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Trump Rollback of Obama Mileage Standards Guts Efforts on Climate Change
The final rule on mileage standards through 2026 is expected to be released Tuesday
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time.com
Utah's Largest Medical Provider Announces Pay Cuts for Doctors and Nurses Amid Coronavirus Pandemic
Intermountain Healthcare told its staff in an email that the pay cuts were necessary because the company wasn't bringing in as much revenue due to the COVID-19 outbreak.
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newsweek.com
‘Taking Action Cost Me My Job.’ Amazon Fires Worker Who Led Coronavirus Strike
Amazon confirmed it fired the employee, saying he was "violating social distancing guidelines."
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time.com
Selma Blair gives comforting advice amid coronavirus in conversation with Miley Cyrus
Selma Blair is continuing to use her voice to provide advice and comfort amid the coronavirus pandemic in conversation with Miley Cyrus on Instagram.        
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usatoday.com
Shaq’s ‘Tiger King’ entanglement includes Jeff Lowe FaceTime
Shaquille O’Neal and Joe Exotic might not be BFFs, but it seems the Lakers legend kept in touch with another breakout “Tiger King” star. Earlier this month, Jeff Lowe — who took over the Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park from Exotic — revealed on Facebook that O’Neal FaceTimed him after the Netflix docuseries premiered. “One...
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nypost.com
How to Delete Your Houseparty Account Now That You're Worried About Getting Hacked
In light of the rumors about hacking that are circulating on Twitter, here's a step-by-step guide to ditching your Houseparty account.
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newsweek.com
See how Empire State Building honored emergency workers
The Empire State Building was lit up with red and white lights to honor emergency workers during the Covid-19 outbreak.
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edition.cnn.com
College golf coach, ex-PGA Tour pro fighting to save his leg
Casey Martin, the Oregon Ducks’ golf team head coach and former PGA Tour pro, is fighting to save his leg after fracturing his right tibia in October when he was walking on a road under construction.
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foxnews.com
Ariana Grande’s ‘Victorious’ Zoom Reunion Is What Nostalgic Dreams Are Made of
Stars: they’re just like us. No matter how famous, they are also limited by the rules of social distancing — and have been making use of teleconferencing software like Zoom to host “parties.” Just consider the case of Ariana Grande, Victoria Justice and the rest of the cast of 2010 hit Nickelodeon show Victorious, created…
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time.com
Sony postpones 'Ghostbusters: Afterlife,' 'Morbius' and more summer releases due to coronavirus concerns
Due to the coronavirus pandemic, Sony Pictures announced Monday that it is postponing its big summer releases to 2021.
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foxnews.com
'Stealing Home' revisits Dodger Stadium's nefarious origins
Eric Nusbaum's "Stealing Home" follows a family displaced from Chavez Ravine, where Dodger Stadium was built.
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latimes.com
Florida pastor's legal team responds to 'entirely inappropriate' arrest
Florida megachurch pastor, Dr. Rodney Howard-Browne, is defending himself after he was arrested at his home Monday for holding church services Sunday in defiance of government orders to stop the spread of the coronavirus.
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus and cruises: Roughly 10 ships are 'stranded' at sea amid pandemic
Several cruise ships carrying passengers are "stranded" at sea.
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foxnews.com
Airline Staff Dance to 'Don't Stop Believing' After Final Flight Due to Coronavirus Pandemic
Virgin Australia employees got down with a heartfelt boogie set to Glee's version of the Journey hit, marking end to all intentional flights from Australia.
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newsweek.com
Pompeo: Countries need to ‘step up’ and provide accurate coronavirus data
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called on a number of countries to provide clear and accurate data about the coronavirus outbreak within their borders so that the worldwide risk from the pandemic can be estimated. “When you hear doctors Fauci and Birx talk about risk and talk about fatalities trying to think about how to...
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nypost.com
'I thought I was going to die': Nigerian coronavirus survivor shares her experience
Oluwaseun Ayodeji Osowobi shares survival story after testing positive for coronavirus
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edition.cnn.com
Katherine Schwarzenegger's coronavirus concern prompts LA mayor to suspend farmers markets
Arnold Schwarzenegger's former political run may have rubbed off on his daughter, Katherine Schwarzenegger.
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foxnews.com
Florida sheriff getting 6 tips a day in 1997 'Tiger King' disappearance
A Florida sheriff is using the hype surrounding the wildly popular Netflix series "Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness" to seek new leads in the case of Jack Donald "Don" Lewis, who's been missing since 1997.
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edition.cnn.com
Belgium woman, 90, with coronavirus dies after telling doctors to save ventilator for younger patients
A 90-year-old woman in Belgium died after refusing critical treatment for the coronavirus, reportedly telling doctors to save her ventilator for younger patients.
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foxnews.com
‘Bachelor’ alum Michelle Money says daughter’s surgery ‘went great’
"Surgery went great. Her numbers are in a really good place," she shared online.
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nypost.com
What the Polls Say About a Donald Trump vs Joe Biden Presidential Matchup
A poll by Harvard and Harris conducted from March 24 to 26 shows Biden beating Trump by 10 points, 55 percent to 45 percent.
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newsweek.com
Maxine Waters blasts Trump for handling of coronavirus outbreak
The Democratic congresswoman called Mr. Trump a "failure" and said his "ignorance and incompetence are appalling."
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cbsnews.com
Thailand's king self-quarantining in Germany with 20 women, servants: reports
This isn’t your typical coronavirus quarantine. 
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foxnews.com
Stocks head toward worst quarter since 2008
U.S. stocks were on pace for their worst quarter since the depths of the financial crisis in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.       
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usatoday.com
Coronavirus claims life of New York City minor
A minor in New York City — now the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in the U.S. — has suffered a coronavirus-related death, according to data from the city released on Monday. 
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foxnews.com
Ford to build 50,000 ventilators within 100 days to help coronavirus patients
Ford plans to produce 50,000 ventilators within 100 days to help meet the demand for the machines critical to fighting the coronavirus. Through a partnership with GE Healthcare, the automaker said it will start making ventilators by the week of April 20 at its car-parts plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan with the goal of producing 50,000...
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nypost.com
ABC shelves ‘The Bachelor Summer Games’ amid coronavirus pandemic
The prospective series, which had yet to be officially announced, was slated to air during the Olympics this summer.
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nypost.com
11 Veterans Die At Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts Amid COVID-19 Outbreak
More than 20 coronavirus cases have been confirmed at the facility, and officials are rushing to do more tests, hoping to learn the full extent of the exposure.
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npr.org
Enjoy culture while social distancing: 9 picks, from Alvin Ailey to Bach cello suites
We've selected nine things to watch online today — all of them free — including performances by Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and violinist Johnny Gandelsman
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latimes.com
Prince Harry and Meghan Start Their New Chapter
The move has been made more complicated for the family as Prince Charles recovers from testing positive for COVID-19
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time.com
Coronavirus live blog: Allergist and immunologist Dr. Purvi Parikh answers your questions
Allergist and immunologist Dr. Purvi Parikh is here to answer your coronavirus questions.
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foxnews.com
Americans face nearly unprecedented travel restrictions inside US as states rush to stem coronavirus tide
Taken together, these travel restrictions, which reach nearly every corner of the United States, are a nearly unprecedented limitation of Americans' movement as every level of government is scrambling to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.
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foxnews.com
The teacher who disarmed, then hugged a student will receive the citizen Congressional Medal of Honor
The Medal of Honor is typically awarded to members of the US military, but Keanon Lowe and his fellow recipients were chosen as Citizen Honorees for their bravery and valor.
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edition.cnn.com
Coronavirus can cause heart injury even for those without underlying issues: study
Coronavirus can cause heart injuries in patients that put them at higher risk of dying from the disease, researchers said.
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nypost.com
Amazon fires walkout leader; AG calls for investigation
New York Attorney General Letitia James is calling for an investigation of Amazon, after the online shopping giant fired an employee who staged a walkout in Staten Island.
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foxnews.com
When is the April Full Moon? Pink Supermoon to Be Biggest and Brightest of 2020
April's Pink Moon is the second supermoon to take place this year and the first since the Spring Equinox.
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newsweek.com
Former NFL player-turned-neurosurgeon: A 'collective buy-in' is needed to slow coronavirus
While it is a "difficult" and "bad" time both for hospitals and patients strained under the threat of coronavirus (COVID-19), America can make it past this virus by working together, former NFL player-turned-neurosurgeon for Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital Myron Rolle said Tuesday. 
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foxnews.com
Amazon fires Staten Island warehouse worker who wanted coronavirus protections
Amazon has fired a worker at its Staten Island, N.Y. warehouse after he helped organize a walkout over the company's coronavirus responses, alleging he put others at risk.
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foxnews.com
President of Holland America cruise line pleads for compassion while Florida debates allowing ships to dock
“We are dealing with a ‘not my problem’ syndrome,” said Orlando Ashford.
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foxnews.com
Meghan McCain says she ‘cannot buy a bagel’ without someone praising her dad, doubts Trump’s kid have same experience
“The View” co-host Meghan McCain said she “cannot buy a bagel” without people praising her dad and doesn’t think President Trump’s children have the same experience. 
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foxnews.com
Meghan Markle's Disney 'Elephant' debut panned by critics as 'shallow,' cheesy
Meghan Markle's first post-royal gig as the narrator of Disney's upcoming documentary titled "Elephant" has been dubbed cheesy and "shallow" by critics ahead of its streaming debut.
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foxnews.com
Americans look to animal adoption for a bright spot amid coronavirus crisis
A growing number of Americans are choosing to adopt or foster a pet as millions are forced to stay home over coronavirus precautions. The ASPCA says it’s seen a nearly 70% increase in the number of animals going into foster care in New York and Los Angeles, compared to this time last year. Dana Jacobson speaks to shelter workers and foster groups to hear how they are preparing the flood of new pet owners .
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cbsnews.com
Fountains of Wayne frontman Adam Schlesinger on ventilator after getting coronavirus
Fountains of Wayne co-frontman Adam Schlesinger is reportedly in a medically-induced coma after contracting coronavirus.
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nypost.com
Dr. Oz goes over list of 'promising' coronavirus treatments
Fox News contributor Dr. Mehmet Oz reviewed Tuesday the treatments being used to combat the coronavirus and for building up the body's immunity. 
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foxnews.com
Moon bases could be built using astronaut urine
Lunar bases for astronauts could be built using moon dust, urine and 3D printers, according to a new study. This would make use of resources they already have without the expense of shipping materials to the moon.
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edition.cnn.com
The coronavirus has now killed more Americans than the 9/11 terror attacks
Times Square in New York City on March 22, 2020. | Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images Does this mean the US national security community should prioritize global health now? The coronavirus has now killed more Americans than the 9/11 terror attacks — and the death toll is poised to rise in the weeks ahead. Nearly 3,000 people died after terrorists flew planes into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, and a third plane that had been hijacked crashed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, on 9/11. According to tallies by both CNN and the New York Times, over 3,000 people in the US infected with Covid-19 have died. It is, of course, not a neat comparison. Those who perished on 9/11 died instantly or soon thereafter, though many first responders suffered major complications in the subsequent years. Meanwhile, the death toll from the coronavirus has risen since January and has grown substantially in the past few weeks. Top health officials in the US government, like Dr. Anthony Fauci, predicted on Sunday between 100,000 and 200,000 deaths in the country before the crisis subsides. Dr. Deborah Birx, another medical professional leading the American response, said the following day that Fauci’s figures could pan out even “if we do things almost perfectly.” President Donald Trump, a longtime New Yorker who only last year changed his official residence to Florida, seems to agree. If the death toll stays around 100,000, then “we all together have done a very good job,” he said during a Sunday press conference. But one parallel between the coronavirus crisis and 9/11 is that, so far, New York City has borne the brunt of two of the worst crises in recent American history. Steven Kassapidis, an intensive care unit doctor in the city, told the Guardian last week that “9/11 was nothing compared to this.” Current conditions are “Hell. Biblical,” he continued. With regard to 9/11, he said, “We were waiting for patients to come who never came, okay? Now, they just keep coming.” That tracks with what Vox’s Jen Kirby and Emily Stewart reported last week: Officials are frantically trying to find spaces to care for the New Yorkers they expect to become sick. The US Army Corps of Engineers is planning to build field hospitals at now-empty colleges on Long Island, and to remake the Jacob Javits Center, the convention center on the far west side of Manhattan, into a FEMA hospital. De Blasio said Thursday the city is trying to triple its capacity to 60,000 beds by May. That still may not be enough. The USNS Comfort, the US Navy’s hospital ship, has now docked outside Manhattan for the first time since the 9/11 attacks. The last time this ship docked in Manhattan was in the aftermath of 9/11. It's getting harder to avoid drawing parallels between the two crises. https://t.co/MkL67H2pkY— Richard Hall (@_RichardHall) March 30, 2020 Of course, the greatest devastation of the coronavirus is likely yet to come, whereas the destruction from 9/11 was immediate. Another similarity is that President George W. Bush had ample intelligence informing him that al-Qaeda was planning an attack like 9/11, and Trump had multiple government agencies warning the US wasn’t prepared for a pandemic. Yet neither took sufficient steps to try to prevent the respective threats from unfolding. In Trump’s case, his administration was slow to deal with the outbreak, failing to administer tests early and deliver medical equipment to health care workers treating patients. The sluggish response has already led at least one member of the 9/11 Commission — the government-mandated group that investigated the origins of the attack and the US government’s failures — to call for a similar effort once the crisis is over. “As with prior catastrophic failures of the government to protect the American public,” John Farmer Jr. wrote on Saturday for ABC News, “the public will demand — and good government will require — an accounting of the actions and inactions that contributed to the world’s — and our nation’s — failure to contain the Covid-19 pandemic.” Some national security experts have even begun to argue that the US government needs to dramatically rethink what the greatest threats to America really are — moving terrorism down the list and putting global health near the top. “I can say definitively that the specter of 9/11 has impacted every major political decision tied to US involvement in Afghanistan, with the risk of enabling another such an attack weighing heavily on senior leaders,” Jason Campbell, who from 2016 to 2018 was a top Afghanistan policy official in the Pentagon, told me. “I believe we will see a similar effect when it comes to countering another pandemic.” Should the US focus more on global health than terrorism? In a piece for Politico over the weekend, foreign affairs journalist Nahal Toosi compared the US foreign policy community to a high school cafeteria. The popular kids were those who focused on terrorism, among other things, while “the global health specialists would be eating tater tots in the corner with the band geeks.” The coronavirus may soon flip that hierarchy on its head. “I think this is a breakpoint, a transformative moment that is going to change institutions,” Stephen Morrison, who leads a global health program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies think tank in Washington, DC, told Toosi. “You’re going to have a hard time to find people [who] argue again that this really is not all that important.” Campbell echoed that sentiment. “In the coronavirus context, much like with Afghanistan or even counterterrorism more broadly, there is going to be added political risk associated with underpreparing and underfunding,” he told me. Here again, the case of the 9/11 attacks is instructive. After 9/11, the US changed a lot about how it would defend against the next major attack. The Bush administration combined 22 government agencies into a single overarching agency: the Department of Homeland Security. It also created the Office of the Director of National Intelligence to better coordinate and understand the intelligence being gathered across the countries’ numerous intelligence agencies. The 9/11 attacks also led to the rise of the surveillance state, allowing the government to track the movements of people around the world and online, even if they clearly weren’t terrorists. The Bush administration prioritized tackling terrorism above almost any other threat in its National Security Strategy, and launched a “Global War on Terror” to confront terrorist threats around the world, which some estimates say cost more than $6 trillion. Today, there are those who say the US government should reform once again. “Covid-19 marks the final nail in the coffin of the ‘post-9/11 era,’ in which the United States harnessed all elements of national power to confront the scourge of violent Islamic extremism,” the first director of national intelligence, John Negroponte, and Yale’s Edward Wittenstein wrote for USA Today on Monday. “America needs a proactive intelligence agenda that draws on lessons learned from this ongoing pandemic.” Negroponte and Wittenstein lay out four key elements of such an agenda: Closer collaboration between intelligence agencies and the global health and scientific communities Increased focus on cybersecurity so connectivity is safeguarded for those in hospitals and working from home during an outbreak Closer monitoring of misinformation that could get people killed Increased use of artificial intelligence to help spot outbreaks before they get too big and to help physicians with diagnoses However, it’s not like the US government doesn’t have global health security strategies on hand. It actually does, including one from the White House just last year (although it doesn’t feature the word “intelligence” once). Other experts, like Dr. Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at Columbia University, say the most important change would be more money. “There needs to be funding across the board for basic research, surveillance, modeling, and experimental work to predict pathogen emergence,” she told me. “This should include a pandemic preparedness plan and a standing committee to oversee this work.” That work would also include ensuring emergency stockpiles of medical equipment are full and ready for use, and also ensure that government agencies know their exact roles in times of crisis. But some say that, other than a lack of preparation to have the medical capacity needed for an outbreak, the US national security community doesn’t actually need much reform. Michael Leiter, who led the National Counterterrorism Center from 2007 to 2011, told me that the intelligence community did well predicting this kind of crisis. The fault in this case “falls entirely on the National Security Council, and hence the White House.” It’s not so much that the US needs to restructure its national security apparatus, then. The intelligence system worked, Leiter says. It’s the leaders who failed. Others agree. “The real problem is not the intelligence community, but rather the policy side who have been warned about a pandemic multiple times,” said Mathew Burrows, a former top intelligence official who wrote the National Intelligence Council’s Global Trends reports. “The various administrations all complain that there are too many threats to track, but that’s life.” “There is no reason — except bureaucratic inertia — that they could not redesign how they operate in light of a new threat environment,” added Burrows, who’s now at the Atlantic Council think tank in Washington. “This is a huge US failure which goes beyond the stupidity of this administration.”
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vox.com