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The best way to get Americans back to work faster
Implementing selective containment once we get past the first peak of the epidemic would allow a fraction of households to resume normal activity while the rest of the population remains in quarantine, write Arpit Gupta, assistant professor of finance at the NYU Stern School of Business, and David Sraer, associate professor at the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business.
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edition.cnn.com
More than half of renters say they lost jobs due to coronavirus
The longer some people stay at home, the more difficulty they have making ends meet. “Low-income renters — many of whom work in service industries hit hard by the pandemic shutdown — are at high risk for eviction and homelessness during shelter-in-place measures,” according to a report by Mary Cunningham, a fellow at the Urban...
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nypost.com
'Fortnite' Week 8 Challenge - Block Damage With a Kingsman
Need help figuring out how to find and use a Kingsman umbrella?
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newsweek.com
The Brazilian favela resident who saw coronavirus coming
When the coronavirus first emerged, it seemed like a distant threat to Brazil and the country's sprawling and impoverished favelas. But as the virus spreads across the South American nation, one favela resident is taking it upon himself to protect the neighborhood.
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edition.cnn.com
Race and Risk: Dr. Sanjay Gupta's coronavirus podcast for April 9
There have been numerous reports of black Americans dying from Covid-19 in disproportionate numbers. CNN's Chief Medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta breaks down the various factors and demographics that may make some people and communities more susceptible.
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edition.cnn.com
ACLU Launches Television Ad Campaign Calling for Release of Elderly and Vulnerable Inmates 'Before It's Too Late'
"Governors, sheriffs, prosecutors, and the president have the power, and responsibility, to save lives," said ACLU Deputy Political Director Udi Ofer.
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newsweek.com
USNS Comfort, Javits Center at fraction of capacity during coronavirus crisis
Part of the reason for the lack of patients is that hospitalizations are down, Gov. Cuomo said Wednesday.
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nypost.com
Dean McDermott slams critics of wife Tori Spelling’s meet-and-greet fee
Dean McDermott angrily slammed those who criticized his wife for charging money for a virtual meet-and-greet. In a lengthy video posted to Instagram, 53-year-old McDermott defended Tori Spelling, saying she was simply trying to earn a living and spread happiness amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. “I find myself having to come to my wife’s defense...
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nypost.com
Senate Democrats block more money for small businesses, demand funds for hospitals
Senate Republicans failed to pass an additional $250 billion the White House want to help small businesses after Democrats objected, seeking more funds for hospitals.
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abcnews.go.com
Woman who accidentally spilled wine all over herself on Instagram becomes viral hit: 'Never related more'
She is all of us.
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foxnews.com
Corrections officers union secures free coronavirus testing for members
The city will provide free coronavirus testing for corrections officers following a weekslong legal battle for supplies and policies to protect guards from infection. Officers can now visit Northwell Health urgent care sites to get tested for the pandemic COVID-19, the Correction Officers’ Benevolent Association, COBA, announced Thursday. “Our union has always felt that we...
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nypost.com
Petsmart takes 10% off online, pickup, and curbside orders for sitewide sale
Petsmart is offering pet parents a welcome deal on food, carriers, treats, and more for their latest sitewide sale. You can get 10% off all online, pickup, and curbside orders. Members of its Treats reward program will also receive free shipping on orders over $49. Whether you have dogs, cats, or even birds, you’re sure...
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nypost.com
NBA and WNBA stars to compete in televised H-O-R-S-E games on home courts
The opening round of virtual H-O-R-S-E games will air on ESPN beginning Sunday at 4 p.m., with players shooting from their home basketball courts.
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latimes.com
Florida family plays Uno with son through window of special-needs facility amid coronavirus lockdown
If there's even a small window of opportunity, family will always find a way to stick together.
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foxnews.com
Coronavirus Traces Found in Massachusetts Wastewater at Levels Far Higher Than Expected
This could potentially indicate that the number of confirmed cases in the area served by the wastewater facility in the study are a "significant" underestimate.
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newsweek.com
Chicago businesses facing up to $120,000 in fines after violating coronavirus prevention measures: report
Eight businesses in Chicago are now facing a total of up to $120,000 in fines after they reportedly violated Illinois’ coronavirus prevention orders. 
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foxnews.com
Sheree Whitfield of 'Real Housewives of Atlanta' seeking info on missing mother
Sheree Whitfield, a former cast member of "The Real Housewives of Atlanta," is seeking help from the public in finding her mother.
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edition.cnn.com
Prisons and jails across the US are turning into 'petri dishes' for coronavirus. Staffers are falling ill, too.
In the US, the largest known concentration of coronavirus cases outside of hospitals isn't on a cruise ship or in a nursing home. It's at a jail in Chicago.
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edition.cnn.com
Texas pastor puts church members’ faces on pews: ‘Little church with a big heart’
A Huntsville, Texas, pastor paid a "touching" tribute to his 1,500 church members who can no longer meet in person due to the coronavirus pandemic.
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foxnews.com
Washington’s 250-bed field hospital to be dismantled, sent to states worse-hit in coronavirus pandemic
The massive army field hospital that hundreds of troops built inside a Seattle convention center last week will be dismantled and redeployed to a state facing a more difficult battle against the coronavirus outbreak, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said Wednesday.
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foxnews.com
White House to Create Second Coronavirus Task Force Focused on Economy: What We Know So Far
The White House will soon announce the creation of a second coronavirus task force to focus on re-opening the economy after weeks of social distancing measures.
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newsweek.com
Leslie Marshall: Biden vs. Trump — 3 keys to victory for Democrats in November
Sen. Bernie Sanders acted in the best interests of the Democratic Party and the nation Wednesday when he dropped out of the presidential race.
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foxnews.com
‘Black box’ removed from Ruby Princess cruise ship in coronavirus homicide probe
Australian authorities said on Thursday they seized “black box” from a cruise ship, which was the country's deadliest source of coronavirus cases, as part of a homicide investigation.
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nypost.com
Food desert neighbors feed each other amid virus
A grassroots group of volunteers is working to keep Washington's most vulnerable neighborhoods fed during the unprecedented coronavirus crisis, in areas that have no grocery stores within walking distance. (April 9)       
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usatoday.com
6.6 million jobless claims, new CDC guidelines: Thursday’s coronavirus news
A man rides his bike past a sign posted on a boarded up restaurant in San Francisco on April 1. | Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images Here’s what you need to know today. There are no good numbers. Last week, US unemployment claims reached 6.6 million. The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in the United States has now exceeded 432,000, and deaths are nearing 15,000 as of April 9. Nearly 2,000 people died in the last 24 hours. Right now, the United States doesn’t seem to have a clear long-term plan for either the public health or economic catastrophes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued new guidelines for essential workers so they can return to work after they’ve been exposed to the virus, as long as they’re asymptomatic. It’s a start, but officials are still urging the rest of the public to continue staying at home, and practicing social distancing measures. The economic fallout of the coronavirus, of course, is not limited to the United States. The International Monetary Fund warned Thursday that the world is likely to see the “worst economic fallout since the Great Depression.” And lower-income countries might feel the effects of the pandemic even more deeply. According to a report from Oxfam, half a billion people could be pushed into poverty worldwide because of the coronavirus — between 6 and 8 percent of the global population. Here’s what you need to know today. 16.8 million jobless claims in less than a month The unemployment figures are staggering. This week, another 6.6 million jobless claims were filed, and the previous week’s record (of 6.6 million) was revised up to 6.9 million. Combined with the 3.3 million claims prior to that, Americans have filed a total of 16.8 million in unemployment claims in just three weeks. It is a Great Recession in a matter of weeks. Congress and the White House are negotiating another “interim” stimulus package that would include billions for small businesses, and if Democrats get their way, increased support for the food stamps program, hospitals, state and local governments, whose budgets are about to be decimated by both the pandemic response and the economic crisis. That would go on top of the $2 trillion stimulus package already passed by Congress. But even that might not be enough given the scale of the economic emergency the US is facing. The rest of the world is in for economic pain, too On Thursday, Kristalina Georgieva, managing director of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), said the coronavirus pandemic could create the “worst economic fallout since the Great Depression.” The IMF warned that only a “partial recovery” is likely next year, even if countries can get the pandemic under control and businesses and supply chains restart. But that might still be an optimistic scenario. Either way, the worst economic crisis in a generation will likely not be short-lived. And as bad as this will be for major economies like the United States, poorer countries are going to be even more vulnerable to these economic shocks. The aid organization Oxfam is estimating that about half a billion people could be pushed into poverty because of the coronavirus pandemic, somewhere between 6 and 8 percent of the world’s population. The organization is calling on countries to come up a plan to mitigate this disaster, including forgiving developing countries’ debt and offering increased overseas aid packages — an effort that is going to be extraordinarily challenging as major donor countries focus on invest money at home to control the pandemic and provide relief for their own citizens. The CDC updates guidelines for essential workers The CDC has updated its guidelines for essential workers who might have been exposed to the coronavirus. The new recommendations say that healthcare workers, grocery store employees, food service workers, and other people on the frontlines who have been within six feet of someone who has tested positive for Covid-19 can still return to work if they do not show symptoms of the coronavirus and are not feeling sick. The CDC continues to recommend that those employees take their temperatures before work, and asks employers to take workers’ temperatures and monitor symptoms before people are allowed to return to work. The new guidelines also say employees should wear protective gear, such as masks, try to practice social distancing in the workplace as much as possible (like not gathering in large groups in break rooms and cafeterias), and avoid sharing equipment. Previously, the CDC recommended that anyone exposed to the coronavirus should self-quarantine for 14 days, but these new guidelines are intended to ease pressure on strained workforces. And some good news The US response to the coronavirus has at times been chaotic, with states and the federal government competing for vital supplies, from protective gear to ventilators. But in recent days, states have been trying to better coordinate — sending supplies to where they’re most needed, or turning down support so it can be directed to the states and hospital systems that are the most strained right now. California’s Governor Gavin Newsom, for instance, shipped out 500 ventilators to a bunch of states, including New York, New Jersey, and Illinois. It also included a nice note. CA's 500 ventilators will begin to ship out today:100->NY100->NJ100->IL50->MD50->DC50->DE50->NVCommitted to the health of every Californian. Practicing our duty as Americans to take care of one another. I know other states would do the same. pic.twitter.com/5y5hquISew— Gavin Newsom (@GavinNewsom) April 7, 2020 Messages on a shipment of ventilators from California.Thank you to the people of California and Gov. Newsom.We are so moved by the outpouring of support & solidarity pic.twitter.com/WZYnCUYMf6— Andrew Cuomo (@NYGovCuomo) April 9, 2020 Received this message on a shipment of ventilators from Governor @GavinNewsom and the people of California. Have faith – we will beat this if we all work together. pic.twitter.com/uagRbfrmOW— Governor Phil Murphy (@GovMurphy) April 9, 2020 In Washington, Governor Jay Inslee returned a basically returned a field hospital to the federal government as he no longer predicts the state’s hospitals will be overwhelmed by coronavirus patients. The field hospital, with 250 beds, had been set up in CenturyLink Field in Seattle (where the Seahawks), but Inslee asked that it be “deployed to another state facing a more significant need.” States, they can be united sometimes.
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vox.com
Bebe Rexha uses this $27 concealer to hide her severe dark circles
See the dramatic transformation.
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nypost.com
Lonnie Dench, husband of woman who mistakenly invited stranger to Thanksgiving, dies
Lonnie Dench, the husband of the woman who mistakenly invited a stranger to Thanksgiving, died after battling coronavirus.        
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usatoday.com
Prince William, Kate Middleton continue royal duties from home
William and Kate carry out a royal engagement — via video call.
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nypost.com
NYC restaurateur Keith McNally hospitalized in London for coronavirus
New York restaurateur Keith McNally is in a London hospital battling coronavirus — and posting about his battle on Instagram. McNally has created some of the city’s most successful restaurants, including the French-inspired bistros Balthazar and Pastis. Born in Britain, he was hospitalized in London on Sunday. He posted an Instagram photo of himself with...
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nypost.com
Coronavirus and warm weather: Fauci says 'one should not assume' virus will fade away
Just because warmer weather is in the weeks ahead does not mean that coronavirus will fade away, according to the nation's top infectious disease expert. 
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foxnews.com
Cuomo stunned NY coronavirus casualties have soared past 9/11 death toll
New York’s surging death toll from the coronavirus pandemic has so dramatically eclipsed that of Sept. 11 that Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Thursday that he can’t even describe the devastation. “9/11 was supposed to be the darkest day in New York for a generation,” Cuomo said during his daily news conference in Albany. “We lost...
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nypost.com
'Survivor' winner shares coronavirus isolation tips he learned after beating cancer twice
Ethan Zohn, a former “Survivor” winner who also beat cancer twice, is sharing some advice he picked up throughout his journey of being in isolation for long periods of time. 
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foxnews.com
China Is Underreporting Coronavirus Infections and Deaths, Most Britons Believe: Poll
A Newsweek survey found 12 percent of British adults believed China had honestly reported its coronavirus numbers.
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newsweek.com
Ron Rivera gives big hint on Chase Young, Redskins’ draft strategy
The prospect of trading the No. 2 overall pick in NFL Draft 2020 comes with the risk of losing a shot to pick star edge rusher Chase Young. First-year Washington Redskins head coach Ron Rivera is not taking that lightly. “If you’re gonna make a trade, and you’re gonna go back, that guy you’re gonna...
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nypost.com
Pink details 'terrifying' asthma attack amid coronavirus battle
Pink is one of several celebrities who has shared details of her battle with the coronavirus, and in a new interview, the singer breaks down in tears as she details an asthma attack she suffered when she was in the thick of her symptoms.
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foxnews.com
FBI, US government warn on spike in coronavirus scams
Fraudsters are seizing upon the COVID-19 crisis to mount fresh attacks to get your money, the FBI and DHS said in separate advisories this week.
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foxnews.com
Get your goggles on: Any GOAT discussion must include Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
An ESPN tournament, in lieu of any actual games, somehow had the master of the "Sky Hook" falling out early to Shaquille O'Neal. I'm here to set the record straight on a legend.
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washingtonpost.com
Russian Governor Fears Chinese Citizens Have Spread Coronavirus in His Region After Beijing Closes Border
China has closed its border with Russia but a governor in the Russian far-east, Oleg Kozhemyako, fears the virus may have already spread throughout his region.
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newsweek.com
Trump’s case against mail-in voting has become increasingly desperate. His latest briefing showed it.
Trump in the Brady Press Briefing Room on April 8. | Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Pressed to produce evidence of fraud, Trump cited a “pants on fire” lie. President Donald Trump was challenged on Wednesday to substantiate his claims about massive mail-in election fraud benefiting Democrats. The only thing he could come up with was a “pants on fire” falsehood. The idea of more states moving toward a mail-in system ahead of November’s election is gaining steam amid the coronavirus pandemic. The dilemma Wisconsin voters faced on Tuesday between staying safe at home or heading to polling places to vote is one most states are interested in helping their citizens avoid. Trump, however, has other, more self-interested concerns. Not only is the president leading Republican efforts to prevent federal funds from being used for mail-in efforts, but the briefing on Wednesday revealed he really doesn’t have any good reasons for his position. Trump was pressed on the point during the White House coronavirus task force briefing by CNN’s Jim Acosta. Acosta referenced claims the president made the day before about why he thinks mail-in voting is bad — “You get thousands and thousands of people sitting in somebody’s living room, signing ballots all over the place,” Trump said — and asked him to back it up. Acosta mentioned that five states (Utah, Colorado, Hawaii, Washington, and Oregon) already conduct all elections almost entirely by mail, and added, “You’ve been talking about voter fraud since the beginning of this administration. Where is the evidence?” Suffice it to say, no evidence was forthcoming. Here’s a transcript of the first part of Trump’s response (emphasis mine): I think there is a lot of evidence, but we’ll provide you with some. There’s evidence that’s being compiled just like it’s being compiled in the state of California, where they settled with Judicial Watch saying that a million people should not have been voting. You saw that? I am telling you, in California, in the great state of California, they settled and we could’ve gone a lot further. Judicial Watch settled where they agreed that a million people should not have voted, where they were 115 years old and lots of things and people were voting in their place. Pressed by @Acosta to provide evidence of electoral fraud, Trump promises to get back to him and then cites a Judicial Watch story that PolitiFact rated "pants on fire" https://t.co/0LYJBTwU5S pic.twitter.com/zDQe0pSwK2— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) April 8, 2020 Judicial Watch is a right-wing nonprofit led by staunch Trump loyalist Tom Fitton. The settlement Trump referred to is a January 2019 agreement between the organization and Los Angeles County that required the county to remove inactive registrations from the voter rolls. By definition, these people hadn’t voted — that’s why their registrations were inactive. Yet Trump has somehow spun this into an unfounded claim about a million people casting illegal ballots. The briefing on Wednesday was not the first time Trump made this claim. He said the same thing last summer during an interview on Meet the Press. At that time, PolitiFact fact-checked Trump’s claim and rated it a “pants on fire” lie. The PolitiFact piece quotes California Secretary of State Alex Padilla (D) as saying, “[n]o matter how much he repeats them, Trump’s lies about voter fraud are patently untrue. Specifically, the settlement with Judicial Watch, Los Angeles County, and the Secretary of State contains absolutely no admission to or evidence of ‘illegal votes.’” The rest of Trump’s answer wasn’t any better After citing a “pants on fire” lie, Trump referred to the aforementioned five states that already have robust mail-in voting systems and said, “every one of those states you have mentioned is a state that happens to be won by the Democrats.” That’s also not true. Utah, for instance, is a deep-red state. Trump concluded by simply restating the unfounded allegations that Acosta asked him to substantiate, saying of mail-in voting, “thousands of votes are gathered. And they come in and they’re dumped in a location then all of the sudden you lose an election that you think you’re going to win. I won’t stand for it.” Ironically, the only instance of large-scale mail-in election fraud possibly swaying an election in recent history is a Republican scheme in North Carolina in 2018. Other states with mail-in systems, such as Oregon, have safeguards preventing that sort of fraud from happening. After Wednesday’s briefing, Trump took to Twitter to try and make a distinction between absentee voting — which he apparently is fine with (he even voted absentee in Florida’s recent election) — and mail-in voting. “Absentee Ballots are a great way to vote for the many senior citizens, military, and others who can’t get to the polls on Election Day. These ballots are very different from 100% Mail-In Voting, which is “RIPE for FRAUD,” and shouldn’t be allowed!” he wrote. Absentee Ballots are a great way to vote for the many senior citizens, military, and others who can’t get to the polls on Election Day. These ballots are very different from 100% Mail-In Voting, which is “RIPE for FRAUD,” and shouldn’t be allowed!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 8, 2020 But this distinction doesn’t make sense. There’s no reason to think mail-in voting for in-state residents is any more susceptible to fraud than absentee voting for residents who are traveling or temporarily living elsewhere. None of Trump’s claims about election fraud make sense — but he keeps making them anyway The backdrop to all this is the coronavirus pandemic, which threatens to make it unsafe for people to go to the polls in November and has made mail-in voting an increasingly attractive option. A Reuters/Ipsos poll released Thursday morning found that significant majorities of both Democrats (79 percent) and Republicans (65 percent) support a requiring for mail-in voting for November’s election, with 72 percent of US adults supporting it overall. Trump, however, is convinced mail-in voting hurts Republicans in general and him in particular. He even came perilously close to admitting this in a tweet he posted on Wednesday in which he claimed the system “for whatever reason, doesn’t work out well for Republicans.” Republicans should fight very hard when it comes to state wide mail-in voting. Democrats are clamoring for it. Tremendous potential for voter fraud, and for whatever reason, doesn’t work out well for Republicans. @foxandfriends— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 8, 2020 In fact, Republicans in mail-in states like Utah and Colorado have had a lot of success. But it’s been GOP orthodoxy for decades that anything driving up voter turnout is bad for the party. That belief is a big reason why Trump has been pushing bogus claims of election fraud for years and using them to argue on behalf of a voter ID system that would make it harder for poor people to vote. In addition to winning the Electoral College in a landslide, I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) November 27, 2016 The exchange with Acosta illustrated how flimsy these claims are while at the same time showing that even amid a deadly pandemic, Trump prioritizes his perceived political self-interest — even if it means that some people end up abstaining from voting for fear of getting sick. Support Vox’s explanatory journalism Every day at Vox, we aim to answer your most important questions and provide you, and our audience around the world, with information that has the power to save lives. Our mission has never been more vital than it is in this moment: to empower you through understanding. Vox’s work is reaching more people than ever, but our distinctive brand of explanatory journalism takes resources — particularly during a pandemic and an economic downturn. Your financial contribution will not constitute a donation, but it will enable our staff to continue to offer free articles, videos, and podcasts at the quality and volume that this moment requires. Please consider making a contribution to Vox today.
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vox.com
Ex-NFL running back Chris Johnson accused in murder-for-hire plot related to 2015 gang hit: report
Former Tennessee Titans running back Chris Johnson has reportedly ben accused of being involved in a gang-related murder-for-hire plot related to a 2015 shooting in Florida that resulted in the death of his friend. 
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foxnews.com
The Coronavirus Pandemic Will Trigger the Worst Economic Recession Since the Great Depression, Says IMF Chief
About 170 of the 189 member countries in the International Monetary Fund organization are projected to have negative growth.
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newsweek.com
Kaiser closing many Southern California clinics to slow coronavirus spread
Kaiser will stop or limit services at locations including Los Angeles, San Diego, the Antelope Valley and Orange, Kern and Ventura counties.
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latimes.com
NYC cathedral turning into coronavirus field hospital
The Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine in Morningside Heights, the seat of the Episcopal Diocese in New York, will serve as a field hospital during the coronavirus outbreak, according to a report. The cathedral’s dean, the Right Rev. Clifton Daniel III, told The New York Times that nine climate-controlled tents capable of holding...
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nypost.com
Jessica Simpson parodies her Rolling Stone ‘Housewife of the Year’ cover
Things have changed a bit in 17 years.
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nypost.com
It just got harder to get, refinance a mortgage: Who will face more difficulty
A 'refinancing bonanza' continues as mortgage rates remain low but the economic shutdowns across most of the country mean some won't qualify.       
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usatoday.com
AG Barr says ‘draconian’ coronavirus restrictions should be reevaluated
Attorney General William Barr called the restrictions intended to slow the spread of coronavirus “draconian” and said they should be reexamined next month. Government officials, Barr said on Fox News Wednesday evening, should be careful to ensure “that the draconian measures that are being adopted are fully justified, and there are not alternative ways of...
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nypost.com
Fed boosts support for small businesses, local governments
The central bank announced a new $2.3 trillion round of loans that include even more support for small businesses and consumers — and, for the first time, for states, cities and municipalities, too.
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edition.cnn.com
Liz Cheney: China is responsible for the coronavirus pandemic
Rep. Liz Cheney said on Thursday that she forecast potential issues with China’s wet markets for a long before the coronavirus outbreak.
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foxnews.com