Generally
General
1241
unread news
unread news
NYPD unions give cops coronavirus supplies, hospitals food
The Sergeants Benevolent Association was making its way to every precinct, housing bureau and transit district to deliver 80,000 bottles of hand sanitizer and 500 galloons of bleach.
1m
nypost.com
Man carries large American flag on 7-mile run to honor workers battling coronavirus
When his community needed some support, Chris Wauben came running. Wauben, a resident of Holiday, Fla., recently set out for a seven-mile run while carrying a 6-foot-by-10-foot American flag as part of his efforts to honor the brave health care workers battling the coronavirus crisis. “I’ve been running with the American flag for probably about...
1m
nypost.com
Billionaire Investor Mark Cuban on Which Stocks Are Buys, Sells and Holds
"When we get to the other side of this, call it America 2.0, the more entrepreneurs we have coming up with unique ideas, the sooner we will recover," Mark Cuban tells Newsweek.
1m
newsweek.com
‘Ritual Grounds Us.’ Amid Coronavirus, Here’s How People Are Planning to Take the Passover Seder Experience Online
Passover is just one spring holiday effected by coronavirus
1m
time.com
LA retailer Buck Mason makes masks for the masses to protect against coronavirus
In an exclusive interview with Fox News, Buck Mason co-founder Sasha Koehn explained that making face masks was an easy move for his company.
1m
foxnews.com
‘It Started as a Joke:’ Laughter and tears at beloved Brooklyn comedy fest
Arts festivals can be truly life-changing. They can also be ripe for mockery, which is what happened to comedian Eugene Mirman and his friends back in 2008. Their good-natured satire, the Eugene Mirman Comedy Festival, surprised them by becoming the real deal, selling out shows and running for a decade. “It Started as a Joke,”...
1m
nypost.com
Jared Kushner’s ventilator remarks contradicted a government website. Hours later, the site was changed.
Jared Kushner speaks at the White House on Thursday. | Win McNamee/Getty Images The first son-in-law would have you believe that the federal stockpile is “not supposed to be states’ stockpiles.” Jared Kushner would have you believe the Strategic National Stockpile of medical supplies wasn’t meant to be the main national resource in the event of a medical crisis — and now, the stockpile’s official website agrees. It’s an Orwellian twist that shows the lengths to which the Trump administration is going to tell states they need to fend for themselves as the number of coronavirus cases in the US continues to climb with no peak yet in sight. To back up: Kushner created quite a negative stir with comments he made during Thursday’s White House coronavirus task force press briefing characterizing the Strategic National Stockpile as “our stockpile” instead of “states’ stockpiles that they then use” — remarks at odds with language on the stockpile’s website that described it as a resource for “state, local, tribal, and territorial responders” to obtain “the right medicines and supplies ... during an emergency.” But within hours of Kushner making those widely decried remarks, language on the stockpile’s website was changed to be in line with the view he espoused about it belonging to the feds but not necessarily the states. “The Strategic National Stockpile’s role is to supplement state and local supplies during public health emergencies,” the website now says. “Many states have products stockpiled, as well. The supplies, medicines, and devices for life-saving care contained in the stockpile can be used as a short-term stopgap buffer when the immediate supply of adequate amounts of these materials may not be immediately available.” The change was first noted by journalist Laura Bassett: This is what the website for the federal stockpile said yesterday vs what it says today, after Kushner was caught lying about how states aren’t supposed to be using it. It was changed to say, “Many states have products stockpiled, as well.” https://t.co/kbNXiwaJbX pic.twitter.com/xAtPKIyHnA— Laura Bassett (@LEBassett) April 3, 2020 Kushner has been running a coronavirus task force operating in the shadow of the official one overseen by Vice President Mike Pence. His work so far has reportedly been unfruitful. On Tuesday, the New York Times quoted an unnamed senior administration official who described Kushner’s effort as “a ‘frat party’ that descended from a UFO and invaded the federal government” and reported that members of his task force used “the website FreeConferenceCall.com to arrange high-level meetings.” Thursday’s briefing represented a rare public appearance before the media for the president’s son-in-law. It did not go particularly well. Kushner’s opening statement was so replete with meaningless startup-style jargon that it resembled a Saturday Night Live cold open come to life. At one point, he said the word “data” four times in 20 seconds without ever detailing what all that “data” was being used for. Here's Jared Kushner going for the world record of most meaningless corporate buzzwords used in a single one-minute video clip pic.twitter.com/Vy1QJEhLQa— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) April 2, 2020 During the Q&A portion of the briefing, it became clear that the point of Kushner being there in the first place was to contribute to President Trump’s ongoing effort to shift blame for scarcities of ventilators and personal protective equipment (PPE) for health care workers away from the federal government and onto states. “The notion of the federal stockpile was it’s supposed to be our stockpile. It’s not supposed to be states’ stockpiles that they then use,” Kushner said. JARED KUSHNER: "The notion of the federal stockpile was it's supposed to be our stockpile. It's not supposed to be states stockpiles that they then use." pic.twitter.com/9Q7j8QBCMv— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) April 2, 2020 Kushner’s claim contradicted language on the HHS website detailing the purpose and history of the federal stockpile — but aligned perfectly with the administration’s overall response to the crisis. The Trump administration’s philosophy is that states are mostly on their own Thursday’s press briefing came amid reports that New York may as soon as next week run out of the ventilators the state needs to treat Covid-19 patients, forcing hospitals to ration care. And it isn’t alone — as the number of coronavirus cases continues to grow nationwide, states such as Washington and Michigan are also reportedly running low on ventilators. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) has repeatedly pleaded with the federal government to do more to provide states like his with ventilators, as well as decrying the current system in which prices are driven up by states not only bidding against one another for medical supplies but also competing with the federal government. CUOMO: "How can we be in a position where you can have New Yorkers possibly dying because they can't get a ventilator, but a federal agency saying 'I'm going to leave the ventilators in a stockpile.' I mean, have we really come to that point?" pic.twitter.com/8XqAh99Bka— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) March 24, 2020 Cuomo has said his state will need 30,000 ventilators to meet the demand, but he reportedly only has 2,200 in the state stockpile. But instead of using all the tools at his disposal to help, Trump has indicated that he doesn’t believe Cuomo actually needs that many. Though Trump later tried to walk back those comments, Kushner is apparently on the same wavelength. According to Vanity Fair’s Gabriel Sherman, Kushner described Cuomo as an alarmist during a recent White House meeting. According to an unnamed source who talked to Sherman, Kushner said during the meeting, “I have all this data about ICU capacity. I’m doing my own projections, and I’ve gotten a lot smarter about this. New York doesn’t need all the ventilators. ... I don’t believe you need 40,000 or 30,000 ventilators.” Kushner touched on that same I-know-best theme in his comments during Thursday’s briefing, saying at one point that “some governors you speak to, or senators, and they don’t know what’s in their state ... most governors didn’t know off the bat what they needed.” Trump echoed those comments, saying “the states should have building their stockpiles ... we’re a backup. We’re not an ordering clerk.” The whole point of the federal stockpile is to help the states Despite what Kushner would have you believe, the entire purpose of the Strategic National Stockpile is to help states obtain resources they don’t have the means to acquire themselves during crises. The Washington Post’s Aaron Blake detailed the background: The Strategic National Stockpile was formerly known as the National Pharmaceutical Stockpile. In a description of what was then known as the NPS in 2001, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention acknowledged that states couldn’t be counted on to have sufficient supplies in situations such as biological or chemical terrorism and that’s why the federal stockpile was needed. “Few U.S. state or local governments have the resources to create sufficient pharmaceutical stockpiles on their own,” the report says. “The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, under U.S. Congressional mandate, has developed and implemented a National Pharmaceutical Stockpile (NPS) to address this need.” In other words, the program was designed to supplement the states and deliver supplies to them that, according to this U.S. government document, they won’t have because of budgetary constraints. Trump, however, has made abundantly clear he thinks it’s up to states like New York to fend for themselves. “Long before this pandemic arrived, they should have been on the open market just buying,” he claimed on Thursday. "Long before this pandemic arrived, they should have been on the open market just buying" -- Trump tries to shift blame for medical gear shortages to the states pic.twitter.com/vtw3xDC3o6— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) April 2, 2020 Thursday’s briefing came amid growing concerns that Trump is playing politics by being accommodating with requests for supplies made by Republican governors who support him but less so when requests come from people like Cuomo, whom he doesn’t see as on his side and who govern states that aren’t crucial to his reelection hopes. Judging from his performance on Thursday, Kushner’s role seems to provide an intellectual gloss on things. But to hear New York doctor Craig Spencer tell it, Kushner would be better served visiting an ICU like the one he works in instead of tinkering with models meant to prove that New York is asking for more than it needs. “if you’re not stepping foot in a hospital, if you don’t have a visual of what’s going on, then you can understand all the high-level modeling necessary to get the right amount of ventilators or the concerns about supply chains or PPE, but to stand by when [Trump’s] implication is that ‘maybe we don’t need all those ventilators,’ or ‘maybe the ICUs aren’t filling up’ ... that’s not our lived reality on a day-to-day basis,” Spencer told Vox on Tuesday, right after he finished his shift working at Columbia University hospital in Manhattan. “The first two patients I saw were [in] cardiac arrest from coronavirus. We couldn’t move one out of the room fast enough to get the other one in,” Spencer added. “That’s the reality.” The news moves fast. To stay updated, follow Aaron Rupar on Twitter, and read more of Vox’s policy and politics coverage.
1m
vox.com
Ilhan Omar says Trump's coronavirus response could cost 'hundreds of thousands' of lives
Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., argued that President Trump could cost "hundreds of thousands of lives" through his administration's "completely failed" response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
1m
foxnews.com
SiriusXM's new channel devoted to female comics is the laugh we need right now
SiriusXM has launched She's So Funny, a new comedy channel featuring star female comics Amy Schumer, Tiffany Haddish, Whoopi Goldberg, Ali Wong and others.
1m
latimes.com
'Baywatch' star David Chokachi sheds longtime Miracle Mile home
Following 13 years of ownership, David Chokachi of 'Baywatch' fame has sold his Spanish-style home in the Miracle Mile area for $1.515 million.
1m
latimes.com
Kentucky orders quarantine-breakers to wear ankle monitors
Authorities have ordered Louisville residents who have been exposed to the potentially deadly virus but won't self-quarantine to wear a tracking device to ensure they don't leave the house, CNN affiliate WDRB reports.
1m
nypost.com
Feds ramp up probe of $2.1B Google-Fitbit deal amid privacy worries
The Department of Justice has stepped up its investigation of Google’s proposed $2.1 billion acquisition of Fitbit, a deal that critics say could pose increased threats to customer privacy, two sources close to the situation told The Post. In a move that typically signals increased scrutiny for a merger, regulators are now conducting a so-called...
1m
nypost.com
'We Are Swamped': Coronavirus Propels Interest In Raising Backyard Chickens For Eggs
"We've never seen anything like this and I've been here since 1964," the owner of one hatchery says. For anyone looking to start their own flock, an expert has advice on breeds.
1m
npr.org
Preakness Stakes postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak
The Preakness Stakes, the second leg in horse racing's Triple Crown, has been postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak.
1m
latimes.com
Pandemic Claims Doctors In The Philippines At Startling Rates
At least 136 people have died of COVID-19 in the Philippines. At least 14 of them, maybe more, were doctors.
1m
npr.org
White House Stresses Payments Will Come Soon, As Unemployment Soars
The Trump administration has promised that the first direct payments to taxpayers will arrive in two weeks. The White House has scheduled a briefing on its coronavirus response for 5 p.m. ET.
1m
npr.org
New York considers loosening requirements for funeral directors as bodies pile up
1m
politico.com
Cats can infect each other with coronavirus, study finds
Hold on to your cats! The rapidly-spreading coronavirus can be transmitted between your feline pets, according to a new Chinese study. Researchers at Harbin Veterinary Research Institute found that cats are not only susceptible to contracting COVID-19 but can pass it on to their furry friends as well. But other animals — such as dogs,...
1m
nypost.com
U.S. Postal Service could shut down by June, lawmakers warn
As funding runs low, U.S. Postal Service says it may not be able to keep operations going.
1m
cbsnews.com
Remains of 100 million-year-old flying pterosaur with 6-inch beak unearthed by scientists
A new species of pterosaur -- a flying reptile that lived 100 million years ago -- has been discovered by scientists in Africa.
1m
foxnews.com
‘Tootsie Slide’ into these surprising Drake facts
The world knows Drake as a music superstar, dropping dance jams from quarantine in Toronto, Canada. Even the biggest Drizzy fans, however, might not know these seven facts about the “Tootsie Slide” singer.   Subscribe to our YouTube!
1m
nypost.com
Disney announces new dates for 'Black Widow,' 'Mulan,' and more
Disney announced on Friday it's new release schedule for all the upcoming movies that were shifted around due to the coronavirus outbreak. 
1m
foxnews.com
Key GOP senator warns that U.S. needs millions of coronavirus tests by August
“The big test for the administration right now is: Can you scale up the production of hundreds of millions of tests," he says.
1m
politico.com
Storytime with Dana: 'Squeak, Rumble, Whomp Whomp Whomp!'
Today’s book is a treat: "Squeak, Rumble, Whomp Whomp Whomp!" And who better to read all of the onomatopoeia in this book than my husband Peter?
1m
foxnews.com
New York, Connecticut want details on Zoom’s privacy practices
At least two US state attorneys have sought information from Zoom Video Communications following multiple reports that questioned the privacy and security of the videoconferencing app. Zoom’s popularity has surged as employees at businesses, schools and millions of other organizations across the world work from home due to lockdowns imposed to slow the spread of...
1m
nypost.com
Trump Elevates Unqualified Judge As a Reward for Defending Kavanaugh
McConnell ditched coronavirus relief negotiations to celebrate Justin Walker's swearing-in. Now Walker is getting promoted.
1m
slate.com
Anick Jesdanun, longtime AP technology writer, dies at 51
Anick Jesdanun, deputy technology editor for The Associated Press, has died in New York City of coronavirus complications
1m
washingtonpost.com
This isolation system is how the Air Force will transfer coronavirus patients
The Air Force is training medical professionals to operate an isolation system used to safely transport patients with infectious diseases aboard military aircraft.
1m
abcnews.go.com
Could giant concrete 'umbrellas' stop a hurricane's storm surge?
Could giant "dual-purpose" concrete umbrellas provide shade on sunny days and then transform into protective barriers on stormy days?        
1m
usatoday.com
Hobby Lobby is temporarily closing all stores starting Friday night due to the coronavirus
After defying state shelter-in-place orders, Hobby Lobby announced it will temporarily close all stores starting Friday night due to coronavirus.       
1m
usatoday.com
TSA confirms first employee death from coronavirus
A federal TSA employee passed away Thursday from COVID-19, a statement from TSA to Fox News confirmed.
1m
foxnews.com
Wisconsin governor calls on legislature to change primary election
Governor Tony Evers wants the Wisconsin legislature to come back for a special session to vote on changes to Tuesday's primary, amid concerns about the coronavirus.
1m
cbsnews.com
Teresa Giudice and Joe Gorga's father, Giacinto Gorga, has died
Gorga often appeared on series, offering sage advice, biting commentary or active in the kitchen.        
1m
usatoday.com
Illinois AG warns against coronavirus scams
Scammers are looking to take advantage of the coronavirus chaos to make a quick buck.
1m
foxnews.com
Cardi B donates to NYC medical professionals amid coronavirus pandemic
She wanted to provide sustenance for medical staffers and ambulance crews who are too busy to have a proper meal during their hectic shifts.
1m
nypost.com
Attempts for Middle East ceasefires amid the coronavirus crisis have not stopped the fighting
Calls for coronavirus ceasefires have not halted Middle East battles
1m
latimes.com
How 'Pinkalicious & Peterrific' can be a social studies class during coronavirus school closures
During coronavirus school closures PBS offers distance learning on TV and online for students.
1m
latimes.com
Chaos erupts on plane when Moscow-to-NYC flight is suddenly canceled
Fliers desperate to escape Russia erupted in a near-riot Friday when officials canceled Aeroflot’s last Moscow-to-New York flight — even though the plane had already begun taxiing on the runway. “People are starting to panic and go crazy,” one passenger, Montana-born ballet star Julian Mackay, 22, said in a cell-phone video he recorded from his...
1m
nypost.com
Nikki Haley accuses WHO of taking 'China's word' on coronavirus transmission
Former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley took aim at the World Health Organization on Friday, saying the health body owes an explanation for why “they took China’s word” on the claim that coronavirus could not be spread from person to person -- a claim now known to be entirely false.
1m
foxnews.com
At collapsed New Orleans Hard Rock Hotel, OSHA cites 'willful' and 'serious' safety violations
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration found numerous safety violations at the 18-story Hard Rock Hotel in New Orleans that collapsed.       
1m
usatoday.com
It’s a Tough Time for Men With No Friends
And it turns out a lot of men fit that description.
1m
slate.com
What we know about the fourth coronavirus relief bill
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (right) and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer speak at a press conference marking the one-year anniversary of the House passing HR 1, the For the People Act, March 10, 2020. | Win McNamee/Getty Images Congress’s next coronavirus bill might look a lot like the last one. Despite an initial Democratic push for a bold infrastructure bill to infuse the economy with cash and jobs,the next coronavirus bill Congress may take up later this month could look very similar to the last one it passed. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is already calling it “CARES 2.” A fourth package could include more direct payments, extended unemployment insurance, health insurance for laid-off workers who lose theirs, and hazard pay for front-line health care workers and other essential employees like grocery store workers, truck drivers, and postal workers. With an unprecedented 10 million people applying for unemployment benefits due to the coronavirus economic crisis, Democratic leaders on Capitol Hill are acknowledging the relief provisions in the $2 trillion bipartisan CARES Act simply may not be enough for the stark economic hardship many Americans now face. Both Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and Pelosi told Vox onseparate press calls that Congress needs to take additional action to alleviate the financial hardship of workers and small businesses. “I believe that we will need a Covid 4 [package] and I hope we’ll do it relatively soon,” Schumer told Vox on Friday. “And I think this is one of the big questions. Do we need more money? We probably will.” “I think now we need a fourth bipartisan bill, and I think the bill could be very much like the bill we just passed,” Pelosi told CNBC’s Jim Cramer Friday. “I’d like to go right back and say let’s look at that bill and update it for some other things we need, and again put money in the pockets of the American people.” Pelosi spent much of this week pushing the idea of a recovery infrastructure package to help get Americans back to work and give struggling state and local governments a boost. But on Friday, she shifted hermessage, saying infrastructure might be moved to a later bill. “While I’m very much in favor of doing some of the things to meet the needs — clean water, more broadband, and the rest of that — that may have to be for a bill beyond this,” Pelosi said on CNBC. “Right now, I think we have a good model; it was bipartisan, it was signed by the president, but it’s not enough.” And they may have more luck working with Republicans on such a package than an infrastructure package; Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has also said a fourth bill may be necessary, but he wants to focus on making sure aid from the third package reaches Americans. It’s a tacit acknowledgment from Democratic leadership that the spiraling economic effects of the US coronavirus outbreak are much worse than anyone could have imagined — and may not end anytime soon. “We’re still in the midst of the crisis; that is the difficulty in this,” a congressional aide told Vox. “Imagine it’s a hurricane — it’s not just moving along, it’s sitting on top of you.” What the next coronavirus package could contain The bipartisan CARES Act cost a historic $2 trillion, but it may be just the beginning of the federal response. Congress isn’t scheduled toreturn to Capitol Hill until April 20 at the earliest, but discussions about the next bill are underway. Though we’re nowhere near a bill draft yet, here are some of the ideas being talked about: Extending expanded unemployment insurance: Anyone who is on unemployment or signing up for unemployment benefits will get an extra $600 per week on top of their current state benefit until the end of July. But Schumer and Pelosi admitted that may need to be extended, depending on the state of the US economy this summer. “Certainly, I would be willing, if the numbers continue to be bad, to expand the program,” Schumer told Vox. “We do not want to leave people behind,” Pelosi agreed. “Should we again do the $600? I certainly think so,” she told Vox. “So that the people have the purchasing power to help them meet their needs but also spend it, inject demand into the economy, help the stimulus as well as relief.” Hazard pay for health care and essential workers: The US Department of Labor defines hazard pay as “additional pay for performing hazardous duty or work involving physical hardship.” Schumer said he wants to see hazard pay for health care workers dealing with an influx of Covid-19 patients as well as other essential workers who cannot work from home, like grocery store and food delivery workers, truck drivers, postal service workers, and others. Expanded OSHA regulations for health care and other essential workers: House Democrats want to include something in a bill requiring the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to put in regulations to protect health care workers and essential personnel from infectious diseases. “There is no legal requirement for health care facilities — not just hospitals, but nursing homes, mental health institutions, ambulatory care facilities, and others — to take necessary steps to protect front-line health care workers,” said House Committee on Education and Labor Chair Bobby Scott (D-VA) on a press call. “We introduced legislation requiring OSHA to adopt an emergency temporary standard and pushed to include it in the last Covid-19 bill, but it was blocked by the Senate and the administration.” More direct payments to Americans: Many Americans will see direct payments in the coming weeks and months from the CARES Act. Most adults making less than an adjusted gross income of $75,000 annually will receive a $1,200 one-time payment. Payments will go out to individuals whose income is as much as $99,000, but those bringing in more than $75,000 won’t receive the full amount. Pelosi on Friday said she could see more direct payments for Americans in a fourth bill. Expanded health care access: As millions of Americans get laid off, many are also losing the health insurance they get through their employer. Democratic leaders are calling on the Trump administration to reopen the enrollment period for health care exchanges, so laid-off people can get coverage. The Trump administration has so far declined to do so. “We haven’t gotten to the question of the uninsured,” Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) said on a press call. “I share [Schumer’s] view this is going to be essential.” An infrastructure bill is still being talked about — but it probably won’t happen right away Earlier this week, Pelosi and House committee chairs laid out the first pieces of a potential infrastructure bill — the “recovery” component of coronavirus relief. Democrats wanted to include expanding rural broadband and 5G capacity, building community health centers, and fixing up American water infrastructure. Democrats believe they can work with President Trump on an infrastructure bill; the president tweeted his support for the idea, calling on Congress to get to work on a bipartisan infrastructure bill as its “phase four” coronavirus stimulus and recovery. “It should be VERY BIG & BOLD, Two Trillion Dollars, and be focused solely on jobs and rebuilding the once great infrastructure of our Country!” Trump tweeted. But Senate Republicans may need more convincing. McConnell made it clear he didn’t want to start considering a recovery bill until Congress ensured resources from the CARES Act were actually getting to workers and businesses. “Well, look, the current law has not been in effect for even a week yet,” McConnell told Fox Radio. “The Treasury Department’s got a massive, complicated problem here in getting all of this money out rapidly. And the speaker is already talking about phase four. Well, we may need a phase four, but we’re not even fully into phase three yet.” While Democrats will likely continue to draft an infrastructure package in the background, it’s a more distant priority than continuing to get emergency money out as fast as possible. And it makes sense; this week ended with the realization that far more workers are being impacted by the coronavirus economic crisis than originally thought. As Vox’s Matt Yglesias wrote, the government’s unpredictable response to coronavirus makes it really difficult to know how long the public health crisis and aftershocks on the economy will last: Policymakers currently seem to be assuming that the economy is kind of like a light switch that they’ll be able to turn back on when the virus is under control. But that’s not really an idea the world has a lot of practical experience with, and it’s far from obvious that it will work in practice. All we really know is that the country is currently experiencing an unprecedented economic downturn and nobody can say when it will end. Staving off a prolonged spell of mass unemployment is going to require wartime-style mobilization efforts involving both enormous levels of government spending and a fully cooperative central bank. We’re in uncharted economic territory, and Congress’s next steps are crucial.
1m
vox.com
Trump Administration Used Venezuela Anti-Drug Operation to Distract from Coronavirus Crisis at Home, Officials Say
A senior administration official told Newsweek that the drug trade "can contribute to the spread of the virus," but a senior Pentagon official said the recent mission "has nothing to do with the virus."
1m
newsweek.com
Steven Spielberg feeds doctors, nurses on 'frontlines' battling coronavirus pandemic: report
Steven Spielberg is extending a helping hand to the healthcare professionals who are relentlessly combatting the mounting coronavirus cases around Los Angeles.
1m
foxnews.com
Gen. Milley on Navy removal of aircraft carrier captain over COVID-19 letter
Staff Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said on “Outnumbred Overtime” on Friday that he supports acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly’s decision to relieve the commanding officer of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt.
1m
foxnews.com
Coronavirus Diaries: We Had to Quarantine Our 12-Year-Old
I hate that I can’t hug my sick kid.
1m
slate.com
A $350 Billion Loan Program Is Supposed to Save Small Businesses. But Banks Are Balking.
Thomas Wells is sympathetic to the hundreds of small businesses that have been knocking on the doors of his bank’s 59 branches this week. They all want to know how to apply for a loan through Washington’s massive new program that aims to stop Main Street from collapsing during the coronavirus pandemic. But on Friday,…
1m
time.com
Jordan imposes coronavirus lockdown as cases spread in Middle East
The country of Jordan is imposing a strict 24-hour curfew as the number of coronavirus cases in the country top 290. There are growing fears the virus will spread across some of the nation's poorest communities and Syrian refugee camps. CBS News producer Amjad Tadors joins CBSN from Amman, Jordan with the latest developments.
1m
cbsnews.com