coronavirus -- and in defiance of government restrictions on such gatherings.
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edition.cnn.com
New York Jets GM Joe Douglas helps local restaurant during coronavirus pandemic
New York Jets general manager Joe Douglas is doing his job pitching in to help local businesses during the fight against the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Depravity at LES hotspot The Box not just for show, lawsuits allege
The suits also claim the all-female waitstaff was made to “relinquish 60 percent or more” of their tips.
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nypost.com
Could Society Move Toward Normalcy Before A Coronavirus Vaccine Is Ready?
The best protection against the coronavirus would be a vaccine. But that's probably at least a year away, even if crash development programs succeed. What can be done in the meantime?
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npr.org
Australian court dismisses top cardinal’s sex abuse convictions
CANBERRA, Australia — Australia’s highest court has dismissed the convictions of the most senior Catholic found guilty of child sex abuse. The High Court Chief Justice Susan Kiefel announced the decision of the seven judges on Tuesday in the appeal of Cardinal George Pell. The decision means he will be released from Barwon Prison outside...
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nypost.com
Donations poured in for man stranded at LAX during coronavirus crisis. PayPal still has the money
This is what happened when big-hearted readers donated more than $7,000 through PayPal to help Seth Tom Davis and his seizure alert dog, Poppy.
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latimes.com
Trump says may jump into Navy furor after captain ridiculed in speech
U.S. President Donald Trump said he may get involved in a deepening crisis in the Navy after its top civilian on Monday ridiculed a revered former commander whose letter pleading for help for his coronavirus-stricken aircraft carrier was leaked to the public.
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reuters.com
Igor Shesterkin’s swagger is cherry on top of growing Rangers legend
Part 13 of a series analyzing the New York Rangers. The Rangers haven’t had very many flamboyant players throughout their history. Sean Avery, maybe. Gene Carr, blond locks flying behind him as he raced down the wing, sure, but he lasted about two years and was beaten down by the time he was sent away in the...
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nypost.com
Larry David says it’s hard to think Woody Allen 'did anything wrong’ after reading memoir
Larry David isn’t convinced Woody Allen committed any transgressions after reading the 84-year-old film director’s memoir.
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foxnews.com
Doctors race to develop coronavirus drugs, speeding through hurdles
In a race against time, American medicine is throwing out the rule book, skipping peer-review journals and clinical protocols to accelerate research against COVID-19.
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foxnews.com
Captain Brett Crozier got a raw deal and it needs to be made right
Navy Capt. Brett Crozier was fired last week as commander of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt after complaining about the plight of his crew, which was being ravaged by the coronavirus on his ship. To put it bluntly, he got a raw deal. The raucous cheer by the sailors and aircrew under his command...
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nypost.com
Dr. Anthony Fauci: New York Data Suggests Coronavirus Turnaround
Fauci cited the number of hospitalizations and admissions to intensive care leveling off in the last three days in New York as positive news.
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breitbart.com
MLB, union discuss playing all games in Arizona
Putting all 30 teams in the Phoenix area and playing in empty ballparks was among the ideas discussed Monday by Major League Baseball and the players’ association.
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foxnews.com
Trump’s ‘Hail Mary’ drug push rattles his health team
Some health officials see Trump’s promotion of hydroxychloroquine as an effort to make up time lost early in the coronavirus outbreak.
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politico.com
Boeing will redo bungled test flight of its Starliner spacecraft
Boeing said it will repeat a test flight of its Starliner spacecraft after several major issues plagued its first attempt. The decision casts more uncertainty on when Starliner can be used to begin carrying NASA astronauts into orbit — a milestone that's already years overdue.
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edition.cnn.com
By a 5–4 Vote, SCOTUS Lets Wisconsin Throw Out Tens of Thousands of Ballots
The conservative majority just approved one of the most brazen acts of voter suppression in modern times.
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slate.com
WWE 'Monday Night RAW' Results: What Will Happen on RAW After WrestleMania 36?
New and returning champions are expected to appear on Monday night's show.
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newsweek.com
Who is Dominic Raab?
With British Prime Minister Boris Johnson in an intensive-care unit after showing severe symptoms of COVID-19, attention has turned to the country’s first secretary of state, who is poised to take over for Johnson if he cannot perform his regular duties.
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foxnews.com
America must never again rely on China for our medical supplies
A country learns about itself in a crisis, and one revelation in the coronavirus emergency is that we can’t make our own penicillin. The first patient successfully treated with the antibiotic was a woman suffering from sepsis in a Connecticut hospital in 1942. Her treatment took up half the country’s supply. Yet in short order...
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nypost.com
Aid to unemployed freelancers lags as California officials await federal guidance
California officials have yet to implement rules that give freelancers unemployment insurance coverage in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.
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latimes.com
Ventilators don't operate on their own. Why respiratory therapists are key to coronavirus treatment
The rapid spread of coronavirus has sent states scrambling to buy ventilators to prepare for a coming apex of cases.
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edition.cnn.com
Frenchman breaks quarantine to buy cheap cigarettes, gets lost in mountains
He should be ‘ash-amed.’ A Frenchman broke his quarantine in search of cheap cigarettes over the weekend — and ended up sparking a major rescue operation when he got lost in a mountain range, authorities said. The smoker attempted to cross into Spain from his home in Perpignan in southern France, but was stopped by...
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nypost.com
Cardinal George Pell to be freed as High Court overturns sex abuse conviction
Cardinal George Pell will be immediately freed from prison after Australia's High Court unanimously overturned his conviction on five counts of historical child sex abuse.
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edition.cnn.com
Adam Silver does not expect any NBA decisions to be made until May
Adam Silver has spoken. The NBA Commissioner said he does not expect any decisions to be made about the 2019-20 NBA season until at least May.
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foxnews.com
Vigilance urged as outbreak shows signs of leveling off in New York, New Jersey
Governors of New York, New Jersey and Louisiana pointed to tentative signs on Monday that the coronavirus outbreak may be starting to plateau but warned against complacency as the death toll nationwide topped 10,000 and the number of known infections surpassed 360,000.
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reuters.com
NYPD staying away from issuing social distancing summonses
They saw something and said something — only to watch the cops do next to nothing. New Yorkers have called 311 with nearly 4,300 complaints of people not social-distancing — but the NYPD has issued fewer than two dozen summonses and made just three arrests, city data shows. The kid-glove response was revealed as Gov....
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nypost.com
Dem Reps. Call on Esper to Fire Navy Secretary Over Dismissal of Captain Who Sounded Coronavirus Alarm on Ship
"During this difficult time for our nation, we need steady, calm leadership. Acting Secretary Modly has shown exactly the opposite."
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newsweek.com