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As coronavirus swamps India, hospitals turn away other sick people
Families say hospitals are rationing medical care for other life-threatening illnesses as India mobilizes its resources to fight the coronavirus.
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latimes.com
The Coronavirus Crisis Threatens 2020 Voting Rights, Abortion, Other Civil Liberties, Watchdogs Say
Civil rights activists see danger in the choices being made between safety and liberty.
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newsweek.com
Lionel Richie remembers his friend Kenny Rogers in ACM concert
Some of country music's biggest names came together to celebrate the late Kenny Rogers on Sunday night.
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edition.cnn.com
Anne Tyler’s ‘Redhead by the Side of the Road’ is light on drama. Not that we could handle more drama now anyway.
Micah Mortimer is a milquetoast protagonist with a predictably quirky family.
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washingtonpost.com
U.S. Coronavirus Death Toll Could Be Highest in the World Within a Week
The daily death toll in the U.S. has surpassed that of Italy's for several days and its total death count could potentially reach nearly 40,000 in about a week, according to new projections.
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newsweek.com
Why Donald Trump's firing of the Intelligence Community IG is so, so egregious
President Donald Trump fired Michael Atkinson, the inspector general of the intelligence community, late on a Friday night amid the coronavirus pandemic in hopes that you wouldn't know what he did. Or you'd note it in passing, and then quickly move on to other pressing worries like, well, the coronavirus and its impact on the US economy.
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edition.cnn.com
Rex Ryan draws ire of McCourty twins after Amari Cooper ‘turd’ rant on ESPN
The McCourty brothers weren’t fond of how ESPN handled Rex Ryan’s outburst toward Cowboys wide receiver Amari Cooper. Ryan, 57, caused a stir last week when he criticized the Cowboys’ decision to give Cooper a five-year, $100 million contract extension earlier this offseason before referring to the four-time Pro Bowler as a “turd” during an...
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nypost.com
NPR Names Poynter's Kelly McBride As Sixth Public Editor
Media ethicist Kelly McBride of the Poynter Institute has been named NPR's sixth public editor, an in-house advocate for listeners and newsroom watchdog.
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npr.org
'Doctors disagree all the time': Navarro drags Fauci feud into the public
The clash focused on the efficacy a controversial potential treatment for the coronavirus.
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politico.com
Trump threatens OPEC, Russia with tariffs
OPEC meeting postponed — DOE's 'alternative financing mechanism' for SPR
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politico.com
How to make substitutions for spices, herbs, dairy and meat in your everyday cooking
Pep talk: Your food will turn out just fine.
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washingtonpost.com
To the rescue, states
No bailout for cruises — Welcome, online tool
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politico.com
Ariana Grande surprises quarantined fans with ‘virtual love’ song
"My Everything" was dedicated to the fans.
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nypost.com
A summer without a superhero
The coronavirus pandemic makes caped crusaders seem powerless.
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washingtonpost.com
New York artists share tips with Californians on how to stay sane in crazy times
They were among the first to be furloughed. Now three Metropolitan Opera performers share their survival guide for those facing similar challenges.
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latimes.com
States weigh mobile voting
EAC tries to speed up election grant distribution — Interpol warns of ransomware attacks on health care networks
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politico.com
'There will be death': Hard week looms on coronavirus
Trump stays focused on unproven hydroxychloroquine — Tens of millions of Americans could lose private insurance
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politico.com
How coronavirus is affecting campaign fundraising
Wisconsin voting still on for Tuesday, despite pleas to postpone — House Majority PAC makes fall reservations
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politico.com
What’s next for airline aid
How cruise companies created their own predicament — An infrastructure 'will they or won’t they'
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politico.com
VA officially pauses EHR project
Tech companies roll out new coronavirus tools — A new reporting mandate in California
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politico.com
Zoom looks to reframe its narrative in the Beltway
Pandemic threatens STEM talent — Health care companies get antitrust OK
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politico.com
113 straight months of economic growth halted
Small business loan program has shaky start — New unemployment benefits give low-wage workers a boost
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politico.com
‘Aliens’ actor Jay Benedict dead at 68 from coronavirus
Actor Jay Benedict, who appeared in “Aliens” and “The Dark Knight Rises,” is the latest celebrity to die from the coronavirus. He was 68. “It is with profound sorrow that we must announce Jay’s death on the 4th of April due to complications arising from a COVID-19 infection,” his official website announced. His agency, TSG,...
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nypost.com
Food system faces ‘tsunami’ of changing demand
FDA rolls back egg regs — Dairy marriage open to objections
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politico.com
Trump bars 'unscrupulous' medical goods exports
Food system faces 'tsunami' of change due to pandemic — Mexico, Canada ready for USMCA to take effect
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politico.com
Roosevelt scandal heats up
Intelligence IG cashiered — Senate nuke ‘hearing’ this week
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politico.com
First Look: DeVos to announce new waiver flexibility for existing K-12 funds
Trump to nominate DOJ lawyer as Education Department’s top watchdog — Teachers’ control over course content in U.S., compared to other countries, a disadvantage during crisis, expert says
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politico.com
The cutest, coziest slippers to get you through the rest of quarantine
At this point, you're either living in your favorite house slippers, or desperately looking for a new pair. We rounded up our favorites from Ugg, Zappos, Nordstrom and more.
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edition.cnn.com
Mating flies preserved in amber have been doing it for 41 million years
Have you ever been caught in the act? You know the act I mean. I mean when someone walks in on you and your significant other during a beautiful moment of physical… activity. If you have, you know how traumatizing it can be, so just imagine the plight of these two flies which have spent...
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nypost.com
Inspector general fired by Trump sends a warning signal for American democracy
Michael Atkinson weighed in Sunday on his firing as intelligence community inspector general, suggesting it's part of a President Trump plot to undermine independent oversight.
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washingtonpost.com
Billionaires are failing us when we need them most
With coronavirus pushing the US economy to the brink of disaster, the ultra wealthy have an obligation to step up and use their money and power for the greater good, writes Morris Pearl, chair of the Patriotic Millionaires.
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edition.cnn.com
Watch live: Cuomo gives update on coronavirus crisis
Governor Cuomo said Sunday that a slight dip in new COVID-19 deaths in New York over the last 24 hours may be a glimmer of hope that the spread is slowing.
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cbsnews.com
PGA Championship pushed back to August due to coronavirus
The PGA Championship is returning to an August tee-off thanks to the global coronavirus pandemic. Originally scheduled for May 14-17 at TPC Harding Park in San Francisco, the tournament, like several others, was officially postponed on March 17 due to growing concerns over the rapid spread of COVID-19. The tournament has reportedly been rescheduled, returning...
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nypost.com
3D printer companies step in to fill hospitals' desperate need for face shields
Doctors and nurses on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic are in desperate need of face shields. So tech companies are stepping up to help.
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edition.cnn.com
Trump: Coronavirus-stricken cruise ships docked in Florida for ‘humanitarian reasons’
President Trump on Monday said two cruise ships with outbreaks of coronavirus aboard were allowed to dock in Florida for “humanitarian reasons” after failing to find safe harbor in other countries. “For humanitarian reasons, the passengers from the two CoronaVirus stricken cruise ships have been given medical treatment and, when appropriate, allowed to disembark, under...
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nypost.com
Duran Duran’s John Taylor reveals coronavirus recovery
"I want to let you know that it isn’t always a killer, and we can and will beat this thing."
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nypost.com
Superlative churches: Big, beautiful and unusual religious sites
These are some of the world's most impressive churches and cathedrals.      
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usatoday.com
U.S. Coronavirus Hotspot Updates: The Latest on COVID-19 Cases in New York, Detroit, New Orleans
The peak of the outbreak is expected to hit all three hotspots at the same time.
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newsweek.com
Dr. Drew Pinsky apologizes for equating coronavirus with the flu
"I wish I had gotten it right, but I got it wrong."
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nypost.com
Birdsong, blaring sirens: A pandemic in sound
In the grind of the coronavirus pandemic, sound has become one of our shared experiences. (April 6)       
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usatoday.com
I was food insecure for years. Affluent people finally understand a little of what it’s like.
A woman wearing protective gloves and a mask as a precaution against the coronavirus shops for groceries at a supermarket in Miami, Florida. | Marco Bello/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images The shared experience of grocery shortages is very different from the quiet struggle of people who are used to food insecurity. My friend Rhonda is eating a salad of iceberg lettuce and sardines. My cousin is on her last fresh tomato. My neighbor Nick has found a bread recipe that substitutes beer for baking yeast. Watching relatively affluent people trying to cope with food shortages caused by the coronavirus crisis is interesting for those of us who have lived like this for years. So now you have some faint inkling of what it feels like, we think as we stare speculatively at the last onion. According to a 2018 survey by the United States Department of Agriculture, 11.1 percent of American households could be described as “food insecure.” Until a few years ago, I was in that bottom 11 percent. My husband and I qualified as “low food security,” meaning that we were getting enough to eat but “the quality, variety, and desirability” of our diet was significantly reduced. Poverty breeds creativity. I repurposed stale hot dog buns. I picked nettles and dandelion greens. I figured out how to cook without oil. I learned to love the foods that keep well and can be used in small quantities to brighten an otherwise grim meal: bacon, purple cabbage, red onion. And I learned to hate lentils because they are versatile, cheap, and quick, which meant that we ate bathtubs’ worth. Food insecurity is vastly different from starvation, a condition that neither I nor many of my fellow Americans can speak to. This is because you are poor but not destitute. Food insecurity is not a dire emergency but rather a constant gnawing anxiety. You think about food all the time. Not in a hungry way, but in a calculating way. Which is much different than the disappointment my friends are experiencing when their Fresh Direct order is missing a few items. I came to expect cold sweats when approaching the checkout line, that last panicked bout of mental math as you set the groceries on the conveyor belt. The bread is 2.99, the stewed tomatoes are 99 cents … if it’s too much, what will I send back? Telling the cashier I changed my mind about the sour cream and the sandwich meat and the orange juice always gave me a withering and inexplicable sense of shame. The stigma of poverty is insidious and easy to internalize. If you’re experiencing anxiety about food shortages due to the Covid-19 crisis, take a moment to appreciate that no one is claiming that it’s your own damned fault and that maybe you shouldn’t have spent that money on a smartphone. Obviously, this time of international food insecurity is more difficult for people who already suffer from income-based food insecurity. If you can’t afford to stock up, you have the reasonable fear that there will be nothing left by the time you can. In the absence of school lunch and breakfast programs, you’re suddenly faced with providing your kids three meals a day instead of one. Meanwhile, food banks are struggling with dwindling volunteer teams, a sharp decrease in corporate contributions, a decline in food donations from grocery stores depleted by panic-buying, and a dramatic increase in the number of people lining up for boxes. So you can expect longer lines and a decrease in the quality and diversity of available food. On the other hand, the chronically food insecure have developed useful skill sets. Among my lower-income friends and neighbors, there’s a certain confidence in our ability to survive, to weather economic and social hardship. There’s a sense of “We got this.” One friend told me, “I’ve been training my whole life for something like this.” If you’ve been laid off due to Covid-19, you don’t necessarily have this advantage. It sounds strange to call chronic poverty an “advantage,” but in this case it might be. I was raised poor, and when my husband and I both got laid off in the economic crash of 2008, I already had the life skills I needed to live by the skin of my teeth. I knew what to expect and I knew how to go without. I feel for the people who are experiencing deprivation for the first time while simultaneously trying to cope with the other extreme stress factors we’re all facing. As for me, I’m lucky now. I’m looking at a pantry full of cans, a freezer full of meat and vegetables, and a crisper with a few remaining carrots and greens. We’ll run out of onions tonight. But this is nothing. This feels positively luxurious compared to the time I inadvertently lost 30 pounds because I was trying to live on the cheapest diet I could figure: scrambled eggs, broccoli, and fortified cereal. Meanwhile, my upper-middle-class friends are “anxiety baking” and complaining about having to wash so many dishes. I’m part of a Facebook group where people are documenting their quarantine cooking. There’s a sense of solidarity and camaraderie in deprivation and in substitution. But this shared experience is very different from the quiet struggle of people who are used to going without. Income-based food insecurity doesn’t usually appear on social media. People aren’t humble-bragging on Instagram about having to feed the kids mayonnaise and ketchup sandwiches. Poor Americans suffer their food-based anxieties in silent shame. This isn’t intended to belittle middle-class Americans for feeling anxious about running out of baking yeast, nor is it intended to shame anyone who is, on some level, enjoying the adventure of doing without. These are anxious times and we all need to make our fun where we can. But if you’re new to this game, remember that your creative “quarantine cooking” or “eating out of the pantry” may actually look ridiculously sumptuous to people who suffer from chronic food insecurity. For one in 10 families, constant food-based problem solving is just everyday life, and there’s no real hope that this gnawing anxiety will go away when the pandemic abates. Felisa Rosa Rogers is a freelance writer who lives in backwoods Oregon. She enjoys writing just about anything, but is best known for her essays on food, poverty, and the intersection of conservation and rural economic development.
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vox.com
Singer Duffy says she was drugged, taken to another country and raped
Duffy has revealed harrowing details of a four-week ordeal during which she says she was drugged at a restaurant on her birthday, taken to a foreign county and raped by an unnamed attacker.
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edition.cnn.com
Singer Duffy says she was drugged, taken to another country and raped
Duffy has revealed details of the incident, in a bid, she said, to free herself of her emotional burden and help others who "have suffered the same."
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edition.cnn.com
Book it: 10 works that will transport you around the world
You can "book" a trip anywhere with these reads       
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usatoday.com
Supreme Court won't hear Catholic Church challenge to ban on religious advertising
The case would have been the latest example of religious freedom appeals to be heard by the conservative-leaning court.        
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usatoday.com
Medical supplies are limited. Can 3D-printed face shields help?
Shortages are forcing health care workers treating Covid-19 patients to wear the same face mask for entire shifts. Companies are 3D-printing face shields to make that safer.
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edition.cnn.com
Ezra Miller Appears to Choke a Female Fan in Disturbing Twitter Video
In the viral video, Miller can be seen grabbing a fan by the neck and pulling her into a wall.
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nypost.com
Nurse shows how fast germs spread even with gloves
Former emergency room nurse Molly Lixey made a video to demonstrate how easy it is to cross-contaminate while you wear gloves.
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edition.cnn.com