Generally
General
913
unread news
unread news
Gary Cohen pitches 25-game season after ‘weird, fun’ virtual Mets call
Like everyone else, Gary Cohen doesn’t know if there will be a baseball season. The novel coronavirus has postponed it for now, along with all the other professional sports. But the Mets’ SNY play-by-play announcer believes MLB should hold out as long as possible, even if it means starting as late as September, before canceling...
1m
nypost.com
"Pharma Bro" Martin Shkreli wants prison release to fight COVID-19
The disgraced pharmaceutical entrepreneur believes he's uniquely positioned to fight the coronavirus disease.
1m
cbsnews.com
Where to Find Walgreens Drive-Thru Coronavirus Testing Sites in Louisiana, Florida, Texas and More
In an announcement Tuesday, Walgreens disclosed plans to administer COVID-19 tests at 15 new drive-thru locations across seven states.
1m
newsweek.com
Attorney Generals urge Trump to increase production of coronavirus safety gear
More than a dozen attorneys general from across the country are urging President Trump to order more companies to ramp up production of protective gear and testing supplies — as he has done with with face masks and ventilators. The group, including New York AG Letitia James, asked the president in a letter to invoke...
1m
nypost.com
We Could Be Taking Psychedelics to Help Treat Mental Illness in Just Five Years
The war on drugs which stopped research on psychedelics was "one of the worst examples of censorship of human research in the history of science," according to the authors of a commentary in the journal Cell.
1m
newsweek.com
Trump and Biden should agree on this: Fed Chair Powell deserves a second term
The Federal Reserve has quickly responded to the Covid-19 pandemic in the United States. That's why presidential candidates should acknowledge the Fed's efforts and pledge to keep current chair Jerome Powell on the job.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Cam Newton’s free agency hopes cut further by coronavirus
Cam Newton won the Heisman Trophy. Then he was first-overall pick in the NFL Draft. Then he was the Rookie of the Year. Then he was the MVP, starting in the Super Bowl. Now, the soon-to-be 31-year-old quarterback is grappling with the reality of being unwanted for the first time in his career after being...
1m
nypost.com
'I am negative': Rand Paul recovers from coronavirus
The Kentucky Republican is out of quarantine.
1m
politico.com
Senate Dems push for pay increase for frontline workers in fourth rescue package
“No proposal will be complete without addressing the need for essential workers," Schumer says.
1m
politico.com
Hundreds gather for rabbi's funeral, defying social distancing
The NYPD broke up the crowd and said "these gatherings must cease immediately."
1m
cbsnews.com
Polish parliament approves election by postal vote only
WARSAW, Poland — Polish lawmakers voted late Monday to conduct the country’s forthcoming presidential elections exclusively through postal voting due to the lockdown imposed for the coronavirus pandemic. Parliament also empowered house speaker Elzbieta Witek to push back the date of the election, if necessary. Both decisions by parliament require approval from the Senate and...
1m
nypost.com
Essential Workers Would Get up to $25,000 Boost Under Senate Democrats' New 'Heroes Fund' Stimulus
The hazard pay would go to employees deemed essential during the pandemic, including those who work in drug and grocery stores, and in health care, sanitation and transportation.
1m
newsweek.com
U.S. Coronavirus Update, Map as Death Toll Tops 11,000, Surgeon General Says 2 Million Tests Completed By End of Week
While the death toll in New York shows signs of slowing, Governor Andrew Cuomo warned "now is not the time to be lax with social distancing."
1m
newsweek.com
New White House Press Secretary Said a Month Ago That Coronavirus Would Never Spread to U.S.
The most powerful Kayleigh in the world?
1m
slate.com
Auntie Anne's Pretzels founder: 'The secret nearly killed me'
Anne Beiler is best known as the founder of Auntie Anne’s Pretzels, but she has come a long way. Before her success, tragedy struck her family and she hit rock bottom. She had to choose between darkness and light.
1m
foxnews.com
Husband surprises ICU nurse with drive-by surprise to after work
1m
edition.cnn.com
Girl "replaces sadness with smiles" with concert
1m
edition.cnn.com
Dispute over Wendy's soda refill causes chaos
1m
edition.cnn.com
Formula One puts almost half its staff on furlough due to coronavirus
Formula One has put almost half its staff on furlough until the end of May due to the novel coronavirus with chairman Chase Carey and senior management also taking a pay cut.
1m
nypost.com
The best local New York fashion brands to shop now
As the coronavirus pandemic sweeps the nation — and we all stay home to prevent the spread — independent fashion companies are struggling to stay afloat. The best way to help local brands survive the crisis (and treat yourself for being a good social-distancer) is by shopping online. Here are six of our favorite NYC-based...
1m
nypost.com
Northam to postpone action on teacher raises, tuition freeze
Gov. Ralph Northam plans to push back decisions on whether to give teachers and state workers raises, freeze in-state college tuition, and other new spending items in a proposed state budget in response to the coronavirus
1m
washingtonpost.com
With no theaters, film fans find ways to gather virtually
Movie theaters may be closed, but friends are still finding ways to watch together while staying apart thanks to applications like Netflix Party
1m
washingtonpost.com
Author Dennis Lehane inks a deal for Westchester home
After putting his Playa del Rey home on the market, writer Dennis Lehane has purchased a Westchester house three miles away for $2.395 million.
1m
latimes.com
Trump replaces Pentagon watchdog who was overseeing $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus spending
President Donald Trump replaced acting Pentagon Inspector General Glenn Fine from his post and that of top watchdog for COVID-19 stimulus spending.        
1m
usatoday.com
Kentucky church lights up green to show compassion for health care workers
As businesses and houses of worship are shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic, many are getting creative in how they are support their communities.
1m
foxnews.com
Why New York has 12 times as many coronavirus deaths as California
A temporary 125-bed field hospital has been set up by members of the California National Guard to easy the burden on local hospitals in Indio, California, on March 29. | Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images California is not in the clear yet, but its experience so far has some potential takeaways. As the coronavirus started to spread in the US, California, not New York, might have seemed a likelier place for the pandemic to peak. California, the nation’s most populous state, was among the first to report cases. The first possible case of community transmission in the US was reported in California on February 26; the state reported its first death on March 4. New York lagged by days, reporting its first community transmission case on March 3 and first death on March 14. But just over a month after California’s first coronavirus death, as of April 7, the state has seen more than 16,000 cases and nearly 400 deaths — while New York state has more than 130,000 cases and nearly 4,800 deaths. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images Emergency medical workers transport a sick prisoner to an ambulance outside Elmhurst Hospital Center, in Queens, New York on April 6. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images Hospitals in New York City, which had been especially hard hit by the coronavirus, are facing shortages of beds, ventilators, and protective equipment for medical staff. Experts say it’s too early to definitively say why California is faring so much better than New York. One factor, though, is that California simply acted more quickly than New York once it became clear that coronavirus was starting to spread in the US. If cases in California remain under control while those in New York soar — still a very big if — the experience could carry important lessons for how to deal with Covid-19, the disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. California’s experience likely reflects, at least in part, the value of quick, more proactive action — along the lines of what experts say is needed across the US, even in places that might not feel exposed to coronavirus right now. We “need to shift to a proactive mentality rather than reactive,” Krutika Kuppalli, an infectious diseases physician and emerging leader in biosecurity fellow at Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, told me. The reactive mentality “has been very much the way this outbreak has been from the beginning.” It’s also important, experts added, that California remains vigilant. With the huge economic harm caused by the coronavirus lockdowns, it can be tempting to ease off social distancing measures early. But to truly avoid a catastrophe like New York’s, experts say, California likely needs to stay at home as much as possible, at least until coronavirus cases appear to drop and proper testing and surveillance are in place to better track and mitigate new outbreak clusters. Los Angeles County officials said as much, warning about a potential peak in the next two weeks. “If you have enough supplies in your home, this would be the week to skip shopping altogether,” Los Angeles County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said on Monday. “Without everyone taking every possible precaution, our numbers can start skyrocketing.” How California has avoided an explosion of coronavirus cases There are other factors at play in the differences between the two states. One is the density of their largest cities: New York City is the densest city in the US (though San Francisco is second), and a lot of people packed closely together makes it easier for the coronavirus to spread. New York state has also tested people at more than four times the rate of California, which could partly, though not mostly, explain the difference between both states’ reported cases and deaths. A big factor — perhaps the biggest — is also chance. “There’s the possibility that there were just more introductions of the virus in the East Coast, in the New York area,” Jeffrey Martin, an epidemiologist at the University of California San Francisco, told me. But California also acted more quickly than New York once it became clear that coronavirus was starting to spread in the US. The San Francisco Bay Area issued America’s first shelter-in-place order on March 16, and California Gov. Gavin Newsom issued a statewide stay-at-home order three days later. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images Officials in seven San Francisco Bay Area counties have announced plans to extend the shelter in place order until May 1. Mario Tama/Getty Images Los Angeles County has closed all beaches as a new measure to stem the spread of Covid-19. New York, meanwhile, didn’t issue a statewide stay-at-home order until March 22. (New York City didn’t implement its own order beforehand; Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he didn’t believe it would work if only one city did it.) And there’s evidence that social distancing was taken more seriously in some parts of California even before it was government-mandated. Restaurant data from OpenTable suggests that seated dining on March 1 was down 2 percent in New York City, but it was down 18 percent in San Francisco. (Though it was only down by 3 percent in Los Angeles, so not every place in California acted the same.) As March began in New York, officials were encouraging people to go about their business. On March 2, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted he was “encouraging New Yorkers to go on with your lives” and “get out on the town despite Coronavirus” — offering a movie recommendation for The Traitor. That did come before New York state confirmed a case of community transmission, but it also came after Cuomo, in a press conference with de Blasio, called community transmission “inevitable.” Since I’m encouraging New Yorkers to go on with your lives + get out on the town despite Coronavirus, I thought I would offer some suggestions. Here’s the first: thru Thurs 3/5 go see “The Traitor” @FilmLinc. If “The Wire” was a true story + set in Italy, it would be this film.— Bill de Blasio (@BilldeBlasio) March 3, 2020 The same day, San Francisco Mayor London Breed, who had already declared a local state of emergency on February 25, warned the public to “prepare for possible disruption from an outbreak,” from dealing with school closures to caring for sick family members. California had confirmed a case of community transmission, in nearby Solano County, by then. New York officials seemed to take the threat more seriously in the coming days and weeks, particularly after community transmission and deaths were confirmed. The difference of a few weeks or days on public action and orders telling people to stay home may not seem like a huge deal. But it really is significant with the coronavirus, because the number of cases and deaths, especially early on in an outbreak, can double every few days if protective measures aren’t in place. “With this virus, days, and even hours, matter,” Jen Kates, director of global health and HIV policy at the Kaiser Family Foundation, told me. By March 23, three weeks after Breed and de Blasio’s tweets, New York state reported around 5,000 new coronavirus cases a day. California reported fewer than 500. It seemed like California might have overreacted. It didn’t. One of the big lessons from California: “Anytime you are dealing with an outbreak, if it appears like you overreacted, then you probably did the right thing,” Kuppalli said. That may be especially true for the coronavirus, because it can be a stealthy spreader. People with coronavirus can infect others before they develop significant symptoms or without ever developing symptoms (although we don’t yet know how common this is). Especially during the early stages of a Covid-19 outbreak, that means a lot of people could be walking around with the coronavirus and infecting each other without knowing it. The silent nature of the coronavirus’s spread was exacerbated by America’s lack of testing. Insufficient testing made it harder for officials to confirm people had the coronavirus, isolate them, then track down and quarantine their contacts. That made it much harder to detect any outbreak in the US and eliminated any chance of stopping it in its tracks. Ray Chavez/MediaNews Group/The Mercury News via Getty Images Member at the Stanford Radiology department take blood samples during a coronavirus antibody study in Mountain View, California, on April 3. From the start, then, America was missing a lot of Covid-19 cases. So once a community confirmed a coronavirus case, and especially after it saw a death, there was a good chance it already had a much more widespread outbreak — since most cases are mild (though still potentially very unpleasant) and even the worst cases can take days or weeks to show major symptoms. “Your chance of the first case being the one that comes to your attention is very, very, very, very small,” George Rutherford, an epidemiologist at the UCSF, told me. “By the time you have the first death, you have to figure that there’s been three full weeks of transmission, and there are at least several hundred cases in the population.” So once a city, state, or country is reporting a few Covid-19 cases and especially deaths, it’s typically safe to assume there is a much bigger outbreak going on — just one that’s not fully visible, at least yet, to the public. Given that coronavirus cases and deaths can double every few days, it’s especially important for the general public and officials to act quickly at that point to stop exponential growth. It’s in this context that a six- or three-day lag in issuing a stay-at-home order could really matter. It didn’t seem at the time that either California or New York had major coronavirus outbreaks just yet. But they couldn’t have known at the time — and the early action the states did take very likely prevented cases from taking off as badly as they would have otherwise. “I’m loath to criticize, and hindsight is 20/20,” Rutherford said. But “you’ve got to start early. You’ve got to do it before deaths start to accumulate. … And you’ve got to keep your foot on the break throughout the entire period.” Some evidence on this point comes from the 1918 flu pandemic, which was linked to as many as 100 million deaths globally and about 675,000 deaths in the US. A 2007 study in PNAS found that the places that took quicker action on social distancing — closing schools and banning big public gatherings — saw better outcomes: [C]ities in which multiple interventions were implemented at an early phase of the epidemic had peak death rates ≈50% lower than those that did not and had less-steep epidemic curves. Cities in which multiple interventions were implemented at an early phase of the epidemic also showed a trend toward lower cumulative excess mortality, but the difference was smaller (≈20%) and less statistically significant than that for peak death rates. One example cited in the study is the difference between Philadelphia, which was slow to act, and St. Louis, which was faster. As this chart shows, St. Louis did a much better job of flattening the curve and averting excess deaths: PNAS The goal with disease outbreaks is to look less like Philadelphia and more like St. Louis. So far, New York state looks more like Philly, while California has hewed closer to St. Louis. To avoid New York’s situation, states can’t let up on social distancing early That California has so far avoided an outbreak as bad as New York’s does not mean that the state is in the clear now. To the contrary, experts cautioned, with the coronavirus still spreading quickly across the US, it’s entirely possible at this point that an outbreak could begin in any state where social distancing measures aren’t taken seriously. To that end, California and other states will likely need to maintain such restrictions for the next few weeks, if not months. Even once states see the number of coronavirus cases and deaths decline, they will need to wait some time from now for the threat to really be over. Again, the 1918 flu pandemic offers relevant evidence. St. Louis, although it’s now heralded for its early action, still appeared to, like many cities at the time, pull back social distancing measures too early. Based on a 2007 study in JAMA, that led to a spike in deaths. Here’s how that looks in chart form, with the line chart representing excess flu deaths and the black and gray bars below showing when social distancing measures were in place. The highest peak comes after social distancing measures were lifted, with the death rate falling only after they were reinstated. JAMA This did not just happen in St. Louis. Analyzing data from 43 cities, the JAMA study found this pattern repeatedly across the country. Howard Markel, an author of the study and the director of the University of Michigan’s Center for the History of Medicine, described the results as a bunch of “double-humped epi curves” — officials instituted social distancing measures, saw flu cases fall, then pulled back the measures and saw flu cases rise again. Notably, the second rise in deaths only appeared when cities removed social distancing measures, the JAMA study found: “Among the 43 cities, we found no example of a city that had a second peak of influenza while the first set of nonpharmaceutical interventions were still in effect.” For California and other states, the goal now is to not only get those curves flattened and bending downward in the next few weeks, but also make sure there isn’t another bump up. To some degree, that’ll require vigilance until a vaccine for Covid-19 is developed, which could take another year or more. Jessica Christian/The San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images A group of friends home from college park their cars in a circle to socially distance while spending time together in Berkeley, California, on March 28. But vigilance may not require a full lockdown until a vaccine. If the US scales up testing and surveillance capabilities, experts say, it could detect early warning signs of the disease and act accordingly: isolate people confirmed to have the virus, quarantine everyone they came into contact with, and, if necessary, take broader community-wide measures to make sure the virus doesn’t spread further. “If there’s enough testing around and people are willing to be tested, the brushfires can be identified and put out before the wildfire,” Martin, of UCSF, said. He emphasized, “The only way that a society can function is if the brushfires are identified and put out.” That doesn’t necessarily mean testing everyone, even those without symptoms. That’s largely impractical; for one, people who test negative would have to be retested regularly to make sure they remain negative. But it does mean testing everyone with symptoms and the people they’ve come into contact with on top of getting them to isolate and quarantine. That will allow the US, Martin explained, to reopen society and the economy more broadly. This is essentially what South Korea has done to contain coronavirus. As Max Fisher and Choe Sang-Hun reported at the New York Times, South Korean officials quickly rolled out thousands of tests — still testing, to this day, at nearly double the rate as the US — to track infections and contain them. The country has earned wide acclaim for its response, with its new coronavirus cases now on the decline after it suffered one of the biggest crises in Asia outside China. But even South Korea has braced for a potential second wave, showing the need for constant vigilance. To truly avoid more outbreaks like New York’s, the US needs to get closer to South Korea. But testing is still a problem across the country, including New York and California, experts said. The US has to fully address that problem to get back to normal. Until then, cities and states need to take and maintain the kind of action that San Francisco and California took, both formally and informally, early on.
1m
vox.com
Japanese brewers suggest ‘slowly’ drinking a ‘moderate amount’ of sake
TOKYO – A Japanese sake brewery has warned against binge drinking at home as more Japanese are expected to hunker down indoors after the government stepped up calls for people to stay at home to stop the spread of the coronavirus. Asahi Shuzo, whose premium Dassai is served in high-end restaurants worldwide, said imbibing at...
1m
nypost.com
Woman Opens Empty House to Medical Staff As a Safe Place to Rest Between Tending to Coronavirus Patients
Las Vegas healthcare workers can stay for free in a donated property to keep their families safe from COVID-19.
1m
newsweek.com
As ventilator demand grows, officials look to nursing home supply
The crush of COVID-19 patients is overwhelming the health care system.
1m
abcnews.go.com
Surgeon General Says 'Over 90% Of The Country' Is Doing Right Thing To Fight Virus
"The American people have the power to change the trajectory of this epidemic if we come together like we have after past tragedies in this county," the U.S. Surgeon General told ABC on Tuesday.
1m
npr.org
Pastor who criticized coronavirus ‘mass hysteria’ dies from illness
A Virginia pastor who criticized the “mass hysteria” surrounding the coronavirus pandemic has died of the illness, according to new reports. Landon Spradlin, of Gretna — a small town halfway between Lynchburg and Danville — started to feel sick while in New Orleans, where he went to preach to the crowds gathered for Mardi Gras...
1m
nypost.com
Retired NYPD sergeant with coronavirus symptoms dies after leaving hospital
Police found 56-year-old Yon Chang's, 56 body near the intersection of East 77th Street and Park Avenue around 6 a.m. Monday, sources said.
1m
nypost.com
'Modern Family' signs off amid a crisis, like 'The Cosby Show' did in 1992
"Modern Family" says goodbye Wednesday night, with the Emmy-winning sitcom's series finale offering a potential welcome distraction from unsettling current events. Just as another family comedy, "The Cosby Show," did almost 30 years ago.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Flushing out the true cause of the global toilet paper shortage amid coronavirus pandemic
Scoring a supply of toilet paper allows one tiny bit of control over rattled lives.
1m
washingtonpost.com
Wall Street gains on hopes of coronavirus slowdown
Wall Street rose on Tuesday on early signs of the coronavirus outbreak plateauing in some of the biggest U.S. hot spots, with the New York state's governor saying social distancing measures to curtail the spread of the virus were working.
1m
reuters.com
Audible best-sellers for week ending April 3rd
Audible best-sellers for week ending April 3rd
1m
washingtonpost.com
Chinese Professional Baseball League team will have robot mannequins fill in as fans at games
As Chinese Professional Baseball League starts its season, one team has gotten creative about "filling the stands" during the coronavirus pandemic.      
1m
usatoday.com
Nigel Farage: Seeing Boris Johnson Go Into Intensive Care With Coronavirus Should Rid Us All of "It Won't Happen to Me" Illusions | Opinion
Unless you actually know somebody hit by the disease, the grim daily numbers blur into being mere statistics. But the prime minister's hospitalization brought home the fact it can truly strike anyone, of any rank.
1m
newsweek.com
Trump removes inspector general who was to oversee $2 trillion stimulus spending
Glenn Fine, the acting inspector general at the Defense Department, was dismissed from his acting position at the Pentagon, making him ineligible to be the watchdog over spending to counter the economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. Fine, a career official who will remain a deputy inspector general, had been chosen for the spending role […]
1m
washingtonpost.com
Food meant for Olympic 2020 athletes donated to Colorado food banks
Colorado residents don’t have to train like premier athletes to eat like them.
1m
foxnews.com
Doctors' difficult decisions: Dr. Sanjay Gupta's coronavirus podcast for April 7
As coronavirus cases continue to overwhelm hospitals, resources such as ventilators are in short supply. CNN's Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta speaks to NYU's director of medical ethics about some of the tough questions facing health care.
1m
edition.cnn.com
Jennifer Lopez says coronavirus quarantine has affected her wedding plans: 'We have to wait and see'
It seems Jennifer Lopez and Alex Rodriguez won't be tying the knot anytime soon.
1m
foxnews.com
McConnell backs boost in funding for loans to small businesses
Senator Marco Rubio has asked Treasury Secretary Mnuchin to request additional funding for the Paycheck Protection Program.
1m
cbsnews.com
I Filmed a “Hot” Video of Myself for a Friend—and Yikes
Seems I need a little help with this.
1m
slate.com
Actress who fronted coronavirus PSAs busted for throwing wild house party
A Nigerian actress who fronted a national campaign about social distancing during the coronavirus lockdown has been arrested — for throwing a wild party packed with revelers, according to police. Funke Akindele-Bello, 42, fronted a campaign for the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) in which she filmed PSA’s urging people to remain apart, saying,...
1m
nypost.com
Former NBA player on accepting change during coronavirus crisis
SportsPulse: Former NBA player Lance Allred spoke with USA TODAY Sports about why everyone needs to adapt to the changes our world will face in the wake of the coronavirus crisis.        
1m
usatoday.com
Stay out! 10 images of caution tape in places you wouldn't expect to see it
Caution tape. It's our visual prompt to stay away.
1m
latimes.com
The Dolphins have a ton of draft picks. They shouldn’t trade any for Tua Tagovailoa.
The Dolphins have have six picks in the top-70 and shouldn't package any of them for a high-risk trade to take a quarterback.
1m
washingtonpost.com