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Prince Harry and Meghan Start Their New Chapter
The move has been made more complicated for the family as Prince Charles recovers from testing positive for COVID-19
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time.com
Coronavirus live blog: Allergist and immunologist Dr. Purvi Parikh answers your questions
Allergist and immunologist Dr. Purvi Parikh is here to answer your coronavirus questions.
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foxnews.com
Americans face nearly unprecedented travel restrictions inside US as states rush to stem coronavirus tide
Taken together, these travel restrictions, which reach nearly every corner of the United States, are a nearly unprecedented limitation of Americans' movement as every level of government is scrambling to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus can cause heart injury even for those without underlying issues: study
Coronavirus can cause heart injuries in patients that put them at higher risk of dying from the disease, researchers said.
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nypost.com
Amazon fires walkout leader; AG calls for investigation
New York Attorney General Letitia James is calling for an investigation of Amazon, after the online shopping giant fired an employee who staged a walkout in Staten Island.
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foxnews.com
When is the April Full Moon? Pink Supermoon to Be Biggest and Brightest of 2020
April's Pink Moon is the second supermoon to take place this year and the first since the Spring Equinox.
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newsweek.com
Former NFL player-turned-neurosurgeon: A 'collective buy-in' is needed to slow coronavirus
While it is a "difficult" and "bad" time both for hospitals and patients strained under the threat of coronavirus (COVID-19), America can make it past this virus by working together, former NFL player-turned-neurosurgeon for Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital Myron Rolle said Tuesday. 
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foxnews.com
Amazon fires Staten Island warehouse worker who wanted coronavirus protections
Amazon has fired a worker at its Staten Island, N.Y. warehouse after he helped organize a walkout over the company's coronavirus responses, alleging he put others at risk.
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foxnews.com
President of Holland America cruise line pleads for compassion while Florida debates allowing ships to dock
“We are dealing with a ‘not my problem’ syndrome,” said Orlando Ashford.
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foxnews.com
Meghan McCain says she ‘cannot buy a bagel’ without someone praising her dad, doubts Trump’s kid have same experience
“The View” co-host Meghan McCain said she “cannot buy a bagel” without people praising her dad and doesn’t think President Trump’s children have the same experience. 
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foxnews.com
Meghan Markle's Disney 'Elephant' debut panned by critics as 'shallow,' cheesy
Meghan Markle's first post-royal gig as the narrator of Disney's upcoming documentary titled "Elephant" has been dubbed cheesy and "shallow" by critics ahead of its streaming debut.
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foxnews.com
Americans look to animal adoption for a bright spot amid coronavirus crisis
A growing number of Americans are choosing to adopt or foster a pet as millions are forced to stay home over coronavirus precautions. The ASPCA says it’s seen a nearly 70% increase in the number of animals going into foster care in New York and Los Angeles, compared to this time last year. Dana Jacobson speaks to shelter workers and foster groups to hear how they are preparing the flood of new pet owners .
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cbsnews.com
Fountains of Wayne frontman Adam Schlesinger on ventilator after getting coronavirus
Fountains of Wayne co-frontman Adam Schlesinger is reportedly in a medically-induced coma after contracting coronavirus.
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nypost.com
Dr. Oz goes over list of 'promising' coronavirus treatments
Fox News contributor Dr. Mehmet Oz reviewed Tuesday the treatments being used to combat the coronavirus and for building up the body's immunity. 
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foxnews.com
Moon bases could be built using astronaut urine
Lunar bases for astronauts could be built using moon dust, urine and 3D printers, according to a new study. This would make use of resources they already have without the expense of shipping materials to the moon.
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edition.cnn.com
The coronavirus has now killed more Americans than the 9/11 terror attacks
Times Square in New York City on March 22, 2020. | Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images Does this mean the US national security community should prioritize global health now? The coronavirus has now killed more Americans than the 9/11 terror attacks — and the death toll is poised to rise in the weeks ahead. Nearly 3,000 people died after terrorists flew planes into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, and a third plane that had been hijacked crashed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, on 9/11. According to tallies by both CNN and the New York Times, over 3,000 people in the US infected with Covid-19 have died. It is, of course, not a neat comparison. Those who perished on 9/11 died instantly or soon thereafter, though many first responders suffered major complications in the subsequent years. Meanwhile, the death toll from the coronavirus has risen since January and has grown substantially in the past few weeks. Top health officials in the US government, like Dr. Anthony Fauci, predicted on Sunday between 100,000 and 200,000 deaths in the country before the crisis subsides. Dr. Deborah Birx, another medical professional leading the American response, said the following day that Fauci’s figures could pan out even “if we do things almost perfectly.” President Donald Trump, a longtime New Yorker who only last year changed his official residence to Florida, seems to agree. If the death toll stays around 100,000, then “we all together have done a very good job,” he said during a Sunday press conference. But one parallel between the coronavirus crisis and 9/11 is that, so far, New York City has borne the brunt of two of the worst crises in recent American history. Steven Kassapidis, an intensive care unit doctor in the city, told the Guardian last week that “9/11 was nothing compared to this.” Current conditions are “Hell. Biblical,” he continued. With regard to 9/11, he said, “We were waiting for patients to come who never came, okay? Now, they just keep coming.” That tracks with what Vox’s Jen Kirby and Emily Stewart reported last week: Officials are frantically trying to find spaces to care for the New Yorkers they expect to become sick. The US Army Corps of Engineers is planning to build field hospitals at now-empty colleges on Long Island, and to remake the Jacob Javits Center, the convention center on the far west side of Manhattan, into a FEMA hospital. De Blasio said Thursday the city is trying to triple its capacity to 60,000 beds by May. That still may not be enough. The USNS Comfort, the US Navy’s hospital ship, has now docked outside Manhattan for the first time since the 9/11 attacks. The last time this ship docked in Manhattan was in the aftermath of 9/11. It's getting harder to avoid drawing parallels between the two crises. https://t.co/MkL67H2pkY— Richard Hall (@_RichardHall) March 30, 2020 Of course, the greatest devastation of the coronavirus is likely yet to come, whereas the destruction from 9/11 was immediate. Another similarity is that President George W. Bush had ample intelligence informing him that al-Qaeda was planning an attack like 9/11, and Trump had multiple government agencies warning the US wasn’t prepared for a pandemic. Yet neither took sufficient steps to try to prevent the respective threats from unfolding. In Trump’s case, his administration was slow to deal with the outbreak, failing to administer tests early and deliver medical equipment to health care workers treating patients. The sluggish response has already led at least one member of the 9/11 Commission — the government-mandated group that investigated the origins of the attack and the US government’s failures — to call for a similar effort once the crisis is over. “As with prior catastrophic failures of the government to protect the American public,” John Farmer Jr. wrote on Saturday for ABC News, “the public will demand — and good government will require — an accounting of the actions and inactions that contributed to the world’s — and our nation’s — failure to contain the Covid-19 pandemic.” Some national security experts have even begun to argue that the US government needs to dramatically rethink what the greatest threats to America really are — moving terrorism down the list and putting global health near the top. “I can say definitively that the specter of 9/11 has impacted every major political decision tied to US involvement in Afghanistan, with the risk of enabling another such an attack weighing heavily on senior leaders,” Jason Campbell, who from 2016 to 2018 was a top Afghanistan policy official in the Pentagon, told me. “I believe we will see a similar effect when it comes to countering another pandemic.” Should the US focus more on global health than terrorism? In a piece for Politico over the weekend, foreign affairs journalist Nahal Toosi compared the US foreign policy community to a high school cafeteria. The popular kids were those who focused on terrorism, among other things, while “the global health specialists would be eating tater tots in the corner with the band geeks.” The coronavirus may soon flip that hierarchy on its head. “I think this is a breakpoint, a transformative moment that is going to change institutions,” Stephen Morrison, who leads a global health program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies think tank in Washington, DC, told Toosi. “You’re going to have a hard time to find people [who] argue again that this really is not all that important.” Campbell echoed that sentiment. “In the coronavirus context, much like with Afghanistan or even counterterrorism more broadly, there is going to be added political risk associated with underpreparing and underfunding,” he told me. Here again, the case of the 9/11 attacks is instructive. After 9/11, the US changed a lot about how it would defend against the next major attack. The Bush administration combined 22 government agencies into a single overarching agency: the Department of Homeland Security. It also created the Office of the Director of National Intelligence to better coordinate and understand the intelligence being gathered across the countries’ numerous intelligence agencies. The 9/11 attacks also led to the rise of the surveillance state, allowing the government to track the movements of people around the world and online, even if they clearly weren’t terrorists. The Bush administration prioritized tackling terrorism above almost any other threat in its National Security Strategy, and launched a “Global War on Terror” to confront terrorist threats around the world, which some estimates say cost more than $6 trillion. Today, there are those who say the US government should reform once again. “Covid-19 marks the final nail in the coffin of the ‘post-9/11 era,’ in which the United States harnessed all elements of national power to confront the scourge of violent Islamic extremism,” the first director of national intelligence, John Negroponte, and Yale’s Edward Wittenstein wrote for USA Today on Monday. “America needs a proactive intelligence agenda that draws on lessons learned from this ongoing pandemic.” Negroponte and Wittenstein lay out four key elements of such an agenda: Closer collaboration between intelligence agencies and the global health and scientific communities Increased focus on cybersecurity so connectivity is safeguarded for those in hospitals and working from home during an outbreak Closer monitoring of misinformation that could get people killed Increased use of artificial intelligence to help spot outbreaks before they get too big and to help physicians with diagnoses However, it’s not like the US government doesn’t have global health security strategies on hand. It actually does, including one from the White House just last year (although it doesn’t feature the word “intelligence” once). Other experts, like Dr. Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at Columbia University, say the most important change would be more money. “There needs to be funding across the board for basic research, surveillance, modeling, and experimental work to predict pathogen emergence,” she told me. “This should include a pandemic preparedness plan and a standing committee to oversee this work.” That work would also include ensuring emergency stockpiles of medical equipment are full and ready for use, and also ensure that government agencies know their exact roles in times of crisis. But some say that, other than a lack of preparation to have the medical capacity needed for an outbreak, the US national security community doesn’t actually need much reform. Michael Leiter, who led the National Counterterrorism Center from 2007 to 2011, told me that the intelligence community did well predicting this kind of crisis. The fault in this case “falls entirely on the National Security Council, and hence the White House.” It’s not so much that the US needs to restructure its national security apparatus, then. The intelligence system worked, Leiter says. It’s the leaders who failed. Others agree. “The real problem is not the intelligence community, but rather the policy side who have been warned about a pandemic multiple times,” said Mathew Burrows, a former top intelligence official who wrote the National Intelligence Council’s Global Trends reports. “The various administrations all complain that there are too many threats to track, but that’s life.” “There is no reason — except bureaucratic inertia — that they could not redesign how they operate in light of a new threat environment,” added Burrows, who’s now at the Atlantic Council think tank in Washington. “This is a huge US failure which goes beyond the stupidity of this administration.”
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vox.com
'We don't work, we don't eat': Informal workers face stark choices as Africa's largest megacity shuts down
Nigeria, Africa's most populous country, became the latest country on the continent to impose a 14-day lockdown in major states but daily wage earners are complaining of hunger.
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edition.cnn.com
Prince William wants to pilot air ambulances amid coronavirus pandemic: report
Prince William is itching to return to work as an air ambulance pilot.
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nypost.com
'The Last Dance' Documentary: Release Date, Where to Watch ESPN's Chicago Bulls Series
The series was scheduled to air in June, but ESPN has agreed to bring the release date forward due to the lack of live NBA games.
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newsweek.com
Michael Jordan, Chicago Bulls documentary release date moves up
ESPN on Tuesday announced it was moving its 10-part documentary about Michael Jordan and the 1997-98 Chicago Bulls from June to April 19 as the coronavirus pandemic halted live sports.
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foxnews.com
Ellen Page blasts Donald Trump, Justin Trudeau for 'environmental racism' in new documentary
Ellen Page accused President Donald Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of “environmental racism” for their respective approaches to climate change. 
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foxnews.com
Maryland governor describes stay-at-home order as 'one of the last tools in our arsenal'
Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on Tuesday called the stay-at-home order he issued this week "one of the last tools in our arsenal" in an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus in his state.
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edition.cnn.com
Pandemic playbook author: We knew pandemic was coming
Christiane speaks with Beth Cameron, former NSC senior director for global health security & biodefense, about why the White House pandemic playbook she oversaw wasn't used.
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edition.cnn.com
Attorney representing Epstein accusers details secret meetings with him
Attorney Brad Edwards represents dozens of women who accused late financier and convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein of varying degrees of sexual assault when they were underaged. He speaks with Anthony Mason to talk about his decadeslong psychological struggle against Epstein's estate, chronicled in his new book, "Relentless Pursuit: My Fight for the Victims of Jeffrey Epstein."
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cbsnews.com
Breast cancer survivor with coronavirus says goodbye to kids with walkie-talkie
A breast cancer survivor and mother of six from Washington state who contracted the coronavirus bid her loved ones a heartbreaking farewell by using a walkie-talkie that was propped up against her pillow, according to a report. “I told her I love her … she shouldn’t worry about the kids,” Elijah Ross-Rutter, 20, 42-year-old Sundee...
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nypost.com
What Will Happen When Red States Need Help?
It shouldn’t be all that remarkable when two leaders talk in a crisis. On Sunday morning, President Donald Trump got on the phone with Mayor Bill de Blasio to discuss what New York City needs to survive a white-hot outbreak that is only getting worse. De Blasio asked him to send more ventilators and military personnel, warning that in a week’s time, the health-care system could be overwhelmed. Yet with these particular leaders at this particular point in history, it is remarkable. Until recently, de Blasio told me, none of his calls to the upper reaches of the White House were returned. Two weeks ago, the Democratic mayor said publicly that Trump was “betraying” his native city by not sending more life-saving medical equipment. Ever sensitive to criticism, Trump said, in turn: “I’m not dealing with him.”Defeating a pandemic is hard enough, but Trump has introduced another layer of complexity: He has personalized the battlefield. He calls COVID-19 “the invisible enemy,” but he also seems fixated on the visible variety—all Democratic leaders, who in his view have been insufficiently grateful for the federal government’s response. A stray complaint about equipment shortages invites a public feud with the man controlling the spigot. “If they don’t treat you right, I don’t call,” the president said at a news conference last week.But Democrats can be useful foils for only so long—the virus is already moving beyond blue-state hot spots into the rural red states that are the pillars of Trump’s support. As more people become infected in broader swaths of the country, Trump will face a fresh wave of calls for ventilators, masks, and money. It won’t be so easy to demonize a handful of discontented governors and mayors. Complaints will be coming from friends.Indeed, appeals from Republican governors are already starting. In a conference call with governors yesterday, Trump fielded requests for more medical equipment from leaders from both parties. Like their Democratic counterparts, Republican leaders will need to navigate Trump’s shifting moods—something they may be more suited to handle.His proclivities have left some Democratic state officials flummoxed. They’ve been casting about for strategies to win his cooperation. De Blasio told me he looks to commend Trump when it’s deserved. “If he does something that helps my people, I will praise it and be thankful,” the mayor told me. “If he doesn’t, I’ll say it out loud and call for action.” For others, there may be no hope. Trump has called Washington Governor Jay Inslee a “snake” and said he won’t speak to him. Inslee’s team sounds utterly baffled about what to do. “We’re trying to act as if we’re interacting with a normal president, or at least a normal Republican president,” an aide in Inslee’s administration told me.“The administration’s response in general has been an abysmal failure, and he compounds that failure by regularly attacking the governors to whom he has passed the buck,” Senator Chris Murphy, a Connecticut Democrat, told me. “I just don’t think we can allow ourselves to normalize a president who is politically attacking the very governors who are trying to save lives right now in the absence of real federal leadership.”Inside the White House, there seems to be little sympathy for some of the Democratic governors who have complained the loudest. One White House aide described a pattern in which some governors privately praise the administration and then, later, publicly scorn Trump’s handling of the pandemic. “We have a really productive call with Governor X, who is incredibly complimentary, and then he goes out and does a press conference and kicks the shit out of us,” this person told me.[Read: Trump is on a collision course]“The president has been willing to talk to anyone, without regard to party, geography, or infection rates,” presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway told me. “He’s talking to anybody and everybody who wants to get a handle on our federal response effort. We’re all navigating this unprecedented, unanticipated pandemic together.”Trump, though, is sensitive to anything he sees as ingratitude. If his administration sends planeloads of ventilators—a national resource—he wants a thank you, not a complaint about why it didn’t come sooner.He’s ridiculed Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, whose state has one of the largest outbreaks in the nation, over her requests for medical supplies. He’s said she’s “way in over her head” and “doesn’t have a clue.” “We send her a lot,” Trump told Fox News’s Sean Hannity last week. “Now she wants a declaration of emergency, and we’ll have to make a decision on that.” The relationship isn’t likely to mend soon. After Trump approved the disaster declaration for Michigan on Saturday, Whitmer called the move “a good start.” But she said it wasn’t sufficient to cover Michigan families’ need for meals, housing, and rental assistance.“It’s unprecedented that a president in the middle of something like this would ask you to bow down and kiss his you-know-what in order to get things that every citizen in the United States should get right now,” Jim Ananich, the Democratic leader of the Michigan state Senate, told me. (When I asked her about Whitmer, Conway replied: “If she spent less time on TV auditioning to be Joe Biden’s vice president and more time on the ground with FEMA and medical professionals, that would be helpful to the people of Michigan.”)[Read: Anthony Fauci’s plan to stay honest]One Democratic governor who’s forged what seems a durable rapport with Trump is New Jersey’s Phil Murphy. The reason may come down to how he speaks about the president. He’s generous in his praise, gentle in his criticism.When I spoke with Murphy last week, he lauded Trump for providing support for four federally run makeshift field hospitals in his state. Should Trump have said that he wants to restart the economy by Easter?I asked. Another Democrat might have used the question to skewer the president’s judgment. Murphy didn’t. Instead, he told me: “If we think we’ve broken the back of the coronavirus by Easter, I’ll be the happiest guy maybe not even in New Jersey, but America.” (Trump scuttled his Easter goal on Sunday.)“We’ve got one president right now,” Murphy added, “and we can’t do what we need to do without the White House.” Murphy isn’t looking for a fight with Trump—and he’s not getting one. Trump called him “a terrific guy” at a news conference on Sunday.The virus’s spread will create political pressures Trump has so far escaped. At first the disease took root in densely packed blue states where many residents travel internationally and to which tourists flock. Trump seized on that fact, pointing to red states that have had comparatively few infections. He singled out Republican Governor Jim Justice, whose rural state of West Virginia was the last in the nation to report any cases of infection. “Big Jim, the governor—he must be doing a good job,” Trump said at a news conference earlier this month. (Trump on occasion has also praised some blue-state governors for their performance, like Murphy.)Conservative pundits have amplified Trump’s message. “These spreads are mainly in the blue states,” the author Dinesh D’Souza said in a recent Fox News appearance. “What I find kind of interesting is these blue-state governors and mayors, they’re criticizing Trump, but they also have the outstretched hand.”Over time, though, Trump may find even some of his closest political allies demanding more help from the White House. Republicans’ traditional aversion to government intervention and economic aid will face a severe test as more and more of their constituents fall ill. Health experts expect infections to appear more widely as people living in red America travel out of state and then return home, and as people in stricken areas venture out. West Virginia, which had done little testing, now has more than 100 confirmed cases. “New York is the hardest-hit state right now only because New York has been doing more testing per capita pretty much than anyone else, and New York has a much higher population density, which is what we would expect,” Michael LeVasseur, an epidemiology and biostatistics professor at Drexel University, told me.Before long, Republicans may be the ones with the outstretched hands. How Trump responds will prove revealing. Will he see pleas for help as more legitimate when they’re coming from red states rather than blue?
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theatlantic.com
Coronavirus kills New York neurosurgeon who separated conjoined twins
The coronavirus has killed a world-renowned New York City neurosurgeon who successfully separated conjoined 13-month-old twins in a rare operation.
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foxnews.com
Belgian girl, 12, dies after coronavirus diagnosis, becomes youngest known victim in country
A 12-year-old girl in Belgium died Monday after testing positive for coronavirus, becoming the youngest known fatality among the country’s more than 700 victims, authorities said.
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foxnews.com
'Essential' Child Care Workers Struggle To Balance Family Needs, Safety
Some states are urging childcare centers to stay open to keep essential workers on the job. But providers say they're not trained to keep everyone safe, and there's no social distancing toddlers.
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npr.org
Major cruise lines suspend sailings until mid-May, for now
Carnival, Holland America, Seabourn and others extend suspension of sailings that began March 13
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latimes.com
Fitbit launches $149 Charge 4 with GPS tracking
The Fitbit Charge 4 is the first in the company's lineup to come with GPS tracking and a feature called "Active Zone Minutes."       
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usatoday.com
Roku OS 9.3 adds support for Spanish voice commands, improved search results and more
Roku on Tuesday announced a big update to its streaming devices. Roku will release OS 9.3 to devices in the coming weeks, bringing notable improvements to the likes of the $30 Roku Express and $99 Roku Ultra. It's also coming to Roku TVs, like the popular models from TCL or Hisense.
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edition.cnn.com
Rangers mailbag: The likely Henrik Lundqvist outcome, alternate draft reality
You ask, we answer. The Post is fielding questions from readers about New York’s biggest pro sports teams and getting our beat writers to answer them in a series of regularly published mailbags. In today’s installment: the Rangers. With the current goalie situation on the Rangers, what do you think will happen with Henrik Lundqvist? Do...
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nypost.com
This week in TikTok: Some wholesome family quarantine content
Hello from The Goods’ twice-weekly newsletter! For the next few Tuesdays, internet culture reporter Rebecca Jennings will be using this space to update you all on what’s been going on in the world of TikTok. Is there something you want to see more of? Less of? Different of? Email me at rebecca.jennings@vox.com, and subscribe to The Goods’ newsletter here. Here’s a quote that will probably stay with me until all of this ends and coronavirus becomes a weird, horrible shared memory: Avani Gregg, 17-year-old member of the LA-based TikToker collective Hype House, told Rolling Stone that since the pandemic, engagement on her social profiles has gone up about 25 percent. “People are just waiting for people to post,” she said. “They’re just staring at their phones all day and just waiting.” This has been one of the defining activities of quarantine, at least for me: staring at my phone and waiting for someone to show me something funny, or something pretty, or something that offers at least one moment of distraction. Not that this isn’t a defining activity of my life even when there isn’t the threat of a terrifying global disease, but that particular feeling is a big part of how I’ll remember this period of time. I suspect it’s the same for others. While Spotify streams are down, TikTok appears to have benefited from a nationwide boredom boom, according to some (unconfirmed) numbers. Even anecdotally, people on my Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook feeds who never seemed to have any interest in it before are discovering TikTok (two of them have already gone viral, yes I am jealous), while others are now realizing they might be too into it. Cautioned Lena Yannella, Duke University class of 2022, in her school newspaper, “So you’ve regressed into a vegetative state watching TikTok in bed as you pretend not to hear your mother calling.” @tyga Bored af ♬ Bored In The House - curtisroach There is even a TikTok anthem for boredom, recorded by Detroit-based musician Curtis Roach via an Instagram video of himself rapping, “Bored in the house and I’m in the house bored” earlier this month that has since gone viral. Last week, after making a TikTok to the sound, the rapper Tyga turned it into a full-length song, which sort of bangs. At the very least, it’s topical in a way that doesn’t feel massively depressing. Here’s what else has been going on in the world of TikTok: TikTok in the news Multiple brands have now attempted to make viral coronavirus dances (including Vox!): Procter & Gamble hired Charli D’Amelio to promote its #DistanceDance, which reminds viewers to stay home, while Elf Cosmetics updated its “Eyes Lips Face” song to include lyrics “Y’all need to lather up” and “Don’t touch your face.” Really, though, any existing TikTok dance challenge will encourage people to stay home anyway. Those things take forever to learn! Here’s some totally not-coronavirus-related tea: There’s more drama in the Hype House. After 20-year-old founding member Daisy Keech moved out over a trademark dispute, she released a YouTube video this weekend explaining why she’s suing fellow founders Thomas Petrou and Chase Hudson. Thomas’s ex-girlfriend then filmed a TikTok with Daisy, on which Thomas commented, “Disgusting.” Also, Daisy is possibly dating Brody Jenner now. This, plus there’s rumors that Charli and Chase are broken up! I just spent an hour of my day researching this! I am a meanie skeptic, so I think that a certain viral TikTok “quarantine cutie” story is neither real nor cute. A lot of people disagree, so I’d be remiss if I deprived you of this theoretically very sweet “date” that two people in Bushwick went on while living across the street from one another, the primary goal of which seemed to be going viral on TikTok. Meme watch Families are making tons of quarantine TikToks together, and it’s adorable. It’s also largely thanks to the Blinding Lights challenge, a group dance to The Weeknd song of the same name that — crucially — takes about 30 seconds to learn, making it easy enough to teach reluctant parents. BuzzFeed has a roundup of the best videos, though the funniest by far is from longtime family creators the McFarlands, who finally hopped on the challenge after everyone begged them to. @the.mcfarlands You asked for it... Here it is #blindinglightschallenge #blindinglights #happyathome ♬ The Weeknd - Blinding Lights - gregdahl7 Celebrities, the thirstiest people on TikTok, are also bringing their kids into their TikTok content. Jessica Alba and her little ones promoted Honest Beauty skincare; J. Lo, A Rod, and company did the Something New challenge; and Mark Wahlberg’s poor child tried to teach him a TikTok dance. This week I’ve seen families do Tiger King cosplay, make jingles about walking around a suburban neighborhood, and a girl whose brother has turned her family dinners into elaborate performance art. But if you hate heartwarming things, there’s this extremely dark TikTok that one family made about what life will be like one year from now. One Last Thing It’s been a long time since I got sternly “spoken to” by a teacher, so this TikTok of a boy breathing loudly into his computer microphone during online school and then getting a “warning” for disrupting the class really hits the spot. Stay safe this week! @duckingaroundyt I had to mute my mic for the rest of class cus I couldn’t stop laughing ♬ The Box - Roddy Ricch
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vox.com
Please stop sending Joe Buck your ‘NSFW’ videos
That’s not what Joe Buck had in mind. The lead play-by-play man on Fox for football and baseball asked fans to send him videos from home and he would call the action from these moments to keep his voice sharp and his Twitter followers entertained during the coronavirus pandemic. And if Buck did call your...
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nypost.com
Joe Biden has yet another gaffe-filled media appearance
Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden conducted a gaffe-filled interview on MSNBC Monday, kicking off his media appearance by referring to the epicenter of the coronavirus by the wrong name.
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nypost.com
John Krasinski reminisces about 'The Office' with Steve Carell in YouTube show debut
Good news, "The Office" fans: John Krasinski and Steve Carelll reunited (over video chat) to take a walk down Dunder Mifflin memory lane.        
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usatoday.com
Yankees players praise nurses caught in trenches of coronavirus pandemic
New York Yankees players on Sunday praised nurses working in the trenches of the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
As World Leaders Go Into Coronavirus Isolation, How Would Quarantine Affect Trump's Presidency?
The pandemic has forced governments to consider how they would function with their top officials stuck at home.
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newsweek.com
28-year-old coronavirus patient on recovery, 'frustrating' effort to get tested
Amanda Bono, 28, contracted the novel coronavirus and is now warning people about the virus saying, “please do not take this lightly.”
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foxnews.com
Walmart to check temperatures of workers to prevent coronavirus spread
Walmart will check employees’ temperatures at the start of their shifts to prevent them from working with coronavirus, company executives said Tuesday. Walmart and Sam’s Club staffers who give a reading of at least 100 degrees will be sent home until they go three days without a fever, company officials said. Sick employees will still...
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nypost.com
Eminem is proud of his daughter Hailie
She's all grown up now, but Hailie Jade Mathers is still her daddy's girl.
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edition.cnn.com
Academy of Country Music announces star-studded new special
Blake Shelton and Carrie Underwood are two of the many artists that will be featured on the Sunday special, “ACM Presents: Our Country,” packed full of conversations and songs from country music’s biggest stars. The Academy of Country Music had to postpone its awards show over the coronavirus pandemic, and will air the special in its place to give music fans something to look forward to as the virus forces events such as concerts and festivals to be called off.
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cbsnews.com
Students “looking for guidance on how to cope” with pandemic
Coronavirus school closures are forcing over 55 million students in the U.S. from Kindergarten through 12th grade to learn from home. The mass shut downs are disrupting teachers’ lesson plans and even pose a problem for students who may not have internet access. Julie Lythcott-Haims, CBS News contributor and author of “How to Raise an Adult: Break Free of the Over Parenting Trap and Prepare Your Kid for Success” joins “CBS This Morning” to talk about how the virus precautions could leave some school-age kids behind.
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cbsnews.com
California Health Corps Formed by Newsom to Fight Outbreak
Tuesday: The state hopes to add scores of additional health care workers as hospitals fill. Also: Easy California history lessons.
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nytimes.com
Our environmental practices make pandemics like the coronavirus more likely
“When you cut down the forest where bats live, they don’t just go away,” explains Sonia Shah. “They come roost in the trees in your backyard.” | Universal Images Group via Getty The story we tell about pandemics casts us as victims of nature. It’s the other way around. President Trump likes to refer to the coronavirus as the “Chinese virus,” and in so doing he’s popularizing an image of the pandemic as a foreign invasion. He’s not the only one. Although we are (hopefully) not using a racist term to refer to this virus, many of us have unwittingly bought into a particular paradigm for understanding pandemics. Call it the paradigm of invasion: the idea that we’re being attacked by an onslaught of foreign pathogens that come from animals, and we’re just passive victims. But what if we, the humans, are the ones staging the onslaught? What if the real story of modern pandemics is not about how animals and their germs are invading our human realm but about how we’re invading theirs? That’s the argument of Sonia Shah, author of the 2017 book Pandemic. She says the paradigm of invasion — or “microbial xenophobia,” as she calls it — often fails to explain why a microbe that’s existed for ages suddenly turns into a pandemic-causing pathogen. After studying outbreaks ranging from cholera to West Nile virus to Ebola, she’s found that human activities play a huge, and hugely underrecognized, role. Our environmental and social policies — like cutting down forests or failing to address a housing crisis — make it much likelier that a previously harmless microbe will cause a devastating outbreak. Shah is not alone in advocating for a paradigm shift in how we understand pandemics. The One Health movement, an interdisciplinary way of thinking espoused by some global public health authorities, emphasizes the connections between people, animals, plants, and their shared environment. It’s pushing for this change, too. I talked to Shah about how this approach can help us better understand the true origins of pandemics. A transcript of our conversation, edited for length and clarity, follows. Sigal Samuel The reigning narrative in a lot of people’s minds is that “exotic” animals are to blame for the coronavirus crisis — that they’re dirty and infested with tons of pathogens that just can’t wait to kill us. What’s wrong with this narrative? Sonia Shah First of all, we all have lots of microbes inside of us. Humans give animals microbes that turn into pathogens all the time, so we are also the source of disease for other species. But we don’t talk about that. Species everywhere are full of microbes, but if they stay in the bodies in which they’ve evolved, they don’t cause disease. Ebola doesn’t cause disease in bats. Neither does coronavirus. They cause disease in our bodies because they’re new to us — they’re exploiting a new habitat. Sigal Samuel So why are they exploiting that new habitat, namely us humans? Sonia Shah It’s because we are building roads between wild animals and human bodies. We’re using up a lot of land — for our cities, our mines, our farms — and while doing that, we’re destroying wildlife habitat. That’s why 150 species are going extinct every day. And the species that are remaining have to squeeze into these tiny fragments of wildlife habitat that we leave for them. When you cut down the forest where bats live, they don’t just go away; they come roost in the trees in your backyard or farm. That means it’s easier to have casual contact with their excretions. If a little kid goes outside and plays near a tree where bats roost, they might pick up a piece of fruit that has some bat poop or bat saliva on it and put that in their mouth, and then you’ve created an opportunity for the microbes that live in the bat’s body to enter into a human body. We know that with Ebola, there was a single spillover event — the first case was a 2-year-old child in West Africa who was playing near a tree where bats live. These are accidents waiting to happen. Now we have this amazing flight network, so even if pathogens emerge in a place where there aren’t a lot of transmission opportunities, they can easily get to somewhere where there are. We’re also urbanizing in an ad hoc fashion, so we have a lot of places where people are being exposed to each other’s waste. There’s not a lot of infrastructure in many of the places that are rapidly urbanizing. All these factors combine to increase the risk that a microbe will spill over into human bodies and then start to spread. Sigal Samuel What strikes me is that when you talk about the origins of pandemics, you talk on this macro level — like our environmental and social policies — rather than on the micro level. What kind of explanatory power does this approach give you, in terms of explaining the origins of previous outbreaks? Sonia Shah We often look at an outbreak as a foreign problem — like Ebola and SARS and Zika are coming from outside and encroaching upon us. That’s the traditional narrative: the germ invading from outside. I call it microbial xenophobia. But these are things that are happening right here in the United States. So for example, West Nile virus is a virus of migratory birds from Africa. They’ve been landing in North America for hundreds of years, but we never had West Nile virus here until 1999. Well, why is that? It turns out that when you have a diversity of bird species in your domestic flock, you don’t get a lot of West Nile virus because birds like woodpeckers and rails are really bad carriers. So as long as you have a lot of those diverse bird species around, even if you have an introduction of West Nile virus from a migratory bird, you’re not going to get a lot of virus overall. But what happened over the last 20 years or so is that we lost a lot of that avian biodiversity. Woodpeckers and rails became rare in a lot of environments. Instead, we have a lot of birds like crows and robins, which are generalist species that can live in any kind of degraded environment, and they’re really good carriers of West Nile virus. So the fewer woodpeckers and rails you have around, and the more robins and crows you have around, the more West Nile virus you have around. And the more likely it becomes that a mosquito is going to bite an infected bird and then bite a human. “We’re going to lurch from disaster to disaster to disaster until we start to really change the fundamental relationship between us and nature” Sigal Samuel Since tick-borne diseases are a huge problem in the US, I’m curious: Is there a similar story to be told about Lyme disease? Sonia Shah Yes, it’s a very similar story with Lyme. When we had intact forests over the northeast, we had a diversity of woodland species that lived in those intact forests — like opossums and chipmunks — that helped control the tick population. But over the past 50 years or so, suburbs have expanded into the forest and broken it up into little patchwork quilts, so opossums and chipmunks have become [relatively] rare. Instead, we have a lot of white-footed mice and deer, and it turns out that white-footed mice don’t control tick populations well. A typical mouse destroys about 50 ticks a week, compared to a typical opossum that will destroy hundreds and hundreds of ticks a week just by grooming. So the fewer opossums you have around and the more white-footed mice you have around, the more ticks you have around. And the more likely it becomes that you’re going to have outbreaks of tick-borne disease like Lyme. Sigal Samuel I think that really helps make the case that our interaction with the environment — for example, deforestation — has major impacts on human health. Social policies can also affect the risk of an outbreak, right? Sonia Shah Right, so, when dengue broke out in South Florida in 2009, it was immediately considered an invasion from some foreign place. We coated the environment with insecticide and staged a military-style assault on these mosquitoes. But it turns out the mosquitoes that carry dengue have been in South Florida for a long time. That wasn’t new. What was new was the foreclosure crisis. It had shuttered all these houses. The epicenter of the dengue crisis was also the epicenter of the mortgage crisis. And of course in South Florida people have a lot of swimming pools. So with all these homes closed, these swimming pools were vacant. Lo and behold, it starts to rain and these empty pools fill up with water and it creates these little pockets around the garden that mosquitoes can breed in. And then we have this “unprecedented” outbreak of dengue. Nobody thought to address the housing crisis as a possible driver of the outbreak. Sigal Samuel It sounds like what you’re advocating for is a more holistic approach, a systems-thinking approach. How much of an outlier are you in that? Sonia Shah There’s a whole movement in global health called One Health. It’s the idea that human health is connected to the health of our animals — pets, livestock, wildlife — and our ecosystems and other societies. All these things are connected and we have to look at these broader drivers because that’s going to get to the root of the issue. Otherwise, we’re constantly just mopping up problems that are going to keep erupting again and again. Sigal Samuel It occurs to me that this also has implications for how we do science. Given that so many of our modern pathogens cross disciplinary boundaries, do we need more doctors working with veterinarians, more biomedical experts collaborating with social scientists, and so on? Sonia Shah Absolutely. We have siloed everyone and you can see how that’s impacted the way we responded to some of the zoonotic pathogens. With West Nile Virus, veterinarians at the Bronx Zoo noticed, “Oh, all these birds are getting sick with something.” But they didn’t tell the doctors, so the doctors just said, “Oh, all these people are getting sick with something! What’s happening?” We’ve blinded ourselves to the crossovers by making it so these groups don’t talk to each other. Part of the One Health idea is that we need to be multidisciplinary and bring all these experts together. Sigal Samuel The fact that the coronavirus likely came from a wild-animal market in China makes me wonder about factory farms in countries like the US. It’s not the same, but animals in these farms are also packed very close together. Should the coronavirus crisis prompt us to revise how we think about meat production here, too? Sonia Shah That’s absolutely part of it. When I was writing my book, I asked my sources what keeps them awake at night. They usually had two answers: highly drug-resistant forms of bacterial pathogens and virulent avian influenza. Both those things are driven by the crowding in factory farms. These are ticking time bombs, and they’re still going to be there when we’re done cleaning up the mess we’ve gotten ourselves in with this current virus. Sigal Samuel In your book, you write about paradigm shifts, and one line that jumped out at me was: “Modern biomedicine’s fundamental approach to solving complex problems is to reduce them to their smallest and simplest components.” Do you think this reductionist approach is failing us now? Sonia Shah The reductionist approach in biomedicine comes from a good place. Modern germ theory really made a big difference. Before we had germ theory, people thought cholera, malaria, and so on were caused by miasmas floating in the air or an imbalance of humors in your body. Germ theory helped us in a lot of ways, so it makes sense that that’s the paradigm. But we’ve lost the bigger picture, the connections between social and political health and environmental health. So what we’re seeing right now is an intense amount of reductionism. Moving forward, what we have to see is that pandemics, climate disasters, all of these are related to our huge footprint on the planet. We’ve been using up a lot of natural resources and now the bill is coming due. We’re going to lurch from disaster to disaster to disaster until we start to really change the fundamental relationship between us and nature. Sign up for the Future Perfect newsletter and we’ll send you a roundup of ideas and solutions for tackling the world’s biggest challenges — and how to get better at doing good. Future Perfect is funded in part by individual contributions, grants, and sponsorships. Learn more here.
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vox.com
Coronavirus leaves 3 of 4 Americans under orders to stay at home as more states impose restrictions
About three of every four Americans are now under orders to stay at home --or will be soon -- as more states have imposed restrictions in an attempt to slow the spread of coronavirus as the death toll grows nationwide.
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foxnews.com
Mike ‘The Situation’ says ‘the time for parties is over’ in coronavirus PSA
No gym, no tan, no laundry.
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nypost.com